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Charlotte Mary Mew was an English poet, whose work spans the cusp between Victorian poetry and Modernism.
Born: November 15, 1869, Bloomsbury, London
Died: March 24, 1928, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Hampstead Cemetery, Hampstead, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England, Plot: northern part of the cemetery, GPS (lat/lon): 51.55082, -0.15848
Find A Grave Memorial# 63323444

House: Hampstead Town Hall (Haverstock Hill, London NW3 4QP) has been listed as a queer venue since the 1970s. However, ever since the London Gay Men's Chorus was founded in 1991, its offices and facilities have been based in Hampstead Town Hall. LGMC was founded when nine friends came together to sing a few Christmas carols at Angel Underground Station hoping to raise a few pounds for the Terrance Higgins Trust. LGMC is now Europe's largest gay men's choir. Hampstead Town Hall was designed by Frederick Mew, father of Charlotte Mew (1869–1928), English poet, whose work spans the cusp between Victorian poetry and Modernism. She was born in Bloomsbury, the daughter of Frederick Mew and Anna Kendall. Her father died in 1898 without making adequate provision for his family; two of her siblings suffered from mental illness, and were committed to institutions, and three others died in early childhood leaving Charlotte, her mother and her sister, Anne. Charlotte and Anne made a pact never to marry for fear of passing on insanity to their children. (One author calls Charlotte "almost certainly chastely lesbian)". Through most of her adult life, Mew wore masculine attire and kept her hair short, adopting the appearance of a dandy. In 1898, Mew fell in love with Ella D'Arcy, a writer and the assistant literary editor of the Yellow Book. D'Arcy, however, did not reciprocate the affection. Nine years later, Mew fell in love with May Sinclair, a well known novelist who was active in the suffrage movement. Sinclair was friendly with Mew and helped with her career. Her presentation of Mew's work to Ezra Pound led to the publication of the poem “The Fête” in the Egoist. Nevertheless, Sinclair did not return Mew's affections, and may have even unsympathetically informed others of the poet's lesbianism. Mew gained the patronage of several literary figures, notably Thomas Hardy, who called her the best woman poet of her day, Virginia Woolf, who said she was "very good and interesting and quite unlike anyone else", and Siegfried Sassoon. She obtained a Civil List pension of seventy-five pounds per year with the aid of Sydney Cockerell, Hardy, John Masefield and Walter de la Mare. This helped ease her financial difficulties. After the death of her sister from cancer in 1927, she descended into a deep depression, and was admitted to a nursing home where she eventually committed suicide by drinking Lysol.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: University College London (UCL, Gower St, Kings Cross, London WC1E 6BT) is a public research university in London, England, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It is the largest postgraduate institution in the UK by enrollment and is regarded as one of the world's leading multidisciplinary research universities. Established in 1826 as London University by founders inspired by the radical ideas of Jeremy Bentham, UCL was the first university institution to be established in London, and the first in England to be entirely secular and to admit students regardless of their religion. UCL also makes the contested claims of being the third-oldest university in England and the first to admit women. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Caroline Spurgeon (1869–1942), Charlotte Mew (1869–1928), Derek Jarman (1942–1994), Eileen Gray (1878–1976), Leander Starr Jameson (1853–1917).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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May Sinclair was a popular British writer who wrote about two dozen novels, short stories and poetry. She was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League. From the late 1920s she was suffering from the early signs of Parkinson's disease, and ceased writing. She settled with her companion of 30 years, Florence “Florrie” Bartrop, in Buckinghamshire in 1932.

Addresses:
The Gables, 96 Burcott Lane, Bierton, Aylesbury HP22 5AS, UK (51.83097, -0.78631)
Pembroke Cottage, Little Tingewick, Buckingham MK18 4AG, UK (51.98959, -1.06774)

Place
Bierton is a village in Buckinghamshire, England, about half a mile northeast of the town of Aylesbury. It is a mainly farming parish, The hamlets of Broughton, Broughton Crossing and Burcott lie within Bierton with Broughton civil parish part of Aylesbury Vale district and forms part of the Aylesbury Urban Area. Notable inhabitants of Bierton include architect Deborah Saunt of Channel 4 television's series Grand Designs, playwright Robert Farquhar, BBC fashion commentator Jerry O'Sullivan, and the notable author and poet May Sinclair who lived at The Gables in Burcott Lane for the last ten years of her life. Finmere is a village and civil parish in Oxfordshire, south of the River Great Ouse. It is almost 4 miles (6 km) west of Buckingham in Buckinghamshire and just over 4 miles (6 km) east of Brackley in Northamptonshire. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 466. Finmere's toponym is derived from the Old English for "pool frequented by woodpeckers". The village includes the hamlet of Little Tingewick.

Life
Who: Mary Amelia St. Clair (August 24, 1863 – November 14, 1946), aka May Sinclair
May Sinclair was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League. May Sinclair was also a significant critic in the area of modernist poetry and prose, and she is attributed with first using the term stream of consciousness in a literary context. Sinclair met Ezra Pound in 1908, and would become both his financial patron and advocate for his work. Through him she met H.D. and Richard Aldington in 1911, and she became a champion of these imagist poets, of T.S. Eliot, and of Vorticism. In 1913 May Sinclair met Charlotte Mew, whose long poem The Farmer’s Bride she admired, and the two had a brief but intense friendship. In 1934, Sinclair was living at Pembroke Cottage, Little Tingewick, in Buckinghamshire, with her maid and companion since 1919, Florence Bartrop. She moved to the Gables, 96, Burcott Lane, Bierton in 1936, where she died in 1946. She is buried at St John-at-Hampstead Churchyard, Hampstead, London.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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In 1913 Esther Roper and Eva Gore-Booth moved to London, at 14 Frognal Gardens, London NW3 6UX, for the sake of Eva’s health. The house has a fine mature rear garden. Frognal gardens is a very quiet position, tucked behind Hampstead Village is the most historical location abutting Church Row. Not far from here, at 108 Frognal, London NW3 6XU, lived Tamara Karsavina (1885–1978). She is buried at Hampstead Cemetery (Fortune Green Rd, West Hampstead, London NW6 1DR). 14 Frognal Gardens was listed for rent in 2014 for £5,200. In the same cemetery is buried Charlotte Mew (1869–1928).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Robert Gordon "Bob" Mackie is an American fashion designer, best known for his dressing of entertainment icons such as Joan Rivers, Cher, RuPaul, Barbara Eden, Bette Midler, Diana Ross, Judy Garland, ...
Born: March 24, 1940, Monterey Park, California, United States
Education: Chouinard Art Institute
Pasadena City College
Spouse: LuLu Porter (m. 1960–1963)
Children: Robert Gordon Mackie Jr.
Awards: Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Costumes for a Series, more
Parents: Mildred Agnes Mackie, Charles Robert Mackie

School: The Chouinard Art Institute (743 S Grand View St, Los Angeles, CA 90057) was a professional art school founded in 1921 by Nelbert Murphy Chouinard (1879–1969) in Los Angeles, California. In 1961, Walt and Roy Disney guided the merger of the Chouinard Art Institute and the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music to establish the California Institute of the Arts. The Chouinard Art Institute building is situated at 743 Grand View Street in the Westlake district of central Los Angeles. Today it is used by the Western Day Care School, a child-care center. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Bob Mackie (born 1940), Don Bachardy (born 1934), Ted Graber (1920–2000).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: Pasadena City College (PCC, 1570 E Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91106) is a community college located in Pasadena, California. Pasadena City College was founded in 1924 as Pasadena Junior College. From 1928 to 1953, it operated as a four-year junior college, combining the last two years of high school with the first two years of college. In 1954, Pasadena Junior College merged with another junior college, John Muir College, to become Pasadena City College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Dustin Lance Black (born 1974), Oscar-award winning screenwriter, actor and LGBT activist, known for his work in the film Milk and the TV series Big Love; Dennis Cooper (born 1953), poet and novelist; Jack Larson (1928-2015), “Jimmy Olsen” on TV's Superman show; Bob Mackie (born 1940), fashion designer.

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Paul Leicester Ford was an American novelist and biographer, born in Brooklyn, the son of Gordon Lester Ford and Emily Fowler Ford.
Born: March 23, 1865, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: May 8, 1902, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Buried: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, Westchester County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 24405176
Movies: Janice Meredith
Siblings: Worthington C. Ford, Malcolm Webster Ford

Cemetery: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Sleepy Hollow, New York, is the resting place of numerous famous figures, including Washington Irving, whose story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is set in the adjacent Old Dutch Burying Ground. Incorporated in 1849 as Tarrytown Cemetery, it posthumously honored Irving's request that it change its name to Sleepy Hollow Cemetery.

Address: 540 N Broadway, Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591, USA (41.09702, -73.86162)
National Register of Historic Places: 09000380, 2009

Place
The cemetery is a non-profit, non-sectarian burying ground of about 90 acres (360,000 m2). It is contiguous with, but separate from, the church yard of the colonial-era church that was a setting for "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow". The Rockefeller family estate (see Kykuit), whose grounds abut Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, contains the private Rockefeller cemetery. Several outdoor scenes from the 1970 feature film “House of Dark Shadows” were filmed at the cemetery's receiving vault.

Notable queer burials at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery:
• Elizabeth Arden (1878–1966), businesswoman who built a cosmetics empire.
• Brooke Astor (1902–2007), philanthropist and socialite.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959), philanthropist; member of the Astor family.
• Paul Leicester Ford (1865–1902), editor, bibliographer, novelist, and biographer; brother of Malcolm Webster Ford by whose hand he died.
• Leila Howard Griswold Webb Codman (1856-1910), widow of railroad magnate H. Walter Webb, in 1904 married Ogden Codman, Jr. but died unexpectedly in 1910.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Lived: Bath Hotel, Charlestown, St. Kitts & Nevis (17.13244, -62.62588)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161870547

Peter Watson was a wealthy English art collector and benefactor. He funded the literary magazine, Horizon, edited by Cyril Connolly. "When I think of him then, I think of his clothes, which were beautiful, his general neatness and cleanness, which seemed almost those of a handsome young Bostonian." –Stephen Spender. In 1930, society photographer, artist and set designer Sir Cecil Beaton began a lifelong obsession with Watson, though the two never became lovers. One chapter from Hugo Vickers' authorized biography of Cecil Beaton is titled I Love You, Mr. Watson. One
of Watson's lovers was the American male prostitute and socialite Denham Fouts, whom he continued to support even after they separated because of Fouts's drug addiction. Norman Fowler was Watson's boyfriend from 1949 and heir to most
of Watson's estate. When Watson drowned in his bath, Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler bought a hotel, called The Bath Hotel, on Nevis, in the British Virgin Islands, and lived there until he himself drowned in the bath in 1971, within weeks of the fifteenth anniversary of Watson's death.

Together from 1949 to 1956: 7 years.
Norman Fowler (1927 - March 23, 1971)
Peter Watson (September 14, 1908 – May 3, 1956)

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House: The “White House,” as Sulhamstead is sometimes affectionately called, was sold by the Thoyts' to Sir George Watson in 1910.

Address: 1 North Dr, Sulhamstead, West Berkshire RG7 4DU, UK (51.41866, -1.08021)
English Heritage Building ID: 40018 (Grade II, 1951)

Place
Built in 1748, Rebuilt in the early XIX century with further alterations in 1852 and 1910.
The house is now a police training centre. Painted stucco with hipped slate roofs. Central 3 storey 3 bay block with set back 2 storey wings. Plinth, first floor cill band, cornice, coped parapet, and paired end stacks to central block and wings. Central 2 storey, 3 bay tetrastyle Ionic portico with triangular pediment. Lead downpipes and rainwater heads. 9 bays; glazing bar sashes with architraves and cornices. Central enclosed porch and two 3-panelled doors with bracketed cornice. Rear similar without portico. North-east front of 4 bays. Low early XIX century additions to south-west. Interior: largely 1910. Early XVIII century style panelled entrance hall with coupled Doric pilasters, screen of coupled Doric columns, and bifurcating staircase with balcony on to central landing. Other rooms with early XVIII century style panelling, fireplaces, and plaster ceilings.

Life
Who: Peter Watson (September 14, 1908 – May 3, 1956) and Norman Fowler (1927 – March 23, 1971)
The Watson family constructed the present swimming pool in 1935 but, on the 23rd October 1940, they left and the building became occupied by the War Office as the Commando Troop Headquarters. Late in 1941, it was entirely taken over by the Air Ministry for use as an RAF Elementary Flying Training School. The present large hard-standing garage housed a link trainer and was also used as an Officers Squash Court. Because of the lack of a purpose built landing field, the RAF utilised a nearby grass field. Peter Watson was a wealthy English art collector and benefactor. Norman Fowler was Watson's boyfriend from 1949. When Watson drowned in his bath, Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler bought a hotel, called The Bath Hotel, on Nevis, in the British Virgin Islands, and lived there until he himself drowned in the bath in 1971, within weeks of the fifteenth anniversary of Watson's death.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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National Park: The Bath Hotel in Nevis is considered to have been the first tourist hotel in the Caribbean.

Address: Charlestown, St. Kitts & Nevis (17.13244, -62.62588)

Place
Built in 1778
Bath Hotel was a rather grand “spa” hotel, and it rapidly became a very successful venture, attracting many wealthy European visitors who were hoping to treat their various ailments using the healing waters of the nearby volcanic hot spring, the Bath Spring, and perhaps more importantly, to enjoy the social scene at this tropical spa hotel on what was then the busy colonial island of Nevis. John Huggins, a merchant and aristocrat built the large, stone hotel at a cost of 43,000 “island” pounds, and surrounded it with lush landscaping, statuary, and goldfish ponds. The hotel was 200 feet long and 60 feet wide. Dignitaries such as Lord Nelson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Prince William Henry, who was the Duke of Clarence, visited the hotel in its heyday. With the downturn of the sugar industry, Nevis stepped into the world of tourism with this hotel, which flourished for about 60 years. Since then the hotel has had various uses, reopening as a hotel from 1912 until 1940. It was used as training center for the West Indian regiment during WWII, and most recently, the headquarters of the Nevis Island Administration.

Life
Who: Norman Fowler (1927 – March 23, 1971)
In 1968, Norman Fowler moved to St Kitts and Nevis, farther east in the Leeward Islands, where he was one of the few white people among the mostly black population. He settled on the island of Nevis, where he purchased the Bath Hotel, an elegant XVIII century pile in Charlestown with a two-storey bathhouse attached to it (from which it took its name). He set about restoring the hotel, and lived in one of its suites. His residency there lasted just over two years. On March 23, 1971, at the age of forty-four, Norman Fowler was found dead. He had lost consciousness while bathing in the hot bathhouse and drowned. Almost 15 years before, his lover Peter Watson had drowned in his bathroom as well. Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler’s death was front-page news in his local paper back on Tortola: “There is profound sympathy here over the sad news of his death.” The coroner's inquest returned an open verdict — simply “death by drowning in hot water bath.” There was suspicion locally that he had been murdered, and the case was investigated, but no evidence was ever found and the case was dropped.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Joan Crawford was an American film and television actress who began her career as a dancer and stage showgirl. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Crawford tenth on their list of the greatest female stars of Classic Hollywood Cinema.
Born: San Antonio, Texas, United States
Died: May 10, 1977, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Stephens College
Lived: Omni Parker House, 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum, Hartsdale, Westchester County, New York, USA, Plot: Ferncliff Mausoleum, Unit 8, Alcove E, Crypt 42
Find A Grave Memorial# 242
Children: Christina Crawford, Christopher Crawford, Cathy Crawford, Cynthia Crawford
Spouse: Alfred Steele (m. 1955–1959), more

School: Stephens College (1200 E Broadway, Columbia, MO 65215) is a women's college located in Columbia, Missouri. It is the second oldest female educational establishment that is still a women's college in the United States. It was founded on August 24, 1833, as the Columbia Female Academy. In 1856, David H. Hickman helped secure the college's charter under the name The Columbia Female Baptist Academy. In the late XIX century it was renamed Stephens Female College after James L. Stephens endowed the college with $20,000. From 1937-1943 its Drama Department was renowned by its chairman and teacher, the actress Maude Adams (1872-1953), James M. Barrie's first Peter Pan. The campus includes a National Historic District: Stephens College South Campus Historic District (National Register of Historic Places: 05001326, 2005). Joan Crawford (1904-1977) registered at Stephens College in 1922, giving her year of birth as 1906. She attended Stephens for only a few months before withdrawing after she realized she was not prepared for college.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Place
Ferncliff Cemetery has three community mausoleums that offer what The New York Times has described as "lavish burial spaces". As of 2001, a standard crypt space in the mausoleums was priced at $15,000. The highest-priced spaces were private burial rooms with bronze gates, crystal chandeliers, and stained-glass windows, priced at $280,000. The Ferncliff Mausoleum, aka "The Cathedral of Memories", is the cemetery's oldest mausoleum, constructed in 1928. It has classic architecture, but the corridors are dark without glass panes to admit natural light. Judy Garland, Ed Sullivan, and Joan Crawford are three of the most famous interments in the main mausoleum. The Shrine of Memories is Ferncliff's second mausoleum and was constructed in 1956. "Shrine of Memories" is a more contemporary structure than "Ferncliff Mausoleum." It has many panes of glass to admit natural light, and there is a large frieze of Christopher Columbus in the main hall of the building. Basil Rathbone is one of the most famous interments in "Shrine of Memories." Rosewood is Ferncliff's most recently completed community mausoleum, having been constructed in 1999. Aaliyah and her father Michael Haughton have a private room in Rosewood. Cab Calloway is interred with his wife Zulme "Nuffie". The cemetery is also known for its in-ground burials in sections located in front of the mausoleums. Ferncliff is one of the very few cemeteries that does not permit upright headstones in its outdoor plots. All outdoor grave markers are flush with the ground. This feature facilitates maintenance of the cemetery grounds. However, there are several upright headstones that were placed before this policy was instituted. Malcolm X is one of the most famous ground burials, in plot Pinewood B.

Notable queer burials at Ferncliff Cemetery:
• Diane Arbus (1923-1971), photographer and writer
• James Baldwin (1924–1987) (Cemetery Grounds, HILLA,1203), novelist, essayist
• Joan Crawford (c. 1905–1977) (Ferncliff Mausoleum, M08,E,42-52), actress
• Alice Delamar (1895-1983), heiress and socialite, cremated here but buried in Palm Beach
• Judy Garland (1922–1969), singer, actress
• Moss Hart (1904–1961) (Ferncliff Mausoleum, M08N,EEFF,D,4), playwright and director
• Gerald Haxton (1892-1944) (Cemetery Grounds, PAUL,112C,CENTER), long term secretary and lover of novelist and playwright W. Somerset Maugham.
• Alberta Hunter (1895-1984) (Cemetery Grounds, ELM1,1411), blues singer
• Elsa Maxwell (1883–1963) (Cemetery Grounds, ROSE2,1132), columnist, society figure
• Ona Munson (1910–1955) (Ferncliff Mausoleum, M08TN,Y,G,5), actress
• Basil Rathbone (1892–1967) (Shrine of Memories, S01,K,117), actor. In 1924 he was involved in a brief relationship with Eva Le Gallienne.
• Paul Robeson (1898–1976) (Cemetery Grounds, HILLA,1511), actor, singer, and civil rights activist.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Joseph Christian Leyendecker was one of the preeminent American illustrators of the early 20th century.
Born: March 23, 1874, Montabaur, Germany
Died: July 25, 1951, New Rochelle, New York, United States
Education: Académie Julian
Lived: Mount Tom Day Camp, 48 Mt Tom Rd, New Rochelle, NY 10805, USA (40.89411, -73.78963)
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA, Plot: White Oak Plot, Section 18 Lot West 1925
Find A Grave Memorial# 11089743
Influenced: Norman Rockwell
Siblings: Frank Xavier Leyendecker
Influenced by: Alphonse Mucha, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jules Chéret

J.C. Leyendecker was one of the pre-eminent American illustrators of the early 20th century. Leyendecker lived for most of his life with Charles Beach, the Arrow Collar Man, on whom the stylish men in his artwork were modeled. In 1914, the Leyendeckers and Beach, moved into a large home and art studio in New Rochelle, New York, where J. C. would reside for the remainder of his life. While Beach often organized the famous gala-like social gatherings that Leyendecker was known for in the 1920s, he apparently also contributed largely to Leyendecker's social isolation in his later years. Beach reportedly forbade outside contact with the artist in the last months of his life. When commissions began to wane in the 1930s, Leyendecker was forced to curtail spending considerably. By the time of his death, Leyendecker had let all of the household staff at his New Rochelle estate go. Leyendecker left a tidy estate equally split between his sister and Beach. Leyendecker is buried alongside parents and brother Frank at Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx, New York. Charles Beach died a few months after Leyendecker, and his burial location is unknown.

Together from 1901 to 1951: 50 years.
Charles Beach (1886–1952)
Joseph Christian "J.C." Leyendecker (March 23, 1874 - July 25, 1951)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: In 1914, J.C. Leyendecker, accompanied by Charles Beach, moved into a large home and art studio in New Rochelle, New York, where J.C. would reside for the remainder of his life.

Address: Mount Tom Day Camp, 48 Mt Tom Rd, New Rochelle, NY 10805, USA (40.89411, -73.78963)
Phone: +1 914-636-8130
Website: http://www.mounttomdaycamp.com/

Place
Built in 1914
A three-tiered estate, built by the renowned illustrator, J.C. Leyendecker, to provide space and intimacy. A magnificent 19-room mansion, it features comfortable rooms, covered outdoor lunch patios and a large kitchen. Today is the facility for the Mount Tom Day Camp.

Life
Who: Joseph Christian Leyendecker (March 23, 1874 – July 25, 1951)
J.C. Leyendecker was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century. He is best known for his poster, book and advertising illustrations, the trade character known as The Arrow Collar Man, and his numerous covers for The Saturday Evening Post. Between 1896 and 1950, Leyendecker painted more than 400 magazine covers. During the Golden Age of American Illustration, for The Saturday Evening Post alone, J.C. Leyendecker produced 322 covers, as well as many advertisement illustrations for its interior pages. No other artist, until the arrival of Norman Rockwell two decades later, was so solidly identified with one publication. Leyendecker "virtually invented the whole idea of modern magazine design." Leyendecker often used his favorite model and partner Charles Beach (1886–1952.) The 1920s were in many ways the apex of Leyendecker’s career, with some of his most recognizable work being completed during this time. Modern advertising had come into its own, with Leyendecker widely regarded as among the preeminent American commercial artists. This popularity extended beyond the commercial, and into Leyendecker’s personal life, where he and Charles Beach hosted large galas attended by people of consequence from all sectors. The parties they hosted at their New Rochelle home/studio were important social and celebrity making events. Leyendecker died on July 25, 1951, at his estate in New Rochelle of an acute coronary occlusion. By the time of his death, Leyendecker had let all of the household staff at his New Rochelle estate go, with he and Beach attempting to maintain the extensive estate themselves. Leyendecker left a tidy estate equally split between his sister and Beach. Leyendecker is buried alongside parents and brother Frank at Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York City. Charles Beach died a few months after Leyendecker, and his burial location is unknown.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Cemetery: Although located in Woodlawn, Bronx and one of the largest cemeteries in New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery.

Address: 517 E 233rd St, Bronx, NY 10470, USA (40.89006, -73.87425)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 718-920-0500
Website: http://www.thewoodlawncemetery.org/
National Register of Historic Places: 11000563, 2011 Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
Woodlawn Cemetery opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was later annexed to New York City in 1874. It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great figures in the American arts, such as authors Countee Cullen and Herman Melville, and musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, and Max Roach. “Memorial To A Marriage” has been erected by Patricia Cronin and her partner Deborah Kass. Sculptor Cronin did the original sculpture of Carrara marble in 2002, to address what she considered a Federal failure: not allowing gay Americans the right to marry. It has been replaced with a bronze casting, installed on the couple’s burial plot in 2011. Since 2002 when the marble was first installed, the memorial has become one of the most visited of Woodlawn. After 18 years together, Patricia Cronin and Deborah Kass went to City Hall on the morning of July 24, 2011, with nearly 900 other New York City couples, waiting for three hours in the heat to get legally married on the first day.

Notable queer burials at Woodlawn Cemetery:
• Diana Blanche Barrymore Blythe (1921-1960), known professionally as Diana Barrymore, was a film and stage actress. She was the daughter of renowned actor John Barrymore and his second wife, poet Blanche Oelrichs.
• Frances (Fannie) Evelyn Bostwick (died in 1921) was the mother of Marion “Joe” Carstairs. Bostwick was an American heiress who was the second child of Jabez Bostwick and his wife Helen. Joe Carstairs' legal father was Scottish army officer Captain Albert Carstairs. At least one biographer has suggested that the Captain may not have been Joe's biological father. Carstairs' mother, an alcoholic and drug addict, later married Captain Francis Francis. She divorced Captain Francis to marry French count Roger de Périgny in 1915, but eventually left him because of his infidelity. Her fourth and last husband, whom she married in 1920, was Serge Voronoff, a Russian–French surgeon who become famous in the 1920s and 1930s for his practice of transplanting monkey testicle tissue into male humans for the claimed purpose of rejuvenation. For some years Evelyn had believed in Voronoff's theories, and she funded his research and acted as his laboratory assistant at the Collège de France in Paris. Voronoff arrived in New York with his wife's body on the ship "S.S. France" in May 1921.
• Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years. Under a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) born as Countee Porter, was a poet, author and scholar who was a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. It is rumored that Cullen was a homosexual, and his relationship with Harold Jackman ("the handsomest man in Harlem"), was a significant factor in his divorce. The young, dashing Jackman was a school teacher and, thanks to his noted beauty, a prominent figure among Harlem’s gay elite. Van Vechten had used him as a character model in his novel “Nigger Heaven” (1926.)
• Joseph Raphael De Lamar (1843-1918), a prominent mine owner and operator in the western United States and Canada, as well as a financier and speculator, from the late 1870s until his death in 1918. De Lamar married Nellie Virginia Sands, a direct descendant of John Quincy Adams, on May 8, 1893, and they had one daughter together, Alice DeLamar.
• Marjory Lacey-Baker (died in 1971), actress, she was the long-time companion of Dr. Lena Madesin Phillips, founder of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. They met in 1919 and together until Ms Philipps’ death in 1955. Ms Phillips is buried at Maple Grove Cemetery (500 N Main St, Nicholasville, KY 40356).
• Joseph Christian “J.C.” Leyendecker (1874-1951) was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century.
• George Platt Lynes (1907-1955) was a fashion and commercial photographer.
• Elisabeth "Bessie" Marbury (1856–1933) was a pioneering American theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe (later known as Lady Mendl), a prominent socialite and famous interior decorator.
• Herman Melville (1819-1891) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet from the American Renaissance period.
• Blanche Marie Louise Oelrichs (1890-1950) was a poet, playwright and theatre actress known by the pseudonym "Michael Strange.” Starting in the summer of 1940 until her death, Oelrichs was in a long-term relationship with Margaret Wise Brown, the author of many children’s books. The relationship began as something of a mentoring one, but became a romantic relationship including co-habitating at 10 Gracie Square beginning in 1943.
• Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) was a suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women’s rights movement.
• John William Sterling (1844–1918) was a founding partner of Shearman & Sterling LLP and major benefactor to Yale University. In Sterling's will, he directs: "no interment other than my own and that of my sister, Cordelia, shall ever take place" in his Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery. An exception is made, however, "in case my said friend, James O. Bloss (1847–1918), who has lived with me for more than forty years, should desire to be interred in the said Mausoleum and should die without ever having been married." Cordelia Sterling is burried with her brother. Bloss died less than six months after Sterling, according to his sister, of a broken heart, and is not buried with his friend, though the reason is unknown. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester (same cemetery where are buried Susan B. Anthony and Lillian D. Wald). Sterling's obituary in the New York Times referred to "his lifelong friend, James O. Bloss, a retired cotton broker, who made his home with the testator for more than forty years." James Orville Bloss died suddenly in New York City, on December 15, 1918.
• Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875-1942) was an American sculptor, art patron and collector, and founder in 1931 of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. She was a prominent social figure and hostess, who was born into the wealthy Vanderbilt family and married into the Whitney family. At age 21, Gertrude married the extremely wealthy sportsman Harry Payne Whitney (1872–1930). In 1934, she was at the center of a highly publicized court battle with her sister-in-law, Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt, for custody of her ten-year-old niece, Gloria Vanderbilt. Gertrude Whitney died in 1942, at age 67, and was interred next to her husband.
• Bert Williams (1874-1922) was one of the pre-eminent entertainers of the Vaudeville era. He married Charlotte ("Lottie") Thompson, a singer with whom he had worked professionally, in a very private ceremony. Lottie was a widow eight years Bert's senior. The Williamses never had children biologically, but they adopted three of Lottie's nieces. In 1919 their niece Lottie Tyler met blues singer Alberta Hunter. In August 1927, Hunter sailed for France, accompanied by Lottie. Their relationship lasted until Ms. Tyler's death, many years later.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Buried: Saint Paul Town Cemetery, Saint-Paul-de-Vence, Departement des Alpes-Maritimes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Buried alongside: Maud Hunt Squire
Find A Grave Memorial# 161717757

American artists and life partners for 60 years, Maud Hunt Squire and Ethel Mars met as students at the Cincinnati Art Academy in the 1890s. Mars and Squire forged distinguished careers in book illustration, painting, and woodblock printing. Émigrées to France, they frequented Gertrude Stein’s salons and, during World War I, were among the Provincetown artists working in new methods of printmaking, called the “Provincetown Print” or “White-Line Woodcut.” Squire and Mars were the subject
of Stein's whimsical word portrait Miss Furr and Miss Skeene (Squire's nickname was Skeene), written between 1909 and 1911. With characteristic playfulness, Stein in this piece spoofs young women who come to Paris to "cultivate something." Stein's incessant reiteration of the word "gay" at a time when its coded meaning was not in mainstream use is interpreted today as an in-group double entendre. While in their sixties, Ethel and Maud went into hiding at Grenoble during WWII, and returned to their French Riviera home afterwards. The two women are buried together in France.

Together from 1894 to 1954: 60 years.
Ethel Mars (September 19, 1876 - March 23, 1959)
Maud Hunt Squire (January 30, 1873 - October 25, 1954)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Cemetery: Within the historic village, a medieval walled village, there are numerous interesting sights and monuments. The Peyra Gate was remodelled in 1810. The fountain was rebuilt in 1822 replacing an older one dating from 1578. Nearby is an oak, donated by François I and planted in 1538. The castle is today the Fondation Émile Hugues, a modern and contemporary art museum. The cathedral was built in the IV century on the site of a Roman temple. The stone of the western façade dates from 239. Another, on the right, was engraved in December 220. Other stones in the external walls represent funerary dedications. Also on the western side of the church, the Pierre du Tauroble evokes the cult of Cybele and also the Great mother of the Gods of Mount Ida. A chapel in the cathedral has a mosaic by Marc Chagall, dated 1911. The rue des Portiques is a section of the old Roman road. The town has a small chapel, the Cité Historique Chapelle du Rosaire (1948, completed in 1951), decorated with stained glass and other fittings by Henri Matisse, who owned a home in the village towards the end of his life. Vence is famous for its spring water, which can be collected from numerous fountains in the town. American artists and life partners for more than 50 years, Maud Hunt Squire (1873-1954) and Ethel Mars (1876-1959), forged distinguished careers in book illustration, painting, and woodblock printing. Émigrées to France, they frequented Gertrude Stein's salons and, during WWI, were among the Provincetown artists working in new methods of printmaking. Squire and Mars were the subject of Stein's whimsical word portrait "Miss Furr and Miss Skeene" (Squire's nickname was Skeene), written between 1909 and 1911. With characteristic playfulness, Stein in this piece spoofs young ladies who come to Paris to "cultivate something." Stein's incessant reiteration of the word "gay" at a time when its coded meaning was not in mainstream use is interpreted today as an in-group double entendre. At the beginning of WWI, Squire and Mars returned to the U.S. and eventually relocated to Provincetown, Massachusetts. The quaint fishing community at the tip of Cape Cod, with its old-world ambience and affordable rentals, had by this time become an artists' colony, and the international reputations of Squire and Mars attracted other artists to the town. In the 1920s Squire and Mars returned to Europe, eventually settling in Vence on the French Riviera. There Squire and Mars were active in an artists' community that included Marsden Hartley and Reginald Marsh. The couple continued to collaborate on children's book illustration and each again took up painting and drawing. Mars, who concentrated on modernist painting and gouache drawing, exhibited in Paris during the 1920s. Squire concentrated on large-scale watercolors of outdoor public scenes. The couple continued working until about 1930. During WWII, Squire and Mars, then in their sixties, went into hiding near Grenoble. After the war, they returned to their home, La Farigoule, in Vence. Squire died on October 25, 1954; Mars on March 23, 1959. The two women are buried together at Saint Paul de Vence Cemetery (Chemin de Saint-Paul, 06570 Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Bessie Rayner Parkes Belloc was one of the most prominent English feminists and campaigners for women’s rights in Victorian times and also a poet, essayist and journalist.
Born: June 16, 1829, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Died: March 23, 1925, Slindon, United Kingdom
Buried: St Richards Catholic Church, Top Rd, Slindon, Arundel BN18 0RG
Find A Grave Memorial# 103006416
Children: Hilaire Belloc, Marie Adelaide Belloc Lowndes
Grandchild: Countess Iddesleigh
People also search for: Hilaire Belloc, more

Church: Bessie Rayner Parkes Belloc (1829-1925) was one of the most prominent English feminists and campaigners for women’s rights in Victorian times and also a poet, essayist and journalist. Bessie Rayner Parkes’ wide circle of literary and political friends included George Eliot, Harriet Martineau, Anna Jameson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon, Elizabeth Blackwell, Lord Shaftesbury, Herbert Spencer, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Elizabeth Gaskell, William Thackeray, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, John Ruskin, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Her most fruitful friendship was with Barbara Bodichon, for out of their joint efforts grew the first organized women’s movement in Britain. She is buried at St Richards Catholic Church (Top Rd, Slindon, Arundel BN18 0RG).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Stephen Joshua Sondheim is an American composer and lyricist known for more than a half-century of contributions to musical theatre.
Born: March 22, 1930, New York City, New York, United States
Education: George School
New York Military Academy
Ethical Culture Fieldston School
Williams College
Lived: 246 E. 49th St
Partner: Jeff Romley
Albums: Company (2006 Broadway revival cast), more

School: George School (1690 Newtown Langhorne Rd, Newtown, PA 18940) is a private Quaker boarding and day high school located on a rural campus near Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. George School was founded in 1891 and opened in 1893. It is named for John M. George who donated much of the money for the school. It has grown from a single building (still standing) to over 20 academic, athletic, and residential buildings. Besides the usual college preparatory courses, including an International Baccalaureate program, the school features several distinct programs deriving from its Quaker heritage. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930, class 1946), Pulitzer Prize–winning composer/lyricist, attended George School, where he wrote his first musical, “By George,” and from which he graduated in 1946. Sondheim spent several summers at Camp Androscoggin.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: New York Military Academy (NYMA, 78 Academy Ave, Cornwall-On-Hudson, NY 12520) is a private boarding school in the rural village of Cornwall-on-Hudson, 60 miles (97 km) north of New York City, and one of the oldest military schools in the United States. Originally a boys' school, it became coeducational in 1975. On March 3, 2015, NYMA filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, facing serious financial difficulties from low enrollment. Instead of opening for the fall semester in September 2015, NYMA closed and was sold at auction to a group of Chinese investors who reopened the school in November. NYMA was founded in 1889 by Charles Jefferson Wright, an American Civil War veteran and former schoolteacher from New Hampshire who believed that a military structure provided the best environment for academic achievement, a philosophy to which the school still adheres. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930, class 1946), Tony, Grammy, Oscar and Pulitzer-winning composer and lyricist, attended the New York Military Academy, but did not graduate.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: Ethical Culture Fieldston School (ECFS, 3901 Fieldston Rd, Bronx, NY 10471), known as just Fieldston, is a private, highly selective independent school in New York City. The school is a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. The school opened in 1878 as a free kindergarten, founded by Felix Adler at the age of 24. In 1880, elementary grades were added, and the school was then called the Workingman's School. At that time, the idea that the children of the poor should be educated was innovative. By 1890 the school's academic reputation encouraged many more wealthy parents to seek it out, and the school was expanded to accommodate the upper-class as well, and began charging tuition; in 1895 the name changed to "The Ethical Culture School", and in 1903 the New York Society for Ethical Culture became its sponsor. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Diane Arbus, photographer; Roy Cohn, attorney; Stephen Sondheim (born 1930), composer, attended the Fieldston Lower School.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: Williams College (880 Main St, Williamstown, MA 01267) is a highly selective private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Currently ranked 1st place in the U.S. News & World Report's liberal arts ranking for the 14th consecutive year, Williams College is regarded as a leading institution of higher education in the United States. Forbes magazine ranked Williams the second best undergraduate institution in the United States in its 2016 publication of America's Top Colleges, and the best undergraduate institution in its 2010, 2011, 2014 and 2016 report. Colonel Ephraim Williams was an officer in the Massachusetts militia and a member of a prominent landowning family. His will included a bequest to support and maintain a free school to be established in the town of West Hoosac, Massachusetts, provided that the town change its name to Williamstown. Williams was killed at the Battle of Lake George on September 8, 1755. After Shays' Rebellion, the Williamstown Free School opened with 15 students on October 26, 1791. The first president was Ebenezer Fitch. Not long after its founding, the trustees of the school petitioned the Massachusetts legislature to convert the free school to a tuition-based college. The legislature agreed and on June 22, 1793, Williams College was chartered. It was the second college to be founded in Massachusetts. Stephen Sondheim (born 1930) attended Williams College, whose theatre program attracted him. His first teacher there was Robert Barrow: “everybody hated him because he was very dry, and I thought he was wonderful because he was very dry. And Barrow made me realize that all my romantic views of art were nonsense.” The composer told Meryle Secrest, "I just wanted to study composition, theory, and harmony without the attendant musicology that comes in graduate school. But I knew I wanted to write for the theatre, so I wanted someone who did not disdain theatre music." Barrow suggested that Sondheim study with Milton Babbitt, who Sondheim described as "a frustrated show composer" with whom he formed "a perfect combination." When he met Babbitt, he was working on a musical for Mary Martin based on the myth of Helen of Troy. Sondheim and Babbitt would meet once a week in New York City for four hours (at the time, Babbitt was teaching at Princeton University). At Williams, Sondheim wrote a musical adaption of “Beggar on Horseback” (a 1924 play by George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly, with permission from Kaufman) which had three performances. A member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, he graduated magna cum laude in 1950.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: Turtle Bay is a neighborhood in New York City, on the east side of Midtown Manhattan. It extends from either 41s or 43rd Streets to 53rd Street, and eastward from Lexington Avenue to the East River’s western branch, facing Roosevelt Island. The neighborhood is the site of the headquarters of the United Nations and the Chrysler Building. The Tudor City apartment complex is also considered to be within Turtle Bay.

Address: E 49th St, New York, NY 10017, USA
National Register of Historic Places: Turtle Bay Gardens Historic District (226-246 E. 49th St. and 227-245 E. 48th St.), 83001750, 1983

Place
An army enrollment office was established at Third Avenue and 46th Street, after the first Draft Act was passed during the American Civil War. On July 13, 1863, an angry mob burned the office to the ground and proceeded to riot through the surrounding neighborhood, destroying entire blocks. The New York Draft Riots continued for three days before army troops managed to contain the mob, which had burned and looted much of the city. After the war ended, the formerly pastoral neighborhood was developed with brownstones. By 1868 the bay had been entirely filled in by commercial overdevelopment, packed with breweries, gasworks, slaughterhouses, cattle pens, coal yards, and railroad piers. By the early XX century, Turtle Bay was "a riverside back yard" for the city, as the WPA Guide to New York City (1939) described it: "huge industrial enterprises— breweries, laundries, abattoirs, power plants— along the water front face squalid tenements not far away from new apartment dwellings attracted to the section by its river view and its central position. The numerous plants shower this district with the heaviest sootfall in the city— 150 tons to the square mile annually.” The huge Waterside Station, a power plant operated by the Consolidated Edison Company, producing 367,000 kilowatts of electricity in its coal-fired plant, marked the southern boundary of the neighborhood. There were also 18 acres (73,000 m2) of slaughterhouses along First Avenue. With an infusion of poor immigrants having had come in the later part of the XIX century, and the opening of the elevated train lines along Second and Third Avenues, the neighborhood went into decay with crumbling tenement buildings.

Notable queer residents at Turtle Bay:
• No. 109 E. 42nd St, 10017: Greta Garbo (1905-1990) and Mauritz Stiller occupied rooms at the Hotel Commodore in the first two months of their stay in America in July 1925. The Hotel Commodore (today the Grand Hyatt) was a modest place, at 42nd street, which formed a part of Grand Central Station and just a few steps away from the MGM office at Broadway.
• 525 Lexington Ave, 10017 (now the New York Marriot East Side): in 1925 Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) and Alfred Stieglitz moved to the Shelton Hotel taking an apartment on the 30th floor of the new building. They would live here for 12 years. With a spectacular view, Georgia began to paint the city. The building was depicted in some of the works of these two legendary tenants, O’Keefe the painter and Stieglitz the photographer.
• No. 237 E. 48th St, 10017: Dorothy Thompson (1894-1961), a well-known foreign correspondent and author of "I Saw Hitler," was once married to writer Sinclair Lewis, but the great love of her life was Christa Winsloe, author of the novel upon which the classic lesbian film, "Madchen in Uniform" was based. After they broke up, Thompson lived alone in this three-story brownstone from 1941 to 1957. She spent more than $20,000 for renovations to make it, as she wrote, “the most perfect small house I have ever seen.” Thompson’s “small” home included a library with more than 3,000 books, five fireplaces, and a third-floor study for writing. In the drawing room, a wine-colored satin sofa could hold, she bragged, five of “the most distinguished bottoms in New York.” In the front door were eight painted glass panels showing Thompson in medieval attire performing various tasks – writing, lecturing, greeting guests. There was also the house’s motto: “Gallus in sterquilinio suo plurimum potest.” (“The rooster on his own dunghill is very much in charge.”)
• No. 246 E. 49th St, 10017: Stephen Sondheim (born 1930) has been a long-time resident of the Turtle Bay Gardens. Sondheim has spoken in the past of feeling like an outsider – “somebody who people want to both kiss and kill” – from quite early on in his life. He spent some 25 years – from his thirties through his fifties – in analysis, did not come out as gay until he was about 40, and did not live with a partner, a dramatist named Peter Jones, until he was 61. They separated in 1999. Since 2004 he has been in a relationship with Jeff Romley (born 1978.) In 1969, while he was playing music, he heard a knock on the door. His neighbor, Katharine Hepburn, was in "bare feet – this angry, red-faced lady" and told him "You have been keeping me awake all night!" (she was practicing for her musical debut in Coco). When Sondheim asked why she had not asked him to play for her, she said she lost his phone number. According to Sondheim, "My guess is that she wanted to stand there in her bare feet, suffering for her art".
• No. 244 E. 49 St, 10017: Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003) lived in the apartment at 244 East 49th Street in the Turtle Bay neighborhood for more than 60 years. After her death in 2003, her beloved four-story brownstone was sold sight-unseen to a fan in 2004 for $3.9 million. According to the listing for the renting, the home has been renovated, but “the original mirrored dressing room area retains the glitter.” There is a formal entry, spacious living room, a parlor floor and the master bedroom/bath on the third floor and guest bedrooms on the fourth floor. Behind the brownstone are communal gardens — Turtle Bay Gardens — which are shared by other rowhome owners on East 49th and East 48th Streets. The city honored Hepburn by renaming the nearby intersection of Second Avenue and East 49th Street “Katharine Hepburn Place.” Nearby, in the Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, is a garden dedicated to her — the Katharine Hepburn Garden – which contains 12 stepping stones inscribed with quotes by Hepburn.
• No. 211 E. 49th St, 10017: Amster Yard, located at East 49th Street between Second and Third Avenues. James Amster (1908-1986) had first set eyes on what would become Amster Yard back in 1944 when, after a dinner party, two other guests who were in real estate business took him to see some “down-in-the-heels properties,” as he called them. An old tenement, boarding house, and a carpenter’s workshop ringed a debris-filled yard. But the creative Amster immediately saw potential in the site. Within two years, on a May evening in 1946, Amster was ready to unveil his charming Amster Yard with a grand party attended by some 700 clients, friends and the press. Eugenia Sheppard, writing for the New York Herald Tribune, described her gracious and handsome host as “a man with great romantic flair” and Amster Yard as “pretty and perfect… inside and out.” It was Amster’s dream to make Amster Yard a center of the design profession, and the earliest residents of its six apartments included the Yard’s architect, Sterner, and his wife, Paula; art patron Leonard Hanna; interior designer Billy Baldwin; artist Isamu Noguchi; fahion designer Norman Norell; as well as Amster, of course. Robert Moyer, Jimmy Amster’s partner for 41 years, stayed on at Amster Yard after Amster died in 1986 moving out in 1992.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Pearl M. Hart was a Chicago attorney notable for her work defending oppressed minority groups. Hart was the first woman in Chicago to be appointed Public Defender in the Morals Court.
Born: April 7, 1890, Traverse City, Michigan, United States
Died: March 22, 1975, United States of America
Education: John Marshall Law School
Lived: 2821 N Pine Grove Ave, Chicago, IL 60657, USA (41.93357, -87.64111)
Find A Grave Memorial# 101046635
Partner: Valerie Taylor (1963–1975)

School: The John Marshall Law School (315 S Plymouth Ct, Chicago, IL 60604) is a law school in Chicago, Illinois, that was founded in 1899 and accredited by the American Bar Association in 1951. The school was named for the influential XIX-century U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall. Pearl M. Hart (1890–1975), Chicago attorney notable for her work defending oppressed minority groups, was the first woman in Chicago to be appointed Public Defender in the Morals Court. Most notably, she represented children, women, immigrants, lesbians, and gay men, often without fee or for a nominal fee. She attended the John Marshall Law School and was admitted to the Illinois State Bar in 1914.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1532901909
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House: Pearl Hart, lawyer, social justice advocate, and long-time gay-rights activist lived in the Lakeview neighborhood. Pearl Hart was a founding member and board member of the National Lawyers Guild, the Committee to Defend the Foreign-Born, and the Portes Cancer Preservation Clinic.

Address: 2821 N Pine Grove Ave, Chicago, IL 60657, USA (41.93357, -87.64111)
LGBTQ-friendly Bookstore: Unabridged Books (3251 North Broadway, Chicago, IL 60657)

Life
Who: Pearl Minnie Harchovsky (April 7, 1890 - March 22, 1975) aka Pearl M. Hart and Valerie Taylor (September 7, 1913 – October 22, 1997)
Pearl M. Hart was an ardent defender of gay rights, appearing on behalf of many victims of entrapment and harassment, often without fee or for minimal fee. She worked for anti-entrapment laws and the right to privacy. She was involved in the founding and work of the present Mattachine Society as well as its predecessor and focused on the Chicago Police Department and its historic entrapment of gays. Valerie Taylor was an American author of books published in the lesbian pulp fiction genre, as well as poetry and novels after the "golden age" of lesbian pulp fiction. She was born Velma Nacella Young and also published as Nacella Young, Francine Davenport, and Velma Tate. Her publishers included Naiad Press, Banned Books, Universal, Gold Medal Books, Womanpress, Ace and Midwood-Tower. In 1965 she met Pearl Hart, another founder of Mattachine Midwest. They were together until 1975 when Hart died. Taylor lived in an apartment at 540 W Surf St, Chicago, IL 60657, around the corner from Hart, the heart of the" gay ghetto" of Chicago at that time, but close to Hart. Not being an immediate family member, Taylor was not allowed to visit Hart in the hospital as she was dying and missed being able to tell her goodbye. She had to appeal to a friend of Hart's but by the time she was able to see her, Hart was in a coma. When Pearl Hart died in February, 1975, Taylor moved to 3356 N Claremont Ave, Chicago, IL 60618, but soon after she moved again to Margaretville, New York, in October 1975 to be near friends Hank and Ada Mayer's Catskills farm. In 1979, she moved again to Tucson, initially at the guest house of La Casa Nuestra (2433 N Dodge Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85716), a private lesbian club, but then, in 1980, to 3751 E Grant Rd, Tucson, AZ 85716, where she lived until hospitalized after a fall on October 10, 1997. She died on October 22, 1997, in a Tucson hospice.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Nona Lovell Brooks, described as a "prophet of modern mystical Christianity", was a leader in the New Thought movement and a founder of the Church of Divine Science.
Born: March 22, 1861, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
Died: March 14, 1945, Denver, Colorado, United States
Lived: First Church of Divine Science, 1400 N Williams St, Denver, CO 80218, USA (39.73874, -104.96557)
645 Lafayette Street, Denver
Buried: Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Denver County, Colorado, USA, Plot: Blk 2
Find A Grave Memorial# 33130165
Books: Short Lessons in Divine Science, In the Light of Healing: Sermons by Nona L. Brooks, Mysteries

Church: The First Church of Divine Science in Denver is located at the northeast corner of 14th Avenue and Williams Street, just north of Cheesman Park. Now known as the Althea Center for Engaged Spirituality, the church and its Denver congregants were important in the development of Divine Science.

Address: 1400 N Williams St, Denver, CO 80218, USA (39.73874, -104.96557)
Phone: +1 303-322-7738
Website: www.altheacenter.org

Place
Founded in 1885 in San Francisco by Malinda Cramer, the Church of Divine Science moved its headquarters to Denver after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Cramer first visited Colorado in 1887 to lecture on Divine Science and found an attentive audience in Denver, particularly in the Brooks sisters of Pueblo. By 1898, Cramer’s followers founded the Colorado College of Divine Science, and a year later they founded the First Church of Divine Science in Denver. From what I have read, Divine Science has similarities to Christian Science, but more information about the faith can be found here. The First Church of Divine Science building was constructed in 1922 to accommodate the growing congregation in Denver. The church has a circular colonnade at the corner entrance, which is flanked by two wings, both with a series of columns supporting a decorative frieze. Large windows between the columns allow light into the sanctuary and offices. The church was designed by Denver society architect, Jules Jacques Benois Benedict, often known as J.J.B. Benedict. Benedict was a talented architect who also had a reputation for being moody and difficult to work with despite his creative genius. He designed numerous residences for Denver’s elite, including the (demolished) Belmar mansion for May Bonfils Berryman. He also designed commercial buildings and several structures for Denver’s city and mountain parks. According to the National Register nomination for Benedict’s completed buildings, the First Church of Divine Science was Benedict’s first church commission. The main body of the church is buff-colored stucco textured with small pebbles. This is ornamented by beautiful buff and pale-blue glazed terra cotta at the rounded colonnade and on the flanking wings. The National Register nomination refers to a 1923 article in Architectural Record noting that the congregation requested classical ornament rather than more overtly religious symbolism.

Life
Who: Nona Lovell Brooks (March 22, 1861 – March 14, 1945)
Nona L. Brooks, described as a "prophet of modern mystical Christianity", was a leader in the New Thought movement and a founder of the Church of Divine Science. Brooks was born in Louisville, Kentucky, the youngest daughter of Chauncey and Lavinia Brooks. At a fairly early age, her family moved just outside Charleston, West Virginia, where Brooks graduated from the Charleston Female Academy. Due to the collapse of her father's salt mining business, the family moved again, this time to Pueblo, Colorado where he entered the metal mining business. He died shortly after the move, when Brooks was 19. In 1890, with the aim of becoming a teacher, Brooks enrolled at Pueblo Normal School, which was followed by a one-year stay at Wellesley College. In 1887, encouraged by her sister, Althea Brooks Small, Nona Brooks attended classes taught by Kate Bingham, proponent of the New Thought philosophy. While attending these classes, Brooks "found herself healed of a persistent throat infection" and shortly thereafter Brooks and Small began to heal others. In December 1898, Brooks was ordained by Malinda Cramer as a minister in the Church of Divine Science and founded the Denver Divine Science College. Shortly thereafter, she inaugurated the Divine Science Church of Denver, holding its initial service on January 1, 1899 at the Plymouth Hotel in Denver, in the process becoming the first woman pastor in Denver. In 1902, Brooks founded Fulfillment, a Divine Science periodical. During this period, she also served on several Denver civic boards, including the Colorado State Prison Board. After World War I Brooks succeeded her sister Fannie James as head of the college and in 1922 Brooks aligned the growing Church of Divine Science with the International New Thought Alliance. In the early 1930s she moved to Australia, where she established several Divine Science organizations, returning to Chicago in 1935 and then back to Denver in 1938. Nona was described by many who knew her as warm, gentle, and "motherly", but with "a strength that came from conviction". She lived at 645 N Lafayette St, Denver, CO 80218, and is buried at Fairmount Cemetery (430 S Quebec St, Denver, CO 80247, USA).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Jean-Baptiste Lully was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. He is considered a master of the French baroque style.
Born: November 28, 1632, Florence
Died: March 22, 1687, Paris, France
Spouse: Madeleine Lambert (m. 1662–1687)
Buried: Basilica of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, Paris, France
Find A Grave Memorial# 87133521
Children: Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, Jean-Louis Lully
Employer: Paris Opera Ballet

School: The Paris Opera Ballet (Place de l'Opéra, 75009) is the oldest national ballet company. Together with the Moscow Bolshoi Ballet and the London Royal Ballet it is regarded as one of the three most preeminent ballet companies in the world. The Paris Opera Ballet has always been an integral part of the Paris Opera, which was founded in 1669 as the Académie d'Opéra (Academy of Opera), although theatrical dance did not become an important component of the Paris Opera until 1673, after it was renamed the Académie Royale de Musique (Royal Academy of Music) and placed under the leadership of Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687). The Paris Opera Ballet had its origins in the earlier dance institutions, traditions and practices of the court of Louis XIV. Of particular importance were the series of comédies-ballets created by Molière with, among others, the choreographers and composers Pierre Beauchamps and Jean-Baptiste Lully. In 1929, Jacques Rouché invited 24-year-old dancer Serge Lifar (1905-1986) to take over the directorship of the Paris Opéra Ballet, which had fallen into decline in the late XIX century. As ballet master from 1930 to 1944, and from 1947 to 1958, he devoted himself to the restoration of the technical level of the Opéra Ballet, returning it to its place as one of the best companies in the world. Lifar gave the company a new strength and purpose, initiating the rebirth of ballet in France, and began to create the first of many ballets for that company. During his three decades as director of the Paris Opéra Ballet, Lifar led the company through the turbulent times of World War II and the German occupation of France. Lifar brought the Paris Opéra Ballet to America and performed to full houses at the New York City Center. Audiences were enthusiastic and had great admiration for the company of dancers. In 1983, Rudolf Nureyev was appointed director of the Paris Opera Ballet, where, as well as directing, he continued to dance and to promote younger dancers. The top female ballet dancer at that time, if not of all times was Sylvie Guillem who was nominated principal dancer at the age of 19 by Rudolf Nureyev in 1984. They were a mythical dance couple. The years of Nureyev marked a golden era of the Paris Opera Ballet.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Church: Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632–1687) was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. After Queen Marie-Thérèse's death in 1683 and the king's secret marriage to Mme de Maintenon, devotion came to the fore at court. The king's enthusiasm for opera dissipated; he was revolted by Lully's dissolute life and homosexual encounters. Lully died from gangrene, having struck his foot with his long conducting staff during a performance of his “Te Deum” to celebrate Louis XIV's recovery from surgery. He refused to have his leg amputated so he could still dance. This resulted in gangrene propagating through his body and ultimately infecting the greater part of his brain, causing his death. He died in Paris and was buried in the church of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires (Place des Petits Pères, 75002), where his tomb with its marble bust can still be seen. All three of his sons (Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, and Jean-Louis Lully) had musical careers as successive surintendants of the King's Music.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Ilana Sheryl Kloss is a former professional tennis player, tennis coach, and the current commissioner of World TeamTennis, a position that she has held since 2001.
Born: March 22, 1956, Johannesburg, South Africa
Turned pro: 1973
Partner: Billie Jean King

Ilana Sheryl Kloss (born 22 March 1956) is a former professional tennis player and the commissioner of World Team Tennis. Kloss is the partner of Billie Jean King, the US tennis player. She currently resides near the Museum of Natural History in New York City. Kloss is the daughter of Ruth and Shlaim Kloss. She has a sister, Yvette Merle Blackman (née Kloss), now married to Richard Blackman with two children, Lara and Joshua Blackman. Kloss was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. Before turning professional, in 1972 she won the Wimbledon juniors singles title. In 1974 she won U.S. Open juniors singles title, and was the youngest player ever to be ranked No. 1 in South Africa. Kloss was ranked No. 1 in the world in doubles in 1976. That year, she won doubles titles at the U.S. Open, the Italian Open, the U.S. Clay Courts, the German Open, the British Hard Courts Championship, and Hilton Head, as well as the mixed doubles title at the French Open. She was ranked as high as No. 19 in the world in singles play in 1976. In 1977 she won both the German and Canadian championships, and the British clay court championship. In 1973, she won the title in Cincinnati with Pat Walkden, defeating Evonne Goolagong and Janet Young in the final. Most of her women's doubles titles were achieved with partner Linky Boshoff. After retiring, Kloss took part in the 35-and-over tour, winning the U.S. Open doubles and mixed doubles championship in 1999. In the 1970s she was 12–5 in Federation Cup matches. Kloss, who is Jewish, was inducted into the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 2006. She also played in the Maccabiah Games in Israel. Since 2001 she has been the Chief Executive Officer & Commissioner of World Team Tennis, a coed professional tennis league.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilana_Kloss
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Fredrick Newton Arvin was an American literary critic and academic. He achieved national recognition for his studies of individual nineteenth-century American authors.
Born: August 23, 1900, Valparaiso, Indiana, United States
Died: March 21, 1963, Northampton, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Harvard Univeristy
Buried: Old City Cemetery, Valparaiso, Porter County, Indiana, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 19602976
Employer: Smith College
Books: Longfellow: his life and work, Herman Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman
Awards: National Book Award for Nonfiction, Guggenheim Fellowship for Humanities, US & Canada

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Marshall Kirk (1957-2005) was valedictorian of his high school class and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980, majoring in psychology, and writing his honors thesis on the testing of gifted children. In 1987 Kirk partnered with Hunter Madsen (writing under the pen-name "Erastes Pill") to write an essay, "The Overhauling of Straight America." The pair developed their argument in the 1989 book "After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ’90s." The book outlined a public relations strategy for the LGBT movement.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Agnes Morgan (1879-1976) attended Radcliffe College and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1901 and her Master of Arts in 1903. In 1904 she attended George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop at Harvard University.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Harry Elkins Widener (1885-1912) was the son of George and Eleanor Widener. He lived in Elkins Park, PA. Harry studied at Hill School, a private establishment in Pottstown, PA; graduating in 1903 he left to study at Harvard (graduated 1907). Harry was a noted collector of rare books, included in his collection was a Shakespeare Folio and a Gutenberg Bible. Harry developed his bibliophilic interests while in college, when he did research among early books with coloured plates illustrating costumes for a Hasty Pudding Theatrical. In the spring of 1912, he went to England to buy books (including the second edition of Bacon's Essais, 1598) and it was while returning from this visit that he lost his life along with many of the books purchased. Harry boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg with his father and mother, George Widener's valet Edwin Keeping and Mrs Widener's maid Emily Geiger. The Widener's occupied cabins C-80-82. On the night of April 14th Harry and his parents threw a party in honour of Captain Smith which was attended by some of the most wealthy passengers on board the Titanic. Later that night Harry helped his mother into boat 4 and then stood back to await his fate, at one point he was joined by William Ernest Carter who advised him to try for a boat but Harry "I'll think I'll stick to the big ship, Billy, and take a chance." A story, never confirmed by Mrs Widener, romanticizes the death of her son. He was about to step into a lifeboat that would have saved his life when he remembered a newly acquired and unique copy of Bacon's Essais and ran back to get it. After his death the librarians turned to Mrs Widener for a donation in memory of her bibliophile son. His mother gave $2,000,000 for the construction of the building that would also house her son's collection and in 1915 the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library was dedicated. Horace Trumbauer (hon. A.M. 1915) of Philadelphia designed the library building. Harvard still pays for fresh flowers to be placed under a portrait of Widener in the chapel.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Yaddo, Saratoga Springs (12866)

School: Yaddo was founded by Spencer and Katrina Trask as an artist colony on their estate in Saratoga Springs. LGBTQ artists and writers, including Patricia Highsmigh, Langston Hughes, Aaron Copland, and Truman Capote spent time as artists in residence at Yaddo.

Address: 312 Union Ave, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866, USA (43.06926, -73.758)
Phone: +1 518-584-0746
Website: www.yaddo.org
National Register of Historic Places: 13000282, 2013

Place
Yaddo is an artists' community located on a 400-acre (1.6 km²) estate in Saratoga Springs, New York. Its mission is "to nurture the creative process by providing an opportunity for artists to work without interruption in a supportive environment." It offers residencies to artists working in choreography, film, literature, musical composition, painting, performance art, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and video. Collectively, artists who have worked at Yaddo have won 66 Pulitzer Prizes, 27 MacArthur Fellowships, 61 National Book Awards, 24 National Book Critics Circle Awards, 108 Rome Prizes, 49 Whiting Writers' Awards, a Nobel Prize (Saul Bellow, who won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction and Nobel Prize in Literature in 1976), and countless other honors. Yaddo is included in the Union Avenue Historic District. Entering its second century, Yaddo accepts contributions to its endowment and underwriting for specific projects to ensure that the artists' community will always be a place of inspiration. During the Centennial Gift Campaign, Yaddo received large contributions from Spencer Trask & Company and Kevin Kimberlin, the firm's current chairman. Novelist Patricia Highsmith bequeathed her entire estate, valued at $3 million, to the community.

Notable queer Alumni at Yaddo:
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) became a trustee in 1939, where he was also a frequent writer in residence. There in the summer of 1946 he met and began a two-year affair with the young Truman Capote. Newton addressed him as "Precious Spooky" in amorous letters that went on to discuss literary matters.
• James Baldwin (1924-1987)
• Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990)
• Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979)
• Truman Capote (1924-1984) was accepted in the spring of 1946. He later endorsed Patricia Highsmith as a Yaddo candidate, and she wrote “Strangers on a Train” while she was there.
• John Cheever (1912-1982) wrote to Elizabeth Ames, the director of Yaddo, in 1933: "The idea of leaving the city," he said, "has never been so distant or desirable." Ames denied his first application but offered him a place the following year. Cheever spent the summer of 1934 at Yaddo, which would serve as a second home for much of his life.
• Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
• Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) met writer Marc Brandel (the son of J.D. Beresford) during her stay in 1948 and entered into a short-lived relationship with him.
• Langston Hughes (1902-1967)
• Ned Rorem (born 1923)
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989)
• Colm Tóibín (born 1955)

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: Smith College is a private, independent women's liberal arts college with coed graduate and certificate programs, located in Northampton, Massachusetts. It is the largest member of the Seven Sisters. In its 2017 edition, U.S. News & World Report ranked it tied for 12th among the best National Liberal Arts Colleges.

Address: Northampton, MA 01063, USA (42.31809, -72.63723)
Phone: +1 413-584-2700
Website: www.smith.edu
Gay Village: Northampton (Hampshire County, MA 01060)

Place
Smith is also a member of the Five Colleges consortium, which allows its students to attend classes at four other Pioneer Valley institutions: Mount Holyoke College, Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The college was chartered in 1871-1891 by a bequest of Sophia Smith and opened its doors in 1875 with 14 students and six faculty. When she inherited a fortune from her father at age 65, Smith decided that leaving her inheritance to found a women's college was the best way for her to fulfill the moral obligation she expressed in her will: "I hereby make the following provisions for the establishment and maintenance of an Institution for the higher education of young women, with the design to furnish for my own sex means and facilities for education equal to those which are afforded now in our colleges to young men." The Documenting Lesbian Lives Oral History Project is a collection of life histories of women who identify as lesbian, bisexual, woman-identified-woman, queer, or who prefer not to identify with sexuality categories. The project provides a complex and nuanced collective story of American lesbian history and experience. Interviews were conducted by Smith College students in Kelly Anderson's “Documenting Lesbian Lives” course in the spring of 2010 to the present. Students were trained in both United States lesbian history and oral history techniques and protocols. Narrators include grassroots activists and political organizers, educators and academics; musicians, writers, and artists; as well as community and religious leaders. They come from a variety of class, ethnic, racial, social, and geographic backgrounds. Interviews cover childhood and growing up experiences; education and employment; activism and politics; family, identity, relationships, and community.

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Smith College:
• Alice Morgan Wright (1881-1975), a graduate of Smith College, she continued her studies in New York City. Prohibited from attending life studies at the Art Students League of New York, Wright watched local boxing and wrestling competitions in order to study the human form.
• Edith J. Goode (1881–1970), Alice Morgan Wright’s long-time companion, attended Smith College, graduating in 1904.
• Edward "Ned" Spofford (1931-2014) continued teaching literature after his termination as professor from Smith College at Stanford University. His publications include “The Social Poetry of the Georgics.”
• Elisabeth Irwin (1880–1942) attended the Packer Collegiate Institute and received her A.B. from Smith College in 1903, and her M.A. from Columbia University in 1923. She was a member of the feminist intellectual club Heterodoxy.
• Elizabeth McCausland (1899–1965) was born in Wichita, Kansas in 1899, grew up in a middle-class environment, and graduated from Smith College in 1920.
• Newton Arvin (1900–1963) joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist. He taught at Smith College for 38 years and was Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of English during the year before his retirement in 1961. He rarely left Northampton for long nor travelled far. He visited Europe only once in the summer of 1929 or 1930. He spent a year's leave of absence in the mid-1920s as the editor of “Living Age,” a weekly compendium of articles from British and American periodicals. In 1960, the office of the United States Postmaster General (then Arthur Ellsworth Summerfield) initiated a campaign against the distribution and possession of lewd materials, including soft-core homosexually-themed pictures. At the same time, local officials in Northampton were engaged in an anti-homosexual crusade. On September 2, officers of the Massachusetts State Police arrested Arvin on pornography-related charges. The police charged Arvin with "being a lewd person" and charged both him and a Smith faculty colleague, Edward Spofford, with "possession of obscene photographs." Police said Arvin led them to Spofford and that both implicated other male faculty members. Arvin, they said, admitted "displaying the photographs at his apartment and swapping them with others." Further reports specified that the pictures were of males, later revealed as issues of Grecian Guild Pictorial and Trim: Young America’s Favorite Physique Publication containing pictures of semi-nude men. Smith College suspended Arvin from teaching, but kept him on half salary until retirement age. In 2002, Smith College established the "Newton Arvin Prize in American Studies," a student award.
• Oskar Seidlin (1911–1984) was briefly employed by the emigres Thomas Mann and Erika Mann as an amanuensis before obtaining a lecturership in German language and literature at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, in 1939, and advancing to an assistant professorship in 1941. Between 1942 and 1946, he was granted an extended wartime leave from his teaching position at Smith to serve with the "Ritchie Boys" (Military Intelligence Service).
• Raymond Joel Dorius (1919–2006) left the United States after the scandal at Smith College and worked as a professor at the University of Hamburg in Germany. In 1964 he returned to the United States and taught as a professor at San Francisco State University. He died of bone marrow cancer at his home in San Francisco, California, in 2006.
• Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954) attended private secondary schools in Boston, and was graduated from the Boston Girl's Latin School in 1880. Scudder then entered Smith College, where she received her BA degree in 1884. She received the degree of LHD from Smith College in 1922.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Cemetery: Newton Arvin (1900–1963) was an American literary critic and academic. He achieved national recognition for his studies of individual XIX-century American authors. After teaching at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts for 38 years, he was forced into retirement in 1960 after pleading guilty to charges stemming from the possession of pictures of semi-nude males that the law deemed pornographic. Arvin was also one of the first lovers of the author Truman Capote. Arvin was born in Valparaiso, Indiana. He died of pancreatic cancer in Northampton on March 21, 1963 and is buried at Union Street Cemetery, Valparaiso, IN 46383. Truman Capote established in his will the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism to be awarded "in honor of the critic Newton Arvin." It has been awarded annually since 1994 by the University of Iowa. It is said to be the largest annual cash prize for literary criticism in the English language.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Nancy Brooker Spain was a prominent English broadcaster and journalist. She was a columnist for the Daily Express, She magazine, and the News of the World in the 1950s and 1960s.
Born: September 13, 1917, Jesmond, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Died: March 21, 1964, Aintree, United Kingdom
Education: Roedean School
Lived: 35 Carlyle Square, SW3
7 Clareville Grove, SW7
Buried: Holy Trinity Church, Horsley, Northumberland Unitary Authority, Northumberland, England, Plot: Cremated remains
Find A Grave Memorial# 109735781
Parents: Norah Smiles
Partner: Joan Werner Laurie
Battles and wars: World War II
Books: Poison for Teacher: A New Entertainment, more


House: Nancy Spain (1917-1964), journalist, novelist, and television personality, shared a home with publisher Joan (Jonnie) Werner Laurie at 35 Carlyle Square, Chelsea, London SW3 6HA, from 1951 to 1953, and 7 Clareville Grove, Kensington, London SW7 5AU, from 1953 to 1955.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Cemetery: Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.

Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NL, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)

Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.

Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Leslie Poles Hartley (1895–1972), known as L. P. Hartley, was a British novelist and short story writer. Until his death in 1972, Hartley lived alone but for a household of servants, in London, Salisbury and at a home on the Avon, near Bath. Between the wars, Venice was a favoured and frequent destination.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello 6th March 1951 ‘Till you are home once more’.” He has also a memorial inside the St. Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD)
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on 2 July 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noël Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.

Cremated here but ashes taken elsewhere:
• Sir Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), 1st Earl of Bewdley, K.G., P.C. was the leading Conservative politician between the two world wars and was Prime Minister for three terms (1923-4, 1924-29 and 1935-37). Ashes removed to Worcester Cathedral.
• Roger Fry (1866-1934), English artist and critic, a member of the Bloomsbury group. He had an affair with Vanessa Bell, and when she left him, he was heartbroken. Only in 1924 he found happiness with Helen Anrep, a former wife of the Russian-born mosaicist, Boris Anrep. His ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, in a casket decorated by Vanessa Bell.
• In his later years Lord Ronald Gower had been a crusader for cremation, and after his death on March 9, 1916 his body was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were interred at Rusthall, Kent, on 14 March 1916.
• John Inman (1935-2007), actor, star of “Are You Being Served?,” location of ashes unknown.
• Joan Werner Laurie (1920–1964) was an English book and magazine editor. She met journalist and broadcaster Nancy Spain (1917-1964) in 1950 and they became life partners. Joan and Nancy lived openly together with their sons, and later the couple provided a home to Windmill Theatre owner and rally driver Sheila van Damm. She was learning to fly when she died, with Nancy Spain and four others, when the Piper Apache aeroplane crashed near Aintree racecourse on the way to the 1964 Grand National. She was cremated with Spain at Golders Green Crematorium, London. Nancy Spain is buried with her father at Holy Trinity (A68 four miles north of Otterburn, Horsley, Northumberland, NE19 1RU). The relationship between Werner Laurie and Spain is described in Rose Collis' biography of Nancy Spain, published in 1997.
• Charles Ricketts (1866-1931) was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were to be scattered to the four winds in Richmond Park.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period.
Born: March 21, 1839, Toropets, Russia
Died: March 28, 1881, Saint Petersburg, Russia
Buried: Alexander Nevsky Monastery, Saint Petersburg, Saint Petersburg Federal City, Russia
Find A Grave Memorial# 1513
Nationality: Russian
Movies: Boris Godunov
Libretti: Boris Godunov, Khovanshchina, The Fair at Sorochyntsi, Salammbô, Zhenitba

Modest Mussorgsky was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music. Mussorgsky is best known today for his popular piano composition Pictures at an Exhibition: the Russian composer drew inspiration for the piece from an exhibit of watercolors by his friend, artist Victor Hartmann. When Hartmann died in 1874, the grief-stricken Mussorgsky exclaimed, "What a terrible blow! Why should a dog, a horse, a rat live on - and creatures like Hartmann die!" The composition is best known through an orchestral arrangement by Maurice Ravel. Viktor Hartmann was a Russian architect and painter. He was associated with the Abramtsevo Colony, purchased and preserved beginning of 1870 by Savva Mamontov, and the Russian Revival. Vladimir Stasov had introduced him to the circle of Mily Balakirev in 1870 and he had been a close friend of the composer Modest Mussorgsky.

They met in 1870 and remained friends until Hartmann’s death in 1873: 3 years.
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (March 21, 1839 – March 28, 1881)
Viktor Alexandrovich Hartmann (May 5, 1834 - August 4, 1873)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Church: Saint Alexander Nevsky Monastery (1-y pr-d, Sankt-Peterburg, Russia, 196642) was founded by Peter I of Russia in 1710 at the eastern end of the Nevsky Prospekt in Saint Petersburg supposing that that was the site of the Neva Battle in 1240 when Alexander Nevsky, a prince, defeated the Swedes; however, the battle actually took place about 12 miles (19 km) away from that site. The monastery grounds contain two baroque churches, designed by father and son Trezzini and built from 1717–1722 and 1742–1750, respectively; a majestic Neoclassical cathedral, built in 1778–1790 to a design by Ivan Starov and consecrated to the Holy Trinity; and numerous structures of lesser importance. It also contains the Lazarev and Tikhvin Cemeteries. Notable queer burials: Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881) and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave CBE was an British stage and film actor, director, manager and author.
Born: March 20, 1908, Bristol, United Kingdom
Died: March 21, 1985, Denham, United Kingdom
Education: University of Cambridge
Clifton College
Lived: Bedford House, Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London W4 2PJ, UK
3 Hans Crescent, SW1X
Buried: St Paul Churchyard, Covent Garden, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 6942760
Height: 1.9 m
Spouse: Rachel Kempson (m. 1935–1985)
Grandchildren: Natasha Richardson, Joely Richardson, more

Sir Michael Redgrave was an English stage and film actor, director, manager and author. During the filming of Fritz Lang's Secret Beyond the Door (1948), Redgrave met Bob Mitchell. They became lovers, Mitchell set up house close to the Redgraves, and he became a surrogate "uncle" to Redgrave's children (then aged 11, 9 and 5), who adored him. Mitchell later had children of his own, including a son he named Michael. Fred Sadoff, an actor/director who became Redgrave’s assistant and shared his lodgings in New York and London, followed Mitchell. A card was found among Redgrave's effects after his death. The card was signed "Tommy, Liverpool, January 1940", and on it were the words (quoted from W.H. Auden): "The world is love. Surely one fearless kiss would cure the million fevers". Rachel Kempson recounted that, when she proposed to him, Redgrave said that there were "difficulties to do with his nature, and that he felt he ought not to marry". She said that she understood, it did not matter and that she loved him. To this, Redgrave replied, "Very well. If you're sure, we will".

Together from 1948 to 1956: 8 years.
Bob Mitchell
Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave, CBE (March 20, 1908 – March 21, 1985)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Fred Sadoff was an American film, stage and television actor. In 1956, he became personal assistant to Michael Redgrave who starred in and directed a production of The Sleeping Prince. Lynn Redgrave said years later in a filmed documentary: "Bob Mitchell and Fred Sadoff were brought in as part of the family, but we didn't know just how much family they really were." There seems to be only one extant written reference to Fred by a Redgrave - when Rachel, writing to Michael, described Fred "tout court" as "your lover." "Some people thought he used my father," Corin said, "and in a way he did. But I think he got no more from their relationship than he gave. Though he could never replace Bob in my father's life, he gave a great deal, [and he was] indomitably cheerful, funny and loyal after a fashion.” Eventually returning to the United States, Sadoff found success as an actor in The Poseidon Adventure in 1972 when he was cast as Linarcos, the company representative who ordered Captain Harrison (Leslie Nielsen) full ahead. He also acted in other films, including Papillon and The Terminal Man in 1974. Fred Sadoff died of AIDS on May 6, 1994 in his home in Los Angeles, California at age 67.

Together from 1956 to (before) 1972: 16 years.
Fred Sadoff (October 21, 1926 — May 6, 1994)
Sir Michael Redgrave (March 20, 1908 - March 21, 1985)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Clifton College (32 College Rd, Bristol, City of Bristol BS8 3JH) is a co-educational independent school in the suburb of Clifton in the port city of Bristol in South West England, founded in 1862. In its early years it was notable (compared with most Public Schools of the time) for emphasising science rather than classics in the curriculum, and for being less concerned with social elitism, e.g. by admitting day-boys on equal terms and providing a dedicated boarding house for Jewish boys. Having linked its General Studies classes with Badminton School since 1972, it admitted girls to the Sixth Form in 1987 and is now fully coeducational. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Horatio Brown (1854-1926), Robert Smythe Hichens (1864-1950), Roger Fry (1866-1934), L. P. Hartley (1895-1972), Michael Redgrave (1908-1985).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University or simply Cambridge, 4 Mill Ln, Cambridge CB2 1RZ) is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and given royal charter status by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university. The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford after a dispute with the townspeople. The two ancient universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge".

Notable queer alumni and faculty at University of Cambridge:
• Charles Robert Ashbee (1863–1942) was born in 1863 in Isleworth, the son of businessman and erotic bibliophile Henry Spencer Ashbee. His Jewish mother developed suffragette views, and his well-educated sisters were progressive as well. Ashbee went to Wellington College and read history at King's College, from 1883 to 1886, and studied under the architect George Frederick Bodley. His papers and journals are at King's College.
• Anthony Bacon (1558–1601) and Francis Bacon (1561-1626) enrolled in Trinity College in April 1573, where they lived in the household of the Master of Trinity College, John Whitgift.
• Philip Bainbridge (1891-1918), a graduate of Eton and Trinity College, was killed in action at the Battle of Épehy on September 18, 1918, six weeks before his friend Wilfred Owen.
• Thomas Baines (1622–1680) studied at Christ's College, under the tuition of Henry More, and took the degree of B.A. in 1642, and M.A. in 1649. An accident brought him under the notice of John Finch, then at the same college, and from this time they became inseparable friends.
• William John Bankes (1786–1855) was educated at Westminster School and continued his studies at Trinity College, where he received his BA in 1808 and his MA in 1811. Lord Byron, a fellow student at Trinity College, became Bankes' lifelong friend.
• Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) attended Harrow School, and then, despite having little or no interest in academia, moved on to St John's College, and studied history, art and architecture. Beaton continued his photography, and through his university contacts managed to get a portrait depicting the Duchess of Malfi published in Vogue. It was actually George "Dadie" Rylands – "a slightly out-of-focus snapshot of him as Webster's Duchess of Malfi standing in the sub-aqueous light outside the men's lavatory of the ADC Theatre at Cambridge." Beaton left Cambridge without a degree in 1925.
• A.C. Benson (1862-1925) was educated at Temple Grove School, Eton, and King's College. From 1885 to 1903 he taught at Eton, returning to Cambridge to lecture in English literature for Magdalene College. From 1915 to 1925, he was the 28th Master of Magdalene. From 1906, he was a governor of Gresham's School. He is buried at the Ascension Burial Ground (Cambridge CB3 0EA). His cousin James Bethune-Baker is also buried there.
• Anthony Blunt (1907-1983) won a scholarship in mathematics to Trinity College. At that time, scholars in Cambridge University could not earn a degree in less than three years, and hence Blunt spent four years at Trinity and switched to Modern Languages, eventually graduating in 1930 with a first class degree. He taught French at Cambridge and became a Fellow of Trinity College in 1932. Like Guy Burgess, Blunt was known to be homosexual, which was a criminal activity at that time in Britain. Both were members of the Cambridge Apostles (also known as the Conversazione Society), a clandestine Cambridge discussion group of 12 undergraduates, mostly from Trinity and King's Colleges who considered themselves to be the brightest minds in the university. Many were homosexual and Marxist at that time. Amongst other members, also later accused of being part of the Cambridge spy ring, were the American Michael Whitney Straight and Victor Rothschild who later worked for MI5. Rothschild gave Blunt £100 to purchase “Eliezar and Rebecca” by Nicolas Poussin. The painting was sold by Blunt's executors in 1985 for £100,000 and is now in the Fitzwilliam Museum.
• Philip Brett (1937-2002) received his academic degrees from King's College. He was a distinguished professor of musicology, accomplished keyboard player, author and authority on music of the Elizabethan period. He spent his entire teaching career in the University of California system: at Berkeley from 1966 to 1991, at Riverside from 1991 to 2001, and at UCLA for one year. From 1976 onward, Philip produced a steady series of influential articles and books exploring the implications of gay and lesbian sexuality in music. Some of these works included, “Queering the Pitch: The New Gay and Lesbian Musicology” (1994), “Cruising the Performative: Interventions into the Representation of Ethnicity, Nationality, and Sexuality” (1995), and “Decomposition: Post-Disciplinary Performance” (2000). In appreciation of his extraordinary achievement as scholar, teacher and organizer, the Gay and Lesbian Study Group of the American Musicology Society, created the Philip Brett Award in 1996. They give the award each year to honor exceptional musicological work in the field of GLBT studies. For his specialization of early music he received the Noah Greenberg Award in 1980 and a Grammy nomination in 1991. He died of cancer just one day shy of his 65th birthday. He is survived by his registered domestic/life partner of 28 years, Professor George Haggerty, Chair of the Department of English at University of California, Riverside. Professor Brett is buried at St Faith’s Crematorium (75 Manor Rd, Horsham St Faith, Norwich NR10 3LF), Plot: Memorial Garden at Horsham.
• Reginald Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher (1852-1930), known as Regy, was the son of William Baliol Brett, 1st Viscount Esher and Eugénie Mayer. Born in London, Esher remembered sitting on the lap of an old man who had played violin for Marie Antoinette, and was educated at Eton and Trinity College. At Cambridge, Brett was profoundly influenced by William Harcourt the radical lawyer, politician and Professor of International Law. Harcourt controlled Brett's rooms, and lifestyle at Cambridge. Brett was admitted to the Society of Apostles, dedicated to emergent philosophies of European atheism; their number included the aristocratic literati of liberalism Frank, Gerald and Eustace Balfour, Frederick and Arthur Myers, Hallam and Lionel Tennyson, Edmund Gurney, S H and J G Butcher.
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), while travelling in Europe, prepared a thesis, entitled "John Webster and the Elizabethan Drama", which won him a scholarship to King's College, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles, was elected as President of the Cambridge University Fabian Society, helped found the Marlowe Society drama club and acted in plays including the Cambridge Greek Play. Brooke made friends among the Bloomsbury group of writers, some of whom admired his talent while others were more impressed by his good looks. Virginia Woolf boasted to Vita Sackville-West of once going skinny-dipping with Brooke in a moonlit pool when they were in Cambridge together.
• Oscar Browning (1837-1923) was educated at King's College, where he became fellow and tutor, graduating fourth in the classical tripos of 1860, and where he was inducted into the exclusive Cambridge Apostles, a debating society for the Cambridge elite. After being a master at Eton College for 15 years until he was dismissed in 1857, Browning returned to King's College, where he took up a life fellowship and achieved a reputation as a wit, becoming universally known as "O.B.". He travelled to India at George Curzon's invitation after the latter had become Viceroy. In 1876 he resumed residence at Cambridge, where he became university lecturer in history. He soon became a prominent figure in college and university life, encouraging especially the study of political science and modern political history, the extension of university teaching and the movement for the training of teachers. Browning served as principal of the Cambridge University Day Training College (1891–1909), treasurer of the Cambridge Union Society (1881–1902), founding treasurer of the Cambridge University Liberal Club (1885–1908), and president of the Cambridge Footlights (1890–1895).
• Guy Burgess (1911-1963) attended Trinity College. He joined the conservative Pitt Club but was also recruited into the Cambridge Apostles, a secret, elite debating society at the University, whose members at the time were largely Marxist and included Anthony Blunt. Burgess, together with Blunt, Maclean and Philby, was recruited by the Comintern.
• Samuel Butler (1835-1902) went up to St John's College in 1854, where he obtained a first in Classics in 1858. Tthe graduate society of St John's is named the Samuel Butler Room (SBR) in his honour.
• George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (1788–1824) went up to Trinity College, where he met and formed a close friendship with the younger John Edleston. About his "protégé" he wrote, "He has been my almost constant associate since October, 1805, when I entered Trinity College. His voice first attracted my attention, his countenance fixed it, and his manners attached me to him for ever." In his memory Byron composed “Thyrza,” a series of elegies. Edleston gave Byron a ring which Byron was wearing when he died. In later years he described the affair as "a violent, though pure love and passion". Also while at Cambridge he formed lifelong friendships with men such as John Cam Hobhouse and Francis Hodgson, a Fellow at King's College, with whom he corresponded on literary and other matters until the end of his life.
• Edward Carpenter (1844-1929)’s academic ability appeared relatively late in his youth, but was sufficient enough to earn him a place at Trinity Hall. Whilst there he began to explore his feelings for men. One of the most notable examples of this is his close friendship with Edward Anthony Beck (later Master of Trinity Hall), which, according to Carpenter, had "a touch of romance". Beck eventually ended their friendship, causing Carpenter great emotional heartache. Carpenter graduated as 10th Wrangler in 1868.
• Graham Chapman (1941-1989) began to study medicine at Emmanuel College in 1959. He joined the Cambridge Footlights, where he first began writing with John Cleese. Following graduation, Chapman joined the Footlights show "Cambridge Circus" and toured New Zealand, deferring his medical studies for a year. After the tour, he continued his studies at St Bartholomew's Medical College, but became torn between whether to pursue a career in medicine or acting. His brother John later said, "He wasn't ever driven to go into medicine ... it wasn't his life's ambition."
• Ralph Chubb (1892-1960) was born in Harpenden, Hertfordshire. His family moved to the historic town of St Albans before his first birthday. Chubb attended St Albans School and Selwyn College before becoming an officer in the WWI. He served with distinction but developed neurasthenia, and he was invalided out in 1918.
• William Johnson Cory (1823-1892) studied at King's College, where he gained the chancellor's medal for an English poem on Plato in 1843, and the Craven Scholarship in 1844.
• Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) began a three-year course at Trinity College, in October, 1895 where he was entered for the Moral Science Tripos studying philosophy. With approval from his personal tutor, he changed to English literature, which was not then part of the curriculum offered. Crowley spent much of his time at university engaged in his pastimes, becoming president of the chess club and practising the game for two hours a day; he briefly considered a professional career as a chess player. Crowley also embraced his love of literature and poetry, particularly the works of Richard Francis Burton and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Many of his own poems appeared in student publications such as The Granta, Cambridge Magazine, and Cantab. At Cambridge, Crowley maintained a vigorous sex life, largely with female prostitutes, from one of whom he caught syphilis, but eventually he took part in same-sex activities, despite their illegality. In October, 1897, Crowley met Herbert Charles Pollitt, president of the Cambridge University Footlights Dramatic Club, and the two entered into a relationship. They broke apart because Pollitt did not share Crowley's increasing interest in Western esotericism, a breakup that Crowley would regret for many years. In Julym 1898, he left Cambridge, not having taken any degree at all despite a "first class" showing in his 1897 exams and consistent "second class honours" results before that.
• Edward Joseph Dent (1876–1957) was educated at Eton and King's College, where he sat the Classical Tripos in 1898. He was elected a Fellow of the college in March 1902 having distinguished himself in music both as researcher and a composer. Dent was Professor of Music at Cambridge University from 1926 to 1941.
• A.E. “Tony” Dyson (1928–2002) was a British literary critic, university lecturer, educational activist and gay rights campaigner. Educated at Pembroke College, his academic career began in 1955 when he was appointed Assistant Lecturer in English Literature at the University of North Wales, Bangor. From there, he went to the University of East Anglia where he was later appointed Reader. He took early retirement in the 1980s. Dyson single-handedly took the initiative in forming the Homosexual Law Reform Society (HLRS) in May 1958.
• John Finch (1626–1682) studied with Henry More at Christ's College, and there met his lifelong companion Sir Thomas Baines. Sir John Finch died of pleurisy in Florence, Italy in 1682, is buried in Christ's College and commemorated with Baines, who had died in Constantinople, with an elaborate monument. Their portraits by Florentine artist Carlo Dolci hang in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.
• Ronald Firbank (1886-1926) was an innovative British novelist. His eight short novels, partly inspired by the London aesthetes of the 1890s, especially Oscar Wilde, consist largely of dialogue, with references to religion, social-climbing, and sexuality. At the age of ten Firbank went briefly to Uppingham School (September, 1900 to April, 1901) and then on to Trinity Hall. His rooms were the most aesthetic and elegant in the college. In 1909 he left Cambridge without taking a degree.
• John Fletcher (1579–1625) appeared to have entered Corpus Christi College, in 1591, at the age of eleven. It is not certain that he took a degree, but evidence suggests that he was preparing for a career in the church. Little is known about his time at college, but he evidently followed the same path previously trodden by the University wits before him, from Cambridge to the burgeoning commercial theatre of London.
• Dr Charles Edward Foister FRSE (1903-1989) was a British botanist and plant pathologist. He was Director of Scottish Agricultural Scientific Services in Edinburgh from 1957. He was born in Cambridge, the son of Frederick W Foister and his wife Esther Elizabeth Smith. He was educated locally and won a place at Cambridge University graduating BA in 1925. He continued as a postgraduate taking a Diploma in Agricultural Science (1927). He later received a doctorate (PhD) from Edinburgh University. He never married and was presumed homosexual.
• E.M. Forster (1879–1970)
• Roger Fry (1866-1934) was educated at Clifton College and King's College, where he was a member of the Cambridge Apostles. In 1933, he was appointed the Slade Professor at Cambridge, a position that Fry had much desired. Fry died very unexpectedly after a fall at his home in London. His death caused great sorrow among the members of the Bloomsbury Group, who loved him for his generosity and warmth. Vanessa Bell decorated his casket before his ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel in Cambridge.
• Stephen Fry (born 1957) secured a place at Queens' College. At Cambridge, Fry joined the Cambridge Footlights, appeared on University Challenge, and read for a degree in English literature, graduating with upper second-class honours. Fry also met his future comedy collaborator Hugh Laurie at Cambridge and starred alongside him in the Footlights Club.
• Geoffrey Gorer (1905–1985) was educated at Charterhouse and at Jesus College.
• John Gostlin (c. 1566–1626)
• Ronald Gower (1845-1916) was educated at Eton and at Trinity College.
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771) went up to Peterhouse in 1734. Gray began seriously writing poems in 1742, mainly after his close friend Richard West died. He moved to Cambridge and began a self-imposed programme of literary study, becoming one of the most learned men of his time, though he claimed to be lazy by inclination. Gray was a brilliant bookworm, a quiet, abstracted, dreaming scholar, often afraid of the shadows of his own fame. He became a Fellow first of Peterhouse, and later of Pembroke College. Gray moved to Pembroke after the students at Peterhouse played a prank on him. Gray spent most of his life as a scholar in Cambridge, and only later in his life did he begin traveling again.
• Fulke Greville (1554-1628) enrolled at Jesus College, in 1568.
• Antony Grey (1927-2010), after attending Norwood College in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, and Millfield School in Somerset, read history at Magdalene College.
• Thom Gunn (1929-2004) attended University College School in Hampstead, London, then spent two years in the British national service and six months in Paris. Later, he studied English literature at Trinity College, graduated in 1953, and published his first collection of verse, “Fighting Terms,” the following year. Among several critics who praised the work, John Press wrote, "This is one of the few volumes of postwar verse that all serious readers of poetry need to possess and to study." He met his future lifelong live-in American lover Mike Kitay in Cambridge in 1952, and followed him to America in 1954 and to San Francisco a few years later. The domestic arrangements were hardly disturbed when Bill Schuessler, a friend of Thom’s, fell in love with Mike, moved in with them, and stayed 35 years. In 2004, he died of acute polysubstance abuse, including methamphetamine, at his home in the Haight Ashbury neighbourhood in San Francisco, where he had lived since 1960.
• G.H. Hardy (1877–1947) was awarded a scholarship to Winchester College for his mathematical work. In 1896 he entered Trinity College. After only two years of preparation under his coach, Robert Alfred Herman, Hardy was fourth in the Mathematics Tripos examination. Years later, he sought to abolish the Tripos system, as he felt that it was becoming more an end in itself than a means to an end. While at university, Hardy joined the Cambridge Apostles, an elite, intellectual secret society. In 1919 he left Cambridge to take the Savilian Chair of Geometry (and thus become a Fellow of New College) at Oxford in the aftermath of the Bertrand Russell affair during WWI. Hardy spent the academic year 1928–1929 at Princeton in an academic exchange with Oswald Veblen, who spent the year at Oxford. Hardy gave the Josiah Willards Gibbs lecture for 1928. Hardy left Oxford and returned to Cambridge in 1931, where he was Sadleirian Professor until 1942. Hardy is a major character in David Leavitt's fictive biography, “The Indian Clerk” (2007), which depicts his Cambridge years and his relationship with John Edensor Littlewood and Ramanujan.
• Walter Burton Harris (1866-1933) was educated at Harrow School and (briefly) at Cambridge University and had already managed to travel around the world by the age of 18.
• Gerald Heard (1889-1971) found respite from bullying he endured at Sherborne School when he matriculated at Gonville and Caius College, in 1908, where he graduated with a Second-Class B.A. in History in 1911. Heard entered university expecting to become a clergyman like his grandfather, father, and eldest brother Alexander, but changed his mind along the way. He studied history under the Caius medievalist Z.N. Brooke (1883–1946), who used a “scientific” or critical approach to sources, and he later described himself as having a “German-Cambridge mind,” though he also regarded himself as an academic failure. Heard acquired an Idealist outlook, and sought to integrate history, religion, and the social, physical, and biological sciences. This Idealism came at least in part from Heard’s politics tutor, the Platonist Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862–1932), who viewed the scientific spirit as threatening. Dickinson’s Platonism embodied the intellectual and social atmosphere of Edwardian Cambridge with its mysticism and its high esteem for “passionate friendship between men.”
• Norman Hartnell (1901-1979), educated at Mill Hill School, became an undergraduate of Magdalene College and read Modern Languages.
• Arthur Hobhouse (1886-1965) was educated at Eton College, St Andrews University and Trinity College, where he graduated in Natural Sciences. At Cambridge, he was a Cambridge Apostle and a member of the Cambridge University Liberal Club, becoming Secretary in 1906 and was also the lover of John Maynard Keynes and Duncan Grant.
• A.E. Housman (1859-1936) took the Kennedy Professorship of Latin at Trinity College in 1911, and remained for the rest of his life.
• Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986) deliberately failed his tripos and left Corpus Christi College without a degree in 1925.
• George Cecil Ives (1867-1950) was educated at home and at Magdalene College, where he started to amass 45 volumes of scrapbooks (between 1892 and 1949). These scrapbooks consist of clippings on topics such as murders, punishments, freaks, theories of crime and punishment, transvestism, psychology of gender, homosexuality, cricket scores, and letters he wrote to newspapers. His interest in cricket led him to play a single first-class cricket match for the Marylebone Cricket Club in 1902.
• Henry Festing Jones (1851-1928), English lawyer, author and composer. After graduating from Cambridge with a B.A. in 1873, he was articled to a solicitor, and qualified fully in 1876. On January 10, 1876, he made the acquaintance of Samuel Butler through another Cambridge man, and thereafter their friendship became close.
• John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) left Eton for King's College in 1902, after receiving a scholarship to read mathematics. Alfred Marshall begged Keynes to become an economist, although Keynes's own inclinations drew him towards philosophy – especially the ethical system of G. E. Moore. Keynes joined the Pitt Club and was an active member of the semi-secretive Cambridge Apostles society, a debating club largely reserved for the brightest students. Like many members, Keynes retained a bond to the club after graduating and continued to attend occasional meetings throughout his life. Before leaving Cambridge, Keynes became the President of the Cambridge Union Society and Cambridge University Liberal Club.
• Thomas Legge (1535–1607)
• John Lehmann (1907-1987) studied history and modern languages at Trinity College. There his close friendship with Julian Bell, nephew of Virginia Woolf, plunged him into the Bloomsbury circle. By 1931 he was working at the Hogarth Press, owned by Woolf and her husband, Leonard. Hogarth Press published his first volume of poems, “A Garden Revisited” (1931).
• Amy Levy (1861-1889) was sent to Brighton and Hove High School in 1876 and later studied at Newnham College. Levy was the first Jewish student at Newnham when she arrived in 1879 but left before her final year without taking her exams. She was a British essayist, poet, and novelist best remembered for her literary gifts; her experience as the first Jewish woman at Cambridge University and as a pioneering woman student at Newnham College; her feminist positions; her friendships with others living what came later to be called a "new woman" life, some of whom were lesbians; and her relationships with both women and men in literary and politically activist circles in London during the 1880s.
• Christopher Lloyd (1921–2006) attended King's College, where he read modern languages before entering the Army during WWII.
• Donald Maclean (1913-1983) won a place at Trinity Hall, arriving in 1931 to read modern languages. Even before the end of his first year he began to throw off parental restraints and engage openly in communist agitprop. He also played rugby for his college through the winter of 1932-33. Eventually his ambitions would lead to him joining the Communist Party. In his final years Maclean had become a campus figure with most knowing he was a communist. In the winter of 1933-34 he wrote a book review for Cambridge Left, to which other leading communists contributed, such as John Cornford, Charles Madge and the Irish scientist, J.D. Bernal. In 1934 he became the editor of the Silver Crescent, the Trinity Hall students' magazine. In his last year, 1934, he became an agent of the NKVD, being recruited by Theodore "Teddy" Maly. He graduated with a First in Modern Languages and slowly abandoned his earlier ideas of teaching English in the Soviet Union. After spending a year preparing for the Civil Service Examinations, Maclean passed with first class honors.
• George Mallory (1886-1924) entered Magdalene College in October 1905, to study history. There he became good friends with members of the future Bloomsbury Group including James Strachey, Lytton Strachey, Rupert Brooke, John Maynard Keynes, and Duncan Grant, who took several portraits of Mallory. Mallory was a keen oarsman, rowing for his college while at Cambridge. In 1923, he took a job as lecturer with the Cambridge University Extramural Studies Department. He was given temporary leave so that he could join the 1924 Everest attempt.
• Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) attended The King's School in Canterbury and Corpus Christi College, where he studied on a scholarship and received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1584. Marlowe is often alleged to have been a government spy (Park Honan's 2005 biography even had "Spy" in its title). The author Charles Nicholl speculates this was the case and suggests that Marlowe's recruitment took place when he was at Cambridge.
• Edward Marsh (1872-1953) was educated at Westminster School, London, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied classics under Arthur Woollgar Verrall. He was a Cambridge Apostle.
• Ian McKellen (born 1939) won a scholarship to St Catharine's College when he was 18 years old, where he read English literature. While at Cambridge McKellen was a member of the Marlowe Society, appearing in “Henry IV” (as Shallow) alongside Trevor Nunn and Derek Jacobi (March 1959), “Cymbeline” (as Posthumus, opposite Margaret Drabble as Imogen) and “Doctor Faustus.” McKellen was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Letters by Cambridge University on June 18, 2014.
• Louis Mountbatten (1900-1979) attended Christ's College for two terms, starting in October 1919, where he studied engineering in a programme that was specially designed for ex-servicemen. He was elected for a term to the Standing Committee of the Cambridge Union Society, and was suspected of sympathy for the Labour Party, then emerging as a potential party of government for the first time.
• Isaac Newton (1642–1727) was a fellow of Trinity College and the second Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He was a devout but unorthodox Christian, and, unusually for a member of the Cambridge faculty of the day, he refused to take holy orders in the Church of England, perhaps because he privately rejected the doctrine of the Trinity.
• Brian Paddick, Baron Paddick (born 1958) went on to take a Master of Business Administration (MBA) at Warwick Business School, University of Warwick (1989–1990) on police scholarships and a postgraduate Diploma in Policing and Applied Criminology at Fitzwilliam College.
• Frances Partridge (1900–2004) was educated at Bedales School and Newnham College.
• Kim Philby (1912-1988) won a scholarship to Trinity College, where he read History and Economics. He graduated in 1933 with a 2:1 degree in Economics. Upon Philby's graduation, Maurice Dobb, a fellow of King's College, and tutor in Economics, introduced him to the World Federation for the Relief of the Victims of German Fascism in Paris. The organization was one of several fronts operated by German Communist Willi Münzenberg, a member of the Reichstag who had fled to France in 1933.
• Herbert Pollitt (1871-1942) studied at Trinity College, from 1889, graduating with a BA in 1892 and a MA in 1896. He failed to qualify as a doctor.
• Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887–1920) departed from Madras aboard the S.S. Nevasa on 17 March 1914.[82] When he disembarked in London on 14 April, E.H. Neville was waiting for him with a car. Four days later, Neville took him to his house on Chesterton Road in Cambridge. Ramanujan immediately began his work with Littlewood and Hardy. After six weeks, Ramanujan moved out of Neville's house and took up residence on Whewell's Court, a five-minute walk from G.H. Hardy's room.
• Michael Redgrave (1908-1985) studied at Clifton College and Magdalene College.
• Robbie Ross (1869–1918) was accepted at King's College in 1888, where he became a victim of bullying, probably because of his sexuality, which he made no secret of, and perhaps also his outspoken journalism in the university paper. Ross caught pneumonia after a dunking in a fountain by a number of students who had, according to Ross, the full support of a professor, Arthur Augustus Tilley. After recovering, he fought for an apology from his fellow students, which he received, but he also sought the dismissal of Tilley. The college refused to punish Tilley and Ross dropped out. Soon after that, he chose to "come out" to his family. Ross found work as a journalist and critic, but he did not escape scandal. He is believed to have become Oscar Wilde's first male lover in 1886, even before he went to Cambridge.
• Victor Rothschild, 3rd Baron Rothschild (1910-1990) read Physiology, French and English at Trinity College. While at Cambridge Rothschild was said to have a playboy lifestyle, enjoying waterskiing in Monaco, driving fast cars, collecting art and rare books and playing first-class cricket for the University and Northamptonshire. Rothschild joined the Cambridge Apostles, a secret intellectual society at the University. The society was essentially a discussion group. Meetings were held once a week, traditionally on Saturday evenings, during which one member gave a prepared talk on a topic, which was later thrown open for discussion. The society was at that time predominantly Marxist, though Rothschild stated that he "was mildly left-wing but never a Marxist". He became friends with Guy Burgess, Anthony Blunt and Kim Philby; later exposed as members of the Cambridge Spy Ring.
• George “Dadie” Rylands (1902–1999) was a British literary scholar and theatre director. Educated at Eton College and King's College, he was a Fellow of King's from 1927 until his death. As well as being one of the world's leading Shakespeare scholars, he was actively involved in the theatre. He directed and acted in many productions for the Marlowe Society, and was Chairman of the Cambridge Arts Theatre from 1946 to 1982. Rylands' 1939 Shakespeare anthology “Ages of Man” was the basis of John Gielgud's one-man show of the same title. Though Rylands specialised in directing university productions at Cambridge, he also directed Gielgud in professional productions of “The Duchess of Malfi” and “Hamlet” in London in 1945. Parodying a popular song, Maurice Bowra described the situation of many King’s men as being that of “Yes, sir, that’s my Dadie. I’m your Dadie now.” Rylands became a friend for life. Two years before his death, Bowra received a letter from Rylands “This is really a farewell in case I am stabbed during the Rio carnival, and to say I love you very much, and shall be for ever and ever grateful for all you have done to educate me."
• George Santayana (1863-1952) studied at King's College from 1896 to 1897.
• Siegfried Sassoon (1886–1967) was educated at the New Beacon School, Sevenoaks, Kent; at Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wiltshire (where he was a member of Cotton House), and at Clare College, where from 1905 to 1907 he read history. He went down from Cambridge without a degree and spent the next few years hunting, playing cricket and writing verse: some he published privately.
• Michael Schofield (1919-2014) obtained a degree in Psychology at Cambridge University, spent the war years as a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force, and then studied at Harvard Business School. During this time, he identified as homosexual and decided to make an original study of the social aspects of homosexuality.
• Sir John Tresidder Sheppard, MBE (1881–1968) was an eminent classicist and the first non-Etonian to become the Provost of King's College. John Sheppard was educated at Dulwich College. He went up to King's College, where he studied Classics and won the Porson Prize. He was a lecturer in classics at King's College from 1908–1933 and was provost from 1933–1954. During WWII he performed intelligence work, for which he was appointed MBE; he was knighted in 1950 for his services to Greek. During his long career he translated many famous Greek classics, and published several books on the subject. He was openly homosexual.
• Francis Skinner (1912–1941) was a friend, collaborator, and lover of the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. While studying mathematics at Cambridge in 1930, Skinner fell under Wittgenstein's influence and "became utterly, uncritically, and almost obsessively devoted to Wittgenstein.". Their relationship was characterized by Skinner's eagerness to please Wittgenstein and conform to his opinions. In 1934, the two made plans to emigrate to the Soviet Union and become manual labourers, but Wittgenstein visited the country briefly and realised the plan was not feasible - the Soviet Union might have allowed Wittgenstein to immigrate as a teacher, but not as a manual labourer. Skinner graduated with a degree in Mathematics from Cambridge in 1933 and was awarded a postgraduate fellowship. For three years he used his fellowship assisting Wittgenstein in preparing a book on philosophy and mathematics (never published). During the academic year 1934-5 Wittgenstein dictated to Skinner and Alice Ambrose the text of the Brown Book. However, Wittgenstein's hostility towards academia resulted in Skinner's withdrawal from university, first to become a gardener, and later a mechanic (much to the dismay of Skinner's family). In the late 1930s though, Wittgenstein grew increasingly distant, until Skinner's death from polio in 1941.
• Walter John Herbert Sprott, known to friends as ‘Sebastian’ Sprott, and also known as Jack Sprott (1897–1971), was a British psychologist and writer. He was educated at Felsted School and Clare College, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles. He was romantically involved with the economist John Maynard Keynes, who was at the time also seeing the ballerina Lydia Lopokova. Sprott's affair with Keynes ended after Keynes married Lopokova. After a job as a demonstrator at the Psychological Laboratory in Cambridge, he moved to the University of Nottingham, where he eventually became professor of philosophy.
• Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) was educated at St Joseph's Salesian School, Burwash, East Sussex, and then at the Catholic school, Ratcliffe College, Leicester. Afterwards he was for six months enrolled at the English College, Rome, a seminary for the Roman Catholic priesthood but found he had no vocation. He remained a lifelong Catholic, however. He then read law at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. As an undergraduate, he lived at St Edmund's House (now St Edmund's College) and served as President of the Cambridge Union in 1950. He graduated with first class honours and won the Whitlock Prize. He was Master of Emmanuel College from 1991 to 1996.
• Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh (1769-1822) attended St. John's College (1786–87), where he applied himself with greater diligence than expected from an aristocrat and obtained first class in his last examinations. He left Cambridge due to an extended illness, and after returning to Ireland did not pursue further formal education.
• Victor Stiebel (1907-1976) arrived in Britain in 1924 to study architecture at Jesus College.
• Mervyn Stockwood (1913-1995) was the Anglican Bishop of Southwark from 1959 to 1980. He was educated at The Downs School and Kelly College; in 1931 he entered Christ's College, and graduated in 1934. Having studied for the Anglican ministry at Westcott House theological college in Cambridge, he was ordained deacon in 1936, priest in 1937. In 1955 he was appointed Vicar of Great St Mary's, Cambridge where his preaching drew large congregations of undergraduates, gaining him a national reputation. In 1959, at the suggestion of Geoffrey Fisher, Harold Macmillan appointed Stockwood to the diocese of Southwark. He was liberal in his view of the morality of homosexual relationships, favoured homosexual law reform, and included homosexual couples among the guests at his dinner parties. On at least one occasion he blessed a homosexual relationship, but Stockwood himself was celibate.
• Alix Strachey (1892–1973) was educated in England at Bedales School, the Slade School of Fine Art, and Newnham College, where she read modern languages. In 1915 she moved in with her brother in his flat in Bloomsbury and became a member of the Bloomsbury Group, where she met James Strachey, then the assistant editor of The Spectator. They moved in together in 1919 and married in 1920. Soon afterwards they moved to Vienna, where James, an admirer of Freud, began a psychoanalysis with him.
• James Strachey (1887–1967) was educated at Hillbrow preparatory school in Rugby and at Trinity College, where he took over the rooms used by his older brother Lytton Strachey, and was known as "the Little Strachey"; Lytton was now "the Great Strachey". At Cambridge, Strachey fell deeply in love with the poet Rupert Brooke, who did not return his affections. He was himself pursued by mountaineer George Mallory—conceding to his sexual advances—by Harry Norton, and by economist John Maynard Keynes, with whom he also had an affair. His love of Brooke was a constant, however, until the latter's death in 1915, which left Strachey "shattered".
• Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) was admitted as a Pensioner at Trinity College, on September 30, 1899. He became an Exhibitioner in 1900 and a Scholar in 1902. He won the Chancellor's Medal for English Verse in 1902 and was given a B.A. degree after he had won a second class in the History Tripos in June 1903. He did not, however, take leave of Trinity, but remained until October 1905, to work on a thesis that he hoped would gain him a Fellowship. Strachey's years at Cambridge were happy and productive. Among the freshmen at Trinity there were three with whom Strachey soon became closely associated: Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf and Saxon Sydney-Turner. With another undergraduate, A. J. Robertson, these students formed a group called the Midnight Society, which, in the opinion of Clive Bell, was the source of the Bloomsbury Group. Other close friends at Cambridge were Thoby Stephen and his sisters Vanessa and Virginia Stephen. Strachey also belonged to the Conversazione Society, the Cambridge Apostles to which Tennyson, Hallam, Maurice, and Sterling had once belonged. Strachey also became acquainted with other men who greatly influenced him, including G. Lowes Dickinson, John Maynard Keynes, Walter Lamb (brother of the painter Henry Lamb), George Mallory, Bertrand Russell and G. E. Moore.
• Michael Whitney Straight (1916–2004) became a Communist Party member while a student at the University of Cambridge in the mid-1930s, and a part of an intellectual secret society known as the Cambridge Apostles. Straight worked for the Soviet Union as part of a spy ring whose members included Donald Maclean, Guy Burgess, Kim Philby and KGB recruiter Anthony Blunt, who had briefly been Straight's lover. A document from Soviet archives of a report that Blunt made in 1943 to the KGB states, "As you already know the actual recruits whom I took were Michael Straight".
• Howard Sturgis (1855-1920) was born in London to a rich and well-connected New England merchant family. Russell Sturgis, Howard’s father, was a partner at Barings Bank in London, where he and his wife, Julia, were noted figures in society, entertaining such guests as Henry Adams, William Makepeace Thackeray, and Henry James, who became an intimate friend and mentor to Howard. Sturgis was a delicate child, closely attached to his mother, and fond of such girlish hobbies as needlepoint and knitting, which he continued to practice throughout his life. He attended Eton and Cambridge, and, after the death of his parents, purchased a house in the country, Queen’s Acre, called Qu’acre, where Howdie (as Sturgis was known to his intimates) and his presumed lover William Haynes-Smith (called “the Babe”) frequently and happily entertained a wide circle of friends, among them James and Edith Wharton.
• Alan Turing (1912-1954) studied as an undergraduate from 1931 to 1934 at King's College, whence he gained first-class honours in mathematics. In 1935, at the age of 22, he was elected a fellow of King's. The computer room at King's College, Alan Turing's alma mater, is called the Turing Room.
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592–1628). During his short tenure as Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, he had initiated the purchase of Thomas van Erpe's collection of oriental books and manuscripts on its behalf, although his widow only transferred it to Cambridge University Library after his death. With it came the first book in Chinese to be added to the Library's collections.
• Horace Walpole (1717-1797) received early education in Bexley. He was also educated at Eton College and King's College. At Cambridge Walpole came under the influence of Conyers Middleton, an unorthodox theologian. Walpole came to accept the sceptical nature of Middleton's attitude to some essential Christian doctrines for the rest of his life, including a hatred of superstition and bigotry. Walpole ceased to reside at Cambridge at the end of 1738 and left without taking a degree.
• Hugh Walpole (1884–1941) studied history at Emmanuel College from 1903 to 1906. While there he had his first work published, the critical essay "Two Meredithian Heroes", which was printed in the college magazine in autumn 1905. As an undergraduate he met and fell under the spell of A.C. Benson, formerly a greatly loved master at Eton, and by this time a don at Magdalene College. On graduation from Cambridge in 1906 he took a post as a lay missioner at the Mersey Mission to Seamen in Liverpool.
• Anthony Watson-Gandy (1919-1952) was the son of Major William Donald Paul Watson-Gandy and Annis Vere Gandy. He died at age 32, unmarried. He was educated at Westminster School, King's College and Sorbonne University. He fought in the WWII and gained the rank of Flying Officer in the service of the Royal Air Force.
• Patrick White (1912-1990) lived in England from 1932 to 1935, studying French and German literature at King's College. His homosexuality took a toll on his first term academic performance, in part because he developed a romantic attraction to a young man who had come to King's College to become an Anglican priest. White dared not speak of his feelings for fear of losing the friendship and, like many other gay men of that period, he feared that his sexuality would doom him to a lonely life. Then, one night, the student priest, after an awkward liaison with two women, admitted to White that women meant nothing to him sexually. That became White's first love affair. During White's time at Cambridge he published a collection of poetry entitled “The Ploughman and Other Poems,” and wrote a play named “Bread and Butter Women,” which was later performed by an amateur group (which included his sister Suzanne) at the tiny Bryant's Playhouse in Sydney.
• Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) moved to Cambridge in 1911, met Bertrand Russell, and became the Master’s most favored student. He was admitted as a member of Trinity College and elected, somewhat reluctantly, an Apostle. It amused Lytton Strachey to call him behind his back “Herr Sinckel-Winckel” and the “Witter-Gitter Man.” He taught at the University of Cambridge from 1929 to 1947. He had romantic relations with both men and women. He is generally believed to have fallen in love with at least three men: David Hume Pinsent in 1912, Francis Skinner in 1930, and Ben Richards in the late 1940s. He later revealed that, as a teenager in Vienna, he had had an affair with a woman. Additionally, in the 1920s Wittgenstein became infatuated with a young Swiss woman, Marguerite Respinger, modelling a sculpture of her and proposing marriage, albeit on condition that they did not have children. Ben Richards was at Wittgenstein’s bedside when he died. He is buried at the Ascension Burial Ground (Cambridge CB3 0EA), formerly the burial ground for the parish of St Giles and St Peter's. It includes the graves and memorials of many University of Cambridge academics and non-conformists of the XIX and early XX century. The cemetery encapsulates a century-and-a-half of the University's modern history, with 83 people with Oxford Dictionary of National Biography biographies.
• Christopher Wood (1900-1976) attended Cambridge but never graduated. He was the loved of Gerald Heard. Heard’s personal interest in psychology received encouragement from W.J.H. “Jack” Sprott, a lecturer in the subject at Nottingham University and a Cambridge friend of Christopher Wood’s. Sprott, also known as “Sebastian,” read and commented on most of his early manuscripts.
• Leonard Woolf (1880-1969) won a classical scholarship to Trinity College in 1899, where he was elected to the Cambridge Apostles. Other members included Lytton Strachey, John Maynard Keynes, GE Moore and EM Forster. Thoby Stephen, Virginia Stephen's brother, was friendly with the Apostles, though not a member himself. Woolf was awarded his BA in 1902, but stayed for another year to study for the Civil Service examinations.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Bedford House (Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London W4 2PJ) was built together with its neighbour, Eynham House, in the mid-XVII century as a single building by Edward Russell, second son of the 4th Earl of Bedford of Corney House. In 1665, it was bought by Thomas Plukenett, whose daughter, Grace, married her neighbour in Woodroffe House and subsequently inherited the whole group of properties up to Chiswick Lane. The building was given a Georgian style pediment and fenestration in the XVIII century and it may then have been divided into the two dwellings. By 1829, the tenant of Bedford House was the first John Sich, owner of the Lamb brewery. The 1901 the red-brick tower of this now defunct brewery can be seen standing at the top of Church Street. Members of the family lived on here until 1920, and in other houses such as Eynham House and Norfolk House along the Mall. Mabel Sich married Frederick William Tuke, whose family ran the mental asylum and lived in Thames View House. The Sich family were active members of the Chiswick community and benefactors of St Nicholas’ church, assisting with its rebuilding in the XIX century. Warwick Draper (barrister and “William Morris socialist”) lived here in the early 1920s, during which time he wrote his important history of Chiswick. Sadly, in 1926 he fell to his death from a balcony whilst inspecting a chimney fire. In 1928 the house was bought by the Canadian Sir Arthur Ellis, Physician to the London Hospital. He sold it in 1945 to the actor Sir Michael Redgrave (1908-1985), who lived here with his family until 1954, when Sir Arthur Ellis bought it back again.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: 3 Hans Crescent, SW1X 0LN, was a handsome brick building in the ornate style called Pont Street Dutch. The actor Michael Redgrave (1908-1985) lived on the third floor with his wife Rachel Kempson and teenage children Vanessa, Lynn, and Corin, from 1956 to 1977. The building faced the back entrance to Harrod’s Department Store.

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Church: St Paul's Church, also commonly known as the Actors' Church, is a church designed by Inigo Jones as part of a commission for the 4th Earl of Bedford in 1631 to create "houses and buildings fitt for the habitacons of Gentlemen and men of ability" in Covent Garden, London. As well as being the parish church of Covent Garden, the church gained its nickname by a long association with the theatre community.

Address: Covent Garden, Westminster, London WC2N 6ET, UK (51.51157, -0.12365)
Phone: +44 20 7836 5221
Website: www.actorschurch.org
English Heritage Building ID: 208625 (Grade I, 1958)

Place
St Paul's connection with the theatre began as early as 1663 with the establishment of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, and was further assured in 1723 with the opening of Covent Garden Theatre, now the Royal Opera House. On 9 May 1662, Samuel Pepys noted in his diary the first "Italian puppet play" under the portico — the first recorded performance of "Punch and Judy", a fact commemorated by the annual MayFayre service in May. The portico of St Paul's was the setting for the first scene of Shaw's “Pygmalion,” the play that was later adapted as “My Fair Lady.” Since 2007 St Paul's has been home to its own in-house professional theatre company, Iris Theatre, originally created to mount a production of T.S. Eliot’s “Murder in the Cathedral.” It gained full charitable status in October 2009.

Notable queer burials at St Paul Churchyard:
• Samuel Butler (1835-1902), iconoclastic Victorian-era English author who published a variety of works. Butler never married, and although he did for years make regular visits to a woman, Lucie Dumas, he also "had a predilection for intense male friendships, which is reflected in several of his works.”
• Robert Carr (1587-1645), 1st Earl of Somerset, Court favourite of James I until he was disgraced by his involvement of the poisoning of Sir Thomas Overbury.
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), memorial.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), memorial.
• Terence Rattigan (1911-1977), memorial.
• Sir Michael Redgrave (1908-1985), English stage and film actor, director, manager and author. Corin Redgrave helped his father in the writing of his last autobiography. During one of Corin's visits to his father, the latter said, "There is something I ought to tell you". Then, after a very long pause, "I am, to say the least of it, bisexual". During the filming of Fritz Lang's Secret “Beyond the Door” (1948), Redgrave met Bob Michell. They became lovers, Michell set up house close to the Redgraves, and he became a surrogate "uncle" to Redgrave's children (then aged 11, 9 and 5), who adored him. Michell later had children of his own, including a son he named Michael. Michell was followed by Fred Sadoff, an actor/director who became Redgrave's assistant and shared his lodgings in New York and London. A card was found among Redgrave's effects after his death. The card was signed "Tommy, Liverpool, January 1940", and on it were the words (quoted from W.H. Auden): "The word is love. Surely one fearless kiss would cure the million fevers".
• Dame Ellen Terry, GBE (1847-1928), English stage actress who became the leading Shakespearean actress in Britain. Her daughter, Edith Craig (1869-1947) was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England.

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Maurice Talvande, Count de Mauny Talvande, was a French-born naturalised British landscaper, furniture-maker, and self-inventor, who is best known as the owner and recreator of Taprobane Island, in Sri Lanka.
Born: 1866
Died: November 1941
Lived: Taprobane Island (81700)
Buried: St Mary's Burial Grounds, Jaffna, Northern, Sri Lanka
Find A Grave Memorial# 176273134

House: Count de Mauny of Talvande, whose actual name was Maurice Maria Talvande (1866-1941), was born in Le Mans. His father was Felix Talvande. He adopted the prefix of "Count de Mauny" from his mother, Mme Marguerite de Mauny Talvande, and the suffix of "Talvande" from his father, Felix Talvande, who was a bank manager in provincial France. His father died in 1901, in or near Nantes and his mother died in 1907 in Pontvallain. His mother, whose full name was, Margeurite Adelaide Louise Froger de Mauny was born in 1842. Her parents were Alexandre Jacques Eduard Froger de Mauny and Henriette Martin Lavallee. His father, Felix Talvande was born in 1832 and his parents married in Le mans on June 8, 1862. Maurice was born four years later in Le Mans where his father was then employed as a bank manager of the Le Mans branch of Banque de France until 1866. After 1868 Felix worked as a banker at Portet-Lavigierie et Talvande which became the Bank Talvande in 1882 until it and Talvande himself were made bankrupt in 1889. Marguerite applied for legal separation from Felix in 1890 and thereafter resided with her mother at Domaine du Bourg in 72510 Pontvallain, which had been in the possession and ownership of the de Mauny family since 1859. On the death of his mother, Maurice inherited Domaine du Bourg, the family home, which he then sold and shared the proceeds of 17000 francs with his brother Roger and sister Suzanne-Marie. Roger had a son named Albert Talvande.

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House: In 1952, Paul Bowles bought the tiny island of Taprobane, off the coast of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka.) There he wrote much of his novel “The Spider’s House,” returning to Tangier in the warmer months. He returned to Sri Lanka most winters.

Address: Weligama By Pass Rd, Weligama 81700, Sri Lanka (5.96775, 80.42573)

Place
Taprobane Island is a rocky private island with one villa, located just off the southern coast of Sri Lanka opposite the village of Weligama. The island was named after the old Greek word for Sri Lanka. The island was previously owned by (self-titled) Count Maurice Maria de Mauny Talvande who fell in love with Weligama Bay. It was he who had the villa built on this tiny island. The islet passed on to the American author and composer Paul Bowles and then the Sri Lankan born former UN Chief Prosecutor Sir Desmond Lorenz de Silva before it came to the ownership of the Australian businessman Geoffrey Dobbs. Notable people who stayed on Taprobane include Dutch author Peter ten Hoopen, who spent a month there in 1984 during civil unrest on the mainland, as well as Kylie Minogue, who composed a song about the island inspired by her stay titled "Taprobane (Extraordinary Day.”) It had inspired Jason Kouchak to compose "Dark Island" in his 1999 album Watercolours.

Life
Who: Maurice Talvande, Count de Mauny Talvande (March 21, 1866 – November 27, 1941)
Maurice Talvande attended St Mary's College at Hales Place in Canterbury, which was run by French Jesuit Priests, during the period 1883-1884. His brother Roger also attended St Mary's College and stayed on for a longer period from 1883-1888. Maurice, subsequently, went to Saint-Cyr Military College which was also influenced by the Jesuit Order. Despite the basic French environment that he was surrounded by, Maurice probably learned his English too while he was under their tutorship. His close friendship with George Byng, brother of Lady Mary, whom he first met at St Mary's College in Canterbury, may have given him the opportunity to meet Mary, in the first place, and then develop into a relationship that ended in marriage to her. After completing his education, it is reported that, he travelled widely in America for several years. He is reported to have sailed from Le Havre and arrived in New York, in the US, on November 19, 1894 on board the 9,000 ton SS La Touraine., being in transit to Boston, in a journey that lasted about seven days. Count Maurice Maria de Mauny Talvande married Lady Mary Elizabeth Agnes Bynge, daughter of the fourth Earl of Strafford, enry William John Byng, on June 24, 1898. The wedding was a great social occasion and attended by the Princess of Wales, Princess Christian and Prince and Princess Saxe-Weimer. His mother Mme de Mauny Talvande and brother Roger de Mauny Talvande also attended. His father, Felix Talvande, was not present. The bridegroom was 32 and the bride was 33 years old at the timeof their marriage. The newly wed De Mauny's settled down in 1898 at the famous Azay-le-Rideau castle, whose long and memorable history goes bact to the reign of Francois I in the XVI century. From Azay, Maurice and Mary moved to Cannes where their son Victor Alexander Christian henry George was born on April 19 1899. From here they moved briefly to San Remo and then returned to England. On their return from France in 1900 the de Mauny family moved to an old Queen Anne house called "Terrick House", near Ellesbrough in Buckimhamshire. A daughter, Alexandra Mary, was born here on July 19 1904. Maurice is reported to have written three books, "The Peace of Suffering 1914-1918", "Gardening in Ceylon", "The Gardens of Taprobane". Maurice was a great traveller. It is believed that he visited Ceylon for extended periods of a time a year or two after 1910. William Warren has suggested in "Tropical Asian Style", that de Mauny was first invited to Ceylon in 1912 by Sir Thomas Lipton, the tea magnate. Warren has conjectured that it was some “great personal disaster” that drove de Mauny to Ceylon. It is possible that both his diminishing financial status and also his many marital problems he was facing may have been the reasons for his move eastwards.de Mauny travelled several times between Hampshire and Ceylon soon after his bankruptcy problems. His skills as an expert gardener and furniture maker in Ceylon, and, later on Journalism, may have provided him with the necessary finances to supplekent his travel and living. There are accounts from people who knew him in Ceylon that he also used to receive remittances from overseas which probably could have beensent by his wife, Mary, from time to time for his upkeep and living. It is reported that he also ran a furniture factory and workshop in Colombo. A number of de Mauny furniture pieces have survived in the hands of private owners. They are now highly valued and cherished in Sri Lanka. He started the "Weligama Local Industrues" in 1925 which as he claimed gave employment to over 200 carpenters, carvers and inlayers. By 1930, the enterprise suffered at the hands of the Depression and had to be halted until better times. It was restarted in 1936. The craftsmanship was most admirable and the designs were very much French styles of that time. Ferguson's Ceylon Directory for 1920-21 shows that his address was “Ascot,” Albert Crescent, Cinnamon Gardens, Colombo 7, a very elite and high-society area of Colombo. His son, Victor, is also listed as living there. It was in September 1927 that he saw for the first time, and quite by chance, a place that was to become his final home. At the center of the arc of the Bay of Weligama, in the southern tip of Ceylon, “a red granite rock, covered with palms and jungle shrub, rising from the Indian Ocean - an emerald in a setting of pink corral” was where he finally chose to build andlive his eternal dream of peace and tranquility close to nature that he loved so much. He swam across the narrow straight and saw an admirable view as he reached the plateau of the rock. "There was nothing", he recalled some ten years later, "between me and the South Pole". Having located and identified his magical island, which was only a few acres in area, de Mauny then set upon the task of building it into his future home that he had been dreaming of for so many years. The foundation stone of the house was laid on February 1, 1927 and thus initiated the beginning of what was to become a famous and much visited site by many distinguished persons. The seeds of "The Gardens of Taprobane" had been planted. The island was named "Taprobane" based on the ancient name for Ceylon given by the Greeks and also because it suited its pear-shape outline more like a mini Ceylon itself. The local name, by tradition, for the sland was "Galduwa" meaning "Rock Islan" in Sinalese. It is conjectured that the island may have been a art of the mainland in ancient tmes as it is not shown in maps of the Portuguese Colonial era. The name Taprobane is also considered to have been originated from the sanskrit "Tamba Vanna" meaning "copper colored" as a reference to the many famous golden beaches of Ceylon. The house was built on a 135 feet square area with a broad terrace surrounding it. It was octagonal in shape spanninga surface of 25 by 25 yards. This gave the resident and eight faced view of the outsde world with the north side facing towards the mainland and the south facing Antarctica in the South Pole. The central hall was called the "Hall of Lotus" and was also octagonal in shape measuring 26 by 26 feet. A 30 foot high dome lined with eight panels of inlaid wood was located in the center of he hall. The panels were dyed with an opaque gold and blue color and bore designs of Lotus buds and flowers. The dome was supported by eight square pilars of Wedgewood-blue, 24 feet tall. On either side of these were two light columns, 12 feet tall, making sixteen in all, terracotta with gilded capitals. They supported a white stone traverse that connected the pillars in an arch that was 12 foot span. This was hung with curtains of soft blue silk with a deep brocaded border of art noveau design at the bottom colored black and gold on cream. The rooms converged on the hall through eight arches. A Sigiriya frescoe styled border ran along the stone white walls. The whole scheme was engulfed in a golden hue by light entering through Venetian blinds created out of amber colored glass. The furniture within was made by local craftsmen using some of the rarest woods of Ceylon. They were mainly of French style although here were any pieces that belonged to the Dutch designs too. A carpet of Maidenhair ferns and a light bronze creeper with clumps of Eucharist Lilies adorned the hall. From the north-east terrace here was a splendid view of the shoreline, the forest of coconut palms fringing the Bay of Weligama, and the copper colored sands clustered with boats on a pea-green sea. Through the entrances of iron gates, with their design of brass-headed peacocks with prussian blue eyes one could see he openness and vastness of the mighty Indian Ocean sprawling through time. The Count was residing at Weligama in 1931. His son, Victor Alexander, was then residing at "Boxmead", Turret Road (now renamed to Dharmapala Mawatha and running from Kollupitiya junction in Colombo 3 all the way down to Liptons Circus in Colombo 7, bounding one of the most prestigious residential areas of Colombo), Colombo 7. Victor was employed at the Rosehough Tea Company, first as an Assistant and then as an under-manager. It is also reported in the Fergusons Directory that he held the position of Second Lieutenant in the Royal Navy. he went on to become a Commander in the Royal Navy in WW II, wher he was awarded the DFC. He eventually went on to become the Chairman of Rosehough until he resigned in the early 1970's. Local records in Sri Lanka show that the island was actually purchased by de Mauny for a sum of Rs 250 in 1925 in the name of his son Victor Alexander. It remained in his ownership until it was sold by public auction, in 1942, for Rs 12,000. The Count encouraged people to visit is island. His historical visitors book was filled with names of Kings, Princes, Dukes, Duchesses, Aristocrats, Prime Ministers, and other famous personalities from across the blue marble. Count Maurice de Mauny Talvande died on November 27, 1941 while at the Chelvarayan Estate, Navatkuli, in the northern city of Jaffna in Ceylon. Hs remains were buried at St Mary's Burial Grounds in Jaffna. Maurice's son Victor passed away in 1978 and his daughter Alexandra died in 1989. They were both chidlless. De Mauny's island was a very famous destination for many notables from different nations. The island was sold by public auction in 1942 after having been neglected ad in a state of derelict for many years. In 1957 Paul Bowles wrote an article about finding and living on a tiny tropical island in the Indian Ocean – Taprobane – only one hundred yards off the coast of Weligama, near Galle, in southern Ceylon (now Sri Lanka.) He first became intrigued by Taprobane island in 1949 when he saw photographs of it during a stay at Wilton House, the magnificent ancestral home of his friend from Tangier, David Herbert. The Herbert family had stayed on the island in the mid-1930s. Bowles first visited Ceylon in 1950 and two years later, when Taprobane was put up for sale, he bought the island with some of the proceeds from his second book “The Delicate Prey and Other Stories.” Paul Bowles wrote the final chapters of “The Spider’s House” while living on Taprobane. Bowles sold the island n 1956 to the Irish writer Shaun Mandy. For several years, since 1964, the island was in the ownership of of the de Silva whose senior member was Desmond de Silva QC, the very distinguished British barristor. The island was then on a long lease to to the very successful Hong Kong business tycoon Geofrey Dobbs. It may be interesting to note that the wife of Desmond de Silva is Princess Katharina of Yugoslavia. The author Robin Maugham, who visited the Island as a young man, and in the mid-1970s, considered the unique beauty and harmony of the villa had become compromised after de Mauny's death by partitioning and the loss of his furniture and fittings, and that the area itself had been despoiled by the construction of a new road along the mainland beach. Since then, and particularly after the 2004 tsunami, significant development of the adjoining mainland village has occurred.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
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Lilyan Tashman was an American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress. Tashman was best known for her supporting roles as tongue-in-cheek villainesses and the vindictive "other woman."
Born: October 23, 1896, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: March 21, 1934, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: Lilowe, 718 North Linden Dr, Beverly Hills
Buried: Washington Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA, Plot: Palestine Lodge, 71, I.O.S.B. se
Find A Grave Memorial# 6343126
Spouse: Edmund Lowe (m. 1925–1934), Al Lee (m. 1914–1921)
Parents: Maurice Tashman, Rose Tashman
Siblings: Hattie Tashman, Jennie Tashman
Married: September 21, 1925

Lilyan Tashman was a Brooklyn-born Jewish American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress. Tashman was a lesbian and had numerous backstage same-sex liaisons as a New York City chorine and actress. From 1928 to 1932, she was Greta Garbo’s lover. However, Tashman was a fiercely jealous person and had frequent altercations with her lovers. By November 1932, Garbo's patience had worn thin and she ended the relationship, leaving Tashman devastated. In 1925, Tashman married openly gay actor and longtime friend Edmund Lowe, presumably to present a heterosexual façade to the world. The two became the darlings of Hollywood reporters and were touted in fan magazines as having "the ideal marriage". The couple entertained lavishly at "Lilowe", their Beverly Hills home, and weekly parties became full-blown orgies with A-list celebrities seeking invitations. Tashman died from cancer at Doctor's Hospital in New York City on March 21, 1934. Her last film, Frankie and Johnny, was released posthumously.

Together from 1925 to 1934: 9 years.
Edmund Dantes Lowe (March 3, 1890 – April 21, 1971)
Lilyan Tashman (October 23, 1896 – March 21, 1934)
Married: September 21, 1925

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: Lilyan Tashman (1896-1934) and Edmund Lowe (1890-1971) married on September 1, 1925. “We were two people who had reached the years of mental discretion,” she later wrote, “who knew exactly what we were doing with our lives and why.” The two quickly became one of the most popular and social active couples in filmdom. Lilyan and Edmund gave pool parties, beach parties, and cocktail parties that were famous for their chic and wit. Their ultra-modern, red-and-white Beverly Hills home, coyly dubbed “Lilowe” (718 North Linden Dr, Beverly Hills, CA 90210) became known to fan throughout the world via magazine layouts.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Cemetery: At Washington Cemetery (5400 Bay Pkwy, Brooklyn, NY 11230) is buried Lilyan Tashman (1896-1934), American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress. On September 21, 1925, Tashman, who was lesbian, married longtime friend Edmund Lowe, an actor, who was gay. The two became the darlings of Hollywood reporters and were touted in fan magazines as having "the ideal marriage". The couple entertained lavishly at "Lilowe", their Beverly Hills home, and weekly parties invitations. Tashman died of cancer at Doctor's Hospital in New York City on March 21, 1934 at the age of 37.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
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Joan Ann Werner Laurie was an English book and magazine editor.
Born: 1920
Died: 1964
Lived: 35 Carlyle Square, SW3
7 Clareville Grove, SW7
Buried: Golders Green Crematorium, Golders Green, London Borough of Barnet, Greater London, England (cremated)
Find A Grave Memorial# 173517450
Spouse: Paul Seyler
Parents: Thomas Werner Laurie
People also search for: Nancy Spain, Thomas Werner Laurie, Norah Smiles

Cemetery: Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.

Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NL, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)

Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.

Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Leslie Poles Hartley (1895–1972), known as L. P. Hartley, was a British novelist and short story writer. Until his death in 1972, Hartley lived alone but for a household of servants, in London, Salisbury and at a home on the Avon, near Bath. Between the wars, Venice was a favoured and frequent destination.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello 6th March 1951 ‘Till you are home once more’.” He has also a memorial inside the St. Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD)
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on 2 July 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noël Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.

Cremated here but ashes taken elsewhere:
• Sir Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), 1st Earl of Bewdley, K.G., P.C. was the leading Conservative politician between the two world wars and was Prime Minister for three terms (1923-4, 1924-29 and 1935-37). Ashes removed to Worcester Cathedral.
• Roger Fry (1866-1934), English artist and critic, a member of the Bloomsbury group. He had an affair with Vanessa Bell, and when she left him, he was heartbroken. Only in 1924 he found happiness with Helen Anrep, a former wife of the Russian-born mosaicist, Boris Anrep. His ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, in a casket decorated by Vanessa Bell.
• In his later years Lord Ronald Gower had been a crusader for cremation, and after his death on March 9, 1916 his body was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were interred at Rusthall, Kent, on 14 March 1916.
• John Inman (1935-2007), actor, star of “Are You Being Served?,” location of ashes unknown.
• Joan Werner Laurie (1920–1964) was an English book and magazine editor. She met journalist and broadcaster Nancy Spain (1917-1964) in 1950 and they became life partners. Joan and Nancy lived openly together with their sons, and later the couple provided a home to Windmill Theatre owner and rally driver Sheila van Damm. She was learning to fly when she died, with Nancy Spain and four others, when the Piper Apache aeroplane crashed near Aintree racecourse on the way to the 1964 Grand National. She was cremated with Spain at Golders Green Crematorium, London. Nancy Spain is buried with her father at Holy Trinity (A68 four miles north of Otterburn, Horsley, Northumberland, NE19 1RU). The relationship between Werner Laurie and Spain is described in Rose Collis' biography of Nancy Spain, published in 1997.
• Charles Ricketts (1866-1931) was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were to be scattered to the four winds in Richmond Park.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
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House: Nancy Spain (1917-1964), journalist, novelist, and television personality, shared a home with publisher Joan (Jonnie) Werner Laurie at 35 Carlyle Square, Chelsea, London SW3 6HA, from 1951 to 1953, and 7 Clareville Grove, Kensington, London SW7 5AU, from 1953 to 1955.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Pier Paolo Pasolini was an Italian film director, poet, writer and intellectual. Pasolini also distinguished himself as an actor, journalist, philosopher, novelist, playwright, filmmaker, painter and political figure.
Born: March 5, 1922, Bologna
Education: University of Bologna
Buried: Cimitero di Casarsa, Casarsa della Delizia, Provincia di Pordenone, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy, Plot: Buried close to his mother, to the left of the entrance.
Find A Grave Memorial# 6956532
Assassinated: November 2, 1975, Ostia
Books: Ragazzi di vita, Petrolio, Corsair Writings, more
Influenced by: Marquis de Sade, William Shakespeare, more
Film music credits: Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom, Medea, The Canterbury Tales, Oedipus Rex, Location Hunting in Palestine

Cemetery: Pier Paolo Pasolini (1922–1975) was an Italian film director, poet, writer and intellectual. Pasolini also distinguished himself as an actor, journalist, philosopher, novelist, playwright, filmmaker, painter and political figure. Pasolini began writing poems at the age of seven, inspired by the natural beauty of Casarsa. One of his early influences was the work of Arthur Rimbaud. Pasolini was buried in Casarsa (Via Valvasone, 97, 33072 Casarsa della Delizia PN), in his beloved Friuli.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Mary Elizabeth Garrett was an American suffragist and philanthropist.
Born: March 5, 1854, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: April 3, 1915, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States
Lived: Evergreen Museum & Library, 4545 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21210, USA (39.34902, -76.62084)
Buried: Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 39.30766, -76.6067
Find A Grave Memorial# 37473299
Parents: John W. Garrett

Mary Garrett was the daughter of John W. Garrett, president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O). She became the wealthiest "spinster woman" in the country with the demise of her father. Miss Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President M. Carey Thomas $15,000,000 to be disposed of as she saw fit. Helen Horowitz's book Power and Passion suggests very strongly that the relationship was longstanding even during M. Carey Thomas’s relationship with Mamie Gwinn, and that Thomas in fact was deeply engaged with Garrett throughout it. Carey Thomas acknowledged Mary as the source of her “greatest happiness” and the one who was responsible for her “ability to do work.” Nor was the fleshly aspect missing, as Carey wrote to her “lover.” “A word or a photo does all, and the pulses beat and heart longs in the same old way.” Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother, she described it as a "loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. She left the college in the capable hands of Marion Edwards Park. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters
of the Thomas Library.

Together from 1904 to 1915: 11 years.
Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 - December 2, 1935)
Mary Elizabeth Garrett (March 5, 1854 - 1915)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: 48-room Gilded Age mansion housing fine arts and furnishings, a library and formal gardens.

Address: 4545 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21210, USA (39.34902, -76.62084)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 443-840-9585
Website: http://evergreenevents.library.jhu.edu/
National Register of Historic Places: 83002932, 1983

Place
Built in the mid-XIX century
Evergreen Museum & Library, also known as Evergreen House, is a historical museum of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. It is located between the campuses of the College of Notre Dame and Loyola College. It, along with Homewood Museum, make up the Johns Hopkins University Museums. John Garrett’s son T. Harrison added a wing containing a billiard room, bowling alley, and a gymnasium, which in later years were converted into an art gallery and private theater. Evergreen House served as a home for the family until 1952, when it was donated to the university. The mansion was bought in 1878 by the president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, John W. Garrett. Railroads were then a key industry in the United States and, as Baltimore’s Garrett family owned and managed one of the biggest rail companies, the home grew and became both luxurious and famous. The house, a magnificent example of Gilded Age architecture, sits on a 26 acres (11 ha) landscaped site in Northern Baltimore. The initial design was a more modest Italianate house but, with the Garretts, it became a 48-room mansion with a 23-karat gold plated bathroom, a 30,000-book library, and a theatre painted by famous Russian artist Léon Bakst. The abundant decorative items in the house reflect the Garretts’ travels and interests, including a red Asian room displaying Japanese and Chinese items, paintings by Picasso, Modigliani, and Degas, glass by Tiffany or Dutch marquetry. The exterior of the house was an influence for the exterior of the Haunted Mansion at Disneyland in California, as noted in “Haunted Mansion: From The Magic Kingdom To The Movies” by Jason Surrell. Today, the university manages the museum and offers guided tours.

Life
Who: Mary Elizabeth Garrett (March 5, 1854 - April 3, 1915)
Mary Garrett was a suffragist and philanthropist, daughter of John W. Garrett, a philanthropist and president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O.) She became the wealthiest "spinster woman" in the country with demise of her father. Garrett was a part of a group of intellectual women known as "Friday Evening" whose fathers were all on the board at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine or Johns Hopkins Hospital, who were instrumental in advocating for autonomy and more privileges for women, especially intellectually. Garrett helped found the Bryn Mawr School for Women, so named to reference the already-popular Bryn Mawr College of Pennsylvania, which focused on scholastic achievement in traditionally male-dominated disciplines, such as mathematics and science. Although she was greatly hailed for her work, she was also condemned for having such a prominent role in the teaching of controversial (for women at the time) subjects, stating that women do not need so much education just to be homemakers. She also enriched Bryn Mawr College, donating $10,000 per year to help the college. She also endowed the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and secured the rights of women to attend thus making it the first co-educational, graduate-level medical school in the United States. Garrett was also heavily involved in the Women’s Suffrage Movement, organizing the National American Woman Suffrage Association’s national convention in 1906. She continued to donate heavily to the movement until her death. At her death, she gave $15,000,000 to M. Carey Thomas (1857-1935), the president of Bryn Mawr College, with whom she was romantically involved and had lived with at Bryn Mawr in the Deanery. She is buried in Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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School: Bryn Mawr College is a private women’s liberal arts college founded in 1885 in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, in Pennsylvania, four miles (6.4 km) west of Philadelphia. The phrase bryn mawr means "big hill" in Welsh.

Address: 101 N Merion Ave, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010, USA (40.02665, -75.31439)
Phone: +1 610-526-5000
Website: https://www.brynmawr.edu/
National Register of Historic Places: Bryn Mawr College Historic District (Morris Ave., Yarrow St. and New Gulph Rd.), 79002299, 1979. M. Carey Thomas Library is also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
Martha Carey Thomas was president at Bryn Mawr College from 1894 until 1922 and remained as Dean until 1908. Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sister colleges, and is part of the Tri-College Consortium along with two other colleges founded by Quakers—Swarthmore College and Haverford College. The school has an enrollment of about 1300 undergraduate students and 450 graduate students. Bryn Mawr was the name of an area estate granted to Rowland Ellis by William Penn in the 1680s. Ellis’s former home, also called Bryn Mawr, was a house near Dolgellau, Merionnydd, Gwynedd, Wales. The College was largely founded through the bequest of Joseph W. Taylor, and its first president was James Evans Rhoads. Bryn Mawr was the first higher education institution to offer graduate degrees, including doctorates, to women. The first class included 36 undergraduate women and eight graduate students. Bryn Mawr was originally affiliated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), but by 1893 had become non-denominational. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked it 25th in Best Liberal Arts Colleges. In 1912, Bryn Mawr became the first college in the United States to offer doctorates in social work, through the Department of Social Economy and Social Research. This department became the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research in 1970. In 1931, Bryn Mawr began accepting men as graduate students, while remaining women-only at the undergraduate level. From 1921 to 1938 the Bryn Mawr campus was home to the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, which was founded as part of the labor education movement and the women’s labor movement. The school taught women workers political economy, science, and literature, as well as organizing many extracurricular activities. On February 9, 2015, the Board of Trustees announced approval of a working group recommendation to expand the undergraduate applicant pool. Trans women and intersex individuals identifying as women may now apply for admission, while trans men may not. This official decision made Bryn Mawr the fourth women’s college in the United States to accept trans women.

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Bryn Mawr:
• Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), upon receiving a substantial ($2,500) traveling fellowship (Lucy Martin Donelly Fellowship) in 1951, set off to circumnavigate South America by boat.
• Ethel Collins Dunham (1883-1969), and her life partner, Martha May Eliot, devoted their lives to the care of children.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health.
• H.D. (1886-1961) attended Bryn Mawr College to study Greek literature, but left after only three terms due to poor grades and the excuse of poor health.
• Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), educator and author who was "recognized as the greatest woman Classicist.”
• Margaret Hamilton (1871-1969), taught English at Bryn Mawr and took over as head of the school when her sister Edith retired.
• Katherine Hepburn (1907-2003), began to act while studying at Bryn Mawr College.
• Ellen Kushner (born 1955), writer of fantasy novels.
• Clara Landsberg (1873-1966), after graduating from Bryn Mawr, became a part of Hull House in Chicago, founded by Jane Addams, and shared a room with Alice Hamilton (sister of Edith.) She eventually left Hull House to teach Latin at Bryn Mawr while Edith was headmistress.
• Mary Meigs (1917-2002), American-born painter and writer.
• Frieda Miller (1909-1973) was an economics professor at Bryn Mawr College.
• Tracy Dickinson Mygatt (1885-1973), writer and pacifist, co-founder with Frances M. Witherspoon of the War Resisters League, and longtime officer of the Campaign for World Government.
• Edith Russell (1879-1975) was an American fashion buyer, stylist and correspondent for Women's Wear Daily, best remembered for surviving the 1912 sinking of the RMS Titanic with a music box in the shape of a pig. The paper mache toy, covered in pigskin and playing a tune known as "The Maxixe" when its tail was twisted, was used by Edith Russell to calm frightened children in the lifeboat in which she escaped. Her story became widely known in the press at the time and was later included in the best-selling account of the disaster “A Night to Remember” by Walter Lord. She was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, into a wealthy Jewish family in 1879. Her father was Harry Rosenbaum, who rose to prominence in the dry goods field as a director of Louis Stix & Co. in Cincinnati. He was later influential as a cloak and suit manufacturer in his own right and an investor in garment industry real estate in New York, where he moved with his wife, the former Sophia Hollstein, and daughter Edith in 1902. Edith was educated in Cincinnati public schools and a succession of finishing schools, including the Mt. Auburn Young Ladies Institute (later called the H. Thane Miller School) in Cincinnati and Miss Annabel's in Philadelphia. At age 16 in 1895 she attended the Misses Shipley's at Bryn Mawr and later Bryn Mawr College.
• Eva Palmer-Sikelianos (1874–1952), American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music
• Martha Carey Thomas (1857-1935), notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music, at Bryn Mawr she studied literature and the theater arts.
• Paula Vogel (born 1951) is an American playwright and university professor. She received the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play How I Learned to Drive.
• Agnes E. Wells (1876-1959), one of the American’s leading educators, and a vigorous standard bearer in the women’s equal rights movement
• Agnes Wergeland (1857-1914) was the first woman ever to earn a doctoral degree in Norway. She received a fellowship in history from Bryn Mawr College in 1890 and lectured there for two years before lecturing at the University of Illinois in 1893. She was a docent in history and nonresident instructor at the University of Chicago from 1896 to 1902. In 1902, Wergeland was offered the position of chair of the department of history at the University of Wyoming. Agnes Wergeland remained a University of Wyoming history professor until her death.
• Frances May Witherspoon (1886-1973), writer and activist, co-founder with Tracy Dickinson Mygatt of the War Resisters League, and executive secretary of the New York Bureau of Legal Advice, a forerunner of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Life
Who: Martha Carey Thomas (2 January 1857 – December 2, 1935)
Martha Carey Thomas was an educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College. In 1882, Thomas wrote a letter to the trustees of Bryn Mawr College, requesting that she be made president of the university. She was not granted the position, however, as the trustees were concerned about her relative youth and lack of experience. Instead, Thomas entered in 1884 as the dean of the college and chair of English. Despite not receiving her desired role at Bryn Mawr, Thomas was active in the college’s administration, working closely with then President James Rhoads. According to the biographical dictionary Notable American Women: 1607–1950, by 1892 she was "acting president in all but name.” In 1885 Thomas, together with Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), Marie “Mamie” Gwinn (1861-1940), Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College. In 1894, President Rhoads died, and Thomas was narrowly elected to succeed him on September 1, 1894. With respect to the President Rhoads’s recent death, Thomas was not given any ceremony. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery.” When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett. Thomas shared her campus home, the Deanery, with Garrett and together they endeavored to grow Bryn Mawr’s resources. Upon her death, Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President Thomas "a sum which would, in 1994, be close to $15,000,000" to be disposed of as she saw fit. M. Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother she described it as a "Loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. Mary Garrett left a considerable fortune to Thomas, who spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France. Thomas died at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 2, 1935 of a coronary occlusion. She had returned to the city to address Bryn Mawr College on the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters of the Thomas Library.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Cemetery: Green Mount Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland. Established on March 15, 1838, and dedicated on July 13, 1839, it is noted for the large number of historical figures interred in its grounds as well as a large number of prominent Baltimore-area families. It retained the name Green Mount when the land was purchased from the heirs of Baltimore merchant Robert Oliver.

Address: 1501 Greenmount Ave, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA (39.30922, -76.60588)
Phone: +1 410-539-0641
Website: www.greenmountcemetery.com
National Register of Historic Places: 80001786, 1980

Place
Green Mount is a treasury of precious works of art, including striking works by major sculptors including William H. Rinehart and Hans Schuler. Nearly 65,000 people are buried here, including the poet Sydney Lanier, philanthropists Johns Hopkins and Enoch Pratt, Napoleon Bonaparte's sister-in-law Betsy Patterson, John Wilkes Booth, and numerous military, political and business leaders. In addition to John Wilkes Booth, two other conspirators in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln are buried here, Samuel Arnold and Michael O'Laughlen. It is common for visitors to the cemetery to leave pennies on the graves of the three men; the one-cent coin features the likeness of the president they successfully sought to murder. Until a 1965 agreement with Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor had planned for a burial in a purchased plot in Rose Circle at Green Mount Cemetery, near where the father of the Duchess was interred. The 1965 agreement allowed for the former King Edward VIII and wife, the Duchess of Windsor, to be buried near other members of the royal family in the Royal Burial Ground near Windsor Castle.

Notable queer burials at Green Mount Cemetery:
• Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), American suffragist and philanthropist. At her death, she gave $15,000,000 to M. Carey Thomas, the president of Bryn Mawr College, with whom she was romantically involved and had lived with at Bryn Mawr in the Deanery.
• Mamie Gwinn (1860-1940). In 1885 M. Carey Thomas, together with Mary Garrett, Mamie Gwinn, Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery". When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein's “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett.
• Harry Lehr (1869-1929), American socialite during the Gilded Age. He was known for staging elaborate parties alongside Marion "Mamie" Fish, such as the so-called "dog's dinner", in which 100 pets of wealthy friends dined at foot-high tables while dressed in formal attire At a later party, he impersonated the Czar of Russia, and was henceforth dubbed "King Lehr". He was married to heiress Elizabeth "Bessie" Wharton Drexel. He refused to sleep with her on their wedding night.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Louise Pearce was an American pathologist at the Rockefeller Institute who helped develop a treatment for African sleeping sickness.
Born: March 5, 1885, Winchester, Massachusetts, United States
Died: August 10, 1959, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Stanford University
Boston University
Johns Hopkins University
Lived: Trevenna Farm, 208 Orchard Rd, Montgomery, NJ 08558, USA (40.42026, -74.66956)
Buried: Henry Skillman Burying Ground, Skillman, Somerset County, New Jersey, USA
Buried alongside: Ida Alexa Ross Wylie
Find A Grave Memorial# 45275089
Field: Pathology
Institution: Rockefeller University

Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for contributing to public health system. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, better known as I.A.R. Wylie, was an Australian-British-American novelist, screenwriter, magazine writer and poet. She is probably best known as the author of the novel that became the basis of the film Keeper of the Flame (1942), directed by George Cukor and starring Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn. More than 30 of her works were made into films between 1915 and 1953. Sara Josephine Baker wrote very little about her personal life; however, she spent much of the later part of her life with Wylie, who self-identified as a 'woman-oriented woman'. When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography. In 1935, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, together with their friend Louise Pearce. While Baker and Pearce left little documentation of their personal lives, Wylie was open about her orientation, although she did not identify either Baker or Pearce in her writings.

Together from 1920 to 1945: 25 years.
Ida Alexa Ross “I.A.R.” Wylie (March 16, 1885 - November 4, 1959)
Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 - February 22, 1945)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: Trevenna Farm, 11.85 Acres In Montgomery Twp, was last sold in 2013

Address: 208 Orchard Rd, Montgomery, NJ 08558, USA (40.42026, -74.66956)

Place
The history of Trevenna Farm is a fascinating tale of a modest country dwelling dating to 1727 evolving into a refined 4U-bedroom home that graciously welcomes gatherings and personal pursuits without losing its pre-revolutionary ambiance. 11.85 acres in Montgomery Township include a pond, extra garage and barn surrounded by deep lawns. An early XIX century expansion added generous formal rooms and a center hall, now joined by a light-filled family room and well-planned kitchen wing. Skillman is named after the Skillman family. The first Skillmans were Dutch, but lived in England before moving to Brooklyn in 1664, according to family accounts. In 1729, Thomas Skillman ventured westward, buying some 500 acres (2.0 km2) of farmland on the Millstone River, near the village of Rocky Hill, for his sons, Jan and Isaac. That purchase was the Skillman family's entry into Montgomery. The Skillman area got its name when the railroads arrived in the 1870s, according to the Skillman family. Joseph A. Skillman, was a teamster who owned "wild Missouri mules," according to family accounts. When railroad workers were trying to lay tracks, their horses got bogged down in thick, clay mud, and Joseph A. Skillman came to the rescue with his mules. Railroad officials also socialized at the home of another Skillman nearby, and the new train station was named for the family. A post office opened in the station and a small village, with a hay press, feed store and hardware store, sprouted around it. It took the Skillman name, too. (While the train station is gone, remnants of the village still exist at the spot where Camp Meeting Avenue and Skillman Road meet. A clay and sculpting supply business occupies some of the buildings.) Also in Skillman was the sprawling New Jersey Village for Epileptics, a 250-acre (1.0 km2) complex opened around 1900 that had its own dairy, laundry, and movie theater. Visitors would arrive by train. Skillman was a busy little country place. There were 1,637 residents in Montgomery in 1910, compared with more than 23,000 now, according to Census data. The community now has more traffic, fewer farms and more houses (specifically developments). In 2011, Montgomery Township sold what remained of the North Princeton Developmental Center (also known as Skillman Village) to Somerset County in order for the village to be demolished.

Life
Who: Ida Alexa Ross Wylie (March 16, 1885 – November 4, 1959), aka I. A. R. Wylie, Louise Pearce (March 5, 1885 – August 10, 1959) & Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 – February 22, 1945)
Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health, especially in the immigrant communities of New York City. Not much is known about Baker's personal life because she is said to "have destroyed all her personal papers." However, she spent much of the later part of her life with Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, a novelist, essayist, and Hollywood scriptwriter from Australia who identified as a "woman-oriented woman." When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography, “Fighting For Life.” In 1935 and four years before her autobiography was published, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, with their friend Louise Pearce. They lived there together until Baker died in 1945, followed by Pearce, and then later Wylie who died on November 4, 1959 at the age of 74. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie was an Australian-British-American novelist, screenwriter, short story writer, and poet who was honored by the journalistic and literary establishments of her time, and was known around the world. Between 1915 and 1953, more than thirty of her novels and stories were adapted into films, including “Keeper of the Flame” (1942), which was directed by George Cukor and starred Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Louise Pearce was an American pathologist at the Rockefeller Institute who helped develop a treatment for African sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis). The three women were members of Heterodoxy, a feminist biweekly luncheon discussion club, of which many members were lesbian or bisexual. After Baker's death in 1945, Wylie and Pearce continued living at Trevenna Farm until both died in 1959. Her home was described as a "most delightful and interesting place to live and study. Her shelves were crowded with many old editions of medical treasures, the latest scientific literature and the latest works on international questions. She had a wonderful collection of Chinese carvings and porcelains." Ida Alexa Ross Wylie and Dr Louise Pearce are buried at Henry Skillman Burying Ground (Orchard Rd, Trevenna Farms in Rocky Hill, Montgomery Twp., Somerset, NJ) alongside Sarah Wylie, I.A.R. Wylie's bull terrier, died in 1943. Sara Josephine Baker is buried at Poughkeepsie Rural Cemetery (342 South Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: 601 Lorna Ln, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA (34.05636, -118.46985)
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Buried alongside: William Haines
Find A Grave Memorial# 23570553

William Haines was an American film actor and interior designer. On a trip to New York in 1926, Haines met James "Jimmie" Shields, probably as a pick-up on the street. Haines convinced Shields to move to Los Angeles, promising to get him work as an extra. In 1933, Haines was asked to choose between a sham marriage and his relationship with Shields. Haines chose Shields. Haines and Shields remained together for the rest of their lives. Haines died from lung cancer; soon afterward Shields, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, put on Haines' pajamas, took an overdose of pills, and crawled into their bed to die. They were interred side by side in Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery. Joan Crawford, with whom the two men maintained a lifelong friendship, called them "the happiest married couple in Hollywood."

Together from 1926 to 1973: 47 years.
Jimmie Shields (1905 - 1974)
William Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: The duplex at 1712 N. Stanley Avenue was once the home of Billy Haines, the legendary interior designer beloved by Old Hollywood actresses such as Joan Crawford, Carol Lombard, and Claudette Colbert.

Address: 1712 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046, USA (34.10212, -118.35583)

Place
Built in 1926
Rare and beautiful, very large English townhouse style Duplex. Designer William Haynes lived and worked here. According to the book “Tallulah!,” William Haines also rented the home to his friend Tallulah Bankhead for a time in the early 1930s. Floorplan features 4 bedrooms, grand staircase, 2 fireplaces, incredible living room with high ceilings and fireplace, patio/garden, gated, formal entry with amazing panelling, spacious kitchen, beautiful hardwood detailing throughout, hardwoodfloors, 12 Ft ceiling, kitchen and kitchenette, beautiful courtyard patio, den or office, 3 bedrooms. Monthly rent for the unit in 2010 was $3,995. In September 1926, after meeting Jimmie Shields, William Haines bought the house at 1712 North Stanley Drive, just off Sunset Boulevard, from Charles and Bettie Kimble. While most of the movie elite was moving into Beverly Hills, Billy opted to stay right in the heart of Hollywood. He paid $12.500 (along with a trust deed of record for $8.000) for the plain, two-story Spanish home. Billy was determined to transform his house into a showplace. One of the older homes in the area, 1712 North Stanley was built soundly, with deep foundations and heavy timbers. Such solid construction had attracted Billy, as it could withstand significant structural changes. He and Jimmie moved in and began taking measurements, drawing up rough floor plans. He abhorred the mishmash of historical styles that so characterized Hollywood architecture of the time, especially the pseudo-Spanish style that had been the rage of the 1910s and early 1920s. When Billy and Jimmie moved from their elegant movie-star house in Hollywood to a more modest but infinitely better located address in Brentwood, Billy didn’t sell the house on North Stanley right away; for a time he rented it out to the actor John Garfield.

Life
Who: Charles William "Billy" Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973) and Jimmie Shields (May 24, 1905 – March 5, 1974)
William Haines was a film actor and interior designer. Haines was discovered by a talent scout and signed with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) in 1922. His career gained momentum when he was loaned out to Columbia Pictures where he received favorable reviews for his role in “The Midnight Express.” Haines returned to MGM and was cast in the 1926 film “Brown of Harvard.” The role solidified his screen persona as a wisecracking, arrogant leading man. By the end of the 1920s, Haines had appeared in a string of successful films and was a popular box office draw. On a trip to New York in 1926, Haines met James "Jimmie" Shields, possibly as a pick-up on the street. Haines convinced Shields to move to Los Angeles, promising to get him work as an extra. The pair were soon living together and viewed themselves as a committed couple. His career was cut short by the 1930s due to his refusal to deny his homosexuality. Haines quit acting in 1935 and started a successful interior design business with his life partner Jimmie Shields, and was supported by friends in Hollywood. Among their early clients were friends such as Joan Crawford, Gloria Swanson, Carole Lombard, Marion Davies and George Cukor. Their lives were disrupted in June 1936 when approximately 100 members of a white supremacist group dragged the two men from their El Porto home (221 Moonstone Street, El Porto, Manhattan Beach) and beat them, because a neighbor had accused the two of propositioning his son. The incident was widely reported at the time, but Manhattan Beach police never brought charges against the couple’s attackers. The child molestation accusations against Haines and Shields were unfounded and the case was dismissed due to a lack of evidence.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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House: William Haines’s companion of nearly 50 years was devastated by his lover’s death. On the evening of March 5, 1974, Jimmie Shields, 69, telephoned several friends from the Brentwood home at 601 Lorna Lane he had shared with Haines for many years. After making the last call, he swallowed an entire bottle of sleeping pills.

Address: 601 Lorna Ln, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA (34.05636, -118.46985)

Place
L.A.’s most iconic designers, William Haines, lived at 601 Lorna Ln., in a 3,500 sq. ft. home, on a 22,000 sq. ft. lot. Completely out of place in this neighborhood of 3,000-5,000 sq. ft. houses. Haine’s home was considered, by celebrities, and designers alike, to be one of the most tasteful, elegant homes in town. After the grandeur of the previous house in North Stanley, many of Billy’s friends and associates were surprised by his choice. The new house was set in a modest neighbourhood on a small lot, built by the previous owners with a loan from the Federal Housing Administration. (Billy would joke that he decorated castles, but lived in an FHA house.) The property was purchased for just $5.600 from Arthur James Zander on May 22, 1944. Notably, for the first time, Jimmie’s name was included on the deed. Both he and Billy were granted an “undivided, one-half interest” in the property. Billy called in an architect, made plans to raise the ceilings by four feet, then took off for Europe with Jimmie. By the time they’d returned, the house had begun its transformation. “This is where I bring clients and prospective clients,” Billy said. “If we were selling automobiles, this would be our demonstration car. Not that we take pen and ink in hand and sign a client at the table. It’s simply the best way to expose them to a certain quality of life as I live it. Showing is always more meaningful than telling over the barren top of a desk.” He filled his new home with the treasures of his old residence: the antique chairs, the magnificent chandeliers, the priceless paintings. In the living room, a XIX century white marble fireplace rose from the center of the floor. He knocked down a few walls and installed large glass windows overlooking the pool. Outside, Greek and Roman statuary stood among the cypress trees. Most memorable, however was the hand-painted wallpaper that formed an elaborate mural, “Les Incas,” in the sunken living room and the bar area. It was so beautiful that Jack Warner instisted he needed it for a film. Billy agreed to have it all peeled off very carefully and sent over to the studio. In 1951 they’d marked their silver anniversary – 25 years – with an intimate gathering at Lorna Lane. Clifton Webb was there, and Orry-Kelly, and, of course, Joan Crawford and Eleanor Boardman. The house on Lorna Lane was sold in March 1975 for over $200.000 to a husband and wife, both physicians.

Life
Who: Charles William "Billy" Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973) and Jimmie Shields (May 24, 1905 – March 5, 1974)
William Haines and Jimmie Shields settled in the Hollywood community of Brentwood and their business prospered until their retirement in the early 1970s, except for a brief interruption when Haines served in WWII. Their clients included Betsy Bloomingdale and Ronald and Nancy Reagan when Reagan was governor of California. Haines and Shields remained together until Haines’ death. Joan Crawford described them as "the happiest married couple in Hollywood." On December 26, 1973, Haines died from lung cancer in Santa Monica, California at the age of 73. Soon afterward, Shields took an overdose of sleeping pills. His suicide note read in part, "Goodbye to all of you who have tried so hard to comfort me in my loss of William Haines, whom I have been with since 1926. I now find it impossible to go it alone, I am much too lonely."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Cemetery: Billy Haines (1900–1973) and Jimmie Shields (1905–1974) were interred side by side in Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery in Santa Monica (1847 14th St, Santa Monica, CA 90404). In the same cemetery are also buried Dame Christabel Pankhurst (1880–1958) and Evelyn Hooker (1907–1996).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sir Edwin Hardy Amies, KCVO, known as Hardy Amies, was an English fashion designer, founder of the Hardy Amies label and best known for his official title as dressmaker for Queen Elizabeth II, from her ...
Born: July 17, 1909, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 5, 2003, London, United Kingdom
Education: Brentwood School, Essex
Lived: 29 Cornwall Gardens, SW7
70 Delaware Mansions, Elgin Avenue, W9
17b Eldon Road, W8
Find A Grave Memorial# 7289430
Books: ABC of Men's Fashion, more
Organization founded: Hardy Amies

Sir Edwin Hardy Amies was an English fashion designer, founder of the Hardy Amies label and best known for his official title as dressmaker for Queen Elizabeth II, from her accession to the throne 1952 until his retirement in 1989. He established the monarch’s crisp, understated style of dress. “I don’t think she feels clothes which are too chic are exactly very friendly,” he told one fashion editor. “The Queen’s attitude is that she must always dress for the occasion”. Initially discreet about his homosexuality, Amies became more candid in old age; and, when speaking of Sir Norman Hartnell, he commented: "It's quite simple. He was a silly old queen and I'm a clever old queen". Amies and his partner, Kenneth Fleetwood, Design Director
of Hardy Amies Ltd, were together for 43 years until Fleetwood's death in 1996. Amies died at home in 2003, aged 93. In 1961, Amies made fashion history by staging the first men's ready-to-wear catwalk shows, at the Savoy Hotel, London. The runway show was a first on many levels, as it was both the first time music was played and that the designer accompanied models on the catwalk.

Together from 1953 to 1996: 43 years.
Sir Edwin Hardy Amies (July 17, 1909 - March 5, 2003)
Ken Fleetwood (November 11, 1930 - August 9, 1996)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: Sir Edwin Hardy Amies (1909–2003), dressmaker and fashion designer, was born at 70 Delaware Mansions, Elgin Ave, London W9 2HB, the elder son and eldest of the three children of Herbert William Amies, a surveyor for London county council who later became the council's principal resident agent for the Beacontree housing estate, and his first wife, Mary, née Hardy (d. 1938), who worked as a saleswoman for London court dressmakers until the birth of her daughter and second child in 1915.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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House: 17B Eldon Rd, Kensington, London W8 5PT, is a narrow London garden, measuring 20 x 7 metres, that had once belonged to fashion designer Hardy Amies (1909-2003) from 1961 to 1979. He had used L-shapes of pleached dwarf pear trees to instil structure and create privacy. The house had since been sold to a young Swedish couple with small children and dogs. They wanted to use the garden primarily for entertaining and favoured a traditionally English style of garden.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: “My best memory of London is my early-morning walk along the Serpentine before going to the couture house in Savile Row. At the time, I lived at Cornwall Gardens and the walk gave me exercise, time to think and the opportunity to admire the park.” Edwin Hardy Amies (1909-2003) lived at 29 Cornwall Gardens, Kensington, London SW7 4AP, in the 1990s.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Court of Liberty, Lot 1475
Buried alongside: Paul Winfield
Find A Grave Memorial# 10782150

Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.

Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)

Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.

Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964) (Glendale, Section: Section G, Map #: 01, Lot: 5, Space: 9, Property: Ground) and Florence Yoch (1890–1972) were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California.
• George Cukor (1899-1983) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Honor Map #: G28, Lot: 0, Space: 69, Property: Distinguished Memorial), American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, Map #: G64054, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: N.A.), American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) (Glendale, Section: Utility Columbarium, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 4524, Property: Niche) died penniless in Los Angeles on January 6, 1949, and was buried under the name “Gayne Adolphus Demeyer”.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977) (Glendale, Section: Ascension, Map #: L-7296, Lot: N.A., Space:1, Property: N.A.), for nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist, had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959) (Glendale, Section: Wee Kirk Churchyard, Map #: A01, Lot: 260, Space: 4, Property: Ground), British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (1936-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance Wall Crypts, Map #: E25, Lot: 0, Space: 3515, Property: Wall Crypt) and Tory Damon (1939-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance Wall Crypts, Map #: E25, Lot: 0, Space: 3514, Property: Wall Crypt). Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927) (Glendale, Section: Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 1059, Property: Niche), composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970) (Glendale, Section: Whispering Pines, Map #: 03, Lot: 994, Space: 3, Property: Ground Interment, at the top of the hill), American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• J. Warren Kerrigan (1879-1947) (Glendale, Section: Sanct. of Prophecy, Holly Terrace, Map #: 01, Lot: 0, Space: 10698, Property: Mausoleum Crypt) was an American silent film actor and film director. Kerrigan was homosexual. He never married, and lived with his lover James Vincent from about 1914 to Kerrigan's death in 1947.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Remembrance, Map #: C-310, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: wall crypt), English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Eternal Love, Map #: E09, Lot: 1561, Space: 3, Property: Ground), landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 19748, Property: Niche) and James Whale (1889-1957) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 20076, Property: Niche). When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance, Map #: A39, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: Distinguished Memorial, Sarcophagus 4), American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Revelation, Map #: G01, Lot: 3275, Space: 1, Property: Ground) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Revelation, Map #: G01, Lot: 3275, Space: 2, Property: Ground). Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971) (Glendale, Section: Florentine Col. - Dahlia Terr. GM, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 8446, Property: Niche), choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985) (Cathedral City, Section: N.A., Map #: N.A., Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: N.A.). Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945) (Glendale, Section: Whispering Pines, Map #: N.A., Lot: 1689, Space: N.A., Property: N.A.), actress.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Columbarium of Remembrance & Radian, Map #: 1E2, Lot: 0, Space: 60282, Property: Niche), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Columbarium of Providence, Map #: ELC0, Lot: 0, Space: 64953, Property: Niche), one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957) (Glendale, Section: Eventide, Map #: 01, Lot: 2116, Space: 1, Property: Ground), American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Honor, Map #: G58, Lot: 7463, Space: 1, Property: Garden Crypt), judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 20047, Property: Niche). Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Ascension, Map #: E48, Lot: 7152, Space: 4, Property: Ground), African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Liberty, Map #: H18, Lot: 1475, Space: 2, Property: Garden Crypt) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA
Buried alongside: Catherine Jones
Find A Grave Memorial# 161223231

Church: In the chapel of St John the Baptist in Westminster Abbey there is the tomb of Mary Kendall (died March 13, 1709/1710) dating from 1710 with an inscription recording: "That close Union and Friendship, In which she lived, with the Lady Catharine Jones (died April 23, 1740); And in testimony of which she desir’d That even their Ashes, after Death, Might not be divided.”

Address: 20 Dean’s Yard, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK (51.49929, -0.1273)
Hours: Monday and Tuesday 9.30-15.30, Wednesday 9.30-18.00, Thursday and Friday 9.30-15.30, Saturday 9.30-13.30
Phone: +44 20 7222 5152
Website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/

Place
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church. According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the VII century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III. Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held there. There have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey since 1100. Two were of reigning monarchs (Henry I and Richard II), although, before 1919, there had been none for some 500 years.

Notable queer burials at Westminster Abbey:
• Anne, Queen of Great Britain (1665-1714). Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, became close to the young Princess Anne in about 1675, and the friendship grew stronger as the two grew older. Correspondence between the Duchess and the Queen reveals that the two women enjoyed a royally passionate romance. They called each other pet names: Sarah was “Mrs. Freeman” and Anne was “Mrs. Morley.” When Anne came to the throne in 1702, she named Sarah “Lady of the Bedchamber.” Anne and Sarah were virtually inseparable; no king’s mistress had ever wielded the power granted to the Duchess. Over time, Sarah became overconfident in her position and developed an arrogant attitude toward Anne, even going to far as to insult the queen in public. A cousin of Sarah’s, Abigail Hill, caught the Queen’s eye during Sarah’s frequent absences from Court, and eventually replaced her in Anne’s affections. After her final break with Anne in 1711, Sarah and her husband were dismissed from the court. Sarah enjoyed a "long and devoted" relationship with her husband of more than 40 years, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. The money she inherited from the Marlborough trust left her one of the richest women in Europe.
• Sir Frederick Ashton (1904–1988), ballet dancer and choreographer, Memorial in Poet’s Corner (buried St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Yaxley)
• W. H. Auden (1907-1973), poet and essayist. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey in 1974, adjoining the grave of John Masefield. Another memorial is at Christ College Cathedral, Oxford, where he graduated (buried Kirchstetten, Austria) (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for Boys which was an inspiration for the Scout Movement, founder and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association and founder of the Girl Guides. In the south aisle of the nave of Westminster Abbey, against the screen of St George’s chapel, there is a memorial stone to Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, by W.Soukop. Both are buried in Kenya and each had a memorial service held at the Abbey (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), Prime Minister, memorial. A memorial to Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, was unveiled in the nave of Westminster Abbey in 1997. Designed by Donald Buttress and cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was a dramatist in the English Renaissance theatre, most famous for his collaborations with John Fletcher (1579–1625.) According to a mid-century anecdote related by John Aubrey, they lived in the same house on the Bankside in Southwark, "sharing everything in the closest intimacy." About 1613 Beaumont married Ursula Isley, daughter and co-heiress of Henry Isley of Sundridge in Kent, by whom he had two daughters, one posthumous. Francis Beaumont and his brother Sir John Beaumont are both buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, at the entrance to St Benedict's chapel near Chaucer's monument. Fletcher died in 1625 and is buried inside the Southwark Cathedral, London Bridge, London SE1 9DA. On 1November 6, 1996 the cathedral became a focus of controversy when it hosted a twentieth-anniversary service for the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement. In 1997 openly gay cleric, Jeffrey John became Canon Chancellor and Theologian of the Cathedral (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. Behn’s close association with royalty, especially her friendship with the King’s mistress, Nell Gwyn, and her long-standing liaison with John Hoyle (died 1692), whose affairs with other men were notorious, made Behn a prime subject for court and theater gossip. Just as Behn was notorious for presenting sensational subjects on stage despite societal taboos, she achieved a reputation for unusually explicit accounts of erotic and sexual episodes in her poems. Many of these celebrated gay male and lesbian relationships. She was buried in the east cloister of Westminster Abbey, near the steps up into the church. The inscription on her tombstone, written by John Hoyle, reads: "Here lies a Proof that Wit can never be Defence enough against Mortality." John Hoyle was stabbed to death on May 1692 and is buried in the vault of the Inner Temple church, Temple, London EC4Y 7BB) (Location in the Abbey: Cloisters; East Cloister).
• William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709) and King William III of England (1650-1702), are buried next to Queen Mary II. King William III is buried in great simplicity in the South Aisle of the Chapel of Henry VI, and his companion William Bentinck is buried in a vault nearby. Several members of the Bentinck family are buried in the Ormond vault at the eastern end of Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey. None have monuments but their names and dates of death were added to the vaultstone in the late XIX century (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915) died at 4:46 pm on April 23, 1915 in a French hospital ship moored in a bay off the island of Skyros in the Aegean on his way to the landing at Gallipoli. As the expeditionary force had orders to depart immediately, he was buried at 11 pm in an olive grove on Skyros, Greece. His grave remains there today. On 11 November 1985, Brooke was among 16 WWI poets commemorated on a slate monument unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976), musician and composer. In the north choir (or Musicians) aisle in Westminster Abbey there is a memorial stone. Britten refused a formal burial since he wanted to be buried beside his partner Peter Pears (Location in the Abbey: North Quire Aisle).
• Robert Browning (1812-1889), poet, is buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. He was born on 7 May 1812 in London, a son of Robert Browning (1782-1866) and Sarah (Wiedemann). He married Elizabeth Barrett, a famous poet in her own right, in September 1846 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• George, 6th Baron Byron (1788-1824). The memorial stone in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey was given by the Poetry Society and unveiled on May 8, 1969 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), composer and playwright. A memorial was unveiled in 1984 in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. The black marble stone was cut by Ralph Beyer. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend" (Location in the Abbey: South Quire Aisle).
• Major-General Sir Herbert Edwardes (1819–1868) was an administrator, soldier, and statesman active in the Punjab, India. He is buried in Highgate Cemetery. A memorial by sculptor William Theed junior, is on the wall of the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. He is also commemorated by a stained glass window in the chapel of King’s College London. Brigadier-General John Nicholson (1822–1857) was a Victorian era military officer known for his role in British India. Nicholson never married, the most significant people in his life being his brother Punjab administrators Sir Henry Lawrence and Herbert Edwardes. At Bannu, Nicholson used to ride one hundred and twenty miles every weekend to spend a few hours with Edwardes, and lived in his beloved friend’s house for some time when Edwardes’ wife Emma was in England. At his deathbed he dictated a message to Edwardes saying, "Tell him that, if at this moment a good fairy were to grant me a wish, my wish would be to have him here next to my mother." The love between him and Edwardes made them, as Edwardes’ wife latter described it "more than brothers in the tenderness of their whole lives.” In the retaking of Delhi, India, Nicholson led 2,000 men (mostly British, Pathan, and Punjabi troops) through the Kashmiri Gate in Delhi. Mortally wounded he died at the hour of British victory and is buried at New Delhi (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Eliot (1819-1880) was not buried in Westminster Abbey because of her denial of the Christian faith and her "irregular" though monogamous life with Lewes. She was buried in Highgate Cemetery (East), Highgate, London, in the area reserved for religious dissenters and agnostics, beside the love of her life, George Henry Lewes. On 2June 1, 1980 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. Stone by John Skelton (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771)’s biographer William Mason erected a memorial to him, designed by John Bacon the Elder, in the east aisle of Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey in 1778. (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner)
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), Poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in 1975 in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. By sculptor David Peace (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936), poet, has a memorial panel in the window above Chaucer's monument in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner). he has a memorial also at St Laurence (College Street, Ludlow, Shropshire, SY8 1AN).
• Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon (1661-1723), was the only son of Henry and his first wife Theodosia, daughter of Lord Capel. As Viscount Cornbury was governor of New York from 1702 to 1708. He had a very bad reputation and "his character and conduct were equally abhorred in both hemispheres". He secretly married Catherine O'Brien in 1688 and died in obscurity and debt. His only surviving son Edward as Lord Clifton took his seat in the House of Lords but died unmarried of a fever after a drinking bout. His daughter Theodosia married John Bligh, later Earl of Darnley, and both were buried in the vault (Location in the Abbey: North ambulatory)
• Henry James (1843-1916), American born novelist. On June 17, 1976 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets’ Corner Westminster Abbey by his great grand-nephew. Cut by Will Carter (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• James Kendall, politician and governor of Barbados, is buried in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. James’s niece Mary Kendall was buried in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Abbey and has a monument there with a kneeling alabaster figure of herself. The inscription, written by the Dean of Westminster Francis Atterbury, reads: "Mrs Mary Kendall daughter of Thomas Kendall Esqr. and of Mrs Mary Hallet, his wife, of Killigarth in Cornwall, was born at Westminster Nov.8 1677 and dy’d at Epsome March 4 1709/10, having reach’d the full term of her blessed Saviour’s life; and study’d to imitate his spotless example. She had great virtues, and as great a desire of concealing them: was of a severe life, but of an easy conversation; courteous to all, yet strictly sincere; humble, without meanness; beneficient, without ostentation; devout, without superstition. These admirable qualitys, in which she was equall’d by few of her sex, surpass’d by none, render’d her every way worthy of that close uion and friendship in which she liv’d with the Lady Catherine Jones; and in testimony of which she desir’d that even their ashes, after death, might not be divided: and, therefore, order’d her selfe here to be interr’d where, she knew, that excellent Lady design’d one day to rest, near the grave of her belov’d and religious mother, Elizabeth, Countess of Ranelagh. This monument was erected by Capt. Charles Kendall." Her name was inscribed on the vault stone in front of the monument in the late XIX century. Mary’s father Thomas Kendall, son of a merchant, died in 1684 and Mary lived with the Earl of Ranelagh’s family while James was in the West Indies. Lady Catherine Jones (d.1740) was the Earl’s daughter. Charles was Mary’s cousin and was in the Royal Navy. Her estates were left to her cousin Canon Nicholas Kendall. The coats of arms show those for Kendall and also "or, a chief gules overall on a bend engrailed sable three bezants" for Hallet.
• Herbert, 1st Earl Kitchener (1850-1916), Sirdar of the Egyptian army (Commander in Chief), is remembered on the altar in the south aisle of the Lady Chapel (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel)
• D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930), novelist and poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey on 1November 6, 1985. By David Parsley (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• In July 2002, a memorial window to Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) – a gift of the Marlowe Society – was unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey. Controversially, a question mark was added to the generally accepted date of death. On 2October 5, 2011 a letter from Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells was published by The Times newspaper, in which they called on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence.” In 2012, they renewed this call in their e-book Shakespeare Bites Back, adding that it "denies history,” and again the following year in their book Shakespeare Beyond Doubt. (Buried St Nicholas Churchyard, Deptford)
• Just inside the west door of Westminster Abbey there is a memorial brass, by Christopher Ironside, to Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900-1979) and his wife, Countess Mountbatten of Burma. He was Admiral of the Fleet (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• It has been said that the greatest love of Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727)’s life was with a fellow mathematician, Fatio de Duillier. They collaborated for several years, and when they broke up over an argument in 1693, Newton suffered symptoms of a nervous breakdown. Fatio assisted John Conduitt (Newton’s nephew) in planning the design, and writing the inscription for Newton’s monument in Westminster Abbey. His large monument is by William Kent and J.M.Rysbrack. Newton has also a Memorial at Trinity College, Cambridge. Fatio died in 1753 and was buried at the church of St. Nicholas, Worcester (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• After being ill for the last twenty-two years of his life, Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) died of renal failure on 11 July 1989 at his home near Steyning, West Sussex. His cremation was held three days later. The ashes of the greatest actor of his generation, are buried in the south transept of Westminster Abbey. His stone was cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: South Transept).
• Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. The inscription on the stone is taken from Owen’s "Preface" to his poems; "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." (Buried Ors Communal Cemetery, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)
• Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902). A small tablet was unveiled in Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey in 1953 (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Seigfried Sassoon (1886-1967), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. (Buried St Andrew Churchyard, Mells, Somerset)
• Henry John Alexander Seely (1899-1963), 2nd Lord Mottistone, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. A statue by Edwin Russell remembers him (Location in the Abbey: St Catherine's Chapel Garden; Little Cloister).
• Robert Stewart (1769-1822), Viscount Castlereagh and 2nd Marquis of Londonderry, politician, was buried in the centre of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. His statue is by sculptor John Evan Thomas (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628) and King James I of England (1566-1625) are buried in the Henry VII Chapel. King James I’s tomb was lost and not rediscovered until 1869. On His Majesty’s left is the magnificent tomb of his lover George Villiers. On his right is the tomb (with huge bronze figures representing Hope, Truth, Charity and Faith) of Ludovic Stuart, Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1574-1624), son of one of his earliest lovers, Esme Stuart.
• On 14 February 1995 a small stained glass memorial was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey for Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wilde (1854-1900), playwright and aesthete (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Church: Mary Astell died in 1731, a few months after a mastectomy to remove a cancerous right breast. In her last days, she refused to see any of her acquaintances and stayed in a room with her coffin, thinking only of God; she was buried in the churchyard of Chelsea Church in London.

Address: 64 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5LT, UK (51.48304, -0.17094)

Place
The Chelsea Old Church, also known as All Saints, is an Anglican church, on Old Church Street, Chelsea, near Albert Bridge. It is the church for a parish in the Diocese of London, part of the Church of England. Inside there is a memorial plaque to the author Henry James (1843–1916) who lived nearby on Cheyne Walk. To the west of the church is a small public garden containing a sculpture by Jacob Epstein. Chelsea Old Church dates from 1157. Formerly it was the parish church of Chelsea when it was a village, before it was engulfed by London. The building originally consisted of a XIII-century chancel with chapels to the north and south (c.1325) and a nave and tower built in 1670. The chapels were private property. The one to the north was called the Lawrence Chapel and was owned by Chelsea's Lord of the Manor. The chapel to the south was rebuilt in 1528 as Sir Thomas More's private chapel. The date can be found on one of the capitals of the pillars leading to the chancel, which were reputedly designed by Holbein. There is a statue by Leslie Cubitt Bevis of More outside the church, facing the river. There is a 1669 memorial to Lady Jane Cheyne. It was designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini but executed by an apprentice. The social reformer Catherine Courtney, Baroness Courtney of Penwith, is buried in the church.

Life:
Who: Mary Astell (November 12, 1666 – May 11, 1731)
Mary Astell was an English feminist writer and rhetorician. Her advocacy of equal educational opportunities for women has earned her the title "the first English feminist." Mary Astell was born in Newcastle upon Tyne to Peter and Mary (Errington) Astell. Her parents had two other children, William, who died in infancy, and Peter, her younger brother. She was baptized in St. John's Church in Newcastle. Her family was upper-middle-class and lived in Newcastle throughout her early childhood. Her father was a conservative royalist Anglican who managed a local coal company. As a woman, Mary received no formal education, although she did receive an informal education from her uncle when she was eight, an ex-clergyman named Ralph Astell whose bouts with alcoholism prompted his suspension from the Church of England. Though suspended from the Church, he was affiliated with the Cambridge-based philosophical school that based its teachings around radical philosophers such as Aristotle, Plato, and Pythagoras. Her father died when she was 12 years old, leaving her without a dowry. With the remainder of the family finances invested in her brother's higher education, Mary and her mother relocated to live with Mary's aunt. After the death of her mother and aunt in 1688, Astell moved to Chelsea, London, where she was fortunate enough to become acquainted with a circle of literary and influential women (including Lady Mary Chudleigh, Elizabeth Thomas, Judith Drake, Elizabeth Elstob, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu), who assisted in the development and publication of her work. She was also in contact with the Archbishop of Canterbury, William Sancroft, who was known for his charitable works; Sancroft assisted Astell financially and, furthermore introduced her to her future publisher. She was one of the first English women to advocate the idea that women were just as rational as men, and just as deserving of education. First published in 1694, her “Serious Proposal to the Ladies for the Advancement of their True and Greatest Interest” presents a plan for an all-female college where women could pursue a life of the mind. After withdrawing from public life in 1709, she founded a charity school for girls in Chelsea as a token of the Society for the Propagation of Christian Knowledge, organizing the school's curriculum herself with likely financial support from her patrons Lady Catherine Jones and Lady Elizabeth Hastings. When she was 60 years old, Astell was invited to live with Lady Catherine Jones, where she resided until her death. Mary Astell died in 1731, Lady Catherine Jones died in 1740 and is buried with her companion Mary Kendall inside Westminster Abbey.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Howard "Howie" Greenfield was an American lyricist and songwriter, who for several years in the 1960s worked out of the famous Brill Building.
Born: March 15, 1936, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: March 4, 1986, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: Abraham Lincoln High School
Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Courts of Remembrance, wall crypt #3515, GPS (lat/lon): 34.1495, -118.32058
Buried alongside: Tory Damon
Find A Grave Memorial# 6087
Genres: Jazz, Big band
Nominations: Grammy Award for Song of the Year

Howard Greenfield was an American lyricist and songwriter, who for several years in the 1960s worked out of the famous Brill Building. He is best known for his series of successful songwriting collaborations, including one with Neil Sedaka from the late 1950s to the mid-1970s and a near-simultaneous (and equally successful) songwriting partnership with Jack Keller throughout most of the 1960s. Greenfield was openly gay, even though during the era in which he lived it was unusual to be open about this; however, not entirely uncommon amongst people in the entertainment industry who worked outside the public eye. His companion from the early 1960s to his death was cabaret singer Tory Damon; the two lived together in an apartment on East 63rd Street in Manhattan before moving to California in 1966. Greenfield died, aged 49, in 1986 from complications due to AIDS. He was interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park. Tory Damon died just 26 days after Greenfield and is interred in the wall crypt to his right. Damon's epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield's continues: ... Forever.

Together from 1960 to 1986: 26 years.
Howard Greenfield (March 15, 1936 – March 4, 1986)
Tory Damon (September 29, 1939 - March 30, 1986)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California
.
Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)

Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.

Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964) (Glendale, Section: Section G, Map #: 01, Lot: 5, Space: 9, Property: Ground) and Florence Yoch (1890–1972) were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California.

• George Cukor (1899-1983) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Honor Map #: G28, Lot: 0, Space: 69, Property: Distinguished Memorial), American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, Map #: G64054, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: N.A.), American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) (Glendale, Section: Utility Columbarium, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 4524, Property: Niche) died penniless in Los Angeles on January 6, 1949, and was buried under the name “Gayne Adolphus Demeyer”.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977) (Glendale, Section: Ascension, Map #: L-7296, Lot: N.A., Space:1, Property: N.A.), for nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist, had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959) (Glendale, Section: Wee Kirk Churchyard, Map #: A01, Lot: 260, Space: 4, Property: Ground), British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (1936-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance Wall Crypts, Map #: E25, Lot: 0, Space: 3515, Property: Wall Crypt) and Tory Damon (1939-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance Wall Crypts, Map #: E25, Lot: 0, Space: 3514, Property: Wall Crypt). Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927) (Glendale, Section: Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 1059, Property: Niche), composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970) (Glendale, Section: Whispering Pines, Map #: 03, Lot: 994, Space: 3, Property: Ground Interment, at the top of the hill), American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• J. Warren Kerrigan (1879-1947) (Glendale, Section: Sanct. of Prophecy, Holly Terrace, Map #: 01, Lot: 0, Space: 10698, Property: Mausoleum Crypt) was an American silent film actor and film director. Kerrigan was homosexual. He never married, and lived with his lover James Vincent from about 1914 to Kerrigan's death in 1947.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Remembrance, Map #: C-310, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: wall crypt), English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Eternal Love, Map #: E09, Lot: 1561, Space: 3, Property: Ground), landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 19748, Property: Niche) and James Whale (1889-1957) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 20076, Property: Niche). When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance, Map #: A39, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: Distinguished Memorial, Sarcophagus 4), American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Revelation, Map #: G01, Lot: 3275, Space: 1, Property: Ground) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Revelation, Map #: G01, Lot: 3275, Space: 2, Property: Ground). Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971) (Glendale, Section: Florentine Col. - Dahlia Terr. GM, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 8446, Property: Niche), choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985) (Cathedral City, Section: N.A., Map #: N.A., Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: N.A.). Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945) (Glendale, Section: Whispering Pines, Map #: N.A., Lot: 1689, Space: N.A., Property: N.A.), actress.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Columbarium of Remembrance & Radian, Map #: 1E2, Lot: 0, Space: 60282, Property: Niche), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Columbarium of Providence, Map #: ELC0, Lot: 0, Space: 64953, Property: Niche), one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957) (Glendale, Section: Eventide, Map #: 01, Lot: 2116, Space: 1, Property: Ground), American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Honor, Map #: G58, Lot: 7463, Space: 1, Property: Garden Crypt), judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 20047, Property: Niche). Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Ascension, Map #: E48, Lot: 7152, Space: 4, Property: Ground), African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Liberty, Map #: H18, Lot: 1475, Space: 2, Property: Garden Crypt) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.




Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Lived: Shibden Hall, Lister’s Rd, Halifax, West Yorkshire HX3, UK (53.72826, -1.83997)
Crow Nest & Cliffe Hill, Lightcliffe, Halifax, West Yorkshire HX3, UK (53.7254, -1.79181)
Buried: St Matthew's, Wakefield Road, Lightcliffe, West Yorkshire, HX3 8TH
Find A Grave Memorial# 161199401

Anne Lister was a well off Yorkshire landowner, diarist, mountaineer and traveler. Throughout her life, she kept diaries, which chronicled the details of her daily life, including her lesbian relationships, her financial concerns, her industrial activities and her work improving Shibden Hall, near Halifax in the West Riding of Yorkshire, which she had inherited from her uncle, James Lister. Called "Fred" by her lovers and "Gentleman Jack" by Halifax residents, she suffered from harassment for her sexuality, and recognized her similarity to the Ladies of Llangollen, whom she visited. Lister had an affair with a wealthy heiress, Ann Walker, whom she met in September 1832; her eventual marriage (which of course was denied legal recognition) to Walker in 1834 was highly unusual. In 1830, while travelling in France, Lister was the first woman to ascend Mont Perdu in the Pyrenees. Lister died aged 49 of a fever at Koutais (now Kutaisi, Georgia) while travelling with Walker. In the paper obituary Walker is described as Anne Lister’s friend and companion. Walker, to whom ownership
of Shibden Hall passed, had Lister buried in the parish church in Halifax, West Yorkshire. Walker died in 1854 at her home, Cliff Hill in Lightcliffe, after spending some years in an asylum in York. Lister is often called "the first modern lesbian" for her clear self-knowledge and openly lesbian lifestyle.

Together from 1832 to 1840: 8 years.
Ann Walker (May 28, 1803 – March 4, 1854)
Anne Lister (April 3, 1791 - September 22, 1840)


Elizabeth Walker, Ann Walker's sister

Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: Ann Walker moved to Crow Nest when she was six years old. Her grandparents had rebuilt the house, to designs of Thomas Bradley, in 1788. It was a virtual copy of Pye Nest in Halifax, designed by the celebrated York architect John Carr. Her grandparents had also rebuilt nearby Cliffe Hill in 1780.

Address: Crow Nest, Coach Road, Hove Edge, Brighouse HD6 2LN, UK (53.7254, -1.79181)
Address: Cliffe Hill, 146 Wakefield Rd, Lightcliffe, Halifax HX3 8TH, UK (53.7254, -1.79181)

Place
Crow Nest, Lightcliffe was originally a farm. A building is recorded here in 1592 when it was occupied by the Booth family. The building fell into decay after WWI, and was demolished in the mid-1950s. The gatehouse at 82 Wakefield Road is now a private house and is listed. The mid-XIX century single span segmental arched bridge which still stands on the Coach Road is listed. Subsequent owners and tenants have included: John Cowper (1627), Rev William Ainsworth (1632-1649), Rev Alexander Bate, the Mitchell family, James Mitchell, John Mitchell, the Walker family (from 1682), Abraham Walker (1692), William Walker, William Walker, John Walker, Ann Walker. A new house – almost a replica of Pye Nest House – was built for William Walker, and designed by Thomas Bradley. For extensions in 1775, designed by John Carr, William Walker brought timber from the Baltic coast of Russia, then to Hull and finally by canal to Brighouse. The estate occupied 700 acres. It is recorded that the rooms were 16 ft in height. Sir Titus Salt was tenant from 1848 to 1854, but he had to leave when Evan Charles Sutherland-Walker wanted to live there himself. In the 1860s, Sutherland-Walker further extended the mansion with the construction of the entrance and the gatehouse. When he lived at the house, Sutherland-Walker had his own gas works which supplied Crow Nest and Cliffe Hill. In 1867, when Sutherland-Walker fell on hard times, the estate, comprising 2 mansion houses – Crow Nest and Cliffe Hill – other property including the Sun Inn, Lightcliffe and the Travellers’ Rest, Hipperholme and almost 700 acres of land, was sold at auction at the New Assembly Rooms. Crow Nest was sold to Sir Titus Salt for £26,000. Salt built the lake in the grounds, and added his arms to the gatehouse depicting rams and llamas. After Salt’s death in 1876, the house was bought by Richard Kershaw for £34,000 Richard Kershaw discovered the beds of stone which lay beneath the land, and carried out quarrying on the land around the mansion. When Kershaw died in 1917, the house was sold to Joseph Brooke. Sulphur emissions and picric acid from Brooke’s nearby chemical works had contaminated the stream through the grounds of Crow Nest – thereby bringing down the price of the property when Brooke was buying the property – and Kershaw’s solicitors sued the company for compensation, but lost their claim. The company exploited the grounds and the house for stone. During WWI, it was used to billet soldiers from Dunkirk. They damaged the house, and a lorry-driver collided with Titus Salt’s gateway, damaging the pillars and breaking a decorative urn. Cliffe Hill Mansion, Lightcliffe, was built on the site of an earlier house dated 1350. In 1947, it was divided into apartments. Owners and tenants have included: the Cliffe family, the Overall family (XVI century), Henry Hargreaves (1657.) Around 1760, the house was bought by the Walker family – who already owned Crow Nest Mansion. It was rebuilt in 1775, when William Walker brought timber from the Baltic coast of Russia. Ann Walker lived here. It passed to Evan Charles Sutherland-Walker. In 1862, John Foster was a tenant. Also listed at the house are: Abraham Briggs Foster, John Foster, Jonas Foster (1867), Sir William Henry Aykroyd (1880, 1901.) The crest of John Foster is displayed over the entrance: “Justum Perficito Nihil Timeto” (Act justly and fear nothing.) In 1867, Sutherland-Walker sold the house to Major Johnston Jonas Foster. It was later leased to Sir William Aykroyd. In the end David Hepworth bought the house.

Life
Who: Ann Walker (May 28, 1803 – March 4, 1854)
Ann’s father had inherited Crow Nest following the death of his elder brother, who died without issue. She in turn inherited the estate, as the oldest surviving child, following her father’s death. Her four siblings had all died either in infancy or before the age of 43. Ann, who was a shy lady, prone to melancholy illness and a deep lack of confidence, also owned a home at Lydgate. It was here that her friendship with Anne Lister (1791–1840) of Shibden Hall developed. Anne Lister became a regular visitor and Ann began to see her as a companion with the promise of hope, love and fortune. Their friendship, as we know from Anne Lister’s diaries, developed rapidly although Ann Walker, who possessed a strong sense of Christian duty, was often wracked with religious guilt. They eventually agreed that they would live together at Shibden Hall but clearly masked the full extent of their friendship. They travelled widely in Europe and beyond and continued to maintain both their estates. They were in Russia when Anne Lister died and Ann Walker brought the body back for burial in Halifax Parish Church. She had been left a “life interest” in Shibden Hall by her friend. However, Ann’s health and mental state declined as she struggled to maintain the two estates. Matters came to a head when she was forcibly removed from her locked room at the hall by her family and the local constable and consigned to an asylum in York. She returned to Cliffe Hill shortly before her death in 1854. Her nephew Evan Charles Sutherland Walker inherited the estate. Ann Walker is buried at St Matthew's (Wakefield Road, Lightcliffe, West Yorkshire, HX3 8TH).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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House: Timber-framed manor with period rooms, restored gardens, a mini-railway, a boating lake and woods.

Address: Shibden Hall Road, Halifax, Calderdale HX3 9XY, UK (53.72826, -1.83997)
Hours: Monday through Thursday 10.00-17.00, Saturday-Sunday 11.00-17.00
Phone: +44 844 686 1177
Website: http://museums.calderdale.gov.uk/visit/shibden-hall
English Heritage Building ID: 437379 (Grade II, 1954)

Place
Remodeled in 1830, Design by John Harper (1809-1842), Landscape Desgin by Samuel Gray
For three hundred years (c. 1615-1926) the Shibden estate was in the hands of the Lister family, wealthy mill-owners and cloth merchants, the most famous resident being Anne Lister, who became sole owner of the hall after the death of her aunt. The hall dates back to around 1420, when it was recorded as being inhabited by one William Otes. Prior to 1619, the estate was owned by the Savile and Waterhouse families. The three families’ armorial symbols are recorded in a stone-mullioned 20-light window at the hall. The building has been extensively modified from its original design by generations of residents, although its Tudor half-timbered frontage remains its most recognisable feature. A gothic tower was added to the building for use as a library and the major features of the park created, including terraced gardens, rock gardens, cascades and a boating lake. A Paisley Shawl garden designed for the terrace by Joshua Major was added in the 1850s. The estate became a public park in 1926 and the hall a museum in 1934. The park and gardens were restored between 2007 and 2008 with almost £3.9 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund and £1.2 million from Calderdale Council. The hall is currently open to the public, the West Yorkshire Folk Museum being housed in an adjoining barn and farm buildings. The hall has a variety of restored workshops, including a brewery, a basket-weaving shop, a tannery, a stable and an extensive collection of horse-drawn carriages. The park also contains a dry stone walling exhibition, children’s play area and miniature steam railway.

Life
Who: Anne Lister (April 3, 1791 - September 22, 1840) and Ann Walker (May 28, 1803 – March 4, 1854)
On September 22, 1840, Anne Lister (1791-1840) died of a fever in Koutais (now Kutaisi, Georgia). It took five weeks for news of Anne's death in Georgia to reach Halifax; it was announced in the Halifax Guardian on 31st October. The announcement includes these words: "We are informed that the remains of this distinguished lady have been embalmed and that her friend and companion, Miss Walker, is bringing them home by way of Constantinople, for interment in the family vault." She is buried at St John the Baptist (Coley Rd, Hipperholme, Halifax HX3 7SA). During the Millennium restoration of the Parish Church (as it then was) Anne's broken, incomplete tombstone was rediscovered under wooden flooring in the north east corner of the church, having been lost since 1878/9. The estate passed to her lesbian lover, Ann Walker, whom she had met in September 1832, who died in 1854 at her home, Cliff Hill in Lightcliffe. Possession then returned to the Lister family, who donated it to Halifax Corporation.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Victoria Kent Siano was a Spanish lawyer and republican politician.
Born: March 3, 1898, Málaga, Spain
Died: 1987, New York City, New York, United States
Buried: Umpawaug Cemetery, Redding, Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
Buried alongside: Louise Crane
Find A Grave Memorial# 17841306
Lived: Driftwood, Gateway to Penzance Point, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA (41.5264, -70.68553)
Party: Radical Socialist Republican Party

Louise Crane was a prominent American philanthropist, friend to some of New York’s leading literary figures. Crane's father was Winthrop Murray Crane, an American millionaire and former governor of Massachusetts. Her mother was MoMA founder Josephine Porter Boardman. Following her graduation from Vassar, Louise Crane was involved in a number of cultural institutions and programs, including the Harpsichord Music Society and the Museum of Modern Art. Victoria Kent was a Spanish lawyer and republican politician. Kent was Crane's companion in later years. Crane and Kent published Iberica, a Spanish language anti-Franco magazine. Following the death
of Louise’s mother, Kent and Crane lived together in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and Redding, Connecticut. Among the circle of writers, friends with Crane, were Djuna Barnes, Elizabeth Bishop, Bryher, Loren MacIver, W. Somerset Maugham, Marianne Moore, Dame Edith Sitwell and Sir Osbert Sitwell, Virgil Thomson, Glenway Wescott, and Tennessee Williams.

Together from (before) 1952 to 1987: 35 years.
Louise Crane (November 11, 1913 – October 20, 1997)
Victoria Kent Siano (March 6, 1892 - September 22, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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House: Just inside the gateway to the Point was Driftwood, the home of Charles Choate, a Boston barrister.

Address: Gateway to Penzance Point, Penzance Rd, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA (41.5264, -70.68553)

Place
Built in 1926
The first house at the end of Penzance Point’s single residential street is a large Cape Cod house with blue shutters built by Mrs. Winthrop Murray Crane, the widow of a U.S. Senator and former Massachusetts governor who also owned the Crane Paper Company, the stationary firm that provides the paper used to print American currency. Charles Choate—the son of the founders of law firm Choate, Hall & Stewart—lived in a nearby house called Driftwood, a house later owned by Mrs. W. Murray Crane’s descendants. The house was originally built in the late XIX century for the Ginn family of Ginn &Co., the book publishers. When Dyer built The Anchorage in 1895, there were only four other houses on the Point: the Jewett, Wilbur, Harding and Hibbard houses. In the next eighteen years, only the Ginns, Strongs, and Warbasses were added, bringing the number up to nine in 1913. Today there must be at least twenty·five.

Life
Who: Louise Crane (November 11, 1913 – October 20, 1997) and Victoria Kent (March 3, 1897 - September 25, 1987)
Louise Crane was a prominent philanthropist. Crane was a friend to some of New York’s leading literary figures, including Tennessee Williams and Marianne Moore. Crane’s father was Winthrop Murray Crane, a millionaire and former governor of Massachusetts. Her mother was Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) co-founder Josephine Porter Boardman. Josephine Crane was the hostess of a weekly literary salon at her apartment at 820 Fifth Avenue, New York City and at the family home on Penzance Point, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Guests included Marianne Moore and William Somerset Maugham. Louise smoothly moved into the role of patron of the arts. She was a prominent supporter of jazz and orchestral music, initiating a series of "coffee concerts" at MoMA and commissioning a vocal and orchestral work by Lukas Foss. She even worked representing musicians, including Mary Lou Williams. Crane met Elizabeth Bishop while classmates together at Vassar in 1930. The pair traveled extensively in Europe and bought a house together in 1937 in Key West, Florida. While Bishop lived in Key West, Crane occasionally returned to New York. Crane developed a passionate interest in Billie Holiday in 1941. Crane published Ibérica, a Spanish-language review, with her later companion, Victoria Kent, from 1954 to 1974. Ibérica featured news for Spanish people exiled in the United States. Kent was a prominent member of the Spanish Republican party, opposed to Franco. Many prominent writers, including Salvador Madariaga, contributed to Ibérica. Louise Crane and her mother were sponsors of Virgil Thomson’s opera “Four Saints in Three Acts”, among other works. Following Josephine Boardman Crane’s death in 1972, Kent and Crane lived together in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and Redding, Connecticut. Crane was the executor of Marianne Moore’s estate after her death in 1972.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cemetery: Louise Crane (1913-1997) was the daughter of MoMA’s founder Josephine Boardman Crane. The Cranes' apartment was filled with decorative arts and artwork and the Cranes lent and donated a number of pieces to museums. In addition to their home in Manhattan, the Crane family owned homes in Woods Hole, Ma. (Driftwood), Dalton, Ma., Redding, and Fort Myers Beach, Florida. Among the circle of writers whom the Cranes befriended were Djuna Barnes, Elizabeth Bishop, Bryher, Loren MacIver, Somerset Maugham, Marianne Moore, Edith and Osbert Sitwell, Virgil Thomson, Glenway Wescott, and Tennessee Williams. Following Josephine Boardman Crane's death, Louise and her long-time companion, Victoria Kent (1897-1987), lived together in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and Redding, Connecticut. They are both buried in twin tombs at Umpawaug Cemetery (149 Umpawaug Rd, Redding, CT 06896).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Rupert Doone was a British dancer, choreographer, theatre director, and teacher in London.
Born: 1903, Redditch, United Kingdom
Died: 1966
Lived: 46 Fitzroy Street, W1T
Find A Grave Memorial# 100907609
Movies: Rainbow Dance
Organization founded: Group Theatre

Rupert Doone was an English dancer, choreographer, theatre director, and teacher. In Paris on November 1925, Doone met and fell in love with Robert Medley, who was the cofounder of the Group Theatre. Charles Robert Owen Medley CBE, RA, always known as Robert Medley, was an English painter who worked in both abstract and figurative styles, and a theatre designer. He held several teaching positions, in London and Rome. At school, Medley was the friend of W.H. Auden, and first suggested that Auden might write poetry (although Medley did not know at the time that he had this effect). As described in his memoir, Drawn from the Life, in his early years he believed he was heterosexual (and therefore did not understand Auden's erotic intentions toward him until they spent a single weekend together after both had left school). Medley and Doone lived together until Doone's death, because of multiple sclerosis. Medley and Doone invited Auden to write plays for the Group Theatre, and through Auden, Medley met Stephen Spender, Louis MacNeice, and others who became associated with the Group.

Together from 1925 to 1966: 41 years.
Robert Medley (December 19, 1905 - October 20, 1994)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: In 1932, W.H. Auden stayed at 46 Fitzroy St, Kings Cross, London W1T 5BR, with Robert Medley (1905-1994), educator and artist, and Rupert Doone (1903-1966), English dancer and choreographer. In Paris on November 1925, Rupert Doone met and fell in love with Robert Medley. Medley and Doone lived together until Doone's death, because of multiple sclerosis. Medley and Doone invited Auden to write plays for the Group Theatre, and through Auden, Medley met Stephen Spender, Louis MacNeice, and others who became associated with the Group.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Perry Edwin Ellis was an American fashion designer who founded his eponymous sportswear house, in the mid-1970s.
Born: March 3, 1940, Portsmouth, Virginia, United States
Died: May 30, 1986, New York City, New York, United States
Education: New York University
College of William & Mary
Buried: Evergreen Memorial Park, Portsmouth, Portsmouth City, Virginia, USA, Plot: Plot A-62
Find A Grave Memorial# 7238791
Children: Tyler Alexandra Gallagher Ellis
Parents: Edwin Ellis, Winifred Rountree Ellis

Perry Ellis was an American fashion designer who founded a sportswear house in the mid-1970s. In 1981, Ellis began a relationship with divorced attorney Laughlin Barker. Later that year, Ellis appointed Barker the President of licensing division of Perry Ellis International. They remained together until Barker's death in January 1986. In February 1984, Ellis and his long-time friend television producer and writer Barbara Gallagher conceived a child together via artificial insemination. Their daughter, Tyler Alexandra Gallagher Ellis, was born in November 1984. Ellis bought a home for Gallagher and their daughter in Brentwood, Los Angeles, and would visit frequently. In 2011, Tyler released her first line of handbags using the name Tyler Alexandra. Ellis' health rapidly declined after Barker's death. By May 1986, Ellis had contracted viral encephalitis which caused paralysis on one side of his face. Despite his appearance, he insisted on appearing at his Fall fashion show held in New York City on May 8. At the end of the show, Ellis attempted to walk the runway for his final bow but was so weak, he had to be supported by two assistants. It was his final public appearance. Ellis was hospitalized soon after and he slipped into a coma. He died
of viral encephalitis on May 30, 1986.

Together from 1981 to 1986: 5 years.
Laughlin McClatchy Barker (1949 - January 2, 1986)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cemetery: At Evergreen Memorial Park (Portsmouth, VA 23707), is buried Perry Ellis (1940-1986), American fashion designer who founded his eponymous sportswear house, in the mid-1970s. Ellis' influence on the fashion industry has been called "a huge turning point", as he introduced new patterns and proportions to a market which was dominated by more traditional men's clothing.

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Norman Houston O'Neill was an Irish and British composer and conductor who specialized largely in works for the theatre. He studied in London with Arthur Somervell and with Iwan Knorr at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt from 1893-1897.
Born: March 14, 1875, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 3, 1934, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Golders Green Crematorium, Golders Green, London Borough of Barnet, Greater London, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 20313
Parents: George Bernard O'Neill

Cemetery: Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.

Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NL, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)

Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.

Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Leslie Poles Hartley (1895–1972), known as L. P. Hartley, was a British novelist and short story writer. Until his death in 1972, Hartley lived alone but for a household of servants, in London, Salisbury and at a home on the Avon, near Bath. Between the wars, Venice was a favoured and frequent destination.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello 6th March 1951 ‘Till you are home once more’.” He has also a memorial inside the St. Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD)
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on 2 July 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noël Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sir Charles Michael Robert Vivian Duff, 3rd Baronet was a British socialite who was Lord Lieutenant first of Caernarvonshire and then of Gwynedd.
Born: May 3, 1907
Died: 1980, Kensington, London, United Kingdom
Lived: Vaynol, Pentir (LL57 4BP)
Find A Grave Memorial# 176499776

House: Vaynol or Y Faenol is a country estate dating from the Tudor period near Y Felinheli in Gwynedd, North Wales. It comprises 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of park, farmland, and gardens on the estate, with more than thirty listed buildings, surrounded by a wall which is 7 miles (11 km) long. "Y Faenol" means "the manor" and is a mutated form of the Welsh word maenol.

Address: Pentir, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 4BP, UK (53.2036, -4.19035)
Cadw Building ID: 4166 (Vaynol Old Hall, Grade I, 1952), 4173 (Vaynol Hall, Grade I, 1952)

Place
Much of Faenol Old Hall dates from the Williams' period of ownership, while Vaynol Hall was built in 1793 and extended during the XIX century. Once Vaynol Hall was built, Faenol Old Hall became a farm house and subsequently deteriorated; in 2003 it appeared on the BBC's Restoration programme, championed by Robert Hardy. In 2009, the BBC revisited the project, and said that Faenol Hall was now "in private ownership and has been restored". The estate's origins are in the XVI century when the bishops of Bangor sold property belonging to their manor, Maenol Bangor. The estate was developed during that century by the Williams family. It passed to the Crown on the death without issue of Sir William Williams in 1696. In 1723 it was presented to John Smith of Tedworth, and passed to his nephew Thomas Assheton Smith I in 1762. Assheton Smith was the 3rd largest landowner in Gwynedd. This area of Wales is known for its slate production, and the Assheton Smiths profited from slate quarrying, and owned the Dinorwic Quarry, which made a profit of £30,000 in 1856. Even after farms were let on long leases to encourage good tenant behaviour, slate was the family's main economic interest. The Assheton Smiths extended their estate through enclosure, despite strong opposition from local farmers, including the enclosure of existing properties at Gallt-y-foel. The Assheton Smiths remained in possession of the estate until the XX century. In 1847, it passed to Mary Astley, niece of Thomas Assheton Smith of Vaynol, who married Robert George Duff, a distant cousin of the Earls of Fife. Vaynol passed in turn to their two eldest sons (the first of whom left no son) and they took the surname Assheton-Smith instead of Duff. The younger son, Sir Charles Garden Assheton-Smith, was created a baronet in 1911. His son and grandson the 2nd and 3rd baronets, reverted to the name of Duff. Sir Michael Duff, 3rd Baronet had an adopted son, Charles, but left the estate on his death in 1980 to a nephew who sold it. At the beginning of the XX century, the estate amounted to 36,000 acres (150 km2) of land and had 1,600 tenants. The Prince and Princess of Wales (later King George V and Queen Mary) stayed there as guests of the Assheton Smiths during a visit to North Wales in May 1902. Within a few years, however, it became necessary to sell parts, a pattern later repeated. The main core part of the estate was put up for auction in 1984, in addition to the public sale of various properties around the estate. Caernarfon-based Glan Gwna Estates Ltd now owns the bulk of what was the main estate. The National Trust also owns much of the land of the original estate, along with many private individuals owning various properties around the estate. In the second half of the XIX century the park had a zoo, but it was dismantled by 1900. The park has been the setting for Bryn Terfel's Faenol Festival since 2000 and in 2005 hosted the National Eisteddfod. BBC Radio 1's Big Weekend was held at the park in May 2010. The estate began breeding the rare Vaynol cattle, a type of White Park cattle, in the 1870s. A herd was kept there until the death of the owner Sir Michael Duff in 1980, when the estate was sold and the herd was moved to a series of locations in England.

Life
Who: Sir Charles Michael Robert Vivian Duff, 3rd Baronet (May 3, 1907– March 3, 1980) and Caroline, Lady Duff (née Lady Caroline Paget) (June 15, 1913 - May 22, 1973)
Sir Michael Duff, 3rd Baronet, was a British socialite who was Lord Lieutenant first of Caernarvonshire and then of Gwynedd. Duff was the only son of Sir Robert George Vivian Duff, 2nd Baronet, of Vaynol (d. 1914), and his wife, Lady Juliet Lowther (1881-1965), only child of the 4th Earl of Lonsdale and his wife, Constance Robinson, Marchioness of Ripon. His maternal grandmother was a sister of the 13th and 14th Earls of Pembroke and Montgomery, and a daughter of the Rt. Hon. Sidney Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Lea, the half-Russian younger son of the 10th Earl of Pembroke, and a good friend to Florence Nightingale. He had one sibling, Victoria Maud Veronica Duff (1904—1967, married John Edward Tennant). He was a godson of Mary of Teck (queen of King George V). Among his relatives was his maternal aunt, Lady Diana Cooper (née Manners). Exceedingly handsome and with the courteous manners of a true gentleman, he was famed as a host and raconteur. He inherited the 1,000 acre (4 km²) Welsh estate of Vaynol, the slate of which was the principal source of the family's wealth. Surrounded by the estate's seven-mile-long stone wall, the Duffs lived in Vaynol New Hall. On reaching his maturity in 1928, Sir Michael assumed the additional surname of Assheton-Smith, only to renounce it in 1945. He was a practical joker, one of his favourite pranks being to dress up as Queen Mary and pay surprise visits to friends - until he bumped into the Queen herself in a neighbour's hall. He also wrote a light novel, “The Power Of A Parasol.” Sir Michael Duff-Assheton-Smith married first, on 5 March 1935, Hon Millicent Joan Marjoribanks (born 1906), daughter of the 3rd and last Baron Tweedmouth. They divorced in July 1936, and the marriage was annulled 1937. He then married on 1July 4, 1949, Lady (Alexandra Mary Cecilia) Caroline Paget, the eldest daughter of Charles Paget, 6th Marquess of Anglesey, and his wife, Lady Marjorie Manners, the eldest daughter of the Henry Manners, 8th Duke of Rutland. They adopted a son, Charles David Duff (b. 1950), who became a theatre historian. A documentary screened on BBC Two Wales in 2005 (“Faenol: Secrets Behind the Wall”) featured Charles Duff discussing his childhood, the bisexuality of his adoptive parents, their marriage of convenience, and the details of his parentage. He did not inherit the estate, and when it was sold all the records were burnt, so compounding the mystery. In another interview for the BBC (“Wall Of Silence”) Charles said of Vaynol: "It was a place of great conviviality and energy and joy." However, by the time Charles was in his teens, Sir Michael had come to believe that his second marriage and the adoption of his son had been grave errors, and according to Charles Duff, "he started to demonise both my mother and myself." Although appearances were maintained, neither could then do much right in Sir Michael's opinion. By this time the house and estate were also in decline. During the thirties, Caroline, Lady Duff was a notable British socialite, and a minor actress. There are several references to her in the published journals of Edith Olivier and The National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales has footage of short films featuring Caroline and her sister Elizabeth, as well as other material. She died at the age of 59.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Edmund Dantes Lowe was an American actor. His formative experience began in vaudeville and silent film. He was born in San Jose, California. His father was a local judge. His childhood home was at 314 North 1st Street, San Jose.
Born: March 3, 1890, San Jose, California, United States
Died: April 21, 1971, Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States
Lived: Lilowe, 718 North Linden Dr, Beverly Hills
Buried: San Fernando Mission Cemetery, Mission Hills, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 161806424
Height: 1.82 m
Spouse: Rita Kaufman (m. 1936–1950), Lilyan Tashman (m. 1925–1934), Esther Miller (m. ?–1925)
TV shows: Front Page Detective
Married: September 21, 1925

Lilyan Tashman was a Brooklyn-born Jewish American vaudeville, Broadway, and film actress. Tashman was a lesbian and had numerous backstage same-sex liaisons as a New York City chorine and actress. From 1928 to 1932, she was Greta Garbo’s lover. However, Tashman was a fiercely jealous person and had frequent altercations with her lovers. By November 1932, Garbo's patience had worn thin and she ended the relationship, leaving Tashman devastated. In 1925, Tashman married openly gay actor and longtime friend Edmund Lowe, presumably to present a heterosexual façade to the world. The two became the darlings of Hollywood reporters and were touted in fan magazines as having "the ideal marriage". The couple entertained lavishly at "Lilowe", their Beverly Hills home, and weekly parties became full-blown orgies with A-list celebrities seeking invitations. Tashman died from cancer at Doctor's Hospital in New York City on March 21, 1934. Her last film, Frankie and Johnny, was released posthumously.

Together from 1925 to 1934: 9 years.
Edmund Dantes Lowe (March 3, 1890 – April 21, 1971)
Lilyan Tashman (October 23, 1896 – March 21, 1934)
Married: September 21, 1925



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: Lilyan Tashman (1896-1934) and Edmund Lowe (1890-1971) married on September 1, 1925. “We were two people who had reached the years of mental discretion,” she later wrote, “who knew exactly what we were doing with our lives and why.” The two quickly became one of the most popular and social active couples in filmdom. Lilyan and Edmund gave pool parties, beach parties, and cocktail parties that were famous for their chic and wit. Their ultra-modern, red-and-white Beverly Hills home, coyly dubbed “Lilowe” (718 North Linden Dr, Beverly Hills, CA 90210) became known to fan throughout the world via magazine layouts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Cemetery: Edmund Lowe (1890-1971), American actor, is buried at San Fernando Mission Cemetery (11160 Stranwood Ave, Mission Hills, CA 91345). Rumored to be gay, Lowe married three times. After his first marriage to Esther Miller ended in early 1925, Lowe met Lilyan Tashman (1896–1934) while filming “Ports of Call.” Lowe and Tashman were wed on September 21, 1925. The wedding occurred before the release of the film. The two made their home in Hollywood. Tashman was rumoured to be lesbian, and their to be a lavender marriage. Lowe's third wife was costume designer Rita Kaufman (1888–1968). They were married from 1936 to 1950.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Renata Borgatti was an Italian classical musician, performing in Europe and the United States.
Born: March 2, 1894, Bologna
Died: March 8, 1964, Rome
Buried: Cimitero di Palestrina, Palestrina, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 161024877

Renata Borgatti was an Italian classical musician, performing in Europe and the United States. She settled in Capri in the early 1900s, where her lifestyle raised fewer eyebrows than elsewhere in Europe. In 1918, she entered into a lesbian affair with Italian socialite, and baroness, Mimì Franchetti. The two remained together for just over a year, until Franchetti left Capri and linked with the prominent American artist Romaine Brooks. Borgatti had an affair with Faith Stone, whose husband Sir Compton Mackenzie wrote the satirical roman à clef Extraordinary Women, about a group
of lesbians arriving on the island of Sirene, a fictional version of Capri. In 1920, she herself began a liaison with Brooks, who was by that time pursuing a relationship with the American writer Natalie Clifford Barney. Borgatti's affair with Brooks proceeded on and off for at least three years, but was curtailed when Brooks began avoiding her. During the early-1920s, she became intimately involved with Winnaretta Singer (who previously was as well involved with Brooks), heiress to the Singer sewing machine fortune.

Together from 1920 to 1923: 3 years.
Renata Borgatti (March 2, 1894 – March 8, 1964)
Romaine Brooks, born Beatrice Romaine Goddard (May 1, 1874 – December 7, 1970)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Cemetery: Renata Borgatti (1894-1964) is buried in the Palestrina cemetery (Via Santa Maria, 00036 Palestrina RM). Renata Borgatti was an Italian classical musician, performing in Europe and the United States. A lesbian, she settled on the Mediterranean island of Capri in the early 1900s, where her lifestyle raised fewer eyebrows than elsewhere in Europe. In 1918, she entered into a lesbian affair with an Italian socialite (and baroness) Mimì Franchetti. The two remained together for just over a year, until Franchetti left Capri and linked with the prominent American artist Romaine Brooks. Borgatti had an affair with Faith Mackenzie, whose husband Compton Mackenzie wrote of the island's lesbian residents in the 1928 satirical roman à clef “Extraordinary Women,” about a group of lesbians arriving on the island of Sirene, a fictional version of Capri. In 1920, Borgatti left Capri to pursue her career on the European mainland. She also began a romantic liaison with Brooks, who was by that time pursuing a relationship with the American writer Natalie Barney. Borgatti's affair with Brooks proceeded on and off for at least three years, but was curtailed when Brooks began avoiding her. During the early-1920s, she became intimately involved with Winnaretta Singer, heiress to the Singer sewing machine fortune. She performed on stage with the violinist Olga Rudge during this period. They worked frequently together, despite the presence of Rudge's lover, the famous poet Ezra Pound, who was then working as a music critic and was not impressed by Borgatti's playing.

Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Born: May 18, 1929, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 2, 2012, London, United Kingdom
Education: Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge,
Christ Church, Oxford
Yale University
Lived: Old Rectory, Preston Capes
34 Montpelier Square, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1JY
Find A Grave Memorial# 86311243
Party: Conservative Party
Books: Obscenity and the law, The two cities, more
TV shows: BBC-3

House: Norman St John-Stevas (1929–2012) loved beautiful places – Venice and Rome were particular favourites – and attractive things. His Knightsbridge house at 34 Montpelier Square, Knightsbridge, London SW7 1JY, contained a large collection of Victoriana. Visitors were sometimes astonished to call on him in late morning and be welcomed by St John-Stevas in an imperial purple dressing gown. He died in March 2012 from undisclosed causes, aged 82. His homosexuality was summarised by Simon Hoggart in The Guardian obituary note: "He lived in that period where gay politicians never came "out", yet were happy for everyone to know. He lived life as a camp performance."



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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House: Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) was a British politician, author, and barrister. St John-Stevas stood down from the House of Commons at the 1987 general election, being created a life peer in the House of Lords with the title Baron St John of Fawsley of Preston Capes in the County of Northamptonshire in 1987. A loyal monarchist, Lord St John enjoyed a close relationship with the British Royal Family. Soon after his elevation to the Lords, photographs of him in purple bedroom slippers appeared in Hello! magazine while he lounged in the bedroom of his Northampton rectory with a signed photograph of Princess Margaret prominently displayed. The Old Rectory, Preston Capes (1 Church Way, Preston Capes, Daventry NN11 3TE, English Heritage Building ID: 360597 (Grade II, 1987)) is a former rectory. Early XVIII century with earlier origins and large XIX century additions. Coursed ironstone rubble, red brick, hipped slate roofs, various brick lateral, ridge and end stacks. 2 storeys and attic. Stone-built core has two 3-light leaded casement windows with timber lintels to ground and first floors to front facing village and a small roof dormer. A part-glazed plank door to right side. Another stone range projects right towards rear of right side with a glazed door immediately to right but largely hidden by slightly lower early XIX century brick front range with 3-light leaded casement windows with pointed arch heads and hood moulds, to ground and first floors. Right end of 2nd stone wing facing garden has a 4-light painted stone arch-mullion window to ground floor, an early XIX century brick porch with panelled door and fanlight to right and similar 3-light window to first floor. Behind this wing and facing garden a large early XIX century brick range of 3 windows with 15-pane sashes and segmental heads. Other sash windows of 12-panes, leaded wood mullion and transom windows and casement windows to rear and side facing churchyard. St John-Stevas’s partner of over fifty years was Adrian Stanford. They met each other in 1956 at Oxford, where Lord St John taught Stanford law. They entered into a civil partnership shortly before Lord St John's death in order to avoid paying inheritance tax, which would have taxed 40% of his £3.3 million estate.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lived: Bearsville, New York
Buried: Artists Cemetery, Woodstock, Ulster County, New York, USA
Buried alongside: Wilna Hervey
Find A Grave Memorial# 143629972

Wilna Hervey and Nan Mason were artists, actresses and occasional house painters, staying together for 59 years. Known to friends and family as "Willie," Wilna Hervey grew up in affluent circumstances at Beach Ninth Street, Far Rockaway. 6’3” Wilna found some success in silent films, playing rugged mountain girls and other hardy characters. In 1919, she was cast in the role of The Powerful Katrinka in The Toonerville Trolley silent film series based on Fontaine Fox's Toonerville Folks comic strip. While Hervey was in Pennsylvania working on the production, she met the painter Nan Mason, the daughter of her co-star Dan Mason, who played the Skipper. Nan and Hervey became life partners, remaining together until Hervey's death in 1979. Wilna studied art with Winold Reiss, and Nan performed music for Edward Weston and Johan Hagemeyer. Around 1919-1920, Hervey's father bought her a studio in Bearsville, New York. She and Nan Mason split their time between painting and farming in Woodstock, New York, and pursuing acting opportunities in California, from 1922 to 1929. They became popular members of the Woodstock artists’ community, and both found some artistic success there during the 1960s. During the harsh New York winters, they also spent time in Carmel, California and Manatee County, Florida.

Together from 1920 to 1979: 59 years.
Nan Mason (1896-1982)
Wilna Hervey (October 3, 1894 – March 6, 1979)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Cemetery: The town has long been a mecca for artists, musicians, and writers, even before the music festival made the name "Woodstock" famous. The town has a separate "Artist's Cemetery". Film and art festivals attract big names, and hundreds of musicians have come to Woodstock to record.

Address: 12 Mountainview Ave, Woodstock, NY 12498, USA (42.04325, -74.12007)
Phone: +1 845-679-2713
Website: www.woodstockartistscemetery.org

Place
The first non-indigenous settler arrived around 1770. The Town of Woodstock was established in 1787. Later, Woodstock contributed some of its territory to form the towns of Middletown (1789), Windham (1798), Shandaken (1804), and Olive (1853). Woodstock played host to numerous Hudson River School painters during the late 1800s. The Arts and Crafts Movement came to Woodstock in 1902, with the arrival of Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead, Bolton Brown and Hervey White, who formed the Byrdcliffe Colony. In 1906, L. Birge Harrison and others founded the Summer School of the Art Students League of New York in the area, primarily for landscape painting. Ever since, Woodstock has been considered an active artists colony. From 1915 through 1931, Hervey White's Maverick Art Colony held the Maverick Festivals, "in which hundreds of free spirits gathered each summer for music, art, theater and drunken orgies in the woods."A series of Woodstock Sound-Outs were staged at Pan Copeland's Farm just over the town line in Saugerties from 1967 to 1970. These featured folk and rock acts like Richie Havens, Paul Butterfield, Dave van Ronk and Van Morrison and were identified with Woodstock's reputation as a summer arts colony. The Sound-Outs inspired the original Woodstock Festival's organizers to plan their concert at the Winston Farm in Saugerties; however, the town turned down their permit, and the "Woodstock" Festival was actually held almost 60 miles (97 km) away at Max Yasgur's Farm in the Sullivan County town of Bethel. Woodstock is also home to the Karma Triyana Dharmachakra Buddhist monastery, situated at the top of Mead's Mountain Road.

Life
Who: Wilna "Willie" Hervey (October 3, 1894 – March 6, 1979) and Nan Mason (July 17, 1896 – March 2, 1982).
Nan Mason was a member of the Woodstock Artist Colony but spent time in Carmel, California as well. As a painter, she was surrounded by her contemporaries and learned well from their interactions. Nan rests beside her partner of 59 years, Wilna Hervey, actress and Artist. Hervey appeared in a number of silent films, most notably the "Toonerville Trolley" comedies made by the Betzwood Film Company in Pennsylvania in 1920. At 6'3" and weighing nearly 300 pounds, she was perfect in the role of "Powerful Katrinka," one of the most popular characters of the "Toonerville" film series.She came from a very wealthy family and when her movie career ended in 1922, she purchased a farm in Bearsville, NY 12409, near Woodstock and lived there with her life partner, Nan Mason, for most of the rest of her life. As an artist, Wilna Hervey is best remembered for tiny exquisite enamel paintings done in a technique she pioneered. "I'm a big woman, but I want my pictures to be small," she was fond of saying. Her partner, Nan Mason concentrated on painting and photography. Both "Willie" and Nan became beloved members of the artists community that was centered in Woodstock. Well known for their eccentricities, their generosity, and the wild parties they threw, Wilna Hervey and Nan Mason are still fondly remembered in Woodstock today.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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John Gray was an English poet whose works include Silverpoints, The Long Road and Park: A Fantastic Story. It has often been suggested that he was the inspiration behind Oscar Wilde's fictional Dorian Gray.
Born: March 2, 1866, London, United Kingdom
Died: June 14, 1934, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Lived: St. Peter’s Church, 77 Falcon Avenue, Edinburgh EH10 4AN, UK (55.93024, -3.20693)
2 Vivian Road, Bethnal Green
96 Eglinton Road, Woolwich
43 Park Lane, W1K
Buried: Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, City of Edinburgh, Scotland
Find A Grave Memorial# 139613013
People also search for: Ian Fletcher, Allan Walter Campbell, Aubrey Beardsley

John Gray was an English poet whose works include Silverpoints, The Long Road and Park: A Fantastic Story. It has often been suggested that he was the inspiration behind Oscar Wilde's fictional Dorian Gray. Gray's life partner was Marc-Andre Raffalovich, a wealthy poet and early defender of homosexuality. On November 28, 1898, at the age of 32, Gray entered the Scots College, Rome, to study for the priesthood. Cardinal Pietro Respighi at St John Lateran ordained him on December 21, 1901. Raffalovich himself became a Catholic in 1896 and joined the tertiary order of Dominicans. When Gray went to Edinburgh, Raffalovich settled nearby. He helped finance St Peter's Church in Morningside where Gray would serve as priest for the rest of his life. The two maintained a chaste relationship until Raffalovich's sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later at St. Raphael's nursing home in Edinburgh after a short illness. The critic, Valentine Cunningham, has described Gray as the "stereotypical poet of the nineties“.

Together from 1896 to 1934: 38 years.
John Gray (March 9, 1866 – June 14, 1934)
Marc-Andre Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: John Gray (1866-1934) was born at 2 Vivian Rd, London E3 5RF, a working-class area in the East End of London, "Mean streets of semi-detached houses of dull uniformity." Most of the inhabitants, so it seems, were industrious, provident, house-proud, typical altogether of the superior artisan class. A few years later the family moved to 96 Eglinton Rd, Woolwich, London SE18 3SY. His father, another John Gray, was successively a wheelwright in Woolwich Dockyard and inspector of stores at Woolwich Arsenal.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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House: In 1882, aged eighteen, Marc André Raffalovich (1864-1934) moved to London with his governess, Miss Florence Truscott Gribbell (c.1842-1930), with the intention of studying at the University of Oxford. Instead, he settled at 72 S Audley St, Mayfair, London W1K 1JB, with the intention of setting up a salon. Unlike his mother, he was not entirely successful. It was during his time in London that he was introduced to the poet and writer John Gray, through Arthur William Symons (1865–1945), literary scholar and author. They were to remain close friends and companions throughout the next forty years, dying within months of each other.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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House: 43 Park Ln, Mayfair, London W1K 1PN, was home to John Gray (1866–1934) from 1893 to 1898.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: Marc-André Raffalovich (1864-1934) stayed at 11 Egerton Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2BP, from 1898 to 1905 and John Gray spent his holidays there while whilst studying for the priesthood.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: In Whitehouse Terrace, Marc-André Raffalovich established a successful salon. His guests included Henry James, Lady Margaret Sackville, Compton Mackenzie, Max Beerbohm and Herbert Read.

Address: 9 Whitehouse Terrace, Edinburgh EH9 2EU, UK (55.93111, -3.19378)
Historic Scotland Building ID: 30678 (Grade B, 1993)

Place
While John Gray studied in Rome, Marc-André Raffalovich and Miss Florence Truscott Gribbell (the daughter of a Scottish bank manager and Marc-André’s former governess) spent part of each year in Edinburgh, and in 1905, they moved to Morningside, to 9 Whitehouse Terrace, where Raffalovich’s longed-for salon was finally established. “A place of intellectualism and faded decandence,” according to John Kemplay. For 25 years, until Miss Gribbell’s death in 1930, Raffalovich’s Sunday luncheon and Tuesday dinner parties were established features of the city’s social life. His home was last on the market in 2013 and sold for £2,800,000.

Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
Marc-André Raffalovich was a French poet and writer on homosexuality, best known today for his patronage of the arts and for his lifelong relationship with the poet John Gray. Marc-André went up to study in Oxford in 1882 before settling down in London and opening a salon in the 1890s. Oscar Wilde attended, calling the event a saloon rather than a salon. This is where Raffalovich met the love and companion of his life, John Gray. In 1890, his sister Sophie married the Irish nationalist politician William O’Brien (1852–1928.) In 1896, under the influence of John Gray, Raffalovich embraced Catholicism and joined the tertiary order of the Dominicans as Brother Sebastian in honour of Saint Sebastian. At the same time Gray was ordained a priest. In 1905, Gray was appointed to the parish of St Patrick in the working class Cowgate area of Edinburgh. Raffalovich followed and settled down nearby, purchasing No. 9, Whitehouse Terrace. He contributed greatly to the cost of St Peter’s Church in Morningside, Edinburgh, of which Gray was appointed the first parish priest.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Church: St. Peter’s, Falcon Avenue, is a church that gives a remarkable experience of spaciousness for a relative small interior.

Address: 77 Falcon Avenue, Edinburgh EH10 4AN, UK (55.93024, -3.20693)
Phone:+44 131 447 2502
Website: http://www.stpetersrcchurchedinburgh.org.uk/
Historic Scotland Building ID: 27257 (Grade A, 1970)

Place
Built in 1905, Design by Sir Robert Lorimer (1864-1929)
The church was opened on 25 April 1907. The idea was conceived by Fr. John Gray, at the time curate at St. Patrick’s Church (40 High St, Old Town, Edinburgh EH1 1TQ), together with Marc-André Raffalovitch. On a painting inside the church, an angel with raised and partially spread wings and head bowed to right shoulder is holding a model of the Presbytery, whilst kneeling on left leg on what appears to be a coiled serpent. A large flowering plant rises vertically on the angel’s right from a two-handled vase. The work is housed in a stepped niche. In 1906, John Gray was appointed the first parish priest of St. Peter’s church in Edinburgh, which was a huge change of professional environment for him – from shabby Cowgate to affluent Morningside. His friend Raffalovich financed the building of the church in Falcon Avenue, completed in 1907. John Duncan was commissioned to paint the Stations of the Cross for the church, and was often among the guests at Raffalovich’s parties. The paintings were sold around 1965 and their present whereabouts is unknown. One visitor to the church buildings in Falcon Avenue later remembered: “The whole house was in a dim, mysterious, and elusive twilight. It was a world of half-tones: in fact it only needed an invisible gramophone playing Debussy or bits from Maeterlinck to make it quite perfect. To think of “Pellèas et Mèlisande” or “Le Cathèdrale englouti” is to capture the impression of St. Peter’s presbytery – and its creator.” Anson, 1963.

Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
John Gray was a poet whose works include “Silverpoints,” “The Long Road” and “Park: A Fantastic Story.” Gray is best known today as an aesthetic poet of the 1890s and as a friend of Ernest Dowson, Aubrey Beardsley and Oscar Wilde. He was also a talented translator, bringing works by the French Symbolists Stéphane Mallarmé, Paul Verlaine, Jules Laforgue and Arthur Rimbaud into English, often for the first time. He is purported to be the inspiration behind the title character in Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” but distanced himself from this rumour. In fact, Wilde’s story was serialised in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine a year before their relationship began. His relationship with Wilde was initially intense, but had cooled for over two years by the time of Wilde’s imprisonment. The relationship appears to have been at its height in the period 1891-1893. In 1882 he passed the Civil Service exams and, five years later, the University of London matriculation exams. He joined the Foreign Office where he became a librarian. He left his position at the Foreign Office on 28 November 1898, at the age of 32, and he entered the Scots College, Rome, to study for the priesthood. He was ordained by Cardinal Pietro Respighi at St John Lateran on 21 December 1901. He served as a priest in Edinburgh, first at Saint Patrick’s and then as rector at Saint Peter’s. John Gray was to become a close friend of the “Michael Fields” – Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper. His most important supporter, and life partner, was Marc-André Raffalovich, a wealthy poet and early defender of homosexuality. Raffalovich himself became a Catholic in 1896 and joined the tertiary order of Dominicans. When Gray went to Edinburgh he settled nearby. He helped finance St Peter’s Church in Morningside where Gray would serve as priest for the rest of his life. In 1930, Gray was installed as canon in St. Mary’s cathedral (35 Manor Pl, Edinburgh EH3 7EB). The two maintained a chaste relationship until Raffalovich’s sudden death in 1934. A devastated Gray died exactly four months later at St. Raphael’s nursing home in Edinburgh after a short illness.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Cemetery: The Archdiocese of St Andrews & Edinburgh acquired the land in 1895 and it became Mount Vernon Cemetery. The first burial was in 1895.

Address: 49 Mount Vernon Rd, Edinburgh EH16 6JG, UK (55.91498, -3.1576)
Phone: +44 131 664 3064

Place
The land now known as Mount Vernon Cemetery was previously known as the “Lands of Nellfield” and in 1827 was renamed by the then owners as “Mount Vernon”.

Life
Who: John Gray (March 2, 1866 – June 14, 1934) and Marc-André Raffalovich (September 11, 1864 – February 14, 1934)
Given his close and intense friendship with Canon John Gray, Raffalovich is buried as close as possible to him. His tombstone reads: IN PEACE + MARC ANDRE SEBASTIAN RAFFALOVICH 11TH SEPTEMBER 1864 + 14TH FEBRUARY 1934. John Gray is probably buried in the Priests' Circle as he was the founder and first priest of St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church, Falcon Road.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford — also known as Horace Walpole — was an English art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician.
Born: September 24, 1717, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 2, 1797, Berkeley Square, London, United Kingdom
Education: Eton College
University of Cambridge
Lived: 5 Portland Place, W1B
Strawberry Hill House, 268 Waldegrave Road, Twickenham, Greater London TW1 4ST, UK (51.43825, -0.33456)
Houghton Hall, King’s Lynn, Norfolk PE31 6UE, UK (52.82682, 0.65784)
11 Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London W1J, UK (51.50973, -0.14522)
5 Arlington Street, SW1A
Buried: St Martin, Houghton Park, Houghton-next-Harpley, Houghton, Norfolk, PE31 6TY
Find A Grave Memorial# 10142
Movies: Castle of Otranto

At ten years old, Horace Walpole was sent to Eton College, where he became part
of the "Quadruple Alliance" of sensitive literary friends, which included Thomas Gray, who was to become the most popular poet of the century, Richard West and Thomas Ashton. Gray was an English poet, letter-writer, classical scholar and professor at Cambridge University. He is widely known for his Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, published in 1751. Walpole and Gray remained friends throughout the latter's life, and Walpole continued to champion his poetry and defend him personally in the many years he survived him. When Walpole decided to go travelling on the “Grand Tour” with Gray, he wrote a will whereby he left Gray all his belongings. In Europe the two had a bitter falling out that took years to put behind them. In later life, Walpole admitted that the fault lay primarily with himself: "to have been inattentive and insensible to the feelings of one I thought below me.”

They met in 1727 and remained friends until Gray’s death in 1771: 44 years.
Horace Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797)
Thomas Gray (December 26, 1716 - July 30, 1771)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 5 Arlington Street, St. James’s, “Sir Robert Walpole (1676–1745), Prime Minister, and his son Horace Walpole (1717–1797), Connoisseur and Man of Letters, lived here"

Address: 11 Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London W1J 6HE, UK (51.50973, -0.14522)

Place
Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid XVIII century by architect William Kent. The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789. Berkeley Square was laid out in the middle of the XVIII century under Robert Walpole, then Prime Minister. At No. 11 Berkeley Square, Mayfair, London W1J 6HE, lived his son Horace, from 1779 to 1797; at No. 13 the Marquis of Hertford began to collect what is now the Wallace Collection; at No. 25 lived Charles James Fox; at No. 28 Lord Brougham entertained as Lord Chancellor; at No. 38 Lady Jersey’s dinners and balls were the talk of the town; at No. 45 Lord Clive committed suicide in 1774, and in the corner house on Bruton Street Colly Gibber lived and died. Olive Custance (1874-1944) was born at 12 John St, London WC1N 2EB, the only daughter and heiress of Colonel Frederick Hambleton Custance, who was a wealthy and distinguished soldier in the British army. Whilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses. The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865. The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent’s masterpiece. Gunter’s Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here. 50 Berkeley Square is allegedly haunted; it is currently occupied by Maggs Brothers Antiquarian Booksellers.

Life
Who: Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), aka Horace Walpole
Horace Walpole was born in 1717 at 17 Arlington St, St. James's, London SW1A 1RJ, the youngest son of British Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole and his wife Catherine. Sir Robert Walpole (1676–1745) and his son Horace Walpole moved at 5 Arlington St, St. James's, London SW1A 1RA, in 1742. Robert died in 1745, Horave lived there until 1779, where there is a blue plaque to them. Horace Walpole lived for the last fifteen years of his life at No. 11 on the east side of this square, and here he died on the 2nd of March, 1797, a few years after succeeding to the Earldom of Oxford, a title he scarcely ever cared to assume, preferring to be called plain "Horace Walpole" to the end. He thus writes to the Countess of Ossory, under date October, 1779, which fixes the date of his removal hither from Arlington Street, where we have already been introduced to him:—"I came to town this morning to take possession of [my house in] Berkeley Square, and am as well pleased with my new habitation as I can be with anything at present. Lady Shelburne’s being queen of the palace over against me (he is referring, of course, to Lansdowne House) has improved the view since I bought the house, and I trust will make your ladyship not so shy as you were in Arlington Street." Walpole was attacked at Strawberry Hill by the cold, about the close of November, 1796, and at the end of that month he removed to his house in Berkeley Square, which he never left again. On this cold supervened an attack of gout. He still amused himself with writing and dictating brief notes, instead of letters, and with the conversation of his friends; and, exhausted by weakness, sunk gradually and died painlessly, on the 2nd of the following March. On the death of Horace Walpole, the house passed to his niece, Lady Waldegrave, who was living here at the beginning of the XIX century. It has been said of Horace Walpole, with some justice, by Mr. Charles Knight: "The chief value of his letters consists in his lively descriptions of those public events whose nicer details, without such a chronicler, would be altogether hid under the varnish of what we call history."



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Historic District: Regent Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was built under the direction of the architect John Nash. The street runs from Waterloo Place in St James's at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Circus, to All Soul's Church. From there Langham Place and Portland Place continue the route to Regent's Park.

Address: Regent Street, London W1B, UK

Place
• The Langham, London (1C Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1JA) is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium. Since the XIX century the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as “A Scandal in Bohemia” and “The Sign of Four” partly at the Langham. The Langham continued throughout the XX century to be a favoured spot with members of the royal family, such as Diana, Princess of Wales, and many high-profile politicians including Winston Churchill and Charles de Gaulle. Other guests included Noël Coward, Wallis Simpson, Don Bradman, Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, W. Somerset Maugham and Ayumi Hamasaki. Guy Burgess (1911-1963), one of the “Cambridge Five”, a spying ring who fed official secrets to the Soviets during the Cold War, stayed at the Langham while working for the BBC.
• Horace Walpole (1717-1797) lived in 1743 at 5 Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1PW.
• Edward FitzGerald (1809-1883), English writer and translator, lived at 39 Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1QQ, in his childhood. He married Lucy, the daughter of the Quaker poet Bernard Barton in Chichester on 4 November 1856, following a death bed promise to Bernard made in 1849 to look after her. The newly married pair went to Brighton, and then settled for a time at 31 Great Portland St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 8QG. A few days of married life were enough to disillusionise FitzGerald. The marriage was evidently unhappy, for the couple separated after only a few months, despite having known each other for many years, including collaborating on a book about her father's works in 1849.
• Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) was evicted by his landlords as they had heared that he planned to exhibt "erotic" paintings at 2 All Souls' Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 3DA.
• While Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932) was at Charterhouse, his family moved from Hanwell to a house behind All Souls Church in Langham Place (1 All Souls' Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 3DA).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: Restored Gothic castle, once home to Horace Walpole, with a landscaped garden, tours and a cafe.

Address: 268 Waldegrave Road, Twickenham, Greater London TW1 4ST, UK (51.43825, -0.33456)
Hours: Monday through Wednesday 13.30-16.00, Saturday-Sunday 12.00-16.00
Phone: +44 20 8744 1241
Website: http://www.strawberryhillhouse.org.uk/

Place
Horace Walpole rebuilt the existing house in stages starting in 1749, 1760, 1772 and 1776. Strawberry Hill House — often called simply Strawberry Hill — is the Gothic Revival villa that was built in Twickenham, London by Horace Walpole from 1749. It is the type example of the "Strawberry Hill Gothic" style of architecture, and it prefigured the XIX century Gothic revival. Walpole added gothic features such as towers and battlements outside and elaborate decoration inside to create "gloomth" to suit Walpole’s collection of antiquarian objects, contrasting with the more cheerful or "riant" garden. The interior included a Robert Adam fireplace; parts of the exterior were designed by James Essex. The garden contained a large seat shaped like a Rococo sea shell; it has been recreated in the 2012 restoration. The South part of the North East wing was built in 1698 but when the property came into the possession of Horace Walpole in 1747 it was described by him as a cottage. It was converted into a “Gothic” building by him and added to, and nothing of earlier date than his reconstruction is visible outside. Inside the building some of the original chamfered ceiling-beams are exposed and many of the windows contain continental painted glass, mostly of the XVII century. After a £9 million, two-year-long restoration, Strawberry Hill House reopened to the public on Saturday October 2, 2010. In 2013, Strawberry Hill House won the European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage in the Europa Nostra Awards. The Walpole Trust re-opened Strawberry Hill to the public on March 1, 2015. Teddington is a town in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. Historically in the former county of Middlesex, it is on the north bank of the Thames though faces the other way being just after the start of a long meander, between Hampton Wick and the equally affluent area of Strawberry Hill, Twickenham.

Life
Who: Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), aka Horace Walpole
At 10 years old, Horace Walpole was sent to Eton College, where he became part of the “Quadruple Alliance” with Thomas Gray (1716-1771), Richard West and Thomas Ashton. Walpole and Gray remained friends throughout the latter’s life, and Walpole continued to champion his poetry and defend him personally in the many years he survived him. When Walpole decided to go travelling on the Grand Tour with Gray, he wrote a will whereby he left Gray all his belongings. In Europe the two had a bitter falling out that took years to put behind them. In later life, Walpole admitted that the fault lay primarily with himself: “to have been inattentive and insensible to the feelings of one I thought below me.” Walpole left his London villa, Strawberry Hill, to Anne Seymour Damer (1749-1828), Mary Berry (1763-1852) and Mary’s sister, Agnes, to live there for all their life. A number of sources have named Damer as being involved in lesbian relationships, particularly relating to her close friendship with Mary Berry, to whom she had been introduced by Horace Walpole in 1789. Mary Berry was the last to survive, and at her death, the 6th earl of Waldegrave, as it was in Horace Walpole’s will, inherited Strawberry Hill, Twickenham (hence the name of Waldegrave Road, which connects Strawberry Hill with Teddington), but his son, George Edward, the 7th earl (1816–1846), was obliged in 1842 to sell the valuable treasures collected there. In 1923 the empty villa was bought by St Mary’s University, Twickenham. In 2007, it was leased to the Strawberry Hill Trust for restoration and eventual opening to the public.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: Houghton Hall is a country house in Norfolk. It is the home of David Cholmondeley, 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley.

Address: 38 Houghton, King's Lynn PE31 6SX, UK (52.82682, 0.65784)
Phone: +44 1485 528569
Website: http://www.houghtonhall.com/
English Heritage Building ID: 221600 (Grade I, 1953)

Place
Built in the XVIII century, Design by James Gibbs (1682-1754)
It was built for the de facto first British Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole, and it is a key building in the history of Palladian architecture in England. It is surrounded by 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of parkland adjacent to Sandringham House. The house has a rectangular main block which consists of a rustic basement at ground level, with a piano nobile, bedroom floor and attics above. There are also two lower flanking wings joined to the main block by colonnades. To the south of the house there is a detached quadrangular stable block. The exterior is both grand and restrained, constructed of fine-grained, silver-white stone. The Gibbs-designed domes punctuate each corner. In line with Palladian conventions, the interiors are much more colourful, exuberant and opulent than the exteriors. The parklands surrounding Houghton was redesigned in the XVIII century by Charles Bridgeman. In the process, the village of Houghton was demolished and rebuilt outside the park, with the exception of the medieval parish church, which was heavily restored. This new building was placed on the site of earlier Walpole family houses.

Life
Who: Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), aka Horace Walpole
Sir Robert Walpole became the 1st Earl of Orford in 1742. Ownership of Houghton Hall passed to his son and grandson, the 2nd and 3rd earls. On the death of the 3rd earl it reverted to his uncle the 4th Earl of Orford, better known as Horace Walpole. On his death in 1797, possession passed to the family of his sister, Lady Cholmondeley, who died at just 26 years in 1731, more than 65 years before. Sir Robert Walpole’s daughter, Mary, had married George Cholmondeley, 3rd Earl of Cholmondeley and Houghton Hall was modified and maintained by her Cholmondeley family across a further span of generations. Colonel Robert Walpole borrowed a book about the Archbishop of Bremen from the Sidney Sussex College library in 1667 or 1668. The overdue library book was discovered at Houghton in the mid-1950s, and returned 288 years later. The house has remained largely untouched, having remained "unimproved" despite the Victorian passion for remodelling and redecorating. Houghton still belongs to the Marquess of Cholmondeley, and parts of the structure and grounds are opened to the public throughout the year. Horace Walpole is buried at St Martin (Houghton Park, Houghton-next-Harpley, Houghton, Norfolk, PE31 6TY), in the Walpole family vault.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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