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Keith Hale succeeded where many had failed when he convinced the Rupert Brooke Trust to allow him to edit a collection of the poet's letters that had been sealed for eighty years due to their homosexual themes. That edition, Friends and Apostles, was published by Yale University Press. Hale's first two books also were groundbreaking: His novel Clicking Beat on the Brink of Nada, first published in the Netherlands and immediately banned in the United Kingdom during Margaret Thatcher's Operation Tiger, remains unique in its treatment of teen homosexuality, socialism, and existentialism. Hale also published the first and only account of gay life in the Balkans before the walls of Communism crumbled in his travelogue In the Land of Alexander. A fourth book, Torn Allegiances, deals with gays in the military. Hale also has published essays on Dickens, Rumi, Sa'di, Hafiz, David Garnett, and gay Philippine literature.
I think the GLBT novel that sticks in my mind is “Clicking Beat On The Brink Of Nada”, by Keith Hale. Because oh, my gosh that book just took my breath away. I read that, probably, before I was published. Maybe even before I decided to write. It does show up prominently in that first chapter of my first book, “Crossing Borders”, where the character Tristan is trying to get picked up at a bookstore. It may even be the reason I write. I guess I had a simple desire to eradicate the literary presumption that being GLBT means you end up miserable in the end, alone, or insane or eaten by cannibals or something. Jeez. I kept thinking about my kids, and how I’d want them represented in books if they were gay. (Jury’s still out on that BTW, because they’re young) There are all those young adult books about falling in love and being asked to prom and living happily ever after. I thought, “BLEEP this”. I need to write a romance for kids who are feeling same gender attraction where the boy gets the boy or the girl gets the girl at the end and it’s a GOOD THING. --Z.A. Maxfield
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Aidan Chambers (born 27 December 1934) is a British author of children's and young-adult novels. He won both the British Carnegie Medal and the American Printz Award for Postcards from No Man's Land (1999). For his "lasting contribution to children's literature" he won the biennial, international Hans Christian Andersen Award in 2002.

Born near Chester-le-Street, County Durham in 1934, Chambers was an only child, and a poor scholar; considered "slow" by his teachers, he did not learn to read fluently until the age of nine. After two years in the Royal Navy as part of his National Service, Chambers trained as a teacher and taught for three years at Westcliff High School in Southend on Sea before joining an Anglican monastery in Stroud, Gloucestershire in 1960. His young-adult novel Now I Know (1987) is based partly on his experiences as a monk.

His first plays, including Johnny Salter (1966), The Car and The Chicken Run (1968), were published while he was a teacher at Archway School in Stroud.

Chambers left the monastery in 1967 and a year later became a freelance writer. His works include the "Dance sequence" of six novels (1978 to 2005): Breaktime, Dance on My Grave, Now I Know, The Toll Bridge, Postcards from No Man's Land and This is All: The Pillow Book of Cordelia Kenn. He and his wife, Nancy, founded Thimble Press and the magazine Signal to promote literature for children and young adults. They were awarded the Eleanor Farjeon Award for outstanding services to children's books in 1982. From 2003 to 2006 he was President of the School Library Association.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_on_My_Grave

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Peter Lefcourt (born 1941) is an American television producer, a film and television screenwriter, and a novelist.

Lefcourt's early career involved writing teleplays for primetime series such as Cagney and Lacey, Scarecrow and Mrs. King (both of which he also produced), Eight is Enough, and Remington Steele, among others. He penned the scripts for the television movies Monte Carlo, Cracked Up, Danielle Steel's Fine Things, and The Women of Windsor. In more recent years he executive-produced and wrote for Beggars and Choosers and Karen Sisco.

Lefcourt was nominated for a 1984 Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series for Cagney and Lacey and won the following year.

Much of Lefcourt's fiction has been inspired by his true-life experiences working behind-the-scenes in Hollywood. His first novel, The Deal, was adapted for the screen by William H. Macy and debuted at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. Several others of his books are under option or in various stages of development for feature films.

Lefcourt lives with his wife Terri in Santa Monica, California.

In a 2012 interview with Larry Mantle on KPCC's Airtalk, Lefcourt stated he signed with Amazon.com to publish and distribute his most recent book "with some trepidation". He said friends told him he was 'joining the enemy', but his backlist is selling better electronically on Amazon.com than in it did at traditional booksellers while in print.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Lefcourt

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Calvin Marshall Trillin (born December 5, 1935) is an American journalist, humorist, food writer, poet, memoirist and novelist.

Trillin attended public schools in Kansas City and went on to Yale University, where he served as chairman of the Yale Daily News and was a member of the Pundits and Scroll and Key before graduating in 1957; he later served as a Fellow of the University. After a stint in the U.S. Army, he worked as a reporter for Time magazine before joining the staff of The New Yorker in 1963. His reporting for The New Yorker on the racial integration of the University of Georgia was published in his first book, An Education in Georgia. He wrote the magazine’s U.S. Journal series from 1967 to 1982, covering local events both serious and quirky throughout the United States.

He has also written for The Nation magazine. He began in 1978 with a column called Variations, which was eventually renamed Uncivil Liberties and ran through 1985. The same name – Uncivil Liberties – was used for the column when it was syndicated weekly in newspapers, from 1986 to 1995. Essentially the same column then ran without a name in Time magazine from 1996 to 2001. His humor columns for The Nation often made fun of the editor of the time, Victor Navasky, whom he jokingly referred to as the wily and parsimonious Navasky. (He once wrote that the magazine paid "in the high two figures.") From the July 2, 1990, issue of The Nation to today, Trillin has written his weekly "Deadline Poet" column – humorous poems about current events. Trillin has written considerably more pieces for The Nation than any other single person.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calvin_Trillin

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Tim Dlugos (born Francis Timothy Dlugos) (August 5, 1950 – December 3, 1990) was an American poet.

Born in Springfield, Massachusetts, he grew up in Arlington, Virginia.

In 1968, Dlugos joined the Christian Brothers, a Catholic religious order and entered their college, La Salle College, in Philadelphia. He left the Brothers in 1971 to openly embrace a politically active, gay lifestyle. He eventually left La Salle before graduating and moved to Washington, D.C..

Dlugos worked on Ralph Nader's Public Citizen and become heavily involved with the Mass Transit poetry scene. His first book of poetry, High There, was published by the groundbreaking Some of Us Press.

Describing his poetry in None of the Above, an early anthology in which Dlugos appeared, he stated: "1. I try to write out of the time & space I find myself in. 2. My best work takes the 'timeless' -- spontaneous goofs, flights, body motions -- & drags it onto timeline, the 'real world' where most of us live. I am 'successful' when the language (clean combination of words) takes me or someone else back to the original combination of feelings & perceptions 'out there,' or somewhere equally nice. 3. My work is part of the nostalgia craze; all of it reminds me of where I used to be. 4. Grace, in a very orthodox sense, is my major preoccupation."

Dlugos moved to New York City in the late 1970s where he edited and contributed to such magazines as Christopher Street, New York Native and The Poetry Project Newsletter. He read everywhere and with almost everyone involved in the downtown scene. Whether writing about pop culture, New York, being gay, alcoholism or AIDS, content always came secondary to style in Dlugos' poetry. His poetry was published widely in various journals including BOMB magazine, The Paris Review and the Washington Review.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Dlugos

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David Alan Mamet (born November 30, 1947) is an American playwright, essayist, screenwriter, and film director.

Best known as a playwright, Mamet won a Pulitzer Prize and received Tony nominations for Glengarry Glen Ross (1984) and Speed-the-Plow (1988). As a screenwriter, he received Oscar nominations for The Verdict (1982) and Wag the Dog (1997). Mamet's books include: The Old Religion (1997), a novel about the lynching of Leo Frank; Five Cities of Refuge: Weekly Reflections on Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy (2004), a Torah commentary with Rabbi Lawrence Kushner; The Wicked Son (2006), a study of Jewish self-hatred and antisemitism; and Bambi vs. Godzilla, a commentary on the movie business.

Edmond is a one-act play written by David Mamet. It premiered at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, on June 4, 1982. The first New York production was October 27 of the same year, at the Provincetown Playhouse. The play consists of twenty-three short scenes. In the original production, each of the actors took on multiple roles, save the two playing Edmond and his wife. Kenneth Branagh starred as Edmond in a production of the play in London in 2003.

A movie based upon the play, starring William H. Macy and Julia Stiles, has been shown at some film festivals in the U.S. and Europe, and underwent limited U.S. release on July 14, 2006.

The plot, which has a certain fable-like quality, revolves around the titular character, Edmond Burke, a white-collar worker in New York City. After a visit to a fortune teller, he decides to leave his wife and embarks on an odyssey through New York's seedy underbelly, which takes him to two bars, a bordello, and a peep show. When he accuses a three-card monte dealer of running a crooked game, the dealer and his shills beat Edmond to the ground. Increasingly convinced of the ugliness and difficulty of human existence, Edmond buys a knife from a pawnshop. He threatens a woman on a subway platform, then beats an African-American pimp who is trying to rob him, while calling him racial slurs.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Mamet

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John Knowles (September 16, 1926 – November 29, 2001) was an American novelist best known for his novel A Separate Peace. He died in 2001 at the age of seventy-five.

Knowles was born in Fairmont, West Virginia, the son of James M. Knowles, a purchasing agent from Lowell, Massachusetts, and Mary Beatrice Shea Knowles from Concord, New Hampshire. In his home town, Knowles’ father was the vice president of a coal company and they received a steady income affording them a decent standard of living. He attended St. Peter's High School in Fairmont, West Virginia from 1940 until 1942, before continuing at Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire, graduating in 1945. He married Beth Anne Dyment Hughes at the age of 19. Knowles graduated from Yale University as a member of the class of 1949. While at Yale, Knowles served on the Board of Yale Daily News during his sophomore, junior and senior years, specifically as Editorial Secretary during his senior year. He was a record-holding varsity swimmer during his sophomore year. A Separate Peace is based upon Knowles's experiences at Phillips Exeter Academy. The setting for The Devon Woolbert School is a thinly veiled fictionalization of Phillips Exeter Academy. The plot should not be taken as autobiographical, although many elements of the novel stem from personal experience, including Knowles' membership in a secret society and sustaining of a foot injury while jumping from a tree during society exercises. In his essay, "A Special Time, A Special Place," Knowles wrote:
The only elements in A Separate Peace which were not in that summer were anger, violence, and hatred. There was only friendship, character, athleticism, and honor.
The secondary character Finny (Phineas) was the best friend of the main character, Gene. Knowles has stated that he modeled Finny on David Hackett from Milton Academy, whom he met when both attended a summer session at Phillips Exeter Academy. Hackett was a friend of Robert Kennedy's, under whom he later served in the Justice Department. A Phineas Sprague lived in the same dormitory as Knowles during the summer session of 1943 and may have been an inspiration for the character's name.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Knowles
While not blatantly a gay novel, any young gay man who read A Separate Peace by John Knowles in school knows its power. Knowles was a gay man and infused his writing with the pathos and desire that only gay people can know. This was the first gay romantic relationship I had ever read about, and the fact that teachers don´t comment on the underlying love affair when teaching is a true careless disservice to the book and gay youth. --Eric Arvin
But back in the day, everyone else might have been reading “A Separate Peace” in school, and discovering that they had questions about relationships that seemed to blur the lines between friendship and something more between two men or two women. --Z.A. Maxfield


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Lars Eighner (born November 25, 1948) is the author of Travels with Lizbeth, a memoir of homelessness in the American Southwest during the late 1980s; the included essay "On Dumpster Diving," which is widely anthologized both at full length and in abridged form under the title "My Daily Dives in the Dumpster"; Pawn to Queen Four, a novel; Lavender Blue: How to Write and Sell Gay Men's Erotica, also published as Elements of Arousal (an early edition includes an introduction by noted erotica author John Preston); Gay Cosmos, a work of gay theory; and numerous short works of gay men's erotica, collected under various titles.

Lars Eighner was born Laurence Vail Eighner in Corpus Christi, Texas, the son of Alice Elizabeth Vail Eighner (later Harlow) and Lawrence Clifton Eighner, and the grandson of the Texas poets Alice Ewing Vail (The Big Thicket) and John Arthur Vail (John Vail Ballads). He grew up in Houston, Texas, and was graduated from Lamar High School in 1966. He studied creative writing under George Williams of Rice University at the Corpus Christi Fine Arts Colony, and attended the University of Texas at Austin, doing major work in ethnic studies.

Eighner began writing for publication in the early 1980s. By that time he was generally known as Lars, the result of having worked in a small office with two Larrys. Because in early writing attempts he had been confused with Black Mountain poet Larry Eigner, Eighner used 'Lars' for writing. His first book was a collection of short stories, Bayou Boy and Other Stories (Gay Sunshine Press, 1985). In the late 1980s, he and his dog Lizbeth became homeless, and his experiences as a homeless person in Austin, Texas; Los Angeles, and places in between are the subject of Travels with Lizbeth. Eighner was elected to the Texas Institute of Letters in 1994.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lars_Eighner

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Eric Marcus is an American non-fiction writer.

His works are primarily of LGBT interest, including Breaking the Surface, the autobiography of gay Olympic diving champion Greg Louganis, which became a #1 New York Times Bestseller and Making History: The Struggle for Gay and Lesbian Equal Rights, 1945-1990, which won the Stonewall Book Award. Other topics he's addressed in his writing include suicide and pessimistic humor.

Eric Marcus received his A.B. from Vassar College in 1980 where he majored in Urban Studies. He earned his Masters degree from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1984 and a Master's degree in real estate development in 2003, also from Columbia University.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Marcus

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Bruce Bawer (born October 31, 1956, in New York City) is an American literary critic, writer and poet. His work focuses mainly on criticism and issues related to Islam.

Bawer received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in English from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where he also taught courses in literature and composition.

He moved from New York to Amsterdam in 1998, where he felt that he could live better as a gay man in a more liberal society. He then moved to Oslo in 1999, and throughout the years has translated several books from Norwegian to English. He currently lives with his partner in Oslo, Norway.

Bawer's works have appeared in journals such as The New Republic, The Nation, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, The New Criterion, The American Spectator and The Hudson Review.

In A Place at the Table, Bawer argued for what he considers a centrist and mainstream political philosophy at odds with the gay left. In Stealing Jesus, Bawer leveled sharp criticism at evangelical, Pentecostal, and other strains of modern Christianity, including premillennialism and evangelical apologism for capitalism.

In While Europe Slept, Bawer writes that Europe's politically correct culture defends and protects the Islamic fundamentalism that is preying upon its liberal social systems. Bawer argues that Islamists use welfare and religious grants to fund extremist mosques and support imams with a violent past. Once established in Western European nations, Bawer maintains, the Islamists avoid integration and answer only to sharia law, while avoiding the legal systems of their host nations, allowing abuse of women, gays, Jews, and non-Muslims. In his conclusion, Bawer states that rising Muslim birthrates and "refusal" to integrate will allow them to dominate European society within 30 years, and that the only way to avoid such a disaster is to abolish the politically correct and multicultural doctrine that, according to him, is rife within the continent.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Bawer

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Robb Forman Dew is an American author. She has described writing as "a strange absorption about this alternate world and the way it mixes with your real life."

Born in Mount Vernon, Ohio, October 26, 1946, the daughter of Oliver Duane Forman and Helen Ransom Forman, Dew grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where her father set up his medical practice. She also spent a great deal of her childhood in Gambier, Ohio, where she visited and occasionally lived with her maternal grandparents, Robb Reavill and John Crowe Ransom. During that time she found herself surrounded by a wide range of poets and writers connected with the Kenyon Review, or who were friends, colleagues, or former students of her grandfather's. Her godfather was Robert Penn Warren, who was a close friend of the family's.

She attended Louisiana State University but did not graduate. In 1968, she married Charles B. Dew. The couple moved to Columbia, Missouri, in 1969, where Charles taught history at the University of Missouri at Columbia. They have two sons, Charles Stephen, born in 1971, and John Forman, born in 1973. The family moved to Williamstown, Massachusetts, in 1977, where Charles B. Dew is now the Ephraim Williams Professor of American History at Williams College.

Dew's first novel, Dale Loves Sophie to Death, was published in 1981 and won the 1982 National Book Award in category First Novel. She has taught at the Iowa Writer's Workshop, has received a Guggenheim fellowship, and was awarded an honorary degree by Kenyon College in 2007. Her latest novel is Being Polite to Hitler.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robb_Forman_Dew

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Christian McLaughlin (born September 29, 1967 in Houlton, Maine) is a television writer, producer, and author. McLaughlin is a graduate of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas. He gained notoriety in his early twenties with the publication of his novels, Glamourpuss and Sex Toys of the Gods.

He served as a creative consultant for the 2004 Fox reality special Seriously, Dude, I'm Gay but the special was pulled from the schedule before airing following complaints from media watchdog GLAAD. McLaughlin responded to the criticism, saying, "It's unfortunate that a group as well-intentioned as GLAAD is going to set themselves up as censors and judge what other people should be allowed to air or see."

He met his writing partner, Valerie Ahern, at the University of Texas, and started writing sitcom spec scripts together a year later. Together, they created and produced MTV's Emmy nominated soap opera Spyder Games (originally called Spyder Web) after being approached by Drew Tappon at MTV Series Development; they are currently working with Maverick Television to create the first all-LGBT serial, San Rafael, for MTV's new gay channel, Logo. According to Logo, San Rafael is about "the unexpected schemes and twists in the intertwined lives of a group of LGBT friends and foes living in the same apartment complex." (The Advocate)

David Holman, then a production executive at Columbia Pictures Television, helped McLaughlin land an internship job at The Young and the Restless in 1989. His supervisor was Michael Minnis, then a script coordinator and writers' assistant. His internship included script synopsis of Y&R episodes and extras casting.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_McLaughlin

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Russell Charles Leong (born September 7) is an academic editor, a professor, a writer, and long-time Chen Taichiquan student. The long-time editor of Amerasia Journal (1977-2010), he was an adjunct professor of English and Asian-American studies at the University of California at Los Angeles and currently serves as senior editor for international projects. During the 2012-2013 year, Leong is Dr. Thomas Tam Visiting Professor at Hunter College CUNY in New York City. Leong is also the editor and project coordinator for the U.S.-China media brief.

Leong was born Chinatown, San Francisco. He attended local Chinese and American schools where his English teachers and family encouraged him to write. In 1972, He got his B.A. from SFSU where he took one of the first Asian/American writing classes from Jeffrey Chan. Linking art with social and political activism for Asian-Americans, Leong participated in the Kearny Street Workshop. From 1973 to 1974, Leong studied at the National Taiwan University before earning an MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1990.

Leong has a "life is war" ideology representing his dislike towards the academic community. He would like to see himself more as an activist than an academic. Leong's religious views relate most strongly to Buddhist philosophy. Buddhism applies to many aspects of his life including relationships and writing. He agrees with the accepting nature of Buddhism and finds it a strong, but not oppressive set of values to incorporate in daily life.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Leong

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Val Joe "Rudy" Galindo (born September 7, 1969 in San Jose, California) is an American figure skater who competed in both single skating and pair skating. As a single skater, he is the 1996 U.S. national champion and 1987 World Junior Champion. As a pairs skater, he competed with Kristi Yamaguchi and was the 1988 World Junior Champion and the 1989 and 1990 U.S. National Champion.

Rudy Galindo is the third child of Jess and Margaret Galindo, having a brother, George, who was ten years older and sister, Laura, five years older. He began skating with his sister. Although the sport was expensive, his parents were supportive and forewent a chance to buy a house, settling instead for a larger trailer.

As a singles career, Galindo won the 1987 World Junior title.

Galindo was paired with Kristi Yamaguchi by his coach, Jim Hulick. They placed 5th on the junior level at the 1985 U.S. Championships and won the junior title in 1986. Hulick died of AIDS-related cancer in 1989. Galindo did not compete in singles in the 1988-89 and 1989-90 seasons in order to concentrate on pairs. Galindo and Yamaguchi won the 1988 World Junior title and the U.S. senior championships in 1989 and 1990. However, in April 1990, their partnership came to an end when Yamaguchi decided to focus on her singles career. As there was no one of her caliber available, Galindo returned to singles competition.

Rudy Galindo's father died of a heart attack in 1993, his brother, George, died from AIDS in 1994, as did another coach, Rick Inglesi, in 1995. Galindo took eight months off after the 1995 U.S. Championships. However, with the following year's event in his hometown, presenting a chance to compete in front of his mother who no longer traveled, he decided to resume training in September 1995. In January 1996, he won the men's title at the U.S. Championships at the San Jose Arena, becoming the oldest male to win this title in 70 years. He went on to win a bronze medal at the 1996 World Championships. His sister, Laura, was his coach.



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudy_Galindo

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Dick Scanlan (born 1960) is an American librettist, writer, and actor.

Scanlan has written articles that have appeared in The New York Times "Arts & Leisure" section, The Village Voice, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, The Advocate, Playboy and Theatre Week.

His short stories have been published in many magazines and are included in Best American Gay Fiction (1996). Scanlan was a guest editor for the Tony Award edition of Playbill for 1997 and 1998. His critically acclaimed novel Does Freddy Dance was published in 1995.

He is an accomplished actor, best known for his portrayal of Miss Great Plains in the 1991 musical Pageant.

He is the co-book writer (with Richard Morris) and lyricist of the musical Thoroughly Modern Millie, which premiered on Broadway in 2002. He is the co-writer, with Sherie Rene Scott, of the musical Everyday Rapture, which opened Off-Broadway in May 2009 and again on Broadway on April 29, 2010.

In 2011, it was announced that Scanlan is reworking piece originally by Morris (first being Millie), the 1960 Meredith Willson musical The Unsinkable Molly Brown. Scanlan was asked by Morris during Millie if he would look at Molly Brown, and Scanlan declined because of the work they were doing on Millie. After Morris died, his estate contacted Scanlan and asked him to re-write it, Scanlan declined because he already rewrote one of Morris' pieces and had other projects in development. Freddie Gershon, president of MTI asked him again to look Molly Brown, which is considered an underexposed property of MTI's. Scanlan agreed, re-wrote the script to change the fanciful non-fiction plot to a more factual one. The show had a planned reading in 2011 reading with Sutton Foster and Marc Kudisch.


Jim Parsons, Jessica Hecht and more celebrate the opening night of 'Harvey' on June 15, 2012 at Studio 54: Three-time Tony nominee Dick Scanlan (r.) and his partner enjoy the after-party. Photographer: Bruce Glikas, © Broadway.com
Dick Scanlan (born 1960) is an American librettist, writer, and actor. He said: "I never want to imply that I lived because I have a stronger life drive than the people who died" Scanlan says, emphatically crediting his rebound to the anti-HIV drug cocktail instead. "I've lost so many people who I knew to be passionate and committed to their lives. That said, it is absolutely true that your outlook contributes to your longevity. I chose to keep investing in my future — even when I had no future"


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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Scanlan

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Rachel Pollack (b. August 17, 1945 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American science fiction author, comic book writer, and expert on divinatory tarot. Pollack has been a great influence on the women's spirituality movement.

Pollack's work 78 Degrees of Wisdom on tarot reading is commonly referenced by tarot readers. She has created her own tarot deck, Shining Woman Tarot (later Shining Tribe Tarot). She also aided in the creation of the Vertigo Tarot Deck with illustrator Dave McKean and author Neil Gaiman, and she wrote a book to accompany it.

Pollack is best known for her run of issues 64-87 on the comic book Doom Patrol, on DC Comics' Vertigo imprint, which became a cult favorite under Grant Morrison. A comic fandom legend has it that Pollack was assigned to write the series after writing persistent letters to the editor. Although the letters are a matter of record, it's unknown if they were actually the cause of her employment. During her tenure Pollack dealt with such rarely addressed comic-book topics as menstruation, sexual identity, and transsexuality. Pollack's run ended two years later, with the book's cancellation. Pollack also wrote a Brother Power the Geek one-shot, and eleven issues of a New Gods series for DC Comics (the first five co-authored with Tom Peyer). Author Neil Gaiman has sometimes consulted Rachel Pollack on the tarot for his stories. Pollack created an actual tarot spread for one of Gaiman's books.

Her magical realism novels explore worlds imbued with elements pulled from a number of traditions, faiths, and religions.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachel_Pollack

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Thomas Edward Neil Driberg, Baron Bradwell (22 May 1905 – 12 August 1976), generally known as Tom Driberg, was a British journalist, politician and High Anglican churchman who served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1942 to 1955 and from 1959 to 1974. A member of the British Communist Party for more than 20 years, he was first elected to parliament as an Independent, and joined the Labour Party in 1945. He never held any ministerial office, but rose to senior positions within the Labour Party and was a popular and influential figure in left-wing politics for many years.

The son of a retired colonial officer, Driberg was educated at Lancing and Christ Church, Oxford. After leaving the university without a degree, he attempted to establish himself as a poet before joining the Daily Express as a reporter, later becoming a columnist. In 1933 he began the "William Hickey" society column, which he continued to write until 1943. He was later a regular columnist for the Co-operative Group newspaper Reynolds News and for other left-leaning journals. He wrote several books, including biographies of the press baron Lord Beaverbrook and the fugitive British diplomat Guy Burgess. He retired from the House of Commons in 1974, and was subsequently raised to the peerage as Baron Bradwell of Bradwell juxta Mare in the County of Essex.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Driberg

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Renaud Camus (born 1946) is a French writer.

He was born in Chamalières, Puy-de-Dôme, in the Auvergne region of France. He spent some time studying in England and traveling in the United States, particularly New York and California (he taught for a semester in a college in Arkansas). He quickly began to circulate among writers (Louis Aragon, Roland Barthes, Marguerite Duras, etc.) and visual artists (the Warhol circle, the New York School, Gilbert and George, etc.). He also circulated in gay communities and is an outspoken defender of gay rights, although, as with social issues in general, he keeps his distance from doctrinaire positions. One of his first published works (and the only one (partially) translated in English), with a preface by Barthes, is Tricks (1979; enlarged and revised in 1982 and 1988), a “chronicle” consisting of over-detailed descriptions of homosexual encounters in France and elsewhere. Fragments of other works were published in the 75th issue of Yale French Studies (1988).

Camus is an exceptionally prolific writer. His work could be divided into four categories: straightforward prose (travel writing, traditional-form novels, polemic, and lengthy yearly journals (diary) published from 1989 to the present; “creative” prose: “experimental” novels and a large and ever-growing, largely unpublished web text, Burnt Boats (Vaisseaux brûlés); writings on painting and culture; and personal essays.

He has also formed a political party, "Le Parti de l’Innocence", continually evolving its platform, a curious blend of traditional leftist/socialist political values and conservative social values. It plays no role in French politics, but Camus seems to take it very seriously, adding position statements to the party’s website on a nearly daily basis.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaud_Camus

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Lorenzo Wilson Milam, born on August 2, 1933, in Jacksonville, Florida, is an American writer and activist who was instrumental in starting many of the first listener-supported community radio stations in the United States, beginning with KRAB-FM in Seattle in 1962.

Milam, who is credited with helping in the startup of at least 14 stations from the early 1960s through late 1970s, is often referred to as the "Johnny Appleseed" of community radio. He got his start in radio volunteering in 1958-1959 at Lew Hill's KPFA in Berkeley, California. He used a $15,000 inheritance to buy a small FM transmitter in 1959 and spent the next 3 years seeking a broadcasting license "anywhere in the US" from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which assigned him a frequency in Seattle.

With the help of volunteer engineer Jeremy Lansman he was able to get his antique Collins Radio transmitter on the air in 1962. Lansman later assisted him in launching other stations around the country, starting with KBOO in Portland, in a mini-network that was sometimes referred to as the "KRAB nebula". Mr. Milam authored the book Sex and Broadcasting, A Handbook on Starting a Radio Station for the Community.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenzo_Milam

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Joseph Steffan (born July 29, 1964) is an American lawyer and gay activist. He was expelled from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis in 1987 shortly before graduation after disclosing his homosexuality. He sued the U.S. Department of Defense, claiming that his oral avowal of homosexuality could not be construed as an indication that he ever had or intended to engage in sexual relations with another man. He lost a protracted court battle for reinstatement in 1994.

Joseph Steffan was born on July 29, 1964 in Warren, Minnesota, to a family of Scandinavian stock. He was raised a Roman Catholic and was a choir boy. He was inducted into the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis in July 1983. He determined he was gay during his second year there. In his First Class (senior) year he was promoted to a battalion commander, placing him in command of one-sixth of the academy's 4,500 midshipmen and among the top ten highest-ranking midshipmen in the academy. He twice sang "The Star-Spangled Banner" at Army–Navy games. After he told another midshipman and a chaplain that he was homosexual, the academy conducted an investigation and Steffan told a disciplinary board that he was homosexual. The board then changed his performance evaluation from "A" to "F" and recommended that he be discharged. He was expelled from the academy six weeks before graduation. He never admitted, nor was he was accused of, engaging in sex with another man. In a letter to the New York Times dated August 23, 1988, he wrote: "the real problem is not homosexuality, but rather, the military's open and officially supported prejudice against homosexuals who have the desire and capability to serve their country."

On December 29, 1988, Steffan, represented by the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, filed suit in United States District Court for the District of Columbia asking it to order the Department of Defense to reinstate him. He claimed his equal protection and due process rights had been violated. At the time, he was working in Fargo, North Dakota, for a computer software company.



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Steffan

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David Wojnarowicz (September 14, 1954 – July 22, 1992) was a painter, photographer, writer, filmmaker, performance artist, and activist who was prominent in the New York City art world of the 1980s.

Wojnarowicz was born in Red Bank, New Jersey, and later lived with his mother in New York City, where he attended the High School of Performing Arts for a brief period. From 1970 until 1973, after dropping out of school, he for a time lived on the streets of New York City prostituting himself and also worked as a farmer on the Canadian border.

Upon returning to New York City, he saw a particularly prolific period for his artwork from the late 1970s through the 1980s. During this period, he made super-8 films, such as Heroin, began a photographic series of Arthur Rimbaud, did stencil work, played in a band called 3 Teens Kill 4, and exhibited his work in well-known East Village galleries, notably Civilian Warfare, Ground Zero Gallery NY, Gracie Mansion and Hal Bromm. Wojnarowicz is also connected to other prolific artists of the time, appearing in or collaborating on works with artists like Nan Goldin, Peter Hujar, Luis Frangella, Kiki Smith, John Fekner, Richard Kern, James Romberger, Ben Neill and Phil Zwickler.


Water

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Wojnarowicz

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More Artists at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Art
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Gavin Lambert (born 23 July 1924 - 17 July 2005) was a British-born screenwriter, novelist and biographer who lived for part of his life in Hollywood. His writing was mainly fiction and nonfiction about the film industry.

Lambert was educated at Cheltenham College and Magdalen College, Oxford, where one of his professors was C. S. Lewis. At Oxford, he befriended filmmakers Karel Reisz and Lindsay Anderson, and they founded a short-lived but influential journal, Sequence, which he co-edited with Anderson. Lambert eventually left Oxford without obtaining a degree. From 1949 to 1955 he edited the periodical Sight and Sound, again with Anderson as a regular contributor. At about the same time Lambert was deeply involved in Britain's Free Cinema movement which called for more social realism in contemporary movies. He also wrote film criticism for The Sunday Times and The Guardian. In 1957 he moved to Hollywood, California, to work as a screenwriter and personal assistant to director Nicholas Ray, whose movie Bitter Victory (1957) he co-wrote. He claimed to be Ray's lover for a period of time.

Gavin Lambert became an American citizen in 1964. From 1974 to 1989, he chiefly stayed in Tangier, where he was a close friend of the writer and composer Paul Bowles. He spent the final years of his life in Los Angeles, where he died of pulmonary fibrosis on 17 July 2005. He left behind a brother, niece and nephew, and named Mart Crowley executor of his estate.

Gavin's father's half-sister was Ivy Claudine Godber aka Claudine West (1890-1943), a screenwriter who won an Oscar for her joint writing of the script of Mrs. Miniver in 1942.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gavin_Lambert

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Kenneth Hsien-yung Pai (born July 11, 1937) is a writer who has been described as a "melancholy pioneer." He was born in Guilin, Guangxi, China at the cusp of both the Second Sino-Japanese War and subsequent Chinese Civil War. Pai's father was the famous Kuomintang (KMT) general Bai Chongxi (Pai Chung-hsi), whom he later described as a "stern, Confucian father" with "some soft spots in his heart." Pai was diagnosed with tuberculosis at the age of seven, during which time he would have to live in a separate house from his siblings (of which he would have a total of nine). He lived with his family in Chongqing, Shanghai, and Nanjing before moving to the British-controlled Hong Kong in 1948 as CPC forces turned the tide of the Chinese Civil War. In 1952, Pai and his family resettled in Taiwan, where the KMT had relocated the Republic of China (Taiwan) after Japan's defeat in 1945.

Pai studied in La Salle College, a Hong Kong Catholic boys high school, until he left for Taiwan with his family. In 1956, Pai enrolled at National Cheng Kung University as a hydraulic engineering major, because he wanted to participate in the Three Gorges Dam Project. The following year, he passed the entrance examination for the foreign literature department of National Taiwan University and transferred there to study English literature. In September 1958, after completing his freshman year of study, he published his first short story "Madame Ching" in the magazine Literature. Two years later, he collaborated with several NTU classmates — e.g., Chen Ruoxi, Wang Wenxing, Ouyang Tzu — to launch Modern Literature (Xiandai wenxue), in which many of his early works were published. He was also known to frequent the Cafe Astoria in Taipei.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pai_Hsien-Yung

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David Marquette Kopay (born June 28, 1942) is a former American football running back in the National Football League who in 1975 became one of the first professional athletes to come out as gay. His 1977 biography, The David Kopay Story, written with Perry Deane Young, offers insights into the sexual proclivities of heterosexual football players and their homophobia. In 1986, Kopay also revealed his brief affair with Jerry Smith (1943–1986), who played for the Washington Redskins from 1965–1977 and who died of AIDS without ever having publicly come out of the closet.

Kopay attended Notre Dame High School in Sherman Oaks, California. He entered the University of Washington in 1961 and became an All-American running back in his senior year. He was signed by the San Francisco 49ers. He played professional football from 1964 to 1972. After he retired from the NFL, he was considered a top contender for coaching positions, but he believes he was snubbed by professional and college teams because of his sexual orientation. He went to work as a salesman/purchaser in his uncle's floorcovering business in Hollywood. He is also a board member of the Gay and Lesbian Athletics Foundation.

Since Kopay, only four additional former NFL Players have come out as gay, Roy Simmons in 1992, Esera Tuaolo in 2002 , Wade Davis in 2012 and Kwame Harris in 2013. Kopay has been credited with inspiring these athletes to be more open about their sexual orientation.

Kopay appears as himself in a small but pivotal role in the film Tru Loved (2008). His scene features young actor Matthew Thompson and Alexandra Paul.

Kopay became a Gay Games Ambassador for the Federation of Gay Games. He came to Gay Games VII in Chicago in July 2006 and was a featured announcer in the opening ceremonies.



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Kopay

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David Drake (born June 27, 1963 in Edgewood, Maryland) is an American playwright, stage director, actor and author. He is best known as the author and original performer of The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me, for which he received a Village Voice Obie Award, a 1994 Drama-Logue Award for "Outstanding Solo Performance," and a Robbie Stevens Frontiers Magazine Award for the same. Nominations include a 1994 LA Weekly Theater Award and a Lambda Literary Award nomination for "Best New Play of 1994" (published by Anchor Books).

Born as David Drakula, and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, he later began going by the name David Drake. He has contributed articles to the Advocate, TheaterWeek, and Details. One of the longest one-actor plays in Off Broadway history, Larry Kramer has received over thirty productions in nearly a dozen countries, and the published version was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award.

In 2000 Drake starred in a movie version of The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me. The movie was directed by Tim Kirkman and was filmed at Baltimore Theatre Project.

David Drake has appeared in the feature film Philadelphia and on the stage in Vampire Lesbians of Sodom, Pageant, The Boys in the Band, and A Language of Their Own.

He now lives in Manhattan.

As a director, David has directed Eric Bernat's Starstruck, That Woman: Rebecca West Remember, starring Anne Bobby, and The Be(a)st of Taylor Mac, written and performed by Taylor Mac, which won a Herald Angel Award, A Latest Award, and an Argus Angel Award. In May, 2009, his production of James Edwin Parker's 2 Boys in a Bed on a Cold Winter's Night played to sold-out houses and rave reviews as part of the Dublin Gay Theatre Festival. He is currently working on directing Songs My Mother Never Taught Me, written and performed by Deborah Karpel, which premiered at the Ruhrfestspiele in Recklinghausen, Germany, in June, 2009.

In July 2009 he participated in the Sundance Institute Theatre Lab, workshopping Taylor Mac's five act musical Lily's Revenge. This was his second trip to Sundance, having directed the workshop of Edmund White's Terre Haute in 2005.



He is a frequent collaborator of New York producer Paul Lucas, for whom he has directed that Woman, The Be(a)st of Taylor Mac, Stand Up/Lie Down, and Songs My Mother Never Taught Me.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Drake_%28actor%29

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Michael Arlen (Armenian: Մայքլ Արլեն; November 16, 1895 – June 23, 1956), original name Dikran Kouyoumdjian, was an Armenian essayist, short story writer, novelist, playwright, and scriptwriter, who had his greatest successes in the 1920s while living and writing in England. Although Arlen is most famous for his satirical romances set in English smart society, he also wrote gothic horror and psychological thrillers, for instance "The Gentleman from America", which was filmed in 1956 as a television episode for Alfred Hitchcock's TV series Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Near the end of his life, Arlen mainly occupied himself with political writing. Arlen's vivid but colloquial style "with unusual inversions and inflections with a heightened exotic pitch", came to be known as Arlenesque.

Very much a 1920s society figure resembling the characters he portrayed in his novels, and a man who might be referred to as a dandy, Arlen invariably impressed everyone with his immaculate manners. He was always impeccably dressed and groomed and was seen driving around London in a fashionable yellow Rolls Royce and engaging in all kinds of luxurious activities. However, he was well aware of the latent suspicion for foreigners mixed with envy, with which his success was viewed by some. Sydney Horler (1888–1954), another popular author of the time, is said to have called Arlen "the only Armenian who never tried to sell me a carpet" , while Arlen half-jokingly described himself as "every other inch a gentleman". (Picture: Michael Arlen And Atalanta Mercati)

Michael Arlen was born Dikran Kouyoumdjian on November 16, 1895, in Rousse, Bulgaria, to an Armenian merchant family. In 1892, Arlen's family moved to Plovdiv, Bulgaria, after fleeing Turkish persecutions of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire. In Plovdiv, Arlen's father, Sarkis Kouyoumdjian, established a successful import business. In 1895, Arlen was born as the youngest child of five, having three brothers, Takvor, Krikor, and Roupen, and one sister, Ahavni. In 1901, apparently not feeling satisfied with Bulgaria's position in the oncoming war, Arlen's family moved once more: this time to the seaside town of Southport in Lancashire, England.



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Arlen

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Ellen Bass (born 1947, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American poet and co-author of The Courage to Heal.

She grew up in Margate City, NJ, where her parents owned a liquor store. She attended Goucher College, where she graduated magna cum laude in 1968 with her bachelor’s degree. She pursued a master’s degree at Boston University, where she studied with Anne Sexton, and graduated in 1970. From 1970–1974, Bass worked as an administrator at Project Place, a social service center in Boston. She currently is teaching in the low residency MFA program at Pacific University in Oregon and has been teaching Writing About Our Lives workshops since 1974 in Santa Cruz, California.

Her poems have appeared in hundreds of journals and anthologies, including The Atlantic Monthly, Ms., The American Poetry Review, The Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, and Field. Much of her earlier writing is confessional poetry.

Her nonfiction books include I Never Told Anyone, Free Your Mind, and The Courage to Heal, which has sold over a million copies and has been translated into twelve languages. Free Your Mind is the definitive practical guide for gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth -- and their families, teachers, counselors and friends. For too long, gay youth have wanted to be themselves and to feel good about it, but most have been isolated, afraid, harassed, or worse. Their very existence has been ignored, whispered about, or swept under the rug.

She lives in Santa Cruz, California, where she has taught poetry and creative writing since 1974.

She was awarded the Elliston Book Award for Poetry from the University of Cincinnati, Nimrod/Hardman’s Pablo Neruda Prize, The Missouri Review’s Larry Levis Award, the Greensboro Poetry Prize, the New Letters Poetry Prize, the Chautauqua Poetry Prize, a Pushcart Prize, and a fellowship from the California Arts Council.

The Human Line (Copper Canyon Press, 2007) was named a Notable Book of 2007 by the San Francisco Chronicle and Mules of Love (BOA Editions, 2002) won the 2002 Lambda Literary Award for Poetry.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_Bass

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Glenn Burke was a born ballplayer—a "natural"—who spent several years as an outfielder with the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Oakland A’s before the pressures of living a double life with his teammates forced him into early retirement—and an honored place on San Francisco’s gay softball teams.

Burke once said, "They can’t ever say now that a gay man can’t play in the majors, because I’m a gay man and I made it." He was dubbed King Kong by his Dodgers teammates for his size and strength.

Burke was always open about his sexuality with his family and community, but not with his teammates or team management. When he debuted with the Dodgers he threw a party at the Pendulum, a neighborhood gay bar.

He encountered tremendous prejudice within the baseball community and had to resist pressure from his coach, Al Campanis, to marry. His friendship with manager Tommy Lasorda’s estranged openly gay son, Tommy Lasorda, Jr., caused additional problems for Burke.

When Burke returned for spring training with Oakland in 1980, Billy Martin, the newly hired manager of the Athletics, made public statements about not wanting a homosexual in his clubhouse. Burke eventually quit major league baseball. He stated in his autobiography that "prejudice just won out."

Burke died from AIDS-related illness in 1995. One of his legacies is the "high five," which he introduced to baseball.


AIDS Quilt

Source: Queers in History, The Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Historical Gays, Lesbians, Bisexuals, and Transgenders by Keith Stern

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Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American author and "one of the most celebrated writers of his generation," according to The Virginia Quarterly Review.

Chabon's first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh (1988), was published when he was 25 and catapulted him to literary celebrity. He followed it with a second novel, Wonder Boys (1995), and two short-story collections. In 2000, Chabon published The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, a critically acclaimed novel that John Leonard, in a 2007 review of a later novel, called Chabon's magnum opus. It received the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2001 (see: 2001 in literature).

His novel The Yiddish Policemen's Union, an alternate history mystery novel, was published in 2007 to enthusiastic reviews and won the Hugo, Sidewise, Nebula and Ignotus awards; his serialized novel Gentlemen of the Road appeared in book form in the fall of that same year. Chabon's most recent novel, Telegraph Avenue, published in 2012 and billed as "a twenty-first century Middlemarch", concerns the tangled lives of two families in the Bay Area of San Francisco in the year 2004.

His work is characterized by complex language, the frequent use of metaphor along with recurring themes, including nostalgia, divorce, abandonment, fatherhood, and most notably issues of Jewish identity. He often includes gay, bisexual, and Jewish characters in his work. Since the late 1990s, Chabon has written in an increasingly diverse series of styles for varied outlets; he is a notable defender of the merits of genre fiction and plot-driven fiction, and, along with novels, he has published screenplays, children's books, comics, and newspaper serials.

In 1987, Chabon married the poet Lollie Groth. After the publication of The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, he was mistakenly featured in a Newsweek article on up-and-coming gay writers (Pittsburgh's protagonist has liaisons with people of both sexes.) The New York Times later reported that "in some ways, [Chabon] was happy" for the magazine's error, and quoted him as saying, "I feel very lucky about all of that. It really opened up a new readership to me, and a very loyal one." In a 2002 interview, Chabon added, "If Mysteries of Pittsburgh is about anything in terms of human sexuality and identity, it's that people can't be put into categories all that easily." In "On The Mysteries of Pittsburgh", an essay he wrote for the New York Review of Books in 2005, Chabon remarked on the autobiographical events that helped inspire his first novel: "I had slept with one man whom I loved, and learned to love another man so much that it would never have occurred to me to want to sleep with him."

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Chabon
The kid I wanted to find in college, played by Tobey Maguire in the film version of Wonder Boys by Michael Chabon. Who couldn’t fall in love with a chronic lying, gay, rich, talented depressing fiction writer? --Blair Mastbaum
For whatever reason, I didn’t do much reading (at least not for pleasure) in high school or college. But the summer that I graduated from Wayne State, I found a copy of Chabon’s debut, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, in a bin at B. Dalton Booksellers for something like $1.98. I totally judged the book by its cover and took a chance on this is one. As they say, “it changed my life.” I have read this book more times than I can count, and passed it along or recommended to just as many people. When the movie adaptation came out in 2008, I actually did not rush out to see it. Unlike so many others where I’ve almost enjoyed the film more, or didn’t care that “liberties” had been taken, when I learned that the gay character of Arthur Lecomte had been completely excised from this movie adaptation by the writer-director of Dodgeball (!), I literally launched a boycott online urging fans of the novel NOT to go and see it. Shame on Michael Chabon for allowing such a thing to happen to the story that put him on the literary map! I could go on, but… --Frank Anthony Polito
I forget exactly why I picked up The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Klay by Michael Chabon initially, but I wasn’t fifty pages in before I was preparing to shelve it next to American Gods as a favorite novel—and this was before I knew one of the main characters was gay. Somehow I managed to go into this story so cold that I discovered Sammy’s orientation right along with him, which is a gift I’ll always cherish. (I realize I’ve just ruined it for anyone reading this who didn’t know. Ah. Sorry!) But the Sammy’s sexual journey is just one facet of the novel. It’s set in the period around the second World War, and overall it is a story of loss and change and growth. Not growing up, exactly. Just growth. Growth of a country, of the comic book industry, of men, of families. Loss of innocence, loss of love, of life. There are missed opportunities and opportunities made out of sorrow. The book is just so big I don’t know how to describe it. It’s a rich tapestry of lives and character and hope built out of great loss. It’s also flat-out a wonderful novel about men. --Heidi Cullinan
The characters in The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Klay by Michael Chabon are so real, so touching, and so heartbreaking. I get all verklempt just thinking about it. --Astrid Amara
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Marion Dane Bauer (born 1938) is an American children's author.

Born and brought up in Oglesby, a small prairie town in Northern Illinois, she was educated at LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College, the University of Missouri and the University of Oklahoma, where she graduated in 1962. She married Ronald Bauer, raising their two children as well as being a foster parent for other children. She has taught English at a Wisconsin high school and classes in creative writing in Minnesota.

Rain of Fire (1983) won the Jane Addams Children's Book Award in 1984. Bauer received the Kerlan Award in 1986. On My Honor (1986) won a Newbery Medal Honor in 1987, and won the William Allen White Children's Book Award in 1989. Am I Blue, an anthology of children's fiction about gay and lesbian issues, won a Lambda Literary Award in 1994, and the Stonewall Book Award for literature in 1995. The Longest Night won a Golden Kite Award for picture-book text in 2009.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Dane_Bauer

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Diane Duane (born May 18, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. Her works include the Young Wizards young adult fantasy series and the Rihannsu Star Trek novels.

Born in New York City, she grew up in Roosevelt, Long Island. After school, she studied nursing and practiced as a psychiatric nurse for two years until 1976, when she moved to California and worked as an assistant to David Gerrold. Her first novel was published by Dell Books in 1979; Gerrold wrote an "overture" to that novel, on the grounds that he'd rather be making overtures than introductions to Duane.[1] She subsequently worked as a freelance writer. In 1981 she moved to Pennsylvania. She married Northern Irish author Peter Morwood in 1987; they moved to the United Kingdom and then to Ireland, where she resides in County Wicklow.

Also known as the Tale of the Five, The Middle Kingdoms high fantasy series has been awaiting completion since 1992. The books center on some of the same themes as her better-known Young Wizards series; those who wield the Blue Fire have many of the same responsibilities as the wizards and fight the same battle against entropy. In So You Want to Be a Wizard Nita's wizardry manual is written by "Hearnssen", a reference to the protagonist of The Door Into Fire, Herewiss s'Hearn (son of Hearn), so it may be that the Middle Kingdoms are part of the same sheaf of universes as the Young Wizards setting. Adding to this, one interdimensional portal in The Door into Fire appears to open over New York City. Unlike Duane's children's books, however, the Tale of the Five series deals openly with issues of alternative sexuality. Within the Middle Kingdoms, bisexuality and group marriage are the norm. Duane is working on the final volume. The Door into Fire and The Door into Shadow have an omnibus reprint called Tale of Five: The Sword and the Dragon.
Books in the series:
- The Door into Fire (1979)
- The Door into Shadow (1984)
- The Door into Sunset (1992)
- The Door into Starlight (to be written)

Several short stories are set in the Middle Kingdoms: Parting Gifts (1981) and its prequel The Span (1999) featuring Sirronde; Duane plans to write a middle novella and publish the three together as Sirronde's World. Lior and the Sea (1985) is set in the world of the Middle Kingdoms, but not concerning any of the characters in the novels.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diane_Duane

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Steven Craig "Steve" Gunderson (born May 10, 1951, in Eau Claire, Wisconsin) is the former President and CEO of the Council on Foundations and a former Republican congressman from Wisconsin. Gunderson wrote the 1996 book House and Home. He currently lives in Arlington, Virginia, with his partner, Jonathan Stevens, director of demographic change for the Bertelsmann Foundation's North American office.

Previously he was in a relationship with Rob Morris, owner of a Virginia architectural firm and co-author with the same Gunderson and Bruce Bawer of House and Home. In 1983, Gunderson walked into Badlands, a gay disco near Washington's Dupont Circle, and spied Georgia-born Rob Morris, then a 23-year-old architecture student at Auburn University. "For me," Gunderson writes, "it was love at first sight." Within a year they were living together in a relationship that lasted more than fifteen years.

Gunderson grew up near Whitehall, Wisconsin. After studying at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, he went on to train at the Brown School of Broadcasting in Minneapolis. (Picture: Jonathan Stevens and Steve Gunderson)

Gunderson served in the Wisconsin State Assembly from 1975 to 1979 before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1980. Representing Wisconsin's 3rd congressional district. First being elected to the 97th Congress, he served eight terms in the House and did not seek re-election to the 105th Congress in 1996. He was appointed by President Barack Obama to the President's Commission on White House Fellows in January 2010.

In 1994, Gunderson was outed as gay on the House floor by conservative then-representative Bob Dornan (R-CA) during a debate over federal funding for gay-friendly curricula, making him one of the first openly gay members of Congress and the first openly gay Republican representative. In 1996, Gunderson was the only Republican in Congress to vote against the Defense of Marriage Act, and he has been a vocal supporter of gay rights causes since leaving Congress .



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Gunderson

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More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance

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Renaud Camus (born 1946) is a French writer.

He was born in Chamalières, Puy-de-Dôme, in the Auvergne region of France. He spent some time studying in England and traveling in the United States, particularly New York and California (he taught for a semester in a college in Arkansas). He quickly began to circulate among writers (Louis Aragon, Roland Barthes, Marguerite Duras, etc.) and visual artists (the Warhol circle, the New York School, Gilbert and George, etc.). He also circulated in gay communities and is an outspoken defender of gay rights, although, as with social issues in general, he keeps his distance from doctrinaire positions. One of his first published works (and the only one (partially) translated in English), with a preface by Barthes, is Tricks (1979; enlarged and revised in 1982 and 1988), a “chronicle” consisting of over-detailed descriptions of homosexual encounters in France and elsewhere. Fragments of other works were published in the 75th issue of Yale French Studies (1988).

Camus is an exceptionally prolific writer. His work could be divided into four categories: straightforward prose (travel writing, traditional-form novels, polemic, and lengthy yearly journals (diary) published from 1989 to the present; “creative” prose: “experimental” novels and a large and ever-growing, largely unpublished web text, Burnt Boats (Vaisseaux brûlés); writings on painting and culture; and personal essays.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaud_Camus

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