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Colette was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. Her best known work, the novella Gigi, was the basis for the film and Lerner and Loewe stage production of the same name.
Born: January 28, 1873, Saint-Sauveur-en-Puisaye, France
Died: August 3, 1954, Paris, France
Lived: Villa Belle Plage, Rue du Capitaine Guy Dath, 80550 Le Crotoy, France (50.21867, 1.61906)
Rozven, 35350 Saint-Coulomb, France (48.69028, -1.92284)
9 Rue De Beaujolais
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 4, #6, GPS (lat/lon): 48.86073, 2.39115
Full name: Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette
Children: Colette de Jouvenel

Mathilde de Morny, called "Missy", was the daughter of the Duke of Morny, half-brother of Napoleon III, and his wife Princess Sophie Troubetzkoy, who was perhaps the natural daughter of Tsar Nicolas I. She was the great-granddaughter of Talleyrand and Empress Josephine. An extravagant conduct made her a celebrity of the Belle Époque and despite her marriage in 1881 to Jacques Godart, Marquis of Belbeuf - whom she divorced in 1903 - she openly displayed her sexual preference for women. At that time, a woman in love with another woman, was no surprise and was quite well accepted. But Missy was wearing a business suit, short hair and she was a cigar chain smoker. She was called Max, Uncle Max or even the Marquis by her friends. Missy underwent an hysterectomy and removed her breast. She was viril, strong and rich and served as Pygmalion to many women in Paris including her love-friend Colette for which she bought villas, produced comedies and made folies. In 1907, the two performed together in a pantomime entitled Rêve d'Égypte at the Moulin Rouge. Their onstage kiss nearly caused a riot, which the police were called in to suppress. As a result of this scandal, further performances were banned and Colette and de Morny were no longer able to openly live together, though their relationship continued a total of five years. Missy committed suicide on June 29, 1944, by putting the head in the oven and died at three o'clock in the afternoon.
Together from 1906 to 1912: 6 years.
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954)
Mathilde “Missy” de Morny (May 26, 1863 – June 29, 1944)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Henry Gauthier-Villars or Willy was a French fin-de-siecle writer and music critic who is today mostly known as the mentor and first husband of Colette. In 1889, he met Colette, 14 years younger than he was; they married on May 15, 1893. Colette soon learned that Willy had other affairs, and she met his mistress Charlotte Kinceler, who later became her friend. Willy and Colette had an affair unbeknownst to each other with the same woman, the American socialite Georgie Raoul-Duval, née Urquhart. Upon discovery, they made it a threesome and attended the Bayreuth festival together. In 1906, Colette left the unfaithful Gauthier-Villars, living for a time at the home of the American writer and salonist Natalie Clifford Barney. The two had a short affair, and remained friends until Colette's death. The marriage of Willy and Colette lasted until 1910, although in the years prior they were already separated. Colette went to work in the music halls of Paris, under the wing of Missy de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf, with whom she became romantically involved. She also was involved in a heterosexual relationship during this time, with the Italian writer Gabriele D’Annunzio. According to one writer, Colette "never gave Missy as much love" and took "advantage of her and more or less appropriating Rozven, a Brittany villa, from her after they split up." Another affair during this period was with the automobile-empire scion Auguste Heriot.
Together from 1893 to 1906: 13 years.
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954)
Henry Gauthier-Villars aka Willy (August 8, 1859 - January 12, 1931)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Villa Belle Plage was the residence of Colette from 1907 to 1910
Address: Rue du Capitaine Guy Dath, 80550 Le Crotoy, France (50.21867, 1.61906)
Type: Private Property
Place
Villa Belle Plage in rue du Capitaine-Guy-Dath, home to Colette and Missy de Morny, does not longer exist, but Le port and town of Crotoy is still a place of interest. Le Crotoy is a commune in the Somme department in Picardie in northern France. Le Crotoy has had lengthy visits from some famous figures of French history: Joan of Arc (who was imprisoned there), Jules Verne (who wrote “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” here), the perfumer Guerlain who has created in regard of the special shades of blue, purple, violet which cover the bay at down his well-known perfume, "L’Heure Bleue .” Several painters as Toulouse-Lautrec, Paul Signac, and Pierre Risch had also been charmed by Le Crotoy.
Life
Who: Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954), aka Colette
Thanks to her personality and fortune, Mathilde de Morny (1863-1944) became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette. From summer 1906 onwards she and Colette stayed together in the “Belle Plage” villa in Le Crotoy, where Collete wrote “Les Vrilles de la vigne” and “La Vagabonde” which would be adapted for the screen by Musidora. On Jan. 3, 1907 Mathilde and Colette put on a pantomime entitled “Rêve d’Égypte” (Dream of Egypt) at the Moulin Rouge, in which Mathilde caused a scandal by playing an Egyptologist during a simulated lesbian love scene - a kiss between them almost caused a riot and the production was stopped by the prefect of police Louis Lépine. From then on they could no longer live together openly, though the relationship lasted until 1912. Mathilde also inspired the character “La Chevalière” in Colette’s novel “Le Pur et l’Impur,” described as "in dark masculine attire, belying any notion of gaiety or bravado... High born, she slummed it like a prince."



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The property was offered for sale in the early XX century, when it was in possession of the Baroness of Crest.
Address: 35350 Saint-Coulomb, France (48.69028, -1.92284)
Type: Private Property
Place
In May 1910, Colette and Missy de Morny escaped Crotoy for Brittany, to find a holiday home in a less rainy setting. On June 21, 1910 they bought the manor of Rozven at Saint-Coulomb in Brittany (its owner, baron du Crest, refused the sale because Mathilde was dressed as a man and so Colette signed the deed instead.) Rozven was a magnificent property that can be admired even today from the beach of Touesse in Saint-Coulomb, near Saint-Malo. Colette spent her holidays here until 1924, although a newcomer soon replaced Missy in the heart of the writer: Henry de Jouvenel, the second editor of the daily Le Matin, with whom Colette began collaborating. Missy in the end, let Colette enjoyment and possession of Rozven.
Life
Who: Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954), aka Colette
In 1906, Colette separated from Willy. Colette moved in rue de Villejust. She was often found at 2 rue Georges-Ville, home of the Marquise de Belboeuf, called Missy (daughter of Count and Duke of Morny), noble, rich, generous and homosexual. They met in 1905 at the Cercle des arts et de la mode and spent the summers from 1906 to 1910 in Crotoy where Missy rented the villa "Belle Plage.” They bought Rozven on the same day the first chamber of the “tribunal de grande instance” for the Seine departement pronounced Colette’s divorce from Henry Gauthier-Villars. When Mathilde and Colette separated a year later, Colette kept the house.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954), more widely known simply as Colette, French novelist, author of the novella “Gigi” which was later adapted into a stage and then a film musical. She won the 1948 Nobel Prize for Literature. Colette was also a stafe actress and mime artiste. From 1938 to 1954 she lived at 9 Rue De Beaujolais.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robert Ross (1869-1918), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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