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Horatio Robert Forbes Brown was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy.
Born: February 16, 1854, Nice, France
Died: August 19, 1926, Belluno
Education: Clifton College
Lived: Newhall House, Carlops, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 9LY, UK (55.79672, -3.31732)
Ca’ Torresella, Zattere, Venice (45.42905, 12.32734)
Buried: Cimitero di San Michele, Venice, Città Metropolitana di Venezia, Veneto, Italy, Plot: Rec. Evangel, GPS (lat/lon): 45.4475, 12.34833
Find A Grave Memorial# 161099875

Born at Nice (then part of the kingdom of Sardinia) on February 16, 1854, Horatio Brown was the son of Hugh Horatio Brown, an advocate, of New Hall House, Carlops, who was a Deputy Lieutenant for Midlothian, and of Guglielmina Forbes, the sixth daughter of Colonel Ranaldson MacDonnell of Glengarry and Clanranald (1773–1828.) The marriage was in 1853, and his mother was a good deal younger than his father, who died on October 17, 1866, at the age of 66.
Address: Carlops, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 9LY, UK (55.79672, -3.31732)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1968 660206
Historic Scotland Building ID: 14644 (Grade B, 1979)
Place
Remodeled in 1850, Design by David Bryce (1803-1876)
There has been a house at Newhall dating back to the XIII century. The main part of the current house dates from 1703 when it replaced the original keep. This was added to under the ownership of Robert Brown in 1792 when he also built the walled garden. Many alterations were made and signs of former staircases and windows have been found in more recent alterations. Robert Brown’s son, Hugh, extended the house which included the north facing extension housing the dining room and billiard room above, the turreted front door and the domestic offices. The sun room to the rear and the extension housing the eight garages were added in recent years. The principal reception rooms include the drawing room, adjacent to the sun room with French windows to the rear lawn. To the front of the house is the dining room which can seat 22 people at one table. Since 1907, first as occasional tenants and then later as owners, the Maclagan family were connected with Newhall. The Kennedys moved to Newhall in 1998. Alison Maclagan died in 2002 aged 97
Life
Who: Horatio Robert Forbes Brown (February 16, 1854 – August 19, 1926)
Horatio Brown was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy. He spent most of his life in Venice, publishing several books about the city. He also wrote for the Cambridge Modern History, was the biographer of John Addington Symonds, and was a poet and alpinist. In 1877, the Brown family found itself in a bad financial position. Allan Brown emigrated to New South Wales, and a tenant was found for the family home in Midlothian, Newhall House. In 1879, Brown and his mother decided to live in Italy. They went first to Florence, where Guglielmina Brown’s Forbes aunts lived, and then settled at Venice, taking an apartment in the Palazzo Balbi Valier on the Grand Canal. Brown’s mother died in 1909, and Brown began to spend the summers in Midlothian, staying at the inn of Penicuik or with his friend Lord Rosebery, a former prime minister. During the Great War he stayed in Venice, and when the Austrians seemed likely to capture the city he moved to Florence, then home to Scotland, where he lived between the New club in Edinburgh and his home village of Carlops. Brown sold the Newhall estate before dying of heart failure on August 19, 1926 in Italy.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Horatio Brown moved to Ca’ Torresella on the Zattere, where he lived till 1926 when he died, apart from a temporary evacuation during WW1. Every Monday evening, he gave a salon there and British visitors armed with letters of introduction could meet all the great and good.
Address: Zattere, Venice (45.42905, 12.32734)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1879, Horatio Brown and his mother decided to live in Italy. They went first to Florence, where Guglielmina Brown’s Forbes aunts lived, and then settled at Venice, taking an apartment in the Palazzo Balbi Valier on the Grand Canal. In 1885, the Browns bought a tall, narrow, tenement building on the Zattere looking down the Giudecca Canal and reconstructed it as a house called Cà Torresella. Brown’s close friend Antonio Salin, a gondolier, also lived in the house with his wife and family. The receptions he gave at home on Mondays were described by Frederick Rolfe, known as Baron Corvo.
Life
Who: Horatio Robert Forbes Brown (February 16, 1854 – August 19, 1926)
In Venice, Horatio Brown met the archaeologist Giacomo Boni, who became his colleague in a common passion for the antiquities of Venice and Italy. Brown became a leading figure in the English-speaking community, churchwarden of St George’s Church in campo San Vio, president of the city’s Cosmopolitan Hospital, and honorary treasurer of the Sailors’ Institute. He also befriended local gondoliers and fishermen, helping them in their battles, gaining the material for a book of local colour, “Life on the Lagoons,” which appeared in 1884. The ailing Robert Louis Stevenson (whom Brown had met in 1881 at Symonds’s house at Davos, Switzerland) read it and wrote the poem "To H. F. Brown" to celebrate "your spirited and happy book.” An alpinist, Brown climbed peaks in Switzerland, the Carnic Alps and the Tyrol, and was a member of the Alpine Club of Venice. Lord Ronald Gower stayed with Brown in Venice in the 1890s and noted in his diary: "Every morning Horatio Brown goes to his work at the Archives, and I go a-sight-seeing." Brown spent part of the summer of 1895 staying with Gower in London, when they visited picture galleries together. In 1899, his portrait was painted by Henry Scott Tuke. Brown’s friend John Addington Symonds appointed him his literary executor, so that in 1893, when Symonds died, Brown received all his private papers. He went on to publish “John Addington Symonds, a Biography” (1895), followed in 1923 by “Letters and Papers of John Addington Symonds.” In both, he suppressed almost all of Symonds’s homosexuality, and in Brown’s own will he left orders for the destruction of the papers, apart from Symonds’s autobiography, and that was not to be published for at least fifty years. In 1923, an equally discreet obituary of Frederick Rolfe was printed in the London Mercury, and Brown commented with sympathy: “If it was necessary to modify concerning Rolfe – a freelance with no ties – imagine what I was forced to do in my John Addington Symonds books, with his daughters and their husbands insisting on seeing the MS before it was printed!” Brown published some homoerotic poems in his collection “Drift” (1900), but was hostile to the Uranian writers in the circle of Edward Carpenter, and because of his suppression of the truth about Symonds they saw him as a hindrance to homosexual emancipation. After the war he sold most of his Venetian house, keeping an apartment. In March 1925 he had a heart attack, but recovered. He died of heart failure on August 19, 1926 at Belluno, where he had gone to escape the summer heat. He was cremated on San Michele. His estate at death was £6,117, a substantial sum. Brown’s friend and fellow-historian Frederick York Powell described him as "Horatio Brown, the Venetian historian, a real good sort, cheery, broad-faced, shock-headed, tumble-dressed,” while after his death the Cornhill Magazine called him a "Scotch laird, with his ruddy countenance, muscular limbs, and sturdy frame.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

San Michele is an island in the Venetian Lagoon, northern Italy. It is associated with the sestiere of Cannaregio, from which it lies a short distance northeast.
Address: 30135 Venezia, Italy (45.44644, 12.34685)
Type: Cemetery (Open to public)
Phone: +39 041 729 2811
Place
Along with neighbouring San Cristoforo della Pace, the island was a popular place for local travellers and fishermen to land. Mauro Codussi's Chiesa di San Michele in Isola of 1469, the first Renaissance church in Venice, and a monastery lie on the island, which also served for a time as a prison. San Cristoforo was selected to become a cemetery in 1807, designed by Gian Antonio Selva, when under French occupation it was decreed that burial on the mainland (or on the main Venetian islands) was unsanitary. The canal that separated the two islands was filled in during 1836, and subsequently the larger island became known as San Michele. Bodies were carried to the island on special funeral gondolas. Among those buried there are Igor Stravinsky, Joseph Brodsky, Jean Schlumberger, Christian Doppler, Frederick Rolfe, Horatio Brown, Sergei Diaghilev, Ezra Pound, Luigi Nono, Catherine Bagration, Franco Basaglia, Paolo Cadorin, Zoran Mušič, Helenio Herrera, Emilio Vedova, and Salvador de Iturbide y Marzán. The cemetery is still in use today. The cemetery contains 7 war graves from WWI of officers and seamen of the British merchant and Royal Navy. Aspasia Manos was initially interred at the cemetery of Isola di San Michele. Her remains were later transferred to the Royal Cemetery Plot in the park of Tatoi Palace. Other attractions include the Cappella Emiliana.
Notable queer burials at Isola di San Michele:
• Princess Catherine Bagration (1783-1857) was the wife of the general Pyotr Bagration. She was known for her beauty, love affairs and outrageous behaviour. She counted many Parisian celebrities among her close friends: Stendhal, Benjamin Constant, the Marquis de Custine, even the Queen of Greece. The Princess's cook for a time was Marie-Antoine Carême, the founder of Haute Cuisine. Balzac mentions in one of his letters that she was one of the two women upon whom he based the character Feodora, heroine of his first novel “La Peau de Chagrin”. Similarly Victor Hugo mentions her salon in “Les Misérables”.
• Horatio Brown (February 16, 1854-August 19, 1926) was a Scottish historian who specialised in the history of Venice and Italy.
• Sergei Diaghilev (1872-1929) was a Russian art critic, patron, ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes, from which many famous dancers and choreographers would arise.
• Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was an expatriate American poet and critic, and a major figure in the early modernist movement. His contribution to poetry began with his development of Imagism, a movement derived from classical Chinese and Japanese poetry, stressing clarity, precision and economy of language.
• Frederick Rolfe, better known as Baron Corvo (1860-1913), was an English writer, artist, photographer and eccentric.
• Jean Schlumberger (1907-1987) was a French jewelry designer especially well known for his work at Tiffany & Co. Schlumberger was a very private person but liked to socialize among friends like Cristóbal Balenciaga, Emilio Terry, Diana Vreeland and Hubert de Givenchy.
• Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) was a Russian (and later, a naturalized French and American) composer, pianist and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the XX century.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Gabrielle Bonheur "Coco" Chanel was a French fashion designer and businesswoman. She was the founder and namesake of the Chanel brand.
Born: August 19, 1883, Saumur, France
Died: January 10, 1971, Paris, France
Full name: Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel
Books: Chanel
Siblings: Lucien Chanel, Pierre Chanel, Antoinette Chanel, Augustin Chanel, Alphonse Chanel, Julia Chanel
Lived: Villa La Pausa, 12B Avenue de la Torraca, 06190 Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France (43.76102, 7.46707)
Buried: Cimetière du Bois-de-Vaux, Lausanne, District de Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland, Plot: Section 9

It’s hardly surprising that the allure of the Côte d’Azur cast its spell over France’s grande dame of fashion, Coco Chanel. Villa La Pausa, situated in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin between Monte Carlo and Menton, was built for Chanel and her lover, the Duke of Westminster.
Address: 12B Avenue de la Torraca, 06190 Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France (43.76102, 7.46707)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +33 4 93 83 51 20
Place
Built in 1927, Design by Robert Streitz, Interior Design by Coco Chanel (1883-1971)
La Pausa is a large detached villa in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, in the Alpes-Maritimes department of France. It was owned by Chanel until 1953. La Pausa was sold by Chanel to the Hungarian publisher Emery Reves. The British Prime Minister Winston Churchill spent roughly a third year at La Pausa from 1956 to 1958 with Reves and his wife, Wendy, and wrote and edited part of his “History of the English Speaking Peoples” there. La Pausa was occupied by Wendy Reves until 2007. The principal rooms of La Pausa and its significant art collection were recreated at the Dallas Museum of Art during her lifetime and under her direction. The Reves wing was opened in 1985. Situated above the village of Roquebrune, the house enjoys views toward Menton and the French border with Italy on one side, and Monaco on the other. Its name refers to the legend that Mary Magdalene "paused" near here on her journey from Jerusalem following the crucifixion of Jesus. Guests hosted by the Reves with Churchill included Noël Coward, Somerset Maugham and Edward Molyneux. Other notable high society guests hosted by the Reves at La Pausa included the aristocrats Prince Rainier and Princess Grace of Monaco, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, and the actors Greta Garbo, Errol Flynn and Clark Gable. Following Emery Reves’s death in 1981, the Dallas Museum of Art in the United States approached Wendy Reves knowing that there was a possibility that her art collection at La Pausa might be given to a museum. In exchange for the 1985 donation Reves insisted that the museum recreate six of the principal rooms at La Pausa, and display the collection there as she had arranged it. The collection of 1,400 objet d’art is displayed at the museum as the Wendy and Emery Reves Collection in a reconstruction of five rooms from La Pausa. The villa’s central courtyard and patio were reconstructed at the museum along with the villa’s dining room, library, salon, bedroom, and hall, situated in a purpose built 16,500-square-foot wing designed by architect Edward Larrabee Barnes. La Pausa has now been acquired by the House of Chanel again, with plans to restore it to its original decor and spirit.
Life
Who: Gabrielle Bonheur "Coco" Chanel (August 19, 1883 – January 10, 1971)
Chanel bought the five acre plot on which La Pausa was built for 1.8 million French francs in Feb. 1929. The plot had formerly been part of the hunting grounds of the ruling family of Monaco, the Grimaldis, and contained wild olive and orange groves. The villa was built less than a year later. The final cost of the villa was 6 million francs, a large sum for the time. It is not clear whether Chanel or her lover, Hugh Grosvenor, 2nd Duke of Westminster financed the building and furnishing of La Pausa. Architect Robert Streitz sought to build “the ideal Mediterranean villa.” The design of the house modelled on the XII century convent-orphanage in Aubazine, in the department of Corréze, which Chanel spent her childhood. A stone staircase leads up from the main entrance hall and a cloister encloses a courtyard. A design of five windows is repeated throughout the house, in tribute to Chanel’s perfume, Chanel No. 5. Chanel ordered more than 20,000 curved tiles to be handmade for the roof, and furnished the house sparsely in shades of white and beige. Each bathroom has a servants entrance. Chanel would take Le Train Bleu from Paris every month to inspect the progress of the building. If Chanel was unable to make the trip, local craftsmen would be sent to Paris to meet her. The colour scheme of the house was beige, which included a beige piano. Chanel may have been assisted in her design of the interior of La Pausa by Stéphane Boudin, the president of the interior design firm Maison Jansen. The central villa is 10,000 sq ft in size, with two smaller villas built for guests. The main house consists of seven bedrooms, with three living rooms, a dining room, two kitchens and staff quarters. Streitz had previously restored another local villa for Chanel’s friend, Count Jean de Segonzac. La Pausa contains three wings that face onto a shaded courtyard, with the rooms containing large fireplaces. The rooms were filled by Chanel with XVI century English oak furniture, given to her by the Duke of Westminster; English oak was also used for floors and panelling. The large reception rooms were lit by wrought-iron chandeliers from Spain. The poet Pierre Reverdy stayed at La Pausa for long periods during the 1930s, and the poet Paul Iribe, Chanel’s lover, collapsed and died while playing tennis with Chanel at La Pausa in 1935. Guests of Chanel’s at La Pausa included Igor Stravinsky, Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Luchino Visconti. La Pausa was profiled by American Vogue magazine in 1938, with the garden described as containing "groves of orange trees, great slopes of lavender, masses of purple iris, and huge clusters of climbing roses." Twenty olive trees from Antibes were replanted in the garden. The designer Roderick Cameron said that at La Pausa, Chanel was the first to cultivate lavender and other flora previously regarded as "poor plants.” The architect of La Pausa, Robert Streitz, was a member of the French Resistance during the German occupation of France in WWII. Streitz hid in La Pausa’s cellars from where he transmitted covert messages. Jewish refugees were also able to utilise La Pausa, using its gardens as a staging post in their escape from France to the Italian border. During the German occupation of France, Chanel made several visits to La Pausa with her lover, the German spy Baron von Dincklage. The design of La Pausa also influenced Chanel’s fashion designs, with her collections evoking the pink and grey palettes of the house and landscape. In 2007 Chanel released a perfume inspired by La Pausa, 28 La Pausa, as part of their "Les Exclusifs" collection. It was created by Chanel’s perfumer Jacques Polge. Coco Chanel died in 1971 and is buried at Bois-de-Vaux Cemetery (Chemin du Bois-de-Vaux, 1007 Lausanne, Switzerland).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Renowned Fashion Designer Coco Chanel (August 19, 1883 –January 10, 1971) was born a peasant and raised in an orphanage. She grew up with a gift of fashion and a keen awareness of social trends. Chanel died in 1971 at the age of 88. The House of Chanel still exists today. She is buried at Bois-de-Vaux Cemetery (Chemin du Bois-de-Vaux, 1007 Lausanne, Switzerland); her tomb is surrounded by five stone lions.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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