reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Gluck was a British painter.
Born: August 13, 1895
Died: January 10, 1978, Steyning, United Kingdom
Artwork: The three nifty nats, Street gossip, Bank holiday Monday, more
Lived: Chantry House, 51 Church Street, Steyning, West Sussex BN44 3YB, UK (50.8897, -0.32739)
32 Compayne Gardens, NW6
73 Avenue Road, Camden Town
Bolton House, Windmill Hill, Hampstead, London, NW3

English painter Peter Gluck, portrayed by Romaine Brooks in Peter, A Young English Girl, in 1923 or 24, was born as Hannah Gluckstein to a wealthy and close-knit Jewish family. In 1944, Gluck moved to Chantry House in Steyning, Sussex, living with lover Edith Shackleton Heald until her death. Edith, dramatic critic and leader writer on the Evening Standard and book reviewer, had been W.B. Yeats’s close friend and possible lover. Gluck was the child of Joseph Gluckstein, whose brothers Isidore and Montague had founded J. Lyons and Co., a British coffee house and catering empire. Gluck's American-born mother, Francesca Halle, was an opera singer. One of Gluck's best-known paintings, Medallion, is a dual portrait of Gluck and Gluck's lover Nesta Obermer, inspired by a night in 1936 when they attended a Fritz Busch production of Mozart's Don Giovanni. According to Gluck's biographer Diana Souhami, "They sat in the third row and she felt the intensity of the music fused them into one person and matched their love." Gluck referred to it as the "YouWe" picture. Gluck also had a romantic relationship with the British floral designer Constance Spry (December 5, 1886 – January 3, 1960), whose work informed the artist's paintings.
Together from 1944 to 1976: 32 years.
Constance Spry (December 5, 1886 – January 3, 1960)
Hannah Glukstein aka Peter Gluck (August 13, 1895 – January 10, 1978)
Edith Shackleton Heald (died November 5, 1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Gluck was born in 1895 into a wealthy Jewish family at 32 Compayne Gardens, NW6 the child of Joseph Gluckstein, whose brothers Isidore and Montague had founded J. Lyons and Co., a British coffee house and catering empire. Gluck's American-born mother, Francesca Halle, was an opera singer. Her brother, Sir Louis Gluckstein, was a Conservative politician.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Gluck (Hannah Gluckstein, 1895–1978) was a British painter. In 1906 her father, Joseph Gluckstein, whose brothers Isidore and Montague had founded J. Lyons and Co., a British coffee house and catering empire, moved the family to 73 Avenue Road, Camden Town.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Sybil Cookson, journalist and writer of romantic novels, and granddaughter of Sir James Crichton-Browne, moved with her two young daughters into Bolton House with Gluck in 1928. Bolton House (Windmill Hill, Hampstead, London, NW3) was a tall, red-brick Georgian building on three floors, with a wide drive through wrought-iron gates, in the heart of Hampstead village.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1944 Gluck moved to Chantry House in Steyning, Sussex, living with lover Edith Shackleton Heald until her death. Chantry House was Edith’s family home.
Address: 51 Church Street, Steyning, West Sussex BN44 3YB, UK (50.8897, -0.32739)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 298685 (Grade II, 1955)
Place
Chantry House is a XVIII century two storeys house with attic. Five windows. Two dormers. Faced with grey headers on a red brick base with brick dressings, quoins, panels between the ground and first floor windows, dentilled cornice and parapet. Windows with cambered head linings and glazing bars intact. Doorway up five steps with pilasters, pediment, rectangular fanlight and door of six fielded panels. A Tablet recording that: "William Butler Yeats, 1859-1939, wrote many of his later poems in this house" (he was good friend, and possible lover, with Edith Shackleton Heald) Edith and Nora Shackleton Heald, sisters, lived here in the 1920s. Edith Shackleton Heald was a journalist; daughter of J.T. Heald and Mary Shackleton. Formerly a dramatic critic and leader writer on the Evening Standard, later she became a book reviewer. Nora Shackleton Heald was a journalist. She entered journalism in 1918, as Women’s Page Editor of the Sunday Despatch; she was a Dramatic Critic for the Daily Mail, London. A columnist on Daily Chronicle and Women’s Page Editor for the Daily Herald. Editor of The Queen and subsequently of The Lady, until 1954. She died on Apr. 5, 1961. Gluck moved in 1944 and lived here with her lover Edith Shackleton Heald until her death in 1978 (two years after Edith.)
Life
Who: Hannah Gluckstein (August 13, 1895 – January 10, 1978) aka Gluck and Edith Shackleton Heald (1885 – November 5, 1976)
Gluck was a British painter. She was born into a wealthy Jewish family, the child of Joseph Gluckstein, whose brothers Isidore and Montague had founded J. Lyons and Co., a British coffee house and catering empire. Gluck’s American-born mother, Francesca Halle, was an opera singer. Gluck’s brother, Sir Louis Gluckstein, was a Conservative politician. One of Gluck’s best-known paintings, “Medallion,” is a dual portrait of Gluck and Gluck’s lover Nesta Obermer, inspired by a night in 1936 when they attended a Fritz Busch production of Mozart’s “Don Giovanni.” According to Gluck’s biographer Diana Souhami, "They sat in the third row and she felt the intensity of the music fused them into one person and matched their love." Gluck referred to it as the "YouWe" picture. It was later used as the cover of a Virago Press edition of “The Well of Loneliness.” Gluck also had a romantic relationship with the British floral designer Constance Spry, whose work informed the artist’s paintings. In Gluck’s seventies, using special handmade paints supplied free by a manufacturer who had taken Gluck’s exacting standards as a challenge, Gluck returned to painting and had another well-received solo show. It was Gluck’s first since 1937, and Gluck’s last: Gluck died in 1978. Gluck’s last major work was a painting of a decomposing fish head on the beach entitled “Rage, Rage against the Dying of the Light.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
George Merrill was the lifelong partner of English poet and LGBT activist Edward Carpenter. Merrill, a working-class young man who had been raised in the slums of Sheffield, had no formal education.
Born: 1866, Sheffield, United Kingdom
Died: January 1928, Guildford, United Kingdom
Lived: Millthorpe, Mountside, Guildford, Surrey GU2 4JD, UK (51.23228, -0.58286)
Carpenter House, The Glen, Cordwell Ln, Millthorpe, Dronfield, Derbyshire S18 7WH, UK (53.28404, -1.53118)
Buried: Guildford Cemetery, Guildford, Guildford Borough, Surrey, England
Buried alongside: Edward Carpenter

Edward Carpenter was a socialist poet and philosopher, anthologist, and early gay activist. A leading figure in late 19th and early 20th century Britain, he was instrumental in the foundation of the Fabian Society and the Labour Party. A poet and writer, he was a close friend of Walt Whitman and Rabindranath Tagore. A strong advocate of sexual freedom, living in a gay community near Sheffield, he had a profound influence on both D.H. Lawrence and E.M. Forster (it has been said he and Merrill are the inspiration for Maurice and Alec.) On his return from India in 1891, Carpenter met George Merrill, a working class man also from Sheffield, and the two men struck up a relationship, moving in together in 1898. Their relationship endured and they remained partners for the rest of their lives, a fact made all the more extraordinary by the hysteria about homosexuality generated by the Oscar Wilde’s trial of 1895. In January 1928, Merrill died suddenly, leaving Carpenter devastated: "there was only the end to be desired." In May, 1928, Carpenter suffered a paralytic stroke, which rendered him almost helpless. He lived another 13 months before dying on June 28, 1929. They are buried together at Guildford Cemetery, Surrey; under Merrill’s name you read “about 40 years with Edward Carpenter.”
Together from 1891 to 1928: 37 years.
Edward Carpenter (August 29, 1844 - June 28, 1929)
George Merrill (1866 – January 10, 1928)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Edward Carpenter and George Merrill are buried together at Mount Cemetery, Guildford. On the tombstone you can read: Edward Carpenter, also George Merrill, about 40 years with Edward Carpenter.
Addresses:
Millthorpe, Mountside, Guildford, Surrey GU2 4JD, UK (51.23228, -0.58286)
Carpenter House, The Glen, Cordwell Ln, Millthorpe, Dronfield, Derbyshire S18 7WH, UK (53.28404, -1.53118)
Place
Carpenter House was the home of author and philosopher Edward Carpenter until 1922. Millthorpe consist of a mixture of dwellings, ancient cottages and farms on the one hand and a suburban overflow on the other. In the summer of 1922, Edward Carpenter (then age 78) left Derbyshire and his beloved Millthorpe. He moved South with George Merrill to Mountside, Guildford and a villa at the top of the hill of Mountside with fine views over the town, which they named Millthorpe. Mountside rises up just five minutes walk from Guildford station, and the regular train service that can bring you to central London within 40 minutes; a steep residential road, quiet and suburban, that gives glimpses out over Guildford as you climb. A left hand turn at the top of the road also leads to Mountside Cemetery where Edward Carpenter and George Merrill are buried together. If you walk out through the lower part of the cemetary you also pass the grave of Lewis Caroll. Taking an alternative path back to Mountside road, a cutting that ran along the back of the houses, at the far end there is Millthorpe.
Life
Who: Edward Carpenter (August 29, 1844 – June 28, 1929) and George Merrill (1866 – January 10, 1928)
Edward Carpenter was a socialist poet, philosopher, anthologist, and early LGBT activist. A poet and writer, he was a close friend of Rabindranath Tagore, and a friend of Walt Whitman. He corresponded with many famous figures such as Annie Besant, Isadora Duncan, Havelock Ellis, Roger Fry, Mahatma Gandhi, James Keir Hardie, J. K. Kinney, Jack London, E D Morel, William Morris, E R Pease, John Ruskin, and Olive Schreiner. When his father Charles Carpenter died in 1882, he left his son a considerable fortune. This enabled Carpenter to quit his lectureship to start a simpler life of market gardening in Millthorpe, near Barlow, Derbyshire. On his return from India in 1891, he met George Merrill (1866-1928), a working class man also from Sheffield, and the two men struck up a relationship, eventually moving in together in 1898. E. M. Forster was also close friends with the couple, who on a visit to Millthorpe in 1912 was inspired to write his gay-themed novel, “Maurice.” Forster records in his diary that, Merrill, “touched my backside - gently and just above the buttocks. I believe he touched most people’s. The sensation was unusual and I still remember it, as I remember the position of a long vanished tooth. He made a profound impression on me and touched a creative spring." The relationship between Carpenter and Merrill was the template for the relationship between Maurice Hall and Alec Scudder, the gamekeeper in Forster’s novel. Carpenter was also a significant influence on the author D. H. Lawrence, whose “Lady Chatterley’s Lover” can be seen as a heterosexualised Maurice.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Forman Brown was one of the world's leaders in puppet theatre in his day, as well as an important early gay novelist. He was a member of the Yale Puppeteers and the driving force behind Turnabout Theatre.
Born: 1901, Otsego, Michigan, United States
Died: 1996, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: University of Michigan
Books: Better Angel, The Generous Jefferson Bartleby Jones
Movies: Bandits and Ballads, An Old Spanish Onion
People also search for: Leslie Trawin, Friedrich Hollaender, Alfred J. Goulding, Stanley Rauh, Edward Mann, Bert Gilroy
Lived: Turnabout House, 1141 N El Centro Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90038, USA (34.09186, -118.32464)

Forman Brown was one of the world's leaders in puppet theatre in his day, as well as an important early gay novelist. Along with Yale Puppeteers Harry Burnett and Richard Brandon (Brown's life-long lover), Brown launched Turnabout Theatre in 1941 as "a vehicle for performing both puppet plays and revues for adults.” It attracted celebrity attention and support from some of Hollywood's biggest names, e.g., Greta Garbo, Marie Dressler, and Douglas Fairbanks, as well as other notable figures including Albert Einstein. In 1933, Brown wrote, under the pseudonym Richard Meeker, a novel called Better Angel about a young man coming to terms with his homosexuality. This novel is regarded as "the first American novel to present the 'gay' experience in a healthy light." Richard Brandon, the youngest of the three Yale Puppeteers, was the first to die. He was 80 when he died at Turnabout House in Hollywood, the home the three men had occupied for the last several years.
Together from 1928 to 1985: 57 years.
Forman Brown aka Richard Meeker (January 8, 1901 - January 10, 1996)
Richard Brandon (1905 – May 4, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This was the home of the Turnabout Players, Forman Brown, Harry Burnett, and Roddy Brandon. These three gay men, who lived together as a family for over sixty years, founded Hollywood's Turnabout Theater. They took the city by storm in the 1940s and 1950s. Forman Brown was also the author of “Better Angel,” an autobiographical novel published in 1933, often considered the first American gay novel. It was published under the pen name, Richard Meeker.
Address: 1141 N El Centro Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90038, USA (34.09186, -118.32464)
Type: Private Property
Place
“Since the mid-1970s, I’d been attending Harry and Forman’s annual birthday party or dragging friends to performances they presented for longtime fans on the small stage of a big, ramshackle Hollywood home they shared. Turnabout House was almost as enchanting as the theatre itself. Leaving today’s decaying Hollywood, one stepped back into 1927, to a world crowded with dusty photos of mostly forgotten stars, posters, and memorabilia from the puppeteers’ touring days, and pictures of the artists who populated their several theaters. Like most old troupers, whose real terror is that nobody will ask, Forman played the shy schoolboy then quickly let himself be talked into plunking down at the piano to sing three or four of his hundreds of songs. Before a heart condition forced him to spend his last months on the living room couch, Roddy was the busy mother hen, cooking, cleaning, and continuing to organize things as he’d done for more than 50 years. Harry kept manufacturing puppets in his garage workshop, until at 85 he tired of them. Then I’d usually find him in a favorite tattered chair, knitting little woollen hats that he gave to anyone who dropped by. He donated hundreds of them to a children’s hospital. Until his eyesight began to fail, he insisted on working his favorite puppet, Simon Legree, or he’d flourish a soiled handkerchief and do the same tricks for guests that he did for David and me on those distant yesterdays when we were kids. While their time necessarily kept Harry, Forman and Roddy circumspect about their homosexuality, they pretty much lived the lives they wanted to live, busy and content in their work, with a legion of friends, young and old, who popped in at Turnabout House on a regular basis. For those who didn’t know they were gay (or didn’t care to let on), it didn’t matter. Being “artistic” was quite acceptable.” Rare Birds, By Dan Bessie
Life
Who: Forman Brown aka Richard Meeker (January 8, 1901 - January 10, 1996) and Richard Brandon (1905 – May 4, 1985)
Forman Brown was one of the world's leaders in puppet theatre in his day, as well as an important early gay novelist. Along with Yale Puppeteers Harry Burnett and Richard Brandon (Brown's life-long lover), Brown launched Turnabout Theatre in 1941 as "a vehicle for performing both puppet plays and revues for adults.” It attracted celebrity attention and support from some of Hollywood's biggest names, e.g., Greta Garbo, Marie Dressler, and Douglas Fairbanks, as well as other notable figures including Albert Einstein. In 1933, Brown wrote, under the pseudonym Richard Meeker, a novel called Better Angel about a young man coming to terms with his homosexuality. This novel is regarded as "the first American novel to present the 'gay' experience in a healthy light." Richard Brandon, the youngest of the three Yale Puppeteers, was the first to die. He was 80 when he died at Turnabout House in Hollywood, the home the three men had occupied for the last several years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Erna Fergusson was an avid writer, historian, and storyteller, who documented the culture and history of New Mexico for more than forty years.
Born: January 10, 1888, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
Died: July 30, 1964, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
Education: Columbia University
University of New Mexico
Lived: 1021 Orchard Pl NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102, USA (35.09306, -106.65764)

Erna Fergusson was an avid writer, historian, and storyteller, who documented the culture and history of New Mexico for more than forty years.
Address: 1021 Orchard Pl NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102, USA (35.09306, -106.65764)
Type: Private Property
Life
Who: Erna Mary Fergusson (January 10, 1888 – July 30, 1964)
Erna was born to a wealthy and well-known family. Her mother was Clara Mary Huning, the daughter of a very successful merchant by the name of Franz Huning. He was an investor of real estate and owned and operated a downtown mercantile store and flourmill. Erna Fergusson’s father was Harvey Butler Fergusson, a prominent lawyer in White Oaks, New Mexico. It was later in 1883 that he moved to Albuquerque, where he became friends with Franz Huning. Four years later in 1887 Clara Mary Huning and Harvey Fergusson were married. Erna, the eldest of four children, grew up in La Glorieta, which was her primary residence in New Mexico. However, between 1897 and 1899 Erna spent her formative years in Washington, D.C. when her father served as a delegate to the United States. In 1906 Erna graduated from Central High School in Albuquerque. Prior to graduating, she did preparatory work at the University of New Mexico (1904) and the Collegiate School in Los Angeles (1905). She began teaching in the Albuquerque public schools while at the same time furthering her education. In 1912 she graduated from UNM with a Bachelor of Pedagogy Degree. A year later Erna completed her Masters in History from Columbia University in New York. After teaching a while in Chatham hall in Virginia she decided to return home and continue teaching in Albuquerque. Throughout her years Erna had various other occupations. During World War II she took a job with the Red Cross as the home service secretary and State Supervisor for New Mexico. After the war she became a reporter for the Albuquerque Herald, writing various articles regarding her hometown. She was commissioned in 1926 by Century Magazine to write “Redskins to Railroads” and “From Rodeo to Rotary” two of her pieces, which many years later along with other short works became published. While at the Herald, Erna also began a touring company alongside friend Ethel Hickey. The touring company, Koshare Tours, provided guests with tours of the southwest, introducing them to native cultures. Koshare Tours were so successful that Fred Harvey, a famous and well to do western hotel and restaurateur, bought the touring company and hired Erna Fergusson to direct the new endeavor—Indian Detour Service. In 1931 Erna Fergusson published her first book “Dancing Gods,” which was about Indian ceremonials. Several histories and numerous travel books followed after her success with “Dancing Gods.” In her 1934 book, "Mexican Cookbook,” Fergusson was perhaps the first to correct the English-speakers notion that "frijoles refritos" meant "refried beans", but the correction never reached the popular consciousness. In 1942 Erna Fergusson helped found the Albuquerque Historical Society. The year after she was awarded as an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from the University of New Mexico. She died in 1964.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
David Robert Jones, known professionally as David Bowie, was an English singer, songwriter and actor. He was a figure in popular music for over five decades, regarded by critics and musicians as an innovator, particularly for his work in the 1970s.
Died: January 10, 2016, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Movies: Labyrinth, The Man Who Fell to Earth, The Prestige, more
Spouse: Iman (m. 1992–2016), Angie Bowie (m. 1970–1980)
Lived: 40 Stansfield Road, London
Studied: Ravens Wood School

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Crescent, Henry Havelock Ellis (1859–1939), “Pioneer in the scientific study of sex lived here"
Address: Brixton, London SW9 7QF, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Brixton is a district of London, located in the borough of Lambeth in south London. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. The area remained undeveloped until the beginning of the XIX century, the main settlements being near Stockwell, Brixton Hill and Coldharbour Lane. The opening of Vauxhall Bridge in 1816 improved access to Central London and led to a process of suburban development. The largest single development, and one of the last in suburban character, was Angell Town, laid out in the 1850s on the east side of Brixton Road, and so named after a family that owned land in Lambeth from the late XVII century until well into the XX. One of a few surviving windmills in London, built in 1816, is just off Brixton Hill and surrounded by houses built during Brixton’s Victorian expansion. When the London sewerage system was constructed during the mid-XIX century, its designer Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated flows from the River Effra, which used to flow through Brixton, into his “high-level interceptor sewer,” also known as the Effra sewer. Brixton was transformed into a middle class suburb between the 1860s and 1890s. Railways linked Brixton with the centre of London when the Chatham Main Line was built through the area by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway in the 1860s. In 1880, Electric Avenue was so named after it became the first street in London to be lit by electricity. In this time, large expensive houses were constructed along the main roads in Brixton, which were converted into flats and boarding houses at the start of the XX century as the middle classes were replaced by an influx of the working classes. By 1925, Brixton attracted thousands of new people. It housed the largest shopping centre in South London at the time, as well as a thriving market, cinemas, pubs and a theatre. In the 1920s, Brixton was the shopping capital of South London with three large department stores and some of the earliest branches of what are now Britain’s major national retailers. Today, Brixton Road is the main shopping area, fusing into Brixton Market. A prominent building on Brixton High Street (at 472–488 Brixton Road) is Morleys, an independent department store established in the 1920s. On the western boundary of Brixton with Clapham stands the Sunlight Laundry, an Art Deco factory building. Designed by architect F.E. Simpkins and erected in 1937, this is one of the few art deco buildings that is still owned by the firm that commissioned it and is still used for its original purpose. The Brixton area was bombed during WWII, contributing to a severe housing crisis, which in turn led to urban decay. This was followed by slum clearances and the building of council housing. In the 1940s and 1950s, many immigrants, particularly from the West Indies, settled in Brixton. More recent immigrants include a large Portuguese community (Little Portugal) and other European citizens. Brixton also has an increasingly ageing population, which affects housing strategies in the area. The Brixton Gay Community of the 1970s formed around the UK’s first gay centre and a series of nearby squatted houses. Between 50 and 60 men lived in these squats for anything from a week to ten years. In oral testimonies many of them describe how their experience shaped their politics, their ideas about sexual identity and community, and their creative lives. The South London Gay Liberation Front, the journal Gay Left and the Brixton Faeries are each linked to the squatting community, which in the mid-1980s was absorbed into the Brixton Co-op. The houses – and the communal garden that connects them – are still reserved for gay and lesbian tenants: a tangible legacy of the earlier community.
Notable queer residents at Brixton:
• David Bowie (January 8, 1947 –January 10, 2016) was born at 40 Stansfield Road.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), pioneer sexologist lived at 14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Crescent.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Gabrielle Bonheur "Coco" Chanel was a French fashion designer and businesswoman. She was the founder and namesake of the Chanel brand.
Born: August 19, 1883, Saumur, France
Died: January 10, 1971, Paris, France
Full name: Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel
Books: Chanel
Siblings: Lucien Chanel, Pierre Chanel, Antoinette Chanel, Augustin Chanel, Alphonse Chanel, Julia Chanel
Lived: Villa La Pausa, 12B Avenue de la Torraca, 06190 Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France (43.76102, 7.46707)
Buried: Cimetière du Bois-de-Vaux, Lausanne, District de Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland, Plot: Section 9

It’s hardly surprising that the allure of the Côte d’Azur cast its spell over France’s grande dame of fashion, Coco Chanel. Villa La Pausa, situated in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin between Monte Carlo and Menton, was built for Chanel and her lover, the Duke of Westminster.
Address: 12B Avenue de la Torraca, 06190 Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France (43.76102, 7.46707)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +33 4 93 83 51 20
Place
Built in 1927, Design by Robert Streitz, Interior Design by Coco Chanel (1883-1971)
La Pausa is a large detached villa in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, in the Alpes-Maritimes department of France. It was owned by Chanel until 1953. La Pausa was sold by Chanel to the Hungarian publisher Emery Reves. The British Prime Minister Winston Churchill spent roughly a third year at La Pausa from 1956 to 1958 with Reves and his wife, Wendy, and wrote and edited part of his “History of the English Speaking Peoples” there. La Pausa was occupied by Wendy Reves until 2007. The principal rooms of La Pausa and its significant art collection were recreated at the Dallas Museum of Art during her lifetime and under her direction. The Reves wing was opened in 1985. Situated above the village of Roquebrune, the house enjoys views toward Menton and the French border with Italy on one side, and Monaco on the other. Its name refers to the legend that Mary Magdalene "paused" near here on her journey from Jerusalem following the crucifixion of Jesus. Guests hosted by the Reves with Churchill included Noël Coward, Somerset Maugham and Edward Molyneux. Other notable high society guests hosted by the Reves at La Pausa included the aristocrats Prince Rainier and Princess Grace of Monaco, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, and the actors Greta Garbo, Errol Flynn and Clark Gable. Following Emery Reves’s death in 1981, the Dallas Museum of Art in the United States approached Wendy Reves knowing that there was a possibility that her art collection at La Pausa might be given to a museum. In exchange for the 1985 donation Reves insisted that the museum recreate six of the principal rooms at La Pausa, and display the collection there as she had arranged it. The collection of 1,400 objet d’art is displayed at the museum as the Wendy and Emery Reves Collection in a reconstruction of five rooms from La Pausa. The villa’s central courtyard and patio were reconstructed at the museum along with the villa’s dining room, library, salon, bedroom, and hall, situated in a purpose built 16,500-square-foot wing designed by architect Edward Larrabee Barnes. La Pausa has now been acquired by the House of Chanel again, with plans to restore it to its original decor and spirit.
Life
Who: Gabrielle Bonheur "Coco" Chanel (August 19, 1883 – January 10, 1971)
Chanel bought the five acre plot on which La Pausa was built for 1.8 million French francs in Feb. 1929. The plot had formerly been part of the hunting grounds of the ruling family of Monaco, the Grimaldis, and contained wild olive and orange groves. The villa was built less than a year later. The final cost of the villa was 6 million francs, a large sum for the time. It is not clear whether Chanel or her lover, Hugh Grosvenor, 2nd Duke of Westminster financed the building and furnishing of La Pausa. Architect Robert Streitz sought to build “the ideal Mediterranean villa.” The design of the house modelled on the XII century convent-orphanage in Aubazine, in the department of Corréze, which Chanel spent her childhood. A stone staircase leads up from the main entrance hall and a cloister encloses a courtyard. A design of five windows is repeated throughout the house, in tribute to Chanel’s perfume, Chanel No. 5. Chanel ordered more than 20,000 curved tiles to be handmade for the roof, and furnished the house sparsely in shades of white and beige. Each bathroom has a servants entrance. Chanel would take Le Train Bleu from Paris every month to inspect the progress of the building. If Chanel was unable to make the trip, local craftsmen would be sent to Paris to meet her. The colour scheme of the house was beige, which included a beige piano. Chanel may have been assisted in her design of the interior of La Pausa by Stéphane Boudin, the president of the interior design firm Maison Jansen. The central villa is 10,000 sq ft in size, with two smaller villas built for guests. The main house consists of seven bedrooms, with three living rooms, a dining room, two kitchens and staff quarters. Streitz had previously restored another local villa for Chanel’s friend, Count Jean de Segonzac. La Pausa contains three wings that face onto a shaded courtyard, with the rooms containing large fireplaces. The rooms were filled by Chanel with XVI century English oak furniture, given to her by the Duke of Westminster; English oak was also used for floors and panelling. The large reception rooms were lit by wrought-iron chandeliers from Spain. The poet Pierre Reverdy stayed at La Pausa for long periods during the 1930s, and the poet Paul Iribe, Chanel’s lover, collapsed and died while playing tennis with Chanel at La Pausa in 1935. Guests of Chanel’s at La Pausa included Igor Stravinsky, Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Luchino Visconti. La Pausa was profiled by American Vogue magazine in 1938, with the garden described as containing "groves of orange trees, great slopes of lavender, masses of purple iris, and huge clusters of climbing roses." Twenty olive trees from Antibes were replanted in the garden. The designer Roderick Cameron said that at La Pausa, Chanel was the first to cultivate lavender and other flora previously regarded as "poor plants.” The architect of La Pausa, Robert Streitz, was a member of the French Resistance during the German occupation of France in WWII. Streitz hid in La Pausa’s cellars from where he transmitted covert messages. Jewish refugees were also able to utilise La Pausa, using its gardens as a staging post in their escape from France to the Italian border. During the German occupation of France, Chanel made several visits to La Pausa with her lover, the German spy Baron von Dincklage. The design of La Pausa also influenced Chanel’s fashion designs, with her collections evoking the pink and grey palettes of the house and landscape. In 2007 Chanel released a perfume inspired by La Pausa, 28 La Pausa, as part of their "Les Exclusifs" collection. It was created by Chanel’s perfumer Jacques Polge. Coco Chanel died in 1971 and is buried at Bois-de-Vaux Cemetery (Chemin du Bois-de-Vaux, 1007 Lausanne, Switzerland).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Renowned Fashion Designer Coco Chanel (August 19, 1883 –January 10, 1971) was born a peasant and raised in an orphanage. She grew up with a gift of fashion and a keen awareness of social trends. Chanel died in 1971 at the age of 88. The House of Chanel still exists today. She is buried at Bois-de-Vaux Cemetery (Chemin du Bois-de-Vaux, 1007 Lausanne, Switzerland); her tomb is surrounded by five stone lions.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Lived: 306 Liberty St, Rockland, MA 02370, USA (42.1319, -70.90751)
Buried: Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Rockland, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, USA
Buried alongside: Maria Louise Pool

Maria Louise Pool was an American writer. She tended to write about the human character in mundane situations, usually in a New England setting; dogs also had a prominent role in many of her stories. She often travelled around the country, and had lived in various places far from her birth but toward the end of her life she returned to her hometown to care for her elderly mother and frail sister. Her work was reviewed extensively, as by the New York Times, but has lapsed into obscurity. She was an influence upon the young Canadian-American writer Mary MacLane (May 1, 1881 — August 1929), who became friends with Pool's companion Caroline M. Branson. When Pool died, the Rockland newspaper, named, among the survivors of Pool, Caroline, her "literary companion.” Branson and MacLane lived together from 1902 to 1908 in the house Branson and Pool had lived in. Pool and Branson are buried together in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery in Rockland, Massachusetts. Their house still stands on Liberty Street in Rockland, near the corner of East Water Street, and next to the 1770's cape where she was born. A Boston School portrait of Pool hangs in Rockland's Memorial Library.
Together from 1866 to 1898: 32 years.
Caroline M. Branson (March 12, 1837 – January 10, 1918)
Maria Louise Pool (August 21, 1841 – May 19, 1898)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The cottage at 306 Liberty Street, Rockland, was the Daniel Lane Jr. House, presumibily built by young Daniel about the time he married Hannah Andrews in 1774.
Address: 306 Liberty St, Rockland, MA 02370, USA (42.1319, -70.90751)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built about 1774 or 1775
One room was used as a temporary meeting place for religious services in time of the smallpox epidemic of 1775-76. Around 1820 Daniel Lane Jr. served as a justice of the peace, and he probably convened courts in the main room of the house. Maria Louise Pool, the Victorian novelist, was born here. She was a grand-daughter of Daniel Lane Jr., her parents, Elias Pool and Lydia Lane, having come into possession of the homeplace about the time Daniel Lane Jr. died in 1831. Later in her life, Pool built the house next door at 300 Liberty Street. She was more interested in ecology than society. She was a great lover of dogs and was given to solitary strolls with her pets, especially in the earliest morning hours. After Pool’s death in 1898, Judge George W. Kelly bought her new house.
Life
Who: Maria Louise Pool (August 20, 1841 – May 18, 1898) and Caroline M. Branson (March 12, 1837 – January 10, 1918)
Maria Louise Pool was an influence upon the young Canadian-American writer Mary MacLane (1881-1929), who became friends with Pool’s "literary companion" Caroline M. Branson. Branson and MacLane lived together from 1902 to 1908 in the house Branson and Pool had lived in. Caroline M. Branson and Maria Louise Pool are buried together in Mount Pleasant Cemetery (Rockland, MA 02370).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Carl Winter was a British art historian and museum curator. He worked at the Victoria & Albert Museum's collection of English watercolours and miniature portraits before moving to the Fitzwilliam Museum ...
Born: January 10, 1906
Died: 1966
Studied: University of Oxford
Association: Fitzwilliam Museum, Trumpington St, Cambridge CB2 1RB, UK (52.19953, 0.11994)

The Fitzwilliam Museum is the art and antiquities museum of the University of Cambridge, located on Trumpington Street opposite Fitzwilliam Street in central Cambridge. It receives around 470,000 visitors annually (2011–12). Admission is free.
Address: Trumpington St, Cambridge CB2 1RB, UK (52.19953, 0.11994)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1223 332900
Place
The Museum is the lead museum for the University of Cambridge Museums consortium, one of 16 Major Partner Museum services funded by Arts Council England to lead the development of the museums sector. The current Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum is Tim Knox. The museum was founded in 1816 with the legacy of the library and art collection of the 7th Viscount FitzWilliam. The bequest also included £100,000 "to cause to be erected a good substantial museum repository". The collection was initially placed in the old Perse School building in Free School Lane. It was moved in 1842 to the Old Schools (at that time the University Library). The "Founder's Building" itself was designed by George Basevi, completed by C. R. Cockerell and opened in 1848; the entrance hall is by Edward Middleton Barry and was completed in 1875. The first stone of the new building was laid by Gilbert Ainslie in 1837. A further large bequest was made to the University in 1912 by Charles Brinsley Marlay, including a sum of £80,000 and a collection of 84 pictures. A two-storey extension, paid for partly by the Courtauld family, was added in 1931. The portraits of Sir John Finch and Sir Thomas Baines by Florentine artist Carlo Dolci hang in the Fitzwilliam Museum. Also the personal collection of Charles Shannon and Charles Ricketts are hosted at the Museum.
Life
Who: Carl Winter (January 10, 1906– May 21, 1966)
Carl Winter was a British art historian and museum curator. Winter was born in Melbourne, the son of Carl Winter and his wife Ethel (née Hardy). He was educated and Xavier College and Newman College, University of Melbourne. He came to England in 1928 and attended Exeter College, Oxford. He married Theodora (née Barlow) in 1936; they had two sons and a daughter, but were divorced in 1953. He was appointed as an Assistant Keeper in the Departments of Engraving, Illustration and Design, and of Paintings, at the Victoria & Albert Museum 1931, where he worked with Basil Long, leading the department after Long's death in 1936. He was appointed as Deputy Keeper at the V&A in 1945, but moved to become Director and Morley Curator at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge in 1946, and also a fellow of Trinity College, where he remained until his death in 1966. He published “Elizabethan Miniatures” in 1943, and “The British School of Miniature Portrait Painters” in 1948. Along with Patrick Trevor-Roper and Peter Wildeblood, Winter gave evidence to the Wolfenden Committee, whose report led in 1967 to the decriminalization of sex between adult male homosexuals. He gave evidence anonymously as "Mr White". His testimony to the Committee has been portrayed on-screen in the BBC dramatisation, “Consenting Adults.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Lived: 315 Convent Avenue

William Thomas "Billy" Strayhorn was an American jazz composer, pianist and arranger, best known for his successful collaboration with bandleader and composer Duke Ellington lasting nearly three decades. His compositions include Take the 'A' Train, Chelsea Bridge, and Lush Life. Mercer Ellington, son of the Duke, introduced Aaron Bridgers to Strayhorn as a perspective “partner”. A year after their meeting, both Strayhorn and Bridgers moved in together. They were describe as being very affectionate toward one another. Even more importantly, those who knew them as a couple were respectful of the two men and their relationship. Bridgers moved to Paris in 1947. Strayhorn was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in 1964, which eventually caused his death in 1967. Strayhorn finally succumbed in the early morning on May 31, 1967, in the company of his partner, Bill Grove. It has often been falsely reported that Strayhorn died in Lena Horne's arms. By her own account, Horne was touring in Europe when she received the news of Strayhorn's death. His ashes were scattered in the Hudson River by a gathering of his closest friends.
Together from 1937 to 1947: 10 years.
Aaron Bridgers (January 10, 1918 - November 3, 2003)
William Thomas “Sweet Pea” Strayhorn (November 29, 1915 – May 31, 1967)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1939, Jazz great Billy Strayhorn (1915-1967) moved into a ground floor apartment in a building on 315 Convent Avenue, 10031 with his lover, jazz pianist Aaron Bridgers. Bridgers moved to Paris in 1947, but Strayhorn continued to live here until 1950. While living in this apartment, Strayhorn wrote "Take the A Train" (1941); "Lotus Blossom" (1946); "Lush Life" (1949), and most of the music for the musicals Beggars Holiday and Jump for Joy. Strayhorn died on May 31, 1967. After his funeral, as he had requested, a small group of his closest friends, including Duke Ellington, gathered at the 79th Street Boat Basin where they scattered his ashes along with handfuls of rose petals into the Hudson River. They continued to gather there on the anniversary of his death for many years to come, scattering roses into the waters and watching the currents take them away, out to sea.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

June 2017

S M T W T F S
     1 23
4 5 6 7 8910
11 12 1314 151617
1819 2021 22 23 24
252627282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 27th, 2017 01:45 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios