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Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton PRA, known as Sir Frederic Leighton between 1878 and 1896, was an English painter and sculptor. His works depicted historical, biblical, and classical subject matter.
Born: December 3, 1830, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Died: January 25, 1896, London, United Kingdom
Education: University College School
Accademia di Belle Arti di Firenze
Lived: 13 Brunswick Terrace, Brunswick Centre, Brunswick Pavilion, Westborough, Scarborough YO11 1UE, UK
12 Holland Park Road, W14
2 Orme Square, W2
22 Argyle Street, WC1H
Buried: St. Paul's Cathedral, New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD
Awards: Legion of Honour, Prix de Rome, Royal Gold Medal
Periods: Aestheticism, Neoclassicism, Academic art

Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton (1830-1896) was born in Scarborough at 13 Brunswick Terrace, to a family in the import and export business, and there is now a commemorative blue plaque up at the Brunswick Centre (Brunswick Pavilion, Westborough, Scarborough YO11 1UE, UK) marking where the Leighton family home used to be.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Dr Frederic Septimus Leighton (1799-1892), Frederic Leighton’s father, was born in St Petersburg, where his father, Dr James Boniface Leighton, a Yorkshireman, was court physician to czars Alexander I and Nicholas I of Russia. Fred's mother was Frances L'Anson. Fred was trained in medicine at Edinburgh. Soon after his marriage to Augusta Susan they traveled to Russia, and in 1830 returned to England and settled in Scarborough where Frederic Leighton was born. Toward the end of 1833 they re-located, to 22 Argyle Street, WC1H. In 1834 Fred was admitted to the Royal College of Physicians, and that year Augusta Susan sat for her portrait by Edward Foster.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

English Heritage Blue Plaque: Leighton House, 12 Holland Park Road, Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton (1830–1896), "Painter lived and died here"
Address: Holland Walk, Kensington, London W8, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Holland Park is a district and a public park in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, in west London. Holland Park has a reputation as an affluent and fashionable area, known for attractive large Victorian townhouses, and high-class shopping and restaurants. There are many popular shopping destinations located around Holland Park such as High Street Kensington, Notting Hill, Holland Park Avenue, Portobello Market, Westbourne Grove, Clarendon Cross and Ledbury Road. Though there are no official boundaries, they are roughly Kensington High Street to the south, Holland Road to the west, Holland Park Avenue to the north and Kensington Church Street to the east. Holland Park Avenue is at the boundaries of the four census wards of Norland, Holland, Pembridge and Campden. The district was rural until the XIX century. Most of it was formerly the grounds of a Jacobean mansion called Holland House. In the later decades of that century the owners of the house sold off the more outlying parts of its grounds for residential development, and the district which evolved took its name from the house. It also included some small areas around the fringes which had never been part of the grounds of Holland House, notably the Phillimore Estate (there are at least four roads with the word Phillimore in their name) and the Campden Hill Square area. In the late XIX century a number of notable artists (including Frederic Leighton, P.R.A. and Val Prinsep) and art collectors lived in the area. The group were collectively known as "The Holland Park Circle.” Holland Park was for the most part very comfortably upper middle class when originally developed and in recent decades has gone further upmarket. Of the XIX century residential developments of the area, one of the most architecturally interesting is The Royal Crescent designed in 1839. Clearly inspired by its older namesake in Bath, it differs from the Bath crescent in that it is not a true crescent at all but two quadrant terraces each terminated by a circular bow in the Regency style which rises as a tower, a feature which would not have been found in the earlier classically inspired architecture of the XVIII century which the design of the crescent seeks to emulate. The design of the Royal Crescent by the planner Robert Cantwell in two halves was dictated by the location of the newly fashionable underground sewers rather than any consideration for architectural aesthetics. The stucco fronted crescent is painted white, in the style of the many Nash terraces which can be elsewhere in London’s smarter residential areas. Today many of these four storey houses have been converted to apartments, a few remain as private houses. The Royal crescent is listed Grade II. Aubrey House is situated to the North-East of the park. Holland Park is now one of the most expensive residential districts in London or anywhere in the world, with large houses occasionally listed for sale at over £10 million. A number of countries maintain their embassies here.
Notable queer residents at Holland Park:
• Between 1924 and 1929 Radclyffe Hall (August 12, 1880 –October 7, 1943) lived with her partner Una Troutbridge (1887-1963) at 37 Holland Street, W8. By putting pen to paper to write “The Well of Loneliness” (1928) in support of her passionate belief that sexual inverts deserved the same rights as everyone else, this established novelist risked losing everything – her literary reputation, economic security, friends, even her beautiful Kensington home. Radclyffe Hall lived with Lady Troubridge in London and, during the 1930s, in the tiny town of Rye, East Sussex, noted for its many writers, including her contemporary the novelist E.F. Benson. Hall died at age 63 of colon cancer, and is interred at Highgate Cemetery in North London. In 1930, Hall received the Gold Medal of the Eichelbergher Humane Award. She was a member of the PEN club, the Council of the Society for Psychical Research and a fellow of the Zoological Society. Radclyffe Hall was listed at number sixteen in the top 500 lesbian and gay heroes in The Pink Paper. English Heritage Blue Plaque: 37 Holland Street, Radclyffe Hall (1880–1943), "Novelist and Poet lived here 1924–1929" The Hall–Carpenter Archives, EC2M founded in 1982, are the largest source for the study of gay activism in Britain, following the publication of the Wolfenden Report in 1958. The archives are named after the authors Marguerite Radclyffe Hall and Edward Carpenter. They are housed at the London School of Economics, at Bishopsgate Library (230 Bishopsgate, London, EC2M 4QH), and in the British Library (Sound Archive) (oral history tapes).
• Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton (1830–1896), painter and sculptor, lived at 12 Holland Park Road, W14. Leighton remained a bachelor and rumours of his having an illegitimate child with one of his models in addition to the supposition that Leighton may have been homosexual continue to be debated today. He certainly enjoyed an intense and romantically tinged relationship with the poet Henry William Greville whom he met in Florence in 1856. Leighton was knighted at Windsor in 1878, and was created a baronet, of Holland Park Road in the Parish of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, in the County of Middlesex, eight years later, just before her death from heart failure in 1896. He is the only British artist to have been awarded this honour and is buried in St Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD). The Leighton House Museum in the Holland Park district of Kensington and Chelsea in London, former home of Frederic, Lord Leighton, has been open to the public since 1929. Built for Leighton by the architect and designer George Aitchison, it is a Grade II listed building. It is noted for its elaborate Orientalist and aesthetic interiors. It is open to the public daily except Tuesdays, and is a companion museum to 18 Stafford Terrace, another Victorian artist’s home in Kensington. Leighton’s first house in London was 2 Orme Square, W2 and he created much of his early work there. After his election to the Academy in 1864 he commissioned George Aitchison to build Leighton House.
• Legendary lead singer of the rock group Queen, the late Freddie Mercury (1946-1991) wrote the classic bestseller “Bohemian Rhapsody” whilst living at 100 Holland Road, W14 in the 1970s. The front cover from a record album is from a photo session of Queen taken at Freddie’s flat in Holland Road.
• Holland Villas Road in the 1950s was full of married couples with young children. Some of the houses were divided into flats, like 6 Holland Villas Road, W14. Eric Sykes (1923-2012) and Frankie Howerd (1917-1992) lived in separate flats in the ground floor from 1948 to 1958. This being the scenes of social gatherings of comedians of the time, including Peter Cook, Spike Milligan, Ben Warriss, Peter Sellers, and even Dame Margaret Rutherford. Eric Sykes, Spike Milligan, Barry Took and Frankie Howerd shared offices above a grocers shop at 130 Uxbridge Road, W12. Sykes occasionally lodged there too. In addition to the office, social hang-out was at 9 Orme Court, W2.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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