reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Friedrich Alfred Krupp was a German steel manufacturer of the company Krupp. He was the son of Alfred Krupp and inherited the family business when his father died in 1887.
Born: February 17, 1854, Essen, Germany
Died: November 22, 1902, Essen, Germany
Lived: Villa Krupp, Viale Giacomo Matteotti, 12, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54769, 14.24378)
Buried: Friedhof Bredeney, Essen, Essener Stadtkreis, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Find A Grave Memorial# 67917896
Spouse: Margarethe Krupp (m. 1882–1902)
Children: Bertha Krupp, Barbara Krupp
Parents: Bertha Krupp, Alfred Krupp
Grandchild: Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach

Friedrich Alfred Krupp loved the Italian island of Capri, where he often lived for some months in each year.
Address: Viale Giacomo Matteotti, 12, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54769, 14.24378)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone:+39 081 837 0362
Place
Originally Villa Krupp was named Blaesus, in honor of the Greek poet. From 1906 to 1909, guest of the Settanni family, Maksim Gor’kij resided at the villa as well. After that, the villa was converted into an hotel, and the name was changed in Villa Krupp, in honor of Alfred Krupp, who built the street below and the gardens, which he donated to Capri. The Grand Hotel Quisisana is the largest and one of the best known hotels on the island of Capri. It is located in the heart of the old town of Capri, opposite the Hotel Residenza Capri and the Villa Sanfelice, to the south of the Piazza Umberto I. Set in gardens with "sprawling buildings [which] are painted a distinctive yellow and accented with vines," it is also a notable dining venue in the historic centre of Capri. British doctor George Sidney Clark established a sanatorium in 1845, turning it into the Grand Hotel Quisisana in 1861. "Qui si sana" means "here one heals" in Italian. The hotel contains 148 rooms. There are eight conference rooms, one of which can accommodate for up to 500 people. The La Colombaia restaurant serves lunch in the outdoor restaurant next to the pool and serves fresh seafood, pastas and pizzas, chicken dishes and fruits, cheeses and pastries. The Restaurant Quisi indoors serves Italian cuisine for dinner, accompanied by romantic music. It has been cited as one of Italy’s finest hotel restaurants. Since 1986, the Grand Hotel has been a member of The Leading Hotels of the World. They say of it, "Surrounded by its own lush park, the Quisisana is a veritable oasis of relaxation. Terraces overlook the sea and gardens, and the traditional, elegantly furnished accommodations – some with whirlpool baths – are the perfect expression of Capri’s Dolce Vita, famous throughout Italy and the world. Movie stars, royalty, politicians and heads of state have all chosen the Quisisana for their vacation on the Island of Capri, confirming the hotel as one of the world’s most exclusive resorts." Famous guests of the hotel include Russian writer Maxim Gorky, Russian singer Feodor Chaliapin, Oscar Wilde (together with Lord Alfred Douglas) and Friedrich Alfred Krupp. Other notable guests have been Tom Cruise, Sidney Sheldon, Gianni Agnelli, Claudette Colbert, Jean-Paul Sartre, Gerald Ford, and Sting. After escaping Egypt in 1952, King Farouk I was a guest of the hotel during part of his exile in Italy.
Life
Who: Friedrich Alfred Krupp (February 17, 1854 – November 22, 1902)
Friedrich Alfred Krupp was a German steel manufacturer of the company Krupp.Krupp was born in Essen, Germany. His father was Alfred Krupp. In 1887, Friedrich took over the leadership of his father’s company. He married Margarethe Krupp (born Freiin von Ende.) They had two daughters: Bertha and Barbara (married Tilo Freiherr von Wilmowsky.) Krupp increased and diversified the output of the Krupp Works, which he extended by the incorporation with them of other enterprises. A member of the Prussian Upper House and Council of State, he also sat in the Reichstag from 1893 to 1898. When in Capri, he stayed at the hotel Quisisana and had two yachts, Maya and Puritan. His hobby was Oceanography. He met Felix Anton Dohrn and Ignazio Cerio on Capri. On 15 November, 1902 the Social Democratic magazine Vorwärts claimed in an article that Friedrich Alfred Krupp was homosexual, that he had a number of liaisons with local boys and men and that his fondest attachment was to Adolfo Schiano, an 18-year-old barber and amateur musician. A week later, on November 22, 1902, Krupp committed suicide. In a speech at Krupp’s burial, Emperor Wilhelm II attacked the Social Democratic politicians, insisting that they had lied about Krupp’s sexual orientation. Krupp’s heirs began a suit against Vorwärts, but soon abandoned the action.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Friedhof Bredeney (Westerwaldstraße 6, 45133 Essen) is buried Friedrich Alfred Krupp (1854-1902), German steel manufacturer of the company Krupp. Krupp loved the Italian island of Capri, where he often lived for some months in each year. He stayed at the hotel Quisisana and had two yachts, Maya and Puritan. On 15 November, 1902 the Social Democratic magazine Vorwärts claimed in an article that Friedrich Alfred Krupp was homosexual, that he had a number of liaisons with local boys and men and that his fondest attachment was to Adolfo Schiano, an 18-year-old barber and amateur musician. A week after the German article was published, on November 22, 1902, Krupp committed suicide. In a speech at Krupp's burial, Emperor Wilhelm II attacked the Social Democratic politicians, insisting that they had lied about Krupp's sexual orientation. Krupp's heirs began a suit against Vorwärts, but soon abandoned the action.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Her influence was instrumental in the passage of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution.
Born: September 28, 1839, Churchville, New York, United States
Died: February 17, 1898, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: Frances Willard House, 1730 Chicago Ave, Evanston, IL 60201, USA (42.04891, -87.67872)
Frances Willard Schoolhouse, Rock County 4-H Fair Inc, 1301 Craig Ave, Janesville, WI 53545, USA (42.69161, -89.00531)
Buried: Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA, Plot: Section F
Find A Grave Memorial# 6555
Organizations founded: Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Prohibition Party

Frances Willard was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Anna Adams Gordon was an American social reformer and songwriter. In 1877, Gordon met Willard at a Dwight L. Moody revival meeting, in the building where Willard was holding temperance meetings. The two became close friends, with Gordon continuing to play organ for Willard's meetings. Gordon eventually moved into Willard's residence as her personal secretary. Modern scholars have speculated on the precise nature of the relationship between Gordon and Willard (who preferred to be called "Frank"), believing both to have been lesbians. They remained intimate friends until Willard's death in 1898, at which time Lillian M. N. Stevens became president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, with Gordon as vice-president. That same year, Gordon also wrote a memorial biography of Willard. Upon Lillian Stevens' death in 1914, Anna Adams Gordon became president of the WCTU. “The loves of women for each other grow more numerous each day, and I have pondered much why these things were. That so little should be said about them surprises me, for they are everywhere…. In these days, when any capable and careful women can honorably earn her own support, there is no village that has not its examples of “two hearts in counsel,” both of which are feminine.” –Frances E. Willard, Glimpses of Fifty Years (1889)
Together from 1877 to 1898: 21 years.
Anna Adams Gordon (July 21, 1853 – June 15, 1931)
Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Frances Willard Schoolhouse is located in Janesville, Wisconsin.
Address: Rock County 4-H Fair Inc, 1301 Craig Ave, Janesville, WI 53545, USA (42.69161, -89.00531)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: 77000054, 1977
Place
The schoolhouse was built by Josiah Willard and his neighbor, David Inman. It was named after Willard’s daughter, Frances, the noted suffragist.
Life
Who: Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898)
In 1869, Frances Willard (1839-1898) was involved in the founding of Evanston Ladies’ College. In 1870, the college united with the former North Western Female College to become the Evanston College for Ladies, of which Willard became president. After only one year, the Evanston College for Ladies merged with Northwestern University and Willard became Northwestern’s first Dean of Women of the Women’s College. However, that position was to be short-lived due to her resignation in 1874. After her resignation, Willard focused her energies on a new career, traveling the American East Coast participating in the women’s temperance movement. Her tireless efforts for women’s suffrage and prohibition included a fifty-day speaking tour in 1874, an average of 30,000 miles of travel a year, and an average of four hundred lectures a year for a ten-year period, mostly with her longtime companion Anna Adams Gordon (1853-1931). In 1877, Gordon met Frances E. Willard at a Dwight L. Moody revival meeting, in the building where Willard was holding temperance meetings. Gordon’s younger brother Arthur had died just days before, a traumatic event which had, as Willard later wrote, driven Gordon "Godward.” The two became close friends, with Gordon continuing to play organ for Willard’s meetings. Gordon eventually moved into Willard’s residence as her personal secretary.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Frances Willard House was the home of Frances Willard and her family and was the longtime headquarters of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU.) Willard called the house Rest Cottage because it became a place for her to rest in between her tours and WCTU activities.
Address: 1730 Chicago Ave, Evanston, IL 60201, USA (42.04891, -87.67872)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +1 847-328-7500
National Register of Historic Places: 66000318, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The original 1865 house was probably based on a pattern book. It was an L-shaped building with vertical board and batten siding. The 1878 addition was consistent with the architectural form of the house but greatly expanded it. Proceeds from the sale of Willard’s autobiography were used to add large bay windows on the main facade around 1890. Willard made another addition in 1893. The two-story house is in the Carpenter Gothic style. It is painted pearl grey and has white trim. The front of the house has two columned porches. Three small porches lead to other entrances, and the second floor has a balcony on the rear. The three gables on the main facade have decorative trim and a turned finial in the center. There are seventeen rooms in the house, most with oak and walnut flooring.
Life
Who: Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898) and Anna Adams Gordon (July 21, 1853 – June 15, 1931)
Frances Willard was born in 1839 in Churchville, New York. When she was two, her family moved to Oberlin, Ohio, a town recently founded by ministers who wanted to build a community with strong Christian morals. When she was 18, Willard moved with her family to Evanston, Illinois to attend the Northwestern Female College. She spent the next sixteen years of her life as an educator at a variety of institutions across the county. In 1865, her father Josiah, who stayed in Evanston, built a house, which remains as the southern portion of the current structure. Frances Willard returned to Evanston and moved in with her father in 1871 when she accepted a position as Dean of the Women’s College at Northwestern. Unhappy with the role of women at the university, and frequently at odds with University President Charles Henry Fowler, Willard resigned three years later. Willard’s resignation prompted a change in her life. She resumed her position as a travelling educator, but began to focus on the study of temperance. In the summer of 1874, Willard travelled around the East Coast to meet with other temperance advocates. She also became a noted public speaker on the virtue. Returning to Evanston, she helped to found the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and was elected its first corresponding secretary and first president of the Chicago chapter. Her brother Oliver died in 1878, and Frances decided to expand her Evanston home that April to accommodate his widow and four children. The next year, she was elected President of the WCTU. After her brother’s family moved to Germany, Willard began to rent out the northern section of her house to friends and fellow WCTU members. This section soon became used as an informal headquarters for the WCTU under Willard. Willard died in 1898 and left the entire house to the WCTU in her will. Two years later, the WCTU made the house in Evanston its national headquarters. The WCTU also made the house into a museum dedicated to Willard in that year. In 1910, the organization built the Literature Building in the rear of the property. Museum tours are now offered to the public on the first and third Sundays of every month. Willard is buried at Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago. Her lifelong companion Anna Adams Gordon is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Mattapan, Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Rosehill Cemetery (5800 N Ravenswood Ave, Chicago, IL 60660) is buried Frances Willard (1839-1898), American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. In the same cemetery is buried Margaret “Marty” Mann (1904-1980), an early female member of Alcoholics Anonymous and author of the chapter "Women Suffer Too" in the second through fourth editions of the Big Book of AA.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Dieter Cunz was an emigre from Nazi Germany first to Switzerland and then to the U.S. who taught German language and literature as a professor at the University of Maryland from 1939 to 1957 and at Ohio ...
Born: August 4, 1910, Westerwald, Alpenrod, Germany
Died: February 17, 1969, Columbus, Ohio, United States
Education: Ohio State University
University of Maryland
Buried: Walnut Grove Cemetery, Worthington, Franklin County, Ohio, USA, Plot: Lot 178, Section D, Space #2 east
Buried alongside: Oskar Seidlin
Find A Grave Memorial# 36405794
Partner: Oskar Seidlin
Books: German for Beginners, The Maryland Germans

Richard Plant was a German-American writer. He is said to have written, in addition to the works published under his own name, several detective novels or Kriminalromane, with Dieter Cunz and Oskar Seidlin, under the collective pen name of Stefan Brockhoff. Upon the accession of the Nazis to power in Germany in 1933, and the enforcement of the Paragraph 175 against homosexuality, Plant was obliged to leave Germany for Switzerland in concert with his partner, Oskar Seidlin. In 1939, Seidlin obtained a lectureship (in 1941 elevated to assistant professorship) at Smith College for women in Northampton, Massachusetts. At Smith, he is said to have had a relationship with Newton Arvin. Seidlin also served on the Advisory Council of Princeton University for several terms. Plant is the author of The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War against Homosexuals, the first comprehensive book in English on the fate of the homosexuals in Nazi Germany. The horror of camp life is described through diaries, previously untranslated documents, and interviews with and letters from survivors, revealing how the anti-homosexual campaign was conducted.
Together from (before) 1933 to 1984: 51 years.
Oskar Seidlin (February 17, 1911 – December 11, 1984)
Richard Plant (July 22, 1910 – March 3, 1998)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

By the early 1900s, downtown Columbus residents and professors from The Ohio State University had built summer homes in Clintonville and the surrounding farmland was developed into housing developments shortly after the extension of the streetcar lines northward from Columbus. A business district developed in Beechwold, separated by nearly a mile of residences from the Clintonville district to the south. Both communities were entirely part of Columbus by the 1950s after it annexed most of Clinton Township.
Address: Walnut Grove Cemetery, 5561 Milton Ave, Columbus, OH 43085 (40.0759, -83.02371)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 614-885-5933
Place
Clintonville is a neighborhood in north-central Columbus, Ohio, with around 30,000 residents. Clintonville is an informal neighborhood. The southern border is loosely defined as Arcadia Avenue or the Glen Echo Ravine. To the east, either Interstate 71 or the adjacent railroad tracks are commonly accepted. The western boundary is assumed to be the Olentangy River. The northern border of Clintonville is the most ambiguous, with definitions anywhere in the 3 mi (4.8 km) stretch from Cooke Road to the southern border of Worthington. Worthington is a city in Franklin County, Ohio, and is a northern suburb of the larger Columbus. The population was 13,575 at the 2010 census. The city was founded in 1803 by the Scioto Company led by James Kilbourne, who was later elected to the United States House of Representatives, and named in honor of Thomas Worthington, who later became governor of Ohio.
Life
Who: Dieter Cunz (August 4, 1910 – February 17, 1969), Oskar Seidlin (February 17, 1911 – December 11, 1984) and Richard Plant (July 22, 1910 – March 3, 1998)
Dieter Cunz was an emigre from Nazi Germany first to Switzerland and then to the U.S. who taught German language and literature as a professor at the University of Maryland from 1939 to 1957 and at Ohio State University from 1957 until his death in 1969. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works. He studied at the University of Frankfurt. Here in the fall of 1931 he met two gay Jewish students of German literature, Richard Plaut and Oskar Koplowitz, and Koplowitz became his life partner. In 1938 Cunz, Koplowitz, and Plaut emigrated to the U.S., where within a year their paths diverged. While Plaut, who officially changed his name to Plant, remained in New York, Koplowitz, who changed his name to Seidlin, moved to Massachusetts in 1939 to take up a teaching position at Smith College. Cunz, who arrived in New York in August 1938, relocated to Maryland in October 1939. In 1957, Cunz accepted an offer to chair the German Department at Ohio State University following the departure of Bernhard Blume for Harvard University. Here he joined his partner Seidlin, who had been teaching at Ohio State since 1946, and the two built a house in the suburb Worthington. Cunz and Seidlin enjoyed summer vacations in the company of Richard Plant in Manomet, Massachusetts, and Mallnitz, Austria. Cunz was in declining health during his final years, suffering from high blood pressure and a heart valve defect. Even so, his death following a heart attack on February 17, 1969, at the age of 58, was unexpected and plunged Seidlin into a deep depression. In a signal honor, Ohio State University in 1973 named its new building for foreign languages and literatures after him (Dieter Cunz Hall, at 1841 Millikin Road, Columbus, Ohio). Oskar Seidlin taught German language and literature as a professor at Smith College, Middlebury College, Ohio State University, and Indiana University from 1939 to 1979. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works. In 1972, he found a new partner in the 35-year-old Hans Høgel, whom he visited regularly in Denmark and with whom he vacationed in the Great Smoky Mountains and the Caribbean. A heavy smoker, he suffered a heart attack in June, 1984 and was diagnosed with a malignant tumor at the beginning of October; he died nine weeks later. In accordance with his wishes, his mortal remains were interred alongside those of Dieter Cunz at the Walnut Grove Cemetery (5561 Milton Ave, Columbus, OH 4308). Richard Plant became a professor at the City University of New York, where he taught German language and literature from 1947 to 1973. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works as well as an opera scenario. He resided in Greenwich Village. Plant's companion during his final years was Michael Sasse. His papers are preserved in the Manuscripts and Archives Division of the New York Public Library.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life.
Born: March 9, 1892, Brighton, United Kingdom
Died: February 17, 1981, Montcuq, France
Lived: Wissett Lodge, Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Charleston Farmhouse, West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Hilton Hall, High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Château de Charry, Le Verger de Charry, 46800 Montcuq, France (44.31818, 1.22313)
Find A Grave Memorial# 133696391
Spouse: Angelica Garnett (m. 1942)
Movies: The Sailor's Return
Children: Amaryllis Garnett

David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. A writer, he first met members of the Bloomsbury group in 1910 but was not fully accepted by them until 1914, when he became Duncan Grant's lover. Like Grant, Garnett was a conscientious objector and having worked in France in 1915 with the Friends War Victims Relief Mission, he worked as a farm laborer to avoid conscription on his return to England. Garnett moved with Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell to Charleston farmhouse in 1916. He married Grant’s daughter (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), Angelica, in 1942. He was present at her birth on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry, to the horror of her parents.
Together from 1914 to 1921: 7 years.
David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

"Vanessa Bell, who had fallen in love with Duncan Grant before the start of the war, was painting in a farm-cottage on the Sussex coast, living in an uneasy triangle with Duncan and his new lover, David (known as Bunny) Garnett. In 1918 Bell gave birth to Grant’s child, Angelica Bell.” Hermione Lee, “Virginia Woolf” (1996)
Address: Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 01986 873173
Place
Wissett is a village and parish in the Waveney district of Suffolk located at 52.35N 01.46E TM3679 about 2 km (about 1.5 miles) northwest of Halesworth. Historically, it was in the hundred of Blything. It has a population of about 200, measured at 268 in the 2011 Census. Wisset manor was held by Ralph the staller, Baron of Gael in Brittany before the Norman Conquest. Ralph was created Earl of Suffolk and Norfolk in 1067, but his son lost the title and the manor passed to Count Alan of Brittany and Richmond in 1075. The Domesday Book shows that in 1086 Wissett had a church at Rumburgh with two carucates of free land, twelve monks, and a chapel in the village. The XI century flint parish church dedicated to Saint Andrew has a circular church tower with a floor dated to the XII Century. This is the oldest recorded church tower floor in the United Kingdom. Built as a chapel to Rumburgh Priory, the surviving elements of the Norman church are two doors to the nave and the tower arch. The parish is now part of the Blyth Valley Team Ministry in the diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich. Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and David Garnett lived in Wissett for the summer of 1916. Virginia Woolf (Vanessa’s sister) said after visiting them: "Wissett seems to lull asleep all ambition. Don’t you think they have discovered the secret of life? I thought it wonderfully harmonious." Wissett Hall is a red brick manor house owned by Colin Holmes, co-founder of Dencora PLC. The village pub is the Plough Inn. Wissett Wines are produced at the Valley Farm Vineyards by Elaine Heeler and Vanessa Tucker, who brought the business in 2014, Wissett Wines was established in 1987.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981), Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 – April 7, 1961)
David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. He was the son of Constance Clara Garnett (née Black), an English translator of XIX-century Russian literature, one of the first English translators of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Anton Chekhov who introduced them on a wide basis to the English-speaking public, and Edward William Garnett, an English writer, critic and a significant and personally generous literary editor, who was instrumental in getting D. H. Lawrence's “Sons and Lovers” published. As a child, David had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny,” by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. His first wife was illustrator Rachel "Ray" Marshall (1891–1940), sister of translator and diarist Frances Partridge. He and Ray, whose woodcuts appear in some of his books, had two sons, one of whom (Richard) went to Beacon Hill School. Ray died relatively young of breast cancer. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. He was present at the birth of Grant’s daughter, Angelica (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?.” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry (on May 8, 1942), to the horror of her parents.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1922 David Garnett published the highly successful novel, “Lady Into Fox.” The money he made from this book enabled him to buy Hilton Hall, an early XVII century house near Huntingdon.
Address: High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 54022 (Grade II, 1951)
Place
Described as “The most beautiful of all the Bloomsbury houses” by biographer, critic and art historian Frances Spalding, Hilton Hall was bought by David Garnett Fox in 1924. There he entertained many literary friends: T.E. Lawrence would startle the village by roaring up unannounced on his motorbike; Virginia Woolf came and amused his boys by pretending to be a wolf. D.H. Lawrence teased him for living in a Hall, but added: “It’s not at all grand, except in the way a grandmother is grand, by being ancient.” Hilton Hall was built early in the XVII century perhaps by Robert Walpole, (a very distant relative of the prime minister) who died there in 1699 and is buried in Hilton Church. It was refronted and given new sash windows and panelling in the middle of the XVIII century but the fine Jacobean staircase, wide floorboards and moulded beams all remain. Otherwise it has been very little altered except by an extension containing panelling and a bay window salvaged from the ruins of Old Park Farm in Hilton. Behind the house there is a large dovehouse, also of the XVII century, which was used by Garnett’s second wife, Angelica, as a studio. She was the daughter of the Bloomsbury artists Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell, and was herself a noted artist. She has left her mark on the house with a decorated bedroom mantelpiece, a large mural in the dovehouse and a mosaic doorstep. Because of its place in the history of the Bloomsbury Group, and its collection of paintings and sculpture – especially by Angelica’s parents, it has been a popular destination for groups from the Cambridge branch of the Art Fund and the Friends of Kettle Yard. The grounds are all enclosed by hedging and fencing. Swimming pool, kitchen garden.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
The Garnetts lived at Hilton Hall, Hilton near St Ives in Cambridgeshire, where David Garnett kept a herd of Jersey cows. They had four daughters: in order, Amaryllis, Henrietta, and twins Nerissa and Frances; eventually the couple separated. Amaryllis Garnett (1943–1973) was an actress who had a small part in Harold Pinter’s film adaptation of “The Go-Between” (1970.) She drowned in the Thames, aged 29. Henrietta Garnett married Lytton Burgo Partridge, her father’s nephew by his first wife Ray, but was left a widow with a newborn infant when she was 18; she oversaw the legacies of both David Garnett and Duncan Grant. Nerissa Garnett (1946–2004) was an artist, ceramicist, and photographer. Fanny (Frances) Garnett moved to France where she became a farmer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

As one of David Garnett’s friends pointed out: "Here he bottled wine and cooked for his many visitors, and could be seen sitting out of doors under a large straw hat typing away at his latest book."
Address: Le Verger de Charry, 46800 Montcuq, France (44.31818, 1.22313)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in the XV century
The Château de Charry is a castle in the commune of Montcuq in the Lot département of France. The castle was built in three stages. It was initially a keep whose principal masonry was flanked by two polygonal towers. It was encircled by a fortified curtain wall; the remains of this are the third tower, though not connected to the main building, and a rectangular barbican. Cannon positions defended access to the well. An underground passage linked the barbican to one of the towers of the keep. A second period of building, in the XVII century, added the central building to the right of the tower, as well as buildings forming the court. In the XIX century, the main building was joined to the round tower of the ramparts. This keep provided a firing line between Montcuq and the keep at Marcilhac, and guaranteed the defence of the Charry valley The castle is privately owned. It has been listed since 1976 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
After his separation from Angelica Bell, David Garnett, the British writer and publisher and a prominent member of the Bloomsbury Group, moved to France and lived in a pleasant house in the grounds at the Château de Charry, Montcuq (near Cahors) leased to him by the owners, Jo and Angela D’Urville. He continued to write, made friends among the local English community, and lived there until his death in 1981. The Frances and Ralph Partridge’s son, Burgo, had married Angelica and David Garnett’s daughter, Henrietta, but died of a heart attack on September 7, 1963, aged only 28.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Corinne Roosevelt was an American poet, writer, lecturer, and public speaker. She was also the younger sister of former President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt and an aunt of former First Lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt.
Born: September 27, 1861, New York City, New York, United States
Died: February 17, 1933, New York City, New York, United States
Buried: Robinson Cemetery, Columbia Center, Herkimer County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 54494616
Children: Theodore Douglas Robinson, Corinne Alsop Cole
Parents: Martha Bulloch Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt Sr.
Siblings: Theodore Roosevelt, Bamie Roosevelt, Elliott Bulloch Roosevelt

At Robinson Cemetery (Gelston Castle, 980 Robinson Rd, Mohawk, NY 13407) is buried Corinne Roosevelt Robinson (September 27, 1861 — February 17, 1933), American poet, writer, lecturer, and public speaker. Younger sister of President Theodore Roosevelt and an aunt of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. Bisexual, she was good friend with Edith Wharton. Corinne Roosevelt married Douglas Robinson, Jr., son of Douglas Robinson, Sr. and Frances Monroe. Frances was a grandniece of President James Monroe.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Lived: 1 Sutton Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75738, -73.96029)
Buried: Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp, Richmond County (Staten Island), New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 145795799

In 1903, Willian K. Vanderbilt married Anne Harriman, daughter of banker Oliver Harriman. She was a widow to sportsman Samuel Stevens Sands and to Lewis Morris Rutherfurd, Jr., son of the astronomer Lewis Morris Rutherfurd. Her second husband died in Switzerland in 1901. Always in 1903, along with Anne Morgan and Bessie Marbury, Anne helped organize the Colony Club, the first women's social club in New York. This same coterie would go on to create the exclusive neighborhood of Sutton Place, along Manhattan's East River, which prompted gossip papers of the 1920s to loudly whisper of an "Amazon Enclave“. Together Bessie Marbury and Elsie de Wolfe cultivated a different sort of salon culture in their Sutton Place home, regularly visited by leading American and European writers and artists. Anne was also a lifelong philanthropist: she was responsible for the building of the "open-stair" apartment houses, four large buildings with 384 apartments on Avenue A (now York Avenue) between 77th and 78th streets in New York. These revolutionary new buildings were intended to house patients suffering from tuberculosis, then the scourge of New York slums, and their families in airy, sanitary surroundings. She paid the $1 million cost of the partments, which were designed by Henry Atterbury Smith. Completed in 1910, the buildings still exist and are still occupied.
Together from 1903 to 1920: 17 years.
Anne Harriman Sands Rutherfurd Vanderbilt (Feb. 17, 1861 – Apr. 20, 1940)
William Kissam Vanderbilt I (December 12, 1849 – July 22, 1920)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Colony Club is a women-only private social club in New York City. Founded in 1903 by Florence Jaffray Harriman, wife of J. Borden Harriman, as the first social club established in New York City by and for women, it was modeled on similar clubs for men. Today, men are admitted as guests.
Address: 120 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016 (40.74553, -73.98476), & 564 Park Ave, New York, NY 10065, USA (40.76513, -73.96864)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 212-838-4200
National Register of Historic Places: Old Colony Club, 80002706, 1980
Place
The club and the street in front of it were often the site of large suffrage rallies sponsored by the Equal Franchise Society to which many members of the Club belonged. With other wealthy women, including Anne Tracy Morgan (a daughter of J.P. Morgan), Anne Harriman raised $500,000, and commissioned Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White to build the original clubhouse, later known as the "Old Colony Club.” This building – at 120 Madison Avenue, between East 30th and East 31st Streets on the west side of Madison – was built between 1904 and 1908 and was modelled on XVIII century houses in Annapolis, Maryland. The interiors, which exist largely unchanged and have been accorded the landmark status, were created by Elsie de Wolfe – later to become Lady Mendl – a former actress who had recently opened an interior-design business, and whose companion, the theatrical agent Elisabeth Marbury, was one of the club’s founders. Stanford White was slain by Harry K. Thaw months before construction of the Colony Club was completed. The building was designed in the Federal Revival style, and has unusual brickwork done in a diaper pattern as a notable feature of its facade. The Old Colony Club was sold after the club moved to its new location in 1916. Today, the building houses the East Coast headquarters of the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. It was awarded landmark status by the City of New York in 1966. The second clubhouse, located at 564 Park Avenue, also known as 51 East 62nd Street, on the northwest corner, was commissioned in 1913 and constructed from 1914 to 1916. It was designed by Delano & Aldrich in the Neo-Georgian style, with interiors designed by Elsie de Wolfe. The building has a marble base with red-brick and marble trim and columns for the upper floors. According to Andrew Dolkart: “This is not one of Delano & Aldrich’s more elegant works in the Colonial idiom, perhaps because it was nearly impossible to create a well-proportioned design for a building with the complex spatial requirements of this club. The beautifully appointed interior included the lounges, dining rooms, and bedrooms common to social clubs, but also had a two-story ballroom, a basement swimming pool and spa that connected via an express elevator to a gymnasium on the fifth floor, two squash courts, servants’ rooms (in 1925 there were thirteen female servants), and even a kennel where members could leave their pets.” In 1973, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger’s birthday party was held at the Colony Club; among the guests were four couples whom Kissinger had ordered to be wiretapped, and in 2007, memorial services for Brooke Astor were held there. The club continues its policy of women-only membership – new members must be recommended by current members — although it was unsuccessfully contested in court in 1987 by conservative radio talk-show host Bob Grant and Sidney Siller, who founded the National Organization for Men. The Club presently has approximately 2,500 members who have access to discussions, concerts, and wellness and athletic programs. The Clubhouse consist of seven stories, 25 guest bedrooms, three dining rooms, two ballrooms, a lounge, a squash court, an indoor pool, a fitness facility and three personal spa service rooms. Annual gross revenues are more than $10 million.
Notable queer members at The Colony Club:
• Anne Harriman Sands Rutherfurd Vanderbilt (1861-1940), along with Anne Morgan and Elisabeth Marbury helped organize the Colony Club. They were known as the Amazon Enclave, from the Sutton Place neighbourhood where they all lived.
• Elisabeth “Bessy” Marbury (1856-1933), a pioneering theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe.
• Anne Tracy Morgan (July 25, 1873 – January 29, 1952), a philanthropist who provided relief efforts in aid to France during and after WWI and WWII with her life partner Anne Murray Dike. Daughter of J.P. Morgan.
Notable queer alumni at American Academy of Dramatic Arts:
• Diana Barrymore (1921-1960) was an American film and stage actress. While in her teens, Barrymore decided to study acting and enrolled at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. Because of the prominence of the Barrymore name in the world of theatre, her move onto the stage began with much publicity including a 1939 cover of Life.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991) was an American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film “Midnight Express” and 1982 film “Querelle.” At 16, after winning a music-talent contest, Davis worked at Theater Atlanta. He later moved to New York City and attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, as well as studied acting at the American Place Theater.
• Katharine Hepburn (1907–2003)
• Guthrie McClintic (1893–1961) was a successful theatre director, film director and producer based in New York. McClintic attended Washington University and New York's American Academy of Dramatic Arts and became an actor but soon became a stage manager and casting director for major Broadway producer Winthrop Ames.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Sutton Place first became fashionable around 1920, when several wealthy socialites, including Anne Harriman Vanderbilt and Anne Morgan, built townhouses on the eastern side of the street, overlooking the East River. Both townhouses were designed by Mott B. Schmidt, launching a career that included many houses for the wealthy.
Address: Sutton Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75738, -73.96029)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Sutton Place Historic District (1--21 Sutton Pl. & 4--16 Sutton Sq.), 85002294, 1985
Place
Elisabeth Marbury, the wealthy literary agent and producer who had been born into an aristocratic family, commissioned society architect Mott Schmidt to transform a Victorian rowhouse at No. 13 Sutton Place into a Georgian residence. She moved in with her long-time companion, decorator Elsie de Wolfe, and began a campaign of convincing her other female friends to follow suit. One of those friends was Anne Vanderbilt whose husband, William K. Vanderbilt died on July 22, 1920, making Anne a widow for the third time. New York society was shocked when, on January 9, 1921, a New York Times headline reported that “Mrs. W.K. Vanderbilt to Live In Avenue A.” She had sold her gargantuan Fifth Avenue mansion for $3 million to move to what the newspaper called “a little-known two-block thoroughfare.” She used $50,000 of the $3 million to purchase Effingham Sutton’s house, No. 1, and, like Elisabeth Marbury, who was already living there, hired Mott B. Schmidt to renovate it into a 13-room Georgian mansion. Anne Vanderbilt’s close friend, 38-year old Anne Tracy Morgan, daughter of J. Pierpont Morgan, announced her plans to have Mott Schmidt create a house abutting the new Vanderbilt house. “Miss Morgan’s new home is being altered, to conform somewhat to the Colonial style of Mrs. Vanderbilt’s house, after which type most of the houses in the exclusive-little nook have been patterned,” said The Times. “Many of the rooms will contain rare old paneling and furniture. Some of these furnishings will be brought from abroad, but much of it will be Colonial. It is expected that the cost of the site and the remodeling will be about $125,000.” By now the neighborhood was filling with single and very wealthy women who were keeping Mott and Elsie de Wolfe busy changing XIX century middle class homes into fashionable neo-Georgian residences. Anne Vanderbilt’s sister, Mrs. Stephen Olin, was already here as were Mrs. Lorillard Cammann and Francis B. Griswold. Sutton Place was dubbed “The Amazon Enclave.” Two months later Mott Schmidt filed revised plans for Anne Morgan’s house at No. 3 Sutton Place. She had purchased the house next door, No. 5, and the original plans were scrapped so that the two houses could be merged. “The new plans call for the rebuilding of the two structures into a four-story dwelling in American Colonial style with a roof garden,” reported The Times. Reflecting their close relationship, Morgan and Vanderbilt would share a common garden to the rear. To create the illusion of a vintage home, Mott reused the bricks from the old buildings on the site. An elevator, in-house incinerator, gas furnace and refrigerators brought the home squarely into the modern age. Mott based the design on two Philadelphia houses; the 1765 Samuel Powel House and its neighbor, the Benjamin Wister Morris House. He treated the Morgan house and the Vanderbilt house as two independent but critically-related designs. A critic assessed them saying “No more valuable or successful examples of the consistent and intelligent use of English architectural precedent in the designing of American houses are to be found than these two houses on Sutton Place.” The house was completed in 1922 and House & Garden praised Morgan for her choice of XVIII Century interiors. “There are hundreds of beautiful drawing rooms in New York, but I know of no one but Miss Morgan who has determined to make the largest and most important room in her house an early American one. She is using an old pine paneled room, such as were often seen in old Southern houses. The New England pine rooms were usually much smaller and the paneling was generally more severe.” The house of Anne Morgan on Sutton Place was purchased after her death by Arthur Amory Houghton, Jr., the great-grandson of the founder of Corning Glass. Twenty years later, Houghton donated the house to the United Nations Association of the United States. The association leased it to the United Nations for a year as the home of the Secretary General, then sold it to the organization in 1973. Today the stately home of Anne Morgan remains the home of the U.N.’s Secretary General. Its colonial façade, along with those of its neighbors built by independent-thinking women who broke free of tradition, looks as though it has stood there for centuries. 360 E. 55th Street, 404 E. 55th Street and 405 E. 54th Street are known as The Sutton Collection. Located in the heart of Sutton Place, the Sutton Collection is made up of three unique buildings, each building is filled with exceptional architectural details and true New York style that can only be found in the rarest of pre-war properties. At 404 E 55th St resided Noel Coward, this was the playwright’s last Manhattan residence.
Life
Who: Anne Tracy Morgan (July 25, 1873 – January 29, 1952)
Anne Morgan was a philanthropist who provided relief efforts in aid to France during and after WWI and WWII. Morgan was educated privately, traveled frequently and grew up amongst the wealth her father had amassed. She was awarded a medal from the National Institute of Social Science in 1915, the same year she published the story “The American Girl.” In 1932 she became the first American woman appointed a commander of the French Legion of Honor. In 1903 she became part owner of the Villa Trianon near Versailles, France, along with decorator and socialite Elsie De Wolfe (1859-1950) and theatrical/literary agent Elisabeth “Bessie” Marbury (1856-1933.) Morgan was instrumental in assisting De Wolfe, her close friend, in pioneering a career in interior decoration. The three women, known as "The Versailles Triumvirate," hosted a salon in France and, in 1903, along with Anne Vanderbilt (1861-1940), helped organize the Colony Club, the first women’s social club in New York City and, later, helped found the exclusive neighborhood of Sutton Place along Manhattan’s East River.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Moravian Cemetery at 2205 Richmond Road in New Dorp on Staten Island, New York is the largest cemetery on the island. The cemetery encompasses 113 acres (46 hectares), and is the property of the Moravian Church of Staten Island. Opened in 1740, it is situated on the southeastern foot of the Todt Hill ridge, and to its southwest is High Rock Park, one of the constituent parks of the Staten Island Greenbelt.
Address: 2205 Richmond Rd, Staten Island, NY 10306, USA (40.58006, -74.11392)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 718-351-0136
Place
In what was a purely farming community, the 113-acre (46 ha) cemetery was originally made available as a free cemetery for the public in order to discourage families from using farm burial plots. The Moravian Cemetery is the burial place for a number of famous Staten Islanders, including members of the Vanderbilt family. In the XIX century Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt gave the Moravian Church 8 1⁄2 acres (3.4 ha), and later his son William Henry Vanderbilt gave a further 4 acres (1.6 ha) and constructed the residence for the cemetery superintendent. The Vanderbilt mausoleum, designed by Richard Morris Hunt and constructed in 1885–1886, is part of the family's private section within the cemetery. Their mausoleum is a replica of a Romanesque church in Arles, France. The landscaped grounds around the Vanderbilt mausoleum were designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. The Vanderbilt section is not open to the public.
Notable queer burials at Moravian Cemetery:
• Alice Austen (March 17, 1866 – June 9, 1952). The Staten Island Historical Society arranged for Alice Austen’s funeral and she was buried in the Austen family plot. Upon Austen’s partner's death, Gertrude, her family learned that Alice and Gertrude had wanted to be buried together. Alice Austen had made arrangements for Gertrude to be interred in the Austen family plot. The Tate family, however, refused to honor the women's wishes. Gertrude is buried at Cypress Hills Cemetery (833 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11208).
• Anne Harriman Vanderbilt (1864-1940), social leader and a philanthropist on two continents, will be remembered particularly in Paris for her work in behalf of France and the allies in the WWI.
• William Kissam Vanderbilt I (1849–1920) was an American heir, businessman, philanthropist and horsebreeder. Born into the Vanderbilt family, he managed his family railroad investments. Vanderbilt died in Paris, France on July 22, 1920. His remains were brought home and interred in the Vanderbilt family vault in the Moravian Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Sir Alan Arthur Bates, CBE was an English actor who came to prominence in the 1960s, when he appeared in films ranging from the popular children's story Whistle Down the Wind to the "kitchen sink" drama A Kind of Loving.
Born: February 17, 1934, Allestree, Derby, United Kingdom
Died: December 27, 2003, Westminster, United Kingdom
Education: Royal Academy of Dramatic Art
Lived: 1 Earls Terrace, W8
Buried: All Saints, Mill Lane, Bradbourne, Derbyshire, DE6 1PA
Find A Grave Memorial# 8214917
Spouse: Victoria Ward (m. 1970–1992)
TV shows: Oliver's Travels, Laurence Olivier Presents, The Mayor of Casterbridge
Awards: Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Acting Ensemble, more

Sir Alan Arthur Bates, CBE was an English actor who came to prominence in the 1960s, a time of high creativity in British cinema, when he appeared in films ranging from the popular children's story Whistle down the Wind to the "kitchen sink" drama A Kind of Loving. John Curry was a British figure skater. He was the 1976 Olympic and World Champion. Prior to the 1976 World Championships, Curry was outed as gay by a German tabloid newspaper, Bild-Zeitung. It caused a brief scandal in Europe at the time, but the press and public generally ignored Curry’s sexual orientation for many years afterwards. In 1987, Curry was diagnosed with HIV, and in 1991 with AIDS. Before his death, he spoke openly to the press about both his disease and his sexual orientation. He died of an AIDS-related heart attack on April 15, 1994 in Binton; he was 44 years old. A 2007 biography of actor Alan Bates claimed that Curry and Bates had a two-year affair, and that Curry died in Bates' arms. Other than Curry, Bates had numerous homosexual relationships throughout his life, including those with actors Nickolas Grace and Peter Wyngarde.
Together from 1992 to 1994: 2 years.
Sir Alan Bates (February 17, 1934 - December 27, 2003)
John Curry (September 9, 1949 - April 15, 1994)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Actors Peter Wyngarde and Alan Bates shared a flat at no. 1 Earls Terrace, W8 for some years in the 1960s.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At All Saints (Mill Lane, Bradbourne, Derbyshire, DE6 1PA) is buried Alan Bates (February 17, 1934 –December 27, 2003). Bates had numerous homosexual relationships throughout his life, including those with actors Nickolas Grace and Peter Wyngarde and with Olympic skater John Curry. In 1994 Curry died from AIDS in Bates' arms.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Hans Blüher was a German writer and philosopher. He attained prominence as an early member and "first historian" of the Wandervogel movement. He was aided by his taboo breaking rebellion against schools and the Church.
Born: February 17, 1888, Świebodzice, Poland
Died: February 4, 1955, Berlin, Germany
Buried: Friedhof Hermsdorf II, Frohnauer Str. 112, 13465 Berlin
People also search for: Stephan Hötzel, Oskar F Scheuer, Oliver Humberg

Hans Blüher (1888-1955), was a German writer and philosopher. His comments on the homosexual aspects of the Wandervogel movement and the role homoeroticism and male bonding played in the creation of European culture and institutions were fiercely combated. He is buried at Friedhof Hermsdorf II (Frohnauer Str. 112, 13465 Berlin).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

June 2017

S M T W T F S
     1 23
4 5 6 7 8910
11 12 1314 151617
1819 2021 22 2324
252627282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 24th, 2017 05:25 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios