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Glenway Wescott was an American poet, novelist and essayist. A figure of the American expatriate literary community in Paris during the 1920s Wescott was openly gay.
Born: April 11, 1901, Kewaskum, Wisconsin, United States
Died: February 22, 1987, Rosemont, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, New Jersey, United States
Education: University of Chicago
Lived: 410 Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
215 E. 79 St.
Stone-blossom, Clinton, NJ 08809, USA (40.65216, -74.92672)
Haymeadows, Wescott Preserve, Raven Rock Rosemont Rd, Stockton, NJ 08559, USA (40.4265, -75.01584)
Buried: in the small farmer's graveyard hidden behind a rock wall and trees at the farm at Haymeadows (New Jersey) (ashes)
Buried alongside: Monroe Wheeler
Find A Grave Memorial# 13740685
Movies: Apartment in Athens
Siblings: Lloyd Wescott

Glenway Wescott was an American novelist and an important figure in the American expatriate literary community in Paris during the 1920s. Upon receiving a small printing press as a gift from his father, Monroe Wheeler began producing chapbooks of poetry under the imprint, Manikin Press. One of his first works was The Bitterns, a collection of poems by Wescott, whom he had met at the University of Chicago in 1919 and who would become Wheeler's long-time companion. 1927 brought a new challenge to their pairing: George Platt Lynes fell passionately in love with the strikingly good-looking Wheeler. Wheeler, for his part, was entranced by Lynes's "full, luscious mouth and his wasp like waist." The ménage a trois ended in February 1943 when Lynes moved out of the apartment that the three men shared, thus bringing to a close one of the longer chapters that supplemented the sixty-plus years relationship between Wescott and Wheeler. Lynes would eventually succumb to cancer in 1955 at the age of 48. Wheeler died in 1988 at the age of 89, 18 months after the death of Wescott.
Together from 1919 to 1987: 68 years.
Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987)
Monroe Wheeler (February 13, 1899 - August 14, 1988)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1936 Lloyd Wescott purchased a 1,000-acre (4.0 km2) dairy farm along the Mulhocaway Creek in Union Township near Clinton in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Mulhocaway Farm, as it was known, became the headquarters for the Artificial Breeding Association, a pioneer in the artificial insemination of dairy cows. Glenway Wescott along with Monroe Wheeler and George Platt Lynes took over one of the farmhand houses and called it Stone-Blossom. In the 1950s, Mulhocaway Farm was acquired by the State of New Jersey under eminent domain in order to create the Spruce Run Reservoir.
Address: Clinton, NJ 08809, USA (40.65216, -74.92672)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Clinton Historic District (Roughly, along Center, W. Main, Main, E. Main, Halstead, Water, Leigh (Library) and Lower Center Sts.), 95001101, 1995
Place
Clinton is a town in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, located on the South Branch of the Raritan River. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town’s population was 2,719, reflecting an increase of 87 (+3.3%) from the 2,632 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 578 (+28.1%) from the 2,054 counted in the 1990 Census. When the Clinton post office was established in 1829, it was named for DeWitt Clinton, Governor of New York and the primary impetus behind the then-newly completed Erie Canal. Clinton was incorporated as a town by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 5, 1865, within portions of Clinton, Franklin and Union Townships. Clinton gained full independence from its three parent townships in 1895. The town is perhaps best known for its two mills which sit on opposite banks of the South Branch Raritan River. The Red Mill, with its historic village, dates back to 1810 with the development of a mill for wool processing. Across the river sits the Stone Mill, home of the Hunterdon Art Museum for Contemporary Craft and Design, located in a former gristmill that had been reconstructed in 1836 and operated continuously until 1936. In 1952, a group of local residents conceived of a plan to convert the historic building into an art museum, which is still in operation today.
Life
Who: Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987), Monroe Wheeler (1899-1988) and George Platt Lynes (April 15, 1907 – December 6, 1955)
The Elizabethtown Water Company of New Jersey was first drawn to the idea of building a reservoir at the confluence of Spruce Run and Mulhockaway Creek just before 1929. Land speculators bought almost 2,100 acres in anticipation of selling it to the water company, but the Great Depression waylaid everybody’s plans. The state acquired 1,500 acres to build a game preserve, and in 1936, the remaining 600 acres went to Lloyd Wescott and his wife Barbara for $70 an acre. After they moved into their red clapboard farmhouse, the Wescotts restored the old farm buildings and built new metal barns. Farm tenants lived close to each of three complexes of cow barns. Lloyd’s brother, Glenway Wescott, parents and other relatives lived in other separate homes on the property, which he called Mulhocaway Farm (intentionally spelled differently from the name of the creek.) The Westcotts intended to breed healthy livestock, and when the Hunterdon County Board of Agriculture was introduced to the concept of artificial breeding of dairy cattle, Lloyd proposed to construct housing for Guernsey bulls. The farm’s facility became the first artificial insemination station in the country. The old colonial house was refurnished by the Wescotts and given the romantic name Stone-blossom by Glenway Wescott. George Platt Lynes wrote to Katherine Anne Porter in 1938: “You would never know Stone-blossom. There is an acre of lawn, and a little newly-planted flower garden, and there are new stone walls and new trees. Why aren’t you here?” The three men were to remain together in New York and at Stone-blossom until 1943, when George ended his relationship with Monroe Wheeler and moved out. In 1956, the State of New Jersey revived the plan for a reservoir in the fertile valley. The Westcotts negotiated a selling price and relocated to another farm in Delaware Township in 1959, considering the move a blessing since the structures and equipment had become obsolete. Theirs was the only farm to be inundated by water from Spruce Run Creek.


Conversation Piece (Monroe Wheeler, Glenway Wescott and George Platt Lynes). Paul Cadmus Stone Blossom in the background

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Immediately after the death of her father, Alice Delamar rented a house on Park Avenue 270.
Address: Park Ave, New York, NY 10017, USA
Type: Private Property
Place
Park Avenue is a wide New York City boulevard which carries north and southbound traffic in the borough of Manhattan, and is also a wide one-way pair in the Bronx. For most of the road’s length in Manhattan, it runs parallel to Madison Avenue to the west and Lexington Avenue to the east. Park Avenue’s entire length was formerly called Fourth Avenue; the title still applies below 14th Street. Meanwhile, the section between 14th and 17th Street is called Union Square East, and between 17th and 32nd Streets, the name Park Avenue South is used. In the Bronx, Park Avenue runs in several segments between the Major Deegan Expressway and Fordham Road.
Notable queer residents at Park Avenue:
- No. 270: real estate titan Dr. Charles V. Paterno formed the Vanderbilt Av. Realty Corp. and commissioned the architectural firm of Warren & Wetmore to design a massive U-shaped neo-Renaissance building. Paterno envisioned two distinct sections—the mansion-like apartments that took the address 270 Park Avenue, and the apartment hotel that used the name Hotel Marguery. The residents would share a 70 by 275 foot garden with a private drive. As the restrained brick and stone structure rose, Manhattan millionaires rushed to take apartments. Construction was completed, as predicted, in the fall of 1917, at a cost of around $8 million, exclusive of the land. Twelve stories tall, there were 20 acres of floor space divided into 108 apartments. Deemed the “largest apartment building in the world,” a Dec. 1917 advertisement counted “1,536 living rooms; 1,476 closets; 100 kitchens; 100 sculleries.” Potential residents could choose apartments of 6 to 10 rooms with three or four baths, at an annual rent of $4000 to $6500. Larger apartments, from 12 to 19 rooms with four to six baths, would cost $7000 to $15000. The highest rent would be equivalent to about $23,000 per month in 2015. The moneyed residents could enjoy the convenience of the downstairs restaurant, run by the Ritz-Carlton restaurant. Rudolph Guglielmi had a spacious apartment in the building in Nov. 1925 when he applied for United States citizenship. Better known to American audiences by his screen name, Rudolph Valentino, the movie star had to dodge a battery of questions. His failure to do military service during the war was brought up—he explained it was due to “a slight defect in the vision of his left eye.” The Italian Government had listed him “as a slacker.” The New York Times reported that “it was discovered to be an error which was later corrected.” Then there was the question about why Valentine’s wife, Winifred, was living on 96th Street and not in the Park Avenue apartment. “Mrs. Valentino said that the only issue between her husband and herself was that he wished her to give up all business and settle down into home life, and this she would not do.” The 1920s saw the comings and goings of other internationally-known names. In 1926 Queen Marie of Romania stayed briefly in the apartment of Ira Norris; and a year later Charles Lindbergh’s family, including his mother, stayed at No. 270 Park Avenue following his triumphant June 1927 return from Europe. Acclaimed stage actress Gertrude Lawrence (rumoured to be the lover of Daphne du Marier) took an apartment in 1929. No. 270 Park Avenue occupied the entire block between Madison Avenue and 47th and 48th Street. The 12-storey complex containing 108 suites in two separate sections, which were connected by the architects by two triumphal arches over the Vander Bild Avenue. Alice DeLamar rented the largest apartment. The apartment building stood near the Delamar Mansion, which had to be sold. An American magazine, the St. Louis Star “told” the adventures of Prince Carol of Romania (future Carol II of Romania, son of Marie of Romania) overcome by love for the fair miss De la Mar, offering his heart and his titles, but without achieving the desired result. Miss De la Mar told in a few words: “I did not want to marry the prince because I didn’t love him. I own $10 million and if I want to marry then I do not wish to give up my freedom to marry without love." The prince wrote: "The American press blew the rumor that I came to America to find a rich woman. The Daily News even picked a few candidates ahead of me: Miss Millicent Rogers, Miss Abby Rockefeller and Miss Alice Lamar." King Carol II ruled from 1930 to 1940. Carol is more known for his amorous adventures than for his way of ruling: in it, he does not seem to have excelled. In 1920 Alice Delamar moved into a beautiful house on Sunset Boulevard in Palm Beach. The inherited house of Pembroke was sold a few years later. The auction took place on August 16, 1924 in the Great Reception Hall of Pembroke. On June 24, 1947 plans were filed by architects Harrison & Abramovitz for the more than $21 million Time Life Building. The Hotel Marguery, once the largest apartment building in the world, and its astonishingly colorful history, was soon bulldozed. In 1971, Alice wrote that the complex has long been demolished. Today the site is occupied by the JP Morgan Chase Tower, constructed in 1960 and designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
- No. 410: Monroe Wheeler and Glenway Wescott’s latest apartment was in a very grand building at 410 Park Avenue, and they gave a large party for their friend. Maugham enjoyed the gathering, but when their upstairs neighbour Marlene Dietrich appeared, he felt upstaged and left. By the late 40s, Monroe Wheeler was a high profile New Yorker. His full-page portrait appeared in the Nov. 1948 issue of Vogue. At his parties at 410 Park Avenue were such celebrities as Cecil Beaton, Francis Bacon, Ben Shahn, Gore Vidal, and Christopher Isherwood. Among the regulars were Paul Cadmus, Marianne Moore, Katherine Anne Porter, Pavel Tchelitchew and Charles Henri Ford, Diana and Reed Vreeland, Joseph Campbell, the Kirsteins, E.E. Cummings, Brooke Astor, Philip Johnson, and others. Wheeler’s most amusing annual guests were Osbert and Edith Sitwell, the brother and sister poet famous for their double wit and set-up dry humor. In 1958 Monroe Wheeler learned that the grand old building at 410 Park Avenue would be demolished and replaced by a office tower. He found a small apartment at 215 E. 79 St. in a tall pale-blond brick building called the Thornely. They lived there for two years.
- No. 465, The Ritz Tower: Built in 1925 as the city’s most elegant apartment hotel, The Ritz Tower today remains one of Manhattan’s most luxurious and sought-after residential cooperatives noted for its spacious and elegant apartments, each one unique. Greta Garbo lived here for a time in the 40s. Most happy about this move was probably Mercedes de Acosta, who had an apartment at 471 Park Avenue, from where she could see Garbo's north facing rooms. Mercedes told the story that during the wartime, when people were not allowed to show light at night “we gave each other signs with candles. Why we were not arrested for this offence is still today a riddle to me.” In 1951 Garbo moved from the Ritz into a suite with four rooms located on the seventeenth floor of The Hampshire House at 150 Central Park South.
- No. 530: In 1950, Alice DeLamar’s address is still a house in New York at 530 Park Avenue. This 19-story, white-brick apartment building at 530 Park Avenue on the southwest corner at 61st Street next to the Regency Hotel was erected in 1940 and designed by George F. Pelham Jr., who also designed 41, 50, 785, 1130 and 1150 Park Avenue and 1056 Fifth Avenue. It was bought in 2007 for about $211 million by Blackrock Realty Advisors which then sold it to Aby Rosen, the owner of the Seagrams Building and Lever House on Park Avenue who converted the rental building to a condominium with 116 apartments in 2013. Handel Architects LLP was architect and William T. Georgis was interior designer for the conversion.
- No. 564: The second clubhouse of the Colony Club, was commissioned in 1913 and constructed from 1914 to 1916. It was designed by Delano & Aldrich in the Neo-Georgian style, with interiors designed by Elsie de Wolfe. See Colony Club.
- No. 570: On April 24, 1947, Willa Cather died of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 73 in her home at 570 Park Avenue in Manhattan.
- No. 695, 10065: Hunter College is an American public university and one of the constituent organizations of the City University of New York, located in the Lenox Hill neighborhood of Manhattan's Upper East Side. The college grants undergraduate and graduate degrees in over one-hundred fields of study across five schools. Hunter College also administers Hunter College High School and Hunter College Elementary School. Founded in 1870, originally as a women's college, Hunter is one of the oldest public colleges in the United States. The college assumed the location of its main campus on Park Avenue in 1873. Hunter began admitting men into its freshman class in 1964. In 1943 Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated the former home of herself and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to the college, which reopened in 2010 as the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Audre Lorde (1934-1992); Pauli Murray (1910–1985).
- No. 882-884: Ogden Codman, Jr. collaborated with Edith Wharton on the redesign of her townhouse at 882-884 Park Avenue, now demolished.
- No. 993: From the 1940s to the mid 1970s Marlene Dietrich kept, and often resided in apartment 12E, a four room apartment in this building. She relocated to New York to be close to her daughter Maria Riva and her grandchildren. 993 Park Avenue went co-op in the late fifties and Dietrich bought an apartment in the building. The full service, thirteen storey Italianite block had been built in the teens by Bing & Bing. Dietrich decorated her modest apartment (a two bed / two bath unit of 1600 square feet), in a mixture of styles: Louis XIV furniture was offset against glizy mirrored walls befitting a movie star. When she wasn’t travelling the world with her spectacular one-woman show, Dietrich divided her time between her New York home and a Paris rental on the Avenue Montaigne. Visting Dietrich in Paris in the late 70s, her friend Leo Lerman noted "the podge of the [Parisian] flat, which I find touching and that Gray [Foy] says is so unlike her New York controlled elegance. I like both and find both very much the way she is." After a stage fall in Australia in 1975 Dietrich went into semi-retirement in Paris, becoming increasingly reclusive. Her grandson, J. Michael Riva lived at the Park Avenue apartment during the early 80s with his then-fiance, Jamie Lee Curtis, when the latter was filming "Trading Places" (1983.) Dietrich died in 1992. Her heirs sold the apartment in 1998 for $615.000. 993 Park Ave #12E reappeared on the market in 2010. The refurbished unit was listed by Sotheby’s Real Estate for $ 2.250.000.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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In 1959 the Wescotts moved to a 147-acre (0.59 km2) farm further south from Clinton in Hunterdon County, near the community of Rosemont in Delaware Township. The farm had been previously owned by big band leader Paul Whiteman. Glenway Wescott moved into a two-story stone house on the property, dubbed Haymeadows. In 1987, Wescott died of a stroke at his home in Rosemont.
Address: Wescott Preserve, Raven Rock Rosemont Rd, Stockton, NJ 08559, USA (40.4265, -75.01584)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Place
Rosemont is an unincorporated community located within Delaware Township in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Located at the top of a small hill, the center of the community is along Kingwood Stockton Road (County Route 519) near its intersections with Raven Rock Rosemont Road and Rosemont Ringoes Road (CR 604.) Farmland and residences make up the surrounding area while the center of the settlement includes residences, a post office, and an antique shop. Wescott Preserve is named after Lloyd Wescott (1907-1990), an agriculturalist and philanthropist who was the founder and first chairman of the Hunterdon Medical Center. Wescott and his wife Barbara purchased this farm in 1959, and raised dairy cows. In 1966, they donated 15 acres of land to the county for open space, which became Hunterdon’s first county park. The park even predates the Division, which was established in 1973. The Wescotts donated an additional 65 acres to the county four years later. In 2006, 102 acres of mature woodlands and meadows along the Lockatong Creek were added through the generous efforts of the Peters family, the Hunterdon Land Trust Alliance, and the county. Also on the property is a former one-room schoolhouse. Built out of stone in 1861, it was known as the John Reading School or District Schoolhouse #97. Wescott Farm is one-of-a-kind farmhouse apartment located on a working grass-fed cattle and sheep farm. Original XVIII century farmhouse on a 200+ acre working farm. The farmhouse has a porch that overlooks a sculpted kitchen garden and the Delaware river in the distance. The original floor boards of the farmhouse stretch throughout the apartment and other details like moldings and exposed beams make the spaces explode with charm. The historic farmhouse has been used over the centuries by famous writers (Glenway Wescott) and musicians (Paul Whiteman.) There is cooking school located downstairs from the farm stay apartment with classes and dinners available some days and evenings.
Life
Who: Glenway Wescott (April 11, 1901 – February 22, 1987) and Monroe Wheeler (1899-1988)
While Monroe Wheeler was on a long museum trip to Japan and France, Lloyd Wescott found a farm that was for sale by bandleader Paul Whiteman. Glenway Wescott wrote to his mother, who was making her last visit to Wisconsin, “Lloyd has come to an agreement with Mr. Whiteman. The lawyers are drawing up the papers.” He expressed regret to Bernardine Szold: “Now the last season of our beloved valley… For me it will take all that time to prepare to move – twenty years of these attics and archives… Monroe’s as well, very massive now that he has moved from 410 Park Avenue into a small flat.” But after seeing the new farm, he praised Lloyd to William Maxwell: “My brother has bought another farm between Rosemont and Stockton in Delaware township, and is letting me have the handsomest old stone house on it. So, beyond the ordeal of moving, my way of life will not be greatly changed. My good fortune puts me to shame.” Glenway gave the name Haymeadows to the stone house and grounds being refurbished for himself and Wheeler. John Connolly drove Glenway to the property and remembered, “When I first saw it, there was a farm worker named Leroy living there with a house full of kids.” When he died, Glenway Wescot was cremated and his ashes buried in the small farmer's graveyard hidden behind a rock wall and trees at the farm at Haymeadows. In the same graveyard was buried Monroe Wheeler one year later.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Elizabeth Bowen, CBE was an Irish novelist and short story writer.
Born: June 7, 1899, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Died: February 22, 1973, London, United Kingdom
Education: Downe House School
Lived: White Lodge, Headington House Lodge, Old High St, Oxford, OX3 9HN, UK (51.76127, -1.21159)
2 Clarence Terrace, Marylebone, London NW1 4RD, UK (51.52501, -0.15946)
Bowen's Court, Farahy, Co. Cork, Ireland (52.23727, -8.45635)
Buried: Farahy Church Cemetery (North Cork), Farahy, County Cork, Ireland
Find A Grave Memorial# 13718039
Movies: The Last September

In 1923 Elizabeth Bowen married Alan Charles Cameron. and when he was appointed Secretary to the City of Oxford Education Committee in 1925, they moved to Waldencote in the Croft in Old Headington. The house was originally the Coach House for Headington Lodge, and has now reverted to that name.
Address: Headington House Lodge, Old High St, Oxford, OX3 9HN, UK (51.76127, -1.21159)
Type: Private Property
Place
White Lodge in Osler Road is the south wing of the mansion that was known as Headington Lodge. The main part of the mansion to the north is now known as Sandy Lodge. In the late XVIII century the brewer Edward Tawney (1735–1800) built a “gentleman’s farmhouse” in the Croft (Osler Road did not exist until 1802.) On his death in 1800 he left that farmhouse to his cousin’s daughter, Mrs Ann Wharton (née Tawney), with instructions that it should go to her eldest son Theophilus Wharton after her death. Theophilus Wharton inherited his mother’s farmhouse on her death in 1824, and lived in the farmhouse with his brother Bryan (1782–1839.) Neither of the brothers married, and they converted the farmhouse into the regency villa it is today. It was originally known as Headington Lodge, and its main entrance was in Osler Road, where its own little lodge (or gatehouse) still stands to the south, beside Cuckoo Lane. The present house called Greenways is in part of what was Wharton’s garden. Its former lodge is now 38 Osler Road. On the death of Theophilus Wharton in 1831 Headington Lodge passed to his nephew (and Ann Wharton’s grandson), Mark Theophilus Morrell. On his death in 1842 it passed to his cousin, Charles Tawney. Charles (1780–1853) was a partner in the Hall & Tawney Brewery and had been Mayor of Oxford in 1837 and 1840. His town home was Brewery House in Paradise Street, Oxford, but he must have used this as his country retreat, as the Headington Rent-Book for Dec. 1850 shows him as both owner and occupier at this time. Its rateable value was then £58, and its estimated extent just over 5 acres. Charles Tawney died in 1853 and his wife in 1854, and their children, Henry Copland Tawney and Mrs Elizabeth Copland Fisher inherited the house. Between 1861 and 1902 Headington Lodge was let out to various people: Mrs Williams (1861), the Misses Hillderson (1863), John Martin, a retired storekeeper from Portsmouth Dockyard (1871), George Crunwell (1875–6), Colonel (later Major General) John Desborough (while he rebuilt The Priory, 1877–1883), Frederick Evans (1890–95), and Mrs Burch (1896–7.) In 1881 the mansion was bought and then rented out by William Wootten-Wootten of Headington House. His widow gave it to their son Montague on his marriage in 1888, but initially he continued to live in St Giles. By the time of the 1901 census the whole house had become known as White Lodge rather than Headington Lodge, and Montague Wootten is listed there at the age of 48 with his wife Mary and three-year-old son Kenneth, looked after by six indoor servants, with his gardener living in the lodge. Eight years later, in 1909, Montague Wootten committed suicide in the house as a result of financial problems: he was a partner of Parsons, Thomson & Co. (Barclays) at the Old Bank in Oxford’s High Street. The house was leased by a Mrs Newall or Newhall from 1910 to 1914. The next lessee, Miss MacGregor, founded Headington School in this house. It was opened by the Bishop of Liverpool in 1915 with ten boarders and eight day-girls. By 1918 the school had transferred to Brookside. In 1920 The Lodge was bought from Montague Wootten-Wootten’s estate by Edwin J. Hall, who lived in Clifton House on the London Road and built the cinema in New High Street in his garden. Hall divided it into the two separate houses it is today, naming them White Lodge and Sandy Lodge, and let them out to Walter Smith and Raymond Holmes respectively. The novelist Elizabeth Bowen lived at White Lodge from 1960 to 1965.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Bowen’s marriage to Cameron (which survived until his death 22 years later) was apparently not consummated, and early in 1933 Elizabeth fell in love with Humphry House. She had an affair with him that continued after his marriage in Dec. 1933, and his wife, Madeleine House, came with her baby to stay with Elizabeth Bowen at Waldencote in the spring of 1935. Later in 1935 Elizabeth Bowen left Waldencote and moved to London with her husband, who had been appointed Secretary to the Central Council for Schools Broadcasting. In 1952 (after more books and more affairs), Elizabeth Bowen moved with her husband to Bowen’s Court (the house in Cork that Elizabeth had inherited back in 1930 on the death of her father); and in August that year her husband died there. In 1959 she was forced to sell Bowen’s Court, which was demolished in 1960. Elizabeth Bowen returned to Old Headington in 1960, and for the next five years lived at White Lodge, where she is listed in Kelly’s Directory simply as “Mrs A. Cameron.” She was President of the Old Headington branch of the Women’s Institute from 1961 to 1964. Elizabeth Bowen moved to Hythe in 1965. She died of lung cancer in University College Hospital on February 22, 1973. She was buried with her husband in Cork.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 1–7 Clarence Terrace, Elizabeth Bowen (1899–1973), "Writer lived here 1935–1952"
Address: 2 Clarence Terrace, Marylebone, London NW1 4RD, UK (51.52501, -0.15946)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 209191 (Grade I, 1970)
Place
Clarence Terrace overlooks Regent’s Park in Marylebone, City of Westminster, London. This terrace is the smallest in the park. This row of terraced houses is named after William IV. It was designed by Decimus Burton. It is composed of three sections, a centre and two wings, of the Corinthian order, connected by two colonnades of the Ilyssus Ionic order. The elevation is divided into three stories; namely, a rusticated entrance, which serves as a basement to the others, a Corinthian order embellishing the drawing room and chamber stories. There is also a well proportioned entablature.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Bowen was an Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer. In 1923 she married Alan Cameron, an educational administrator who subsequently worked for the BBC. The marriage has been described as "a sexless but contented union." The marriage was reportedly never consummated. She had various extra-marital relationships, including one with Charles Ritchie, a Canadian diplomat seven years her junior, which lasted over thirty years. She also had an affair with the Irish writer Seán Ó Faoláin and a relationship with the American poet May Sarton. Bowen and her husband first lived near Oxford, where they socialized with Maurice Bowra, John Buchan and Susan Buchan, and where she wrote her early novels, including “The Last September” (1929.) Following the publication of “To the North” (1932) they moved to 2 Clarence Terrace, Regent’s Park, London, where she wrote “The House in Paris” (1935) and “The Death of the Heart” (1938.) In 1937, she became a member of the Irish Academy of Letters. In 1977, Victoria Glendinning published the first biography on Elizabeth Bowen. In 2009, Glendinning published a book about the relationship between Charles Ritchie and Bowen, based on his diaries and her letters to him. In 2012, English Heritage marked Bowen’s Regent’s Park home at Clarence Terrace with a blue plaque. A blue plaque was also unveiled October 19, 2014 to mark Bowen’s residence at the Coach House, The Croft, Headington from 1925-35.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Bowen's Court was a historic country house near Kildorrery in County Cork, Ireland.
Address: Farahy, Co. Cork, Ireland (52.23727, -8.45635)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in the 1770s
Bowen’s Court was located in the townland of Farahy near Kildorrery in North Cork. The house was built by Henry Cole Bowen. The house was the seat of the Bowen family until 1959 when it was sold by the author Elizabeth Bowen. Wilson, writing in 1786, refers to it as Faraghy, the seat of Mr. Cole Bowen. It was held in fee by Mrs. Eliza Bowen at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £75. (“House: Bowen’s Court” Landed Estates Database). The house was demolished in 1961. All that remains today is the walls of the 2.5 acre garden. Elizabeth Bowen re-used descriptions of the house in her novels. For example, the house in “The Last September” is directly modelled on Bowen’s Court. Bowen wrote a history of the house, entitled “Bowen's Court,” in 1942.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Bowen, CBE (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973)
Elizabeth Dorothea Cole Bowen was born on June 7, 1899 at 15 Herbert Place in Dublin and baptised in the nearby St Stephen's Church on Upper Mount Street. Her parents, Henry Charles Cole Bowen and Florence (née Colley) Bowen later brought her to Bowen's Court at Farahy, near Kildorrery, County Cork, where she spent her summers. She mixed with the Bloomsbury Group, becoming good friends with Rose Macaulay who helped her seek out a publisher for her first book, a collection of short stories entitled Encounters (1923). In 1930 Bowen became the first (and only) woman to inherit Bowen's Court, but remained based in England, making frequent visits to Ireland. Her husband, Alan Cameron, retired in 1952 and they settled in Bowen’s Court, where Cameron died a few months later. Many writers visited her at Bowen's Court from 1930 onwards, including Virginia Woolf, Eudora Welty, Carson McCullers, Iris Murdoch, and the historian Veronica Wedgwood. For years Bowen struggled to keep the house going, lecturing in the United States to earn money. In 1957 her portrait was painted at Bowen's Court by her friend, painter Patrick Hennessy. She travelled to Italy in 1958 to research and prepare “A Time in Rome” (1960), but by the following year Bowen was forced to sell her beloved Bowen's Court, which was demolished in 1961. After spending some years without a permanent home, Bowen finally settled at "Carbery", Church Hill, Hythe, in 1965. In 1972 Bowen developed lung cancer. She died in University College Hospital on February 22, 1973, aged 73. She is buried with her husband in Farahy, County Cork churchyard, close to the gates of Bowen's Court, where there is a memorial plaque to the author at the entrance to St Colman's Church, where a commemoration of her life is held annually.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Edna St. Vincent Millay was an American poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism.
Born: February 22, 1892, Rockland, Maine, United States
Died: October 19, 1950, Austerlitz, New York, United States
Education: Vassar College
Lived: Ragged Island, Harpswell, Maine
75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
Steepletop, 440 E Hill Rd, Austerlitz, NY 12017, USA (42.32114, -73.44319)
Whitehall (52 High St, Camden, ME 04843)
200 Broadway, Rockland, ME 04841
Buried: Steepletop Cemetery, Austerlitz, Columbia County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 713
Siblings: Norma Millay Ellis, Kathleen Millay
Movies: Hitler's Madman

Edna St. Vincent Millay was a lyrical poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was known for her feminist activism and her many love affairs. Counted among her close friends were Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused. While playing the lead in her own The Princess Marries the Page at Vassar, she was approached by the British actress Edith Wynne Matthison, who, excited by the performance, came backstage to kiss Millay and invite her to her summer home. Millay felt great passion in the kiss and the two exchanged letters, providing one of her few known straightforward pronouncements of lesbian love: "You wrote me a beautiful letter,--I wonder if you meant it to be as beautiful as it was.--I think you did; for somehow I know that your feeling for me, however slight it is, is of the nature of love. . . . When you tell me to come, I will come, by the next train, just as I am. This is not meekness, be assured; I do not come naturally by meekness; know that it is a proud surrender to You.” Another of Edna’s lovers was Thelma Wood, who later became Djuna Barnes’ lover.
Edith Wynne Matthison (November 23, 1875 – September 23, 1955)
Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950) was born at 200 Broadway, Rockland, ME 04841, to Cora Lounella Buzelle, a nurse, and Henry Tolman Millay, a schoolteacher who would later become a superintendent of schools. Her middle name derives from St. Vincent's Hospital in New York, where her uncle's life had been saved just before her birth. The family's house was "between the mountains and the sea where baskets of apples and drying herbs on the porch mingled their scents with those of the neighboring pine woods."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1901, a young widow, who had spent her honeymoon in Camden, purchased an 1834 Sea Captains house. The first of only six owners, she took in a handful of summer guests for income, and then added rooms each year until she operated Whitehall (52 High St, Camden, ME 04843), one of only five hotels in Camden Maine at the start of the century. Whitehall, sometimes called Whitehall Hotel, later became the Whitehall Inn. In 2015, new owners have returned the property to its original and classic name -- Whitehall. It was the summer home for the elite of Camden's summer visitors. Guests would arrive by train with maids or by chauffeur driven cars. Royalty, titans of industry and celebrities, both famous and infamous, made Whitehall a part of their summer schedule. The inn has welcomed a king, a U.S. President and other political notables, many fabled screen stars and sports heroes. And the guest list includes a supermodel, a legendary TV anchorman, and a world-renowned singer-songwriter. Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950) used to work at this tourists’ inn during the busy summer season. In 1912, “Vincent,” as she preferred to be called, did her first public reading here for guests and employees at the inn’s end-of-summer party. The first lines of the poem she read, “Renascence,” described the view of the Maine countryside from nearby Mount Battie, which Vincent loved to climb. “All I could see from where I stood,” the poem began, “was three long mountains and a wood.” A professor, who was vacationing at Whitehall, was so impressed by Vincent’s poem that he arranged to have one of his wealthy friends pay for the girl to study at Vassar College.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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75½ Bedford St is a building in the Greenwich Village area of New York City that is only 9 feet 6 inches (2.9 meters) wide. It is considered to be the narrowest house in New York. Its past tenants have included Edna St. Vincent Millay, Ann McGovern, cartoonist William Steig and anthropologist Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 - November 15, 1978). It is sometimes referred to as the Millay House, indicated by a New York City Landmark plaque on the outside of the house.
Address: 75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1873
The three-story house is located at 75½ Bedford St., off Seventh Ave. between Commerce and Moore Streets, in the West Greenwich Village section of Manhattan. On the inside, the house measures 8 ft. 7 in. wide; at its narrowest, it is only 2 ft. wide. There is a shared garden in the rear of the house. The archives of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation states that the house was constructed in 1873 during a smallpox epidemic, for Horatio Gomez, trustee of the Hettie Hendricks-Gomez Estate, on what was the former carriage entranceway for the adjacent property, which includes the 1799 house at 77 Bedford St., built by Joshua Isaacs, the oldest house in Greenwich Village. However, the house may have been constructed earlier, as the style that appears in a 1922 photograph at the New-York Historical Society is typical of the 1850’s Italianate architecture common in the area at the time. In 1923, the house was leased by a consortium of artists who used it for actors working at the Cherry Lane Theater. Cary Grant and John Barrymore stayed at the house while performing at the Cherry Lane during this time. Edna St. Vincent Millay, the Pulitzer Prize winning poet and her new husband, coffee importer Eugen Jan Boissevain, lived in the house from 1923 to 1924. They hired Ferdinand Savignano to renovate the house, who added a skylight, transformed the top floor into a studio for Millay and added a Dutch-inspired front gabled façade for her husband. Later occupants included cartoonist William Steig, and his sister-in-law, anthropologist Margaret Mead. The current owner is George Gund IV (son of sports entrepreneur George Gund III), who purchased the house for $3.25 million in June 2013. “A centrally placed spiral staircase dominates all three floors and bisects the space into two distinct living areas. The narrow steps call for expert sideways navigational skills. Under the stairwell on the first floor is a tiny utility closet, the only closed storage space in the house. All three floors have fireplaces.” The house has two bathrooms, and its galley kitchen comes with a microwave built into the base of the winding staircase that rises to the upper floors.
Life
Who: Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)
Edna St. Vincent Millay was a poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism. She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work. The poet Richard Wilbur asserted, "She wrote some of the best sonnets of the century." Millay was openly bisexual. Counted among her close friends were the writers Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and the critic Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused. In January 1921, she went to Paris, where she met and befriended the sculptor Thelma Wood. In 1923 she married 43-year-old Eugen Jan Boissevain (1880–1949), the widower of the labor lawyer and war correspondent Inez Milholland, a political icon Millay had met during her time at Vassar. Boissevain died in 1949 of lung cancer, and Millay lived alone for the last year of her life.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Steepletop, also known as the Edna St. Vincent Millay House, was the farmhouse home of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Edna St. Vincent Millay and her husband Eugene Jan Boissevain, in Austerlitz, New York. Her former home and gardens are maintained by the Edna St. Vincent Millay Society. The Millay Colony for the Arts, founded in 1973 by Norma Millay Ellis, sister of the poet, is also located at Steepletop.
Address: 440 E Hill Rd, Austerlitz, NY 12017, USA (42.32114, -73.44319)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 518-392-3362
National Register of Historic Places: 71000534, 1971. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The name Steepletop comes from a pink, conical wildflower that grows there. The Society opened the house for tours in 2010. The guest house is believed to have been built in the late XVIII century, considerably predating the main house, which is believed to have been built around 1870. Millay and Boissevain bought the property, which had been a 635-acre (257 ha) blueberry farm and moved in in 1925, after the period in which critics and scholars generally believe she had done her best work. She continued to write since the rural setting provided sufficient distance from the outside world, and the couple lived there except for periods of travel. After WWII, in the late 1940s, she left Steepletop less frequently. Boissevain died in 1949, making her even more reclusive in the year before she was found dead at the foot of the stairway in the main house. The fall was the proximate cause of death, but what led to it is unknown. Her sister Norma and her husband, painter Charles Ellis, moved in afterwards. In 1973, they established Millay Colony for the Arts on the seven acres (2.8 ha) around the guest house and barn. After her husband’s death in 1976, Norma continued to manage the colony program until her death in 1986. During that time, in 1980, she renovated the barn into housing for visiting artists. In 1997 a disabled-accessible main building was built on colony property. The colony continues to offer one-month residencies to writers, visual artists and composers from the U.S. and other countries. The Edna St. Vincent Millay Society remains in charge of the main house, the outbuildings around it and the grounds as a whole. It operates the property as a historic house museum dedicated to Millay and has spent much effort on restoring the house and grounds.
Life
Who: Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)
On the grounds of Steepletop, Boissevain and Millay built a barn (from a Sears Roebuck kit), and then a writing cabin and a tennis court. Millay grew her own vegetables in a small garden. The couple later bought Ragged Island in Casco Bay, Maine, as a summer retreat. Edna St. Vincent Millay died at her home on October 19, 1950 and is buried at Steepletop: the path rises through hardwood forest to the poet's grave, in a small clearing with a bench that invites contemplation. It's a short walk, maybe a half-mile from the country road high on the Taconic Ridge. In 2003 the Friends of the Millay Society built the Millay Poetry Trail along the dirt road leading to her grave and those of several family members. The trail is open to the public and posted with her nature poetry along the shaded route.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Ragged Island (Harpswell, Maine) is a privately owned island in Harpswell, Cumberland County, Maine, which is geographically within Casco Bay in the Gulf of Maine. It is notable as having been the summer home of poet Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950) and husband Eugen Jan Boissevain from 1933 until her death in 1950. Whatever the history of the island's name, at least one 1790 maritime chart identifies it simply as Cold Arse. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Cosmé McMoon was a Mexican-American pianist and composer, best known as the accompanist to notably tone-deaf soprano Florence Foster Jenkins.
Born: February 22, 1901, Mapimí, Durango, Mexico
Died: August 22, 1980, New York City, New York, United States
Buried: Sunset Memorial Park, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 45333475
Genre: Classical

At the turn of the XX-century the blocks between Fifth and Sixth Avenues in midtown saw the advent of high-end residential hotels and exclusive clubs as once-fashionable residences one-by-one were demolished or converted for business purposes. One of the first, the Royalton Hotel for well-heeled bachelors, was erected in 1898 spanning the block from 44th to 45th Streets.
Address: 44 W 45th St, New York, NY 10036, USA (40.7561, -73.98168)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Place
In 1901 A. G. Hyde sold four lots on 45th Street, Nos. 44 through 50, and a single lot on 44th Street next to the New York Yacht Club. On July 24, 1901 The New York Times reported that “The site will be improved with a twelve-story apartment hotel.” By August of the following year the Seymour Hotel was nearly ready for occupancy. Built by developers Irons & Todd, it was touted as “fireproof” and “positively exclusive.” Unlike the Royalton or the Hotel Mansfield which would open on West 44th Street a year later in 1903 the new Seymour was not intended just for bachelors; but was marketed to well-to-do families. M.F. Miller was the President of the Iroquois Hotel at No. 49 West 44th Street and his brother, J.C. Miller, was its Secretary and Treasurer. On August 16, 1902 they added the Seymour to their responsibilities, leasing the new hotel from Irons & Todd for 21 years at a gross rental of $1,395,900. On October 1 the Seymour Apartment Hotel opened its doors to its new residents. The Beaux Arts building was constructed of red brick with limestone trim, sitting on a two-story rusticated limestone base. The main 45th Street entrance was framed in a dramatic limestone portico above a set of three stone steps. The white stone quoins and bandcourses contrasted with the red brick and a sumptuous balcony stretched the wide of the structure at the 10th floor. On the narrow 44th Street side, the skinny building did its best to keep up. It mimicked the rusticated base and even the balcony; yet the strange proportions resulted in a gawky, cartoonish structure. Residents were offered apartments from two to “five or more” rooms with yearly leases. The magnificent dining room offered both “Restaurant a la Carte” or “Table d’Hote.” Guests were promised that the hotel was planned “for the comfort of its guests, luxurious and artistic in its appointments.” The once-magnificent midtown hotels suffered in the latter part of the XX century as new, modern hotels and apartment buildings left them dowdy and somewhat seedy. On January 19, 1981 New York Magazine remarked about the Seymour Hotel. “An AAA sign hangs out front, and, inside, the dim lobby and corridors—with the obligatory red carpet—give off a sense of better days gone by…Not as Spartan or desperate as some, it’s just…cheerless; call it a 4 on the Depression Scale.” While some of the old hotels—like the Royalton—were reclaimed with multi-million dollar makeovers; it was not to be for the Seymour Hotel. In 2000 it was demolished, replaced with the soaring 30-story Sofitel which, almost ironically, has its main entrance at the skinny little plot on West 44th Street.
Life
Who: Robert Emmett "Bobby" Harron (April 12, 1893 – September 5, 1920) and Narcissa Florence Foster Jenkins (July 19, 1868 – November 26, 1944)
Robert Harron was an American motion picture actor of the early silent film era. Although he acted in over 200 films, he is known for his roles in the D.W. Griffith directed films “The Birth of a Nation” (1915) and “Intolerance” (1916). Born in New York City, Harron was second oldest child of nine siblings in a poor, working-class Irish Catholic family. Harron's younger siblings John (nicknamed "Johnnie"), Mary and Charles also became actors while one of his younger sisters, Tessie, worked as an extra in silent films. Charles was killed in a car accident in December 1915. Tessie died of Spanish influenza in 1918 while Harron's brother John died of spinal meningitis in 1939. Harron attended the Saint John Parochial School in Greenwich Village. At the age of fourteen, he found work as an errand boy at American Biograph Studios. In addition to cleaning duties, Harron also appeared as an extra in a few shorts for Biograph. Within a year of working for Biograph, Harron was noticed by newly hired director D.W. Griffith. In September 1920, Harron traveled from Los Angeles to New York by train to support Lillian Gish at the film premiere of her film “Way Down East.” He checked into the Hotel Seymour on September 1. He was sharing the hotel room with screenwriter and director Victor Heerman. After the premiere, Harron was alone in his hotel room when a gun in his possession discharged and wounded him. According to published reports, Harron had the gun in a trunk along with other possessions. As he took some clothes out of the trunk, the gun fell to the floor, discharged and hit him in the chest, puncturing his lung. He called the hotel desk for assistance and was still conscious when the hotel manager came to his room. Not realizing he was seriously wounded, Harron joked with the manager that he was in a "devil of a fix" having shot himself. He initially refused to let the manager call an ambulance, only wanting to be examined by a local physician. After a physician could not be found, Harron agreed to allow the manager to call an ambulance. Harron was taken to Bellevue Hospital Center. Shortly after the shooting, rumors arose that Harron had intentionally shot himself. There was speculation that Harron was despondent over being passed over for the leading role in “Way Down East” (Richard Barthelmess was cast in the lead role). Several of Harron's friends rejected the suicide theory. Harron's friend Victor Heerman, with whom he often went on double dates and was staying with Harron in the Hotel Seymour, later said that he went to see Harron after the shooting and Harron denied that he intentionally shot himself. There were also rumors that Harron had attempted suicide over the breakup of his relationship with Dorothy Gish. Victor Heerman said that Harron was a teetotaler and a virgin because he was a devout Catholic, and for those reasons Heerman rejected claims that Harron had killed himself. Miriam Cooper and Lillian Gish agreed, largely because he was his family's major source of income and he was about to start filming with Elmer Clifton. Harron also told his friend, a priest, that he did not attempt suicide. Friends who visited Harron in the hospital were optimistic about his recovery as he appeared to be on the mend. However, on September 5, four days after he was shot, Harron died of his wound. He is interred at Calvary Cemetery (4902 Laurel Hill Blvd, Woodside, NY 11377). Critic Richard Schickel believes he was gay and shot himself out of stress from having to hide this. Also Florence Foster Jenkins was living at The Seymour Hotel. nkins was an American socialite and amateur soprano who was known and mocked for her flamboyant performance costumes and notably poor singing ability. The historian Stephen Pile ranked her "the world's worst opera singer". "No one, before or since," he wrote, "has succeeded in liberating themselves quite so completely from the shackles of musical notation." Despite (or perhaps because of) her technical incompetence, she became a prominent musical cult figure in New York City during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. Cole Porter, Gian Carlo Menotti, Lily Pons, Sir Thomas Beecham, and other celebrities were fans. Enrico Caruso is said to have "regarded her with affection and respect". The poet William Meredith wrote that what Jenkins provided "... was never exactly an aesthetic experience, or only to the degree that an early Christian among the lions provided aesthetic experience; it was chiefly immolatory, and Madame Jenkins was always eaten, in the end.” At the age of 76, Jenkins finally yielded to public demand and booked Carnegie Hall (152 W 57th St, New York, NY 10019) for a general-admission performance on October 25, 1944. Tickets for the event sold out weeks in advance; the demand was such that an estimated 2,000 people were turned away at the door. Numerous celebrities attended, including Cole Porter, Marge Champion, Gian Carlo Menotti, Kitty Carlisle, Tallula Bankhead, Daniel Pinkham, Lily Pons with her husband, Andre Kostelanetz, who composed a song for the recital. McMoon later recalled an "especially noteworthy" moment: "[When she sang] 'If my silhouette does not convince you yet/My figure surely will' [from Adele's aria in Die Fledermaus], she put her hands righteously to her hips and went into a circular dance that was the most ludicrous thing I have ever seen. And created a pandemonium in the place. One famous actress had to be carried out of her box because she became so hysterical." Five days after the concert, Jenkins suffered a heart attack while shopping at G. Schirmer's music store, and died a month later on November 26, 1944, at her Manhattan residence, the Hotel Seymour. She was buried next to her father in the family crypt at Hollenback Cemetery (540 N River St, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702), Plot: Foster Family Mausoleum. Cosmé McMoon (born Cosmé McMunn; February 22, 1901 – August 22, 1980) was a Mexican-American pianist and composer, best known as the accompanist to Florence Foster Jenkins. McMoon never ended up making a career in music after Jenkins' death in 1944, and instead took an interest in bodybuilding and judging bodybuilding contests. He resided in New York City until shortly before his death in August 1980. He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and moved back to San Antonio, where he was buried at Sunset Memorial Park (San Antonio, TX 78218). He never married or had any children and is rumoured to be gay.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Christopher Bram is an American author. Bram grew up in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where he was a paperboy and an Eagle Scout. He graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1974. He moved to New York City in 1978.
Born: February 22, 1952, Buffalo, New York, United States
Education: College of William & Mary
Movies: Gods and Monsters, Queer City, Dangerous Music
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada, Lambda Literary Award for Gay Fiction
Nominations: Lambda Literary Award for Gay Men's Mystery, more
Anniversary: October 1979

Christopher Bram is an American author. In 2012, he published Eminent Outlaws: much of the literary history Bram recounts takes place in New York City, where Bram - a native of Virginia - has lived since 1978. Unsurprisingly, a large proportion of that history centers on Greenwich Village, where Bram lives with his partner, filmmaker Draper Shreeve. “We met in a bar talking about movies in 1979 - we are still talking about movies.” Bram has also written two shorts directed by Draper Shreeve. Bram’s 1995 novel Father of Frankenstein, about film director James Whale, was made into the 1998 movie Gods and Monsters starring Ian McKellen, Lynn Redgrave, and Brendan Fraser. The film was written and directed by Bill Condon who won an Academy Award for the adapted screenplay. Shreeve has made several documentaries, including Kids of Penzance, about a high school production of Gilbert and Sullivan, and Queer City, about LGBT lives in New York.
Together since 1979: 36 years.
Christopher Bram (born February 22, 1952)
Draper Shreeve (born May 5, 1954)
Anniversary: October 1979
We met at Julius', a New York gay bar, on a Friday night in October 1979. I was standing by the cigarette machine, Draper by the jukebox. He smiled and I walked over. When he told me his name, I said, "Oh. You're from the South." I am from the South myself and was hoping to meet someone more exotic. Then we started talking about movies. We had both seen the new Bertolucci film, Luna, and we knew it was bad but we admitted we had enjoyed it. We moved from the bar to a diner, where we talked about politics. Then we went uptown to my place, where we stopped talking. The next morning we went for a long walk around Columbia University and talked about our families. We have been talking about movies, politics, and our families ever since, along with books, art, music, friends, and everything else under the sun. We have not run out of words or news or thoughts to share with each other. -Christopher Bram



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Julius (159 West 10th Street at Waverly Place), is a tavern in Manhattan's Greenwich Village. It is often called the oldest continuously operating gay bar in New York City; however, its management was actively unwilling to operate as such and harassed gay customers until 1966. On April 21, 1966 members of the New York Chapter of the Mattachine Society staged a "Sip-In" at the bar which was to change the legal landscape. Dick Leitsch, the society's president, John Timmons and Craig Rodwell planned to draw attention to the practice by identifying themselves as homosexuals before ordering a drink in order to bring court scrutiny to the regulation. The three were going to read from Mattachine stationary "We are homosexuals. We are orderly, we intend to remain orderly, and we are asking for service." Newspaper articles on the wall of Julius indicate it was the favorite bar of Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote and Rudolf Nureyev. In 2016 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Angela Baddeley, CBE was an English stage and television actress, best-remembered for her role as household cook Mrs. Bridges in the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. Her stage career lasted more than six decades.
Born: July 4, 1904, West Ham, London, United Kingdom
Died: February 22, 1976, Grayshott, United Kingdom
Lived: 64 Pretoria Road, West Ham, London
4 Holmbush Road, Putney
Buried: St Mary's, Mill Green, Station Road, Wargrave, Berkshire, RG10 8EU
Find A Grave Memorial# 41541832
Children: Juliet Shaw
Spouse: Glen Byam Shaw (m. 1929–1976), Stephen Thomas (m. 1921)

Glen Byam Shaw was an English actor and theatre director, known for his dramatic productions in the 1950s and his operatic productions in the 1960s and later. In the 1920s and 1930s Byam Shaw was a successful actor, both in romantic leads and in character parts. He worked frequently with his old friend Sir John Gielgud. Actress Constance Collier was impressed by Byam Shaw and used her influence to gain him roles. She introduced him to Ivor Novello, then a leading figure in London theatre. This drew him into contact with the poet Siegfried Sassoon, a friend of Collier; he and Byam Shaw became close. Their friendship lasted for the rest of Sassoon's life, although they ceased to be partners quite quickly; Sassoon became involved with Stephen Tennant, and Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. Their 1929 marriage, which lasted until her death in 1976, was, Denison writes, "a supremely happy one, both domestically and professionally”. Angela Baddeley was an English stage and television actress, best remembered for her role as "Mrs. Bridges" in the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. They are interred together at St Mary's Church, Wargrave, Berkshire.
Together from 1929 to 1976: 47 years.
Angela Baddeley, CBE (July 4, 1904 – February 22, 1976)
Glencairn Alexander "Glen" Byam Shaw, CBE (December 13, 1904 – April 29, 1986)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Angela Baddeley (1904-1976), actress, was born on July 4, 1904 at 64 Pretoria Road, West Ham, London, one of the four daughters of William Herman Clinton-Baddeley, journalist, and his wife, Louise Rosalie Bourdin. She was a descendant of Sir Henry Clinton, the British general.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Actress Constance Collier directed Ivor Novello and Glen Byam Shaw in the play “Down Hill” in 1926. This drew Byam Shaw into contact with the poet Siegfried Sassoon, a friend of Collier; he and Byam Shaw became close. Their friendship lasted for the rest of Sassoon's life, although they ceased to be partners quite quickly; Sassoon became involved with Stephen Tennant, and Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. They married in 1929 and lived from 1930 to 1956 at 4 Holmbush Road, Putney.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Glen Byam Shaw (1904–1986) was an English actor and theatre director, known for his dramatic productions in the 1950s and his operatic productions in the 1960s and later. Byam Shaw fell in love with an actress, Angela Baddeley. They married in 1929. The marriage, which lasted until her death in 1976, was, Denison writes, "a supremely happy one, both domestically and professionally"; the couple had a son and a daughter. They are interred side by side at Wargrave St Mary's (Mill Green, Station Road, Wargrave, Berkshire, RG10 8EU).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Andy Warhol was an American artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture, and advertising that flourished by the 1960s.
Born: August 6, 1928, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: February 22, 1987, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Schenley High School
Carnegie Mellon University
Lived: 242 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74651, -73.97963)
13 E 87th St, New York, NY, USA (40.78177, -73.95884)
158 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74684, -73.98409)
57 E 66th St, New York, NY 10065, USA (40.76781, -73.96725)
1342 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78164, -73.95428)
33 Union Square E, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73551, -73.98985) [Decker Building, 03001179, 2003]
860 Broadway, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73715, -73.99002)
22 E 33rd St, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74728, -73.98391)
Buried: Saint John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery, Bethel Park, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 1459
Movies: Chelsea Girls, Blow Job, Sleep, Empire, more
Periods: Modern art, Pop art

Andy Warhol was an artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture, and advertisement that flourished by the 1960s.
Addresses:
242 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74651, -73.97963)
13 E 87th St, New York, NY, USA (40.78177, -73.95884)
158 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74684, -73.98409)
57 E 66th St, New York, NY 10065, USA (40.76781, -73.96725)
1342 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10128, USA (40.78164, -73.95428)
33 Union Square E, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73551, -73.98985) [Decker Building, 03001179, 2003]
860 Broadway, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.73715, -73.99002)
22 E 33rd St, New York, NY 10016, USA (40.74728, -73.98391)
Place
- In the summer of 1953 Andy Warhol and his mother moved into a floor-through apartment in a four story building at 242 Lexington Avenue. According to Warhol biographers, David Bourdon and Victor Bockris, Warhol subleased the apartment from another ex-classmate at Carnegie Tech., Leonard Kessler.
- No. 13 E. 87th St was the first studio outside his home, rented in 1963. Warhol subleased part of an old firehouse near his home, Hook & Ladder Co., that the tenant was leasing from the City of New York.
- 158 Madison Avenue was Warhol’s last personal studio.
- Andy Warhol bought 57 E 66th St, a brownstone, in 1974 for $310,000. He lived here until his death in 1987.
Andy Warhol Factory locations:
• 1342 Lexington Ave: The first Factory in 1960. This was his home and studio and the first Factory location. “The town house bought by shoe ads,” Andy’s friend Emile de Antonio called it, and it was true: everything Andy owned was paid for with a ceaseless flow of hundred-dollar drawings of shoes, hats, scarves, perfumes, handbags, and other ladies accessories... In 1960, Andy would gross $70,000, his best year yet, and when 1342 Lexington had come up for sale he was easily able to put down $30,000, almost half of the building’s price..."
• 231 E 47th St: The Silver Factory, from 1963 to 1967, the building no longer exists.
• 33 Union Square E: The White Factory, from 1967 to 1973, Decker Building.
• 860 Broadway, from 1973 to 1984, the building has now been completely remodeled.
• 22 E 33rd St: from 1984 to 1987, the building no longer exists.
Life
Who: Andy Warhol (August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987)
Interviewed in 1980, Andy Warhol indicated that he was still a virgin—biographer Bob Colacello who was present at the interview felt it was probably true and that what little sex he had was probably “a mixture of voyeurism and masturbation—to use his [Andy’s] word abstract.” Warhol’s assertion of virginity would seem to be contradicted by his hospital treatment in 1960 for condylomata, a sexually transmitted disease. It has also been contradicted by his lovers, including Warhol muse BillyBoy who has said they had sex to orgasm: “When he wasn’t being Andy Warhol and when you were just alone with him he was an incredibly generous and very kind person. What seduced me was the Andy Warhol who I saw alone. In fact when I was with him in public he kind of got on my nerves… I’d say: “You’re just obnoxious, I can’t bear you.”” Asked if Warhol was only a voyeur, Billy Name also denied it, saying: "He was the essence of sexuality. It permeated everything. Andy exuded it, along with his great artistic creativity… It brought a joy to the whole art world in New York. But his personality was so vulnerable that it became a defense to put up the blank front." Warhol’s lovers included John Giorno, Billy Name, Charles Lisanby, Jon Gould. His boyfriend of 12 years was Jed Johnson, whom he met in 1968, and who later achieved fame as an interior designer. The first works that Warhol submitted to a fine art gallery, homoerotic drawings of male nudes, were rejected for being too openly gay.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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At St. John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery (1066 Connor Rd, Bethel Park, PA 15102) is buried Andy Warhol (1928-1987).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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