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Buried: Congressional Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA, Plot: Range 61 site 250
Buried alongside: Everett Lysle Boyer

The Congressional Cemetery or Washington Parish Burial Ground is a historic and active cemetery located at 1801 E Street, SE, in Washington, D.C., on the west bank of the Anacostia River.
Address: 1801 E St SE, Washington, DC 20003, USA (38.88128, -76.98056)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 202-543-0539
National Register of Historic Places: 69000292, 1969. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
It is the only American "cemetery of national memory" founded before the Civil War. Over 65,000 individuals are buried or memorialized at the cemetery, including many who helped form the nation and the city of Washington in the early XIX century. Though the cemetery is privately owned, the U.S. government owns 806 burial plots administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Congress, located about a mile and a half (2.4 km) to the northwest, has greatly influenced the history of the cemetery. The cemetery still sells plots, and is an active burial ground. From the Washington Metro, the cemetery lies three blocks east of the Potomac Avenue station and two blocks south of the Stadium-Armory station. Many members of the U.S. Congress who died while Congress was in session are interred at Congressional Cemetery. Other burials include early landowners and speculators, the builders and architects of early Washington, Native American diplomats, Washington mayors, and Civil War veterans. XIX century Washington, D.C. families unaffiliated with the federal government also have graves and tombs at the cemetery. In all, there are one Vice President, one Supreme Court justice, six Cabinet members, 19 Senators and 71 Representatives (including a former Speaker of the House) buried there, as well as veterans of every American war, and the first director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover. Peter Doyle, (June 3, 1843-April 19, 1907), a veteran of the Confederate Army, and the greatest love of poet Walt Whitman is buried here. They met in Washington, D.C. on the horse-drawn streetcar for which Doyle was the conductor who later recalled, “We were familiar at once – I put my hand on his knee – we understood. He did not get out at the end of the trip – in fact went all the way back with me.” Whitman wrote in one letter to him, “I will imagine you with my arm around my neck saying Good night, Walt - & me – Good night, Pete.”
Notable queer burials at Congressional Cemetery:
• Everett Lysle Boyer (1927-1998) & Forrest Leroy Snakenberg (1932-1986). Boyer's tombstone reads: Arise up my love, Tis the time of singing birds (Song of Solomon 2:12), Snakenberg's, same style of that of Everett, reads: So be truely glad there is wonderful joy ahead (Peter 1:6)
• Kenneth Dresser (1938-1995) and Charles Fowler (1931-1995) are buried together. Dresser designed the Electric Light Parade at Disneyland, the Electric Water Pageant at Epcot, and the Fantasy of Lights at Callaway Gardens, Georgia. Fowler was an arts educator and writer, director of National Cultural Resources, Inc, and a guest professor at several American universities.
• James Richard Duell (1947-1992) and Larry Martin Worrell (1954-1989). The tombstone reads: "Two most excellent adventures"
• John Frey (1929-1997) and Peter Morris (1929-2010), together 43 years, met while at college together. Frey was a Fulbright Scholar, professor of Romance Languages at George Washington University, and author of books on Victor Hugo and Emile Zola. Morris was an expert French cook, and on the Board of Directors of the gay Catholic organization Dignity for whom he coauthored a community cookbook.
• Barbara Gittings (1932-2007) helped convince the American Psychiatric Association to declassify homosexuality as a mental illness. She founded the New York chapter of the lesbian rights organization the Daughter of Bilitis. The tombstone reads: Gay Pioneers who spoke truth to power: Gay is good. Partners in life, Married in our hearts.
• Dan Hering (1925-2012) was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and served 20 years in the U.S. Army. He and his partner Joel were members of one of the earliest gay right groups, the Society for Individual Rights (SIR) formed in 1964. They were founding members of the earliest known gay boat club, San Francisco’s Barbary Coast Boating Club. Dan was also a member of Service Academy Gay & Lesbian Alumni (SAGLA) and Knights Out, the association of gay West Point graduates. His partner Joel Leenaars (born 1935) lives at 1533 Weybridge Cir, Naples, FL.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) was a WWII veteran and the father of the modern gay rights movement.
• T. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich (1943-1988), was a gay civil rights and AIDS activist, his tombstone reads: "When I was in the military they gave me a medal for killing two men and a discharge for loving one."
• William Boyce Mueller (1942–1993) was the gay grandson of the founder of the Boy Scout of America. Mueller helped create the first organization to lobby today’s Scout oligarchs to end their ban on gay Scouts and Scout leaders, Forgotten Scouts.
• Frank Warren O’Reilly (1922-2001) was a WWII veteran with a Ph.D. in International Relations, and a music critic for The Washington Times, and founder of Miami’s Charles Ives Centennial Festival and the American Chopin Foundation which sponsors an annual national Chopin competition.
• Emanuel “Butch” Zeigler (1951-2009) was a onetime elementary school teacher, and co-owner of Capital Promoting Service whose clients include Heads of State and major corporations.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sir Edward Howard Marsh KCVO CB CMG was a British polymath, translator, arts patron and civil servant. He was the sponsor of the Georgian school of poets and a friend to many poets, including Rupert Brooke and Siegfried Sassoon.
Born: November 18, 1872, London, United Kingdom
Died: January 13, 1953, London, United Kingdom
Parents: Frederick Howard Marsh
Books: Rupert Brooke, Letters to an Editor: Georgian Poetry, 1912-1922: An Exhibition from the Berg Collection
Education: Trinity College, Cambridge
Westminster School
Grandparent: Maria Haward
People also search for: Rupert Brooke, Frederick Howard Marsh, Keith Hale, John Dozier Gordan
Lived: 5 Gray's Inn Square, London WC1R 5AH, UK (51.51967, -0.11313)

The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, commonly known as Gray's Inn, is one of the four Inns of Court (professional associations for barristers and judges) in London. To be Called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, an individual must belong to one of these Inns. Located at the intersection of High Holborn and Gray's Inn Road in Central London, the Inn is both a professional body and a provider of office accommodation (chambers) for many barristers.
Address: 5 Gray's Inn Square, London WC1R 5AH, UK (51.51967, -0.11313)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In the years leading to the outbreak of WWI and then spanning the next 23 post-war years, an apartment at No 5 Raymond Buildings, Gray’s lnn – remarkable for its fine paintings – lay at the centre of a network of emerging poets and other artists. This was the home, until bombed in 1941, of the polymath and senior Civil Servant, Edward (Eddie) Marsh (knighted in 1937), who in 1905 became Private Secretary to Winston Churchill when the latter was made Under-Secretary for the Colonies. The importance of Marsh as the patron of artists, however, ranks even higher than his distinguished career as a public servant. His patronage was of the utmost value because he had access to many friends in the fields of politics, art and literature, regularly spending weekends amongst them at grand country house parties. Above all, he had money – always useful to young impoverished artists. The ever sociable Eddie was also an entertaining host, usually over breakfast at No 5, cooked by his loyal housekeeper Mrs Elgy, ‘an apple-faced woman from Derbyshire’. Breakfast guests might include Rupert Brooke, Stanley Spencer, Siegfried Sassoon, Edward Thomas, Paul Nash and W.H. Davies. To this list ought to be added the name of Lady Eileen Wellesley, daughter of the Duke of Wellington and Rupert Brooke’s lover, whose hair pins were found in Brooke’s bed at No 5 by a shocked Mrs Elgy. In May 1914, Sassoon at last broke free from his family home in Kent and moved to live at No 1 Raymond Buildings, WC1R which if nothing else was close to Marsh. Sassoon engaged a housekeeper, Mrs Fretter, who appeared “economic” or so he told Marsh. At this time Raymond Buildings was regarded as at the “noisy end of Gray’s Inn,” being too close to the interminable traffic on the Theobalds Road. Sassoon was not so much disturbed by that as by his inability to make ends meet despite the estimable Mrs Fretter. He was never very domesticated and, aged 27, had lived a very sheltered life at home, writing poetry, playing cricket and golf, and going fox-hunting. He had overspent furnishing No 1, and rather than concentrating on writing and improving his prospects, he purchased a rolled up umbrella and bowler hat, and from the top deck of a bus became a tourist and generally a man-about-town. It proved disastrous, and soon he was back living with his mother, but not before he met Rupert Brooke. This was over bacon and kidneys at a breakfast meeting at No 5, which from 1909 was Brooke’s unofficial London home, encouraged by the ever indulgent Marsh. (Mrs Elgy, however, disliked Brooke’s preference forr eating meals on a tray whilst sprawled on the sitting-room floor propped up by cushions.) From 1592 to 1594 also Anthony Bacon stayed with his brother Francis in Francis’ chambers at Gray’s Inn. Together, they established a scrivenery employing scriveners who acted as secretaries, writers, translators, copyists and cryptographers, dealing with correspondence, translations, copying, ciphers, essays, books, plays, entertainments and masques.
Life
Who: Sir Edward Howard Marsh KCVO CB CMG (November 18, 1872 – January 13, 1953)
Edward Marsh was a British polymath, translator, arts patron and civil servant. He was the sponsor of the Georgian school of poets and a friend to many poets, including Rupert Brooke and Siegfried Sassoon. In his career as a civil servant he worked as Private Secretary to a succession of Great Britain's most powerful ministers, particularly Winston Churchill. He was a discreet but influential figure within Britain's homosexual community. Marsh's father was (Frederick) Howard Marsh, a surgeon and later Master of Downing College, Cambridge. His mother, born Jane Perceval, was a granddaughter of prime minister Spencer Perceval. Jane, a nurse, was one of the founders of the Alexandra Hospital for Children with Hip Disease; Howard was a surgeon at the hospital. A classical scholar and translator, Marsh edited five anthologies of Georgian Poetry between 1912 and 1922, and he became Rupert Brooke's literary executor, editing his “Collected Poems” in 1918. Later in life he published verse translations of “La Fontaine” and “Horace,” and a translation of Fromentin's novel, “Dominique.” The sales of the first three Georgian Poetry anthologies were impressive, ranging between 15,000 and 19,000 copies apiece. Marsh and the critic J. C. Squire were the group's most important patrons. In 1931, he won a literary contest with a new stanza for “Paradise Lost,” which repairs the omission of how “Adam and Eve Brush Their Teeth.” “His Ambrosia and Small Beer” appeared in 1964, recording a correspondence with Christopher Hassall. Marsh was also a consistent collector and supporter of the works of the avant-garde artists Mark Gertler, Duncan Grant, David Bomberg and Paul Nash, all of whom were also associated with the Bloomsbury Group. In addition to his work editing Churchill's writing while the latter was in or out of government, Marsh introduced Siegfried Sassoon to Churchill as a means of aiding the former's career. He was also a close friend of Ivor Novello. In 1939, he produced “A Number of People,” a memoir of his life and times containing his memories of those writers and politicians with whom he had associated.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Charles Nelson Reilly was an American actor, comedian, director, and drama teacher, known for his comedic roles on stage and in films, children's television and cartoons, and as a game show panelist.
Born: January 13, 1931, South Bronx, New York, United States
Died: May 25, 2007, Beverly Hills, California, United States
Height: 1.8 m
Awards: Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical, Grammy Hall of Fame
Parents: Charles Joseph Reilly, Signe Elvera Nelson
Studied: University of Hartford Hartt School

Charles Nelson Reilly was an American actor, comedian, director, and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in stages, films, children's television, cartoons, and game show panelist. Reilly did not publicly affirm his homosexuality until his one-man show, Save It for the Stage. However, much like fellow game show regular Paul Lynde of the same era, Reilly played up a campy on-screen persona. He mentioned in a 2002 interview with Entertainment Tonight that he felt no need to note this and that he never purposely hid being gay from anyone. Patrick Hughes III, a set decorator and dresser, was Reilly's domestic partner; the two met backstage in 1980 while Reilly appeared on the game show Battlestars. They soon moved together into Reilly's Beverly Hills home, where the two lived a quietly open life. Reilly primarily spent his later life touring the country directing theater and opera, and offering audiences a glimpse into his background and personal life with a critically acclaimed one-man play chronicling his life called Save It for the Stage: The Life of Reilly. In 2004, his final performance of the play was filmed as the basis for an autobiographical independent film titled The Life of Reilly.
Together from 1980 to 2007: 27 years.
Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931 - May 25, 2007)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Buried: Green Mount Catholic Cemetery, Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois, USA
Buried alongside: Dixie Lee Ruliffson

Brenda J. Grissom (1951-2011) was the owner of The Polish Shop in Belleville. She previously co-owned the Char-Pei Lounge in Belleville and Char-Pei's City Center in E. St. Louis. Brenda was an active member of the St. Louis area LGBT community and a member of Metropolitan Community Church in St. Louis, and T.O.P.S. She was a greeter at Belleville Wal-Mart. She was preceded in death by her life companion, Dixie Lee Ruliffson (1943-2007). They are buried together at Green Mount Catholic Cemetery (Belleville, IL 62221).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Captain Benjamin Walker was a soldier in the American Revolutionary War and later served as a U.S. Representative from New York. He was born in London, England, where he attended the Blue-Coat School.
Born: 1753, London, United Kingdom
Died: January 13, 1818, Utica, New York, United States
Party: Federalist Party
Previous office: Representative, NY 9th District (1801–1803)
Succeeded by: Killian K. Van Rensselaer
Member of congress start date: March 4, 1801
Buried: Forest Hill Cemetery, Utica, Oneida County, New York, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 43.07806, -75.25233

On December 23, 1783, the State of New Jersey presented Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben with the use of an estate in Bergen County now known as Steuben House, which had been confiscated from Loyalist Jan Zabriskie in 1781.
Address: 1209 Main St, River Edge, NJ 07661, USA (40.91367, -74.03073)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +1 201-343-9492
National Register of Historic Places: 83001457, 1983
Place
On September 5, 1788, the New Jersey Legislature gave Baron von Steuben full title to the former Zabriskie estate. Located in the formerly strategic New Bridge Landing, the estate included a gristmill and about 40 acres of land. Legislators initially conditioned the grant, requiring Steuben to "hold, occupy and enjoy the said estate in person, and not by tenant.” Gen. Philemon Dickinson of the New Jersey Militia informed the baron of this gift and responded to his inquiries that "there are on the premises an exceeding good House, an excellent barn, together with many useful outbuildings, all of which I am told, want some repairs... there is... a Grist-mill; a good Orchard, some meadow Ground, & plenty of Wood. The distance from N York by land 15 miles, but you may keep a boat & go from your own door to New York by water—Oysters, Fish & wild fowl in abundance—Possession will be given to you in the Spring, when you will take a view of the premises." Von Steuben spent considerable sums to repair wartime damages to the house and restore its commercial operations under former aide Walker. Recognizing his financial embarrassment, Steuben wrote another former aide-de-camp and companion, William North: "The Jersey Estate must and is to be sold. Walker is my administrator, all debts are to be paid out of it." On November 6, 1788, Steuben again wrote North (at his new home in Duanesburg), noting "My Jersey Estate is Advertised but not yet Sold, from this Walker Shall immediately pay to you the money, you so generously lend me and all my debts in New-York will be payed. I support my present poverty with more heroism than I Expected. All Clubs and parties are renounced, I seldom leave the House." Steuben eventually sold the New Jersey property to a son of the previous owner, and it remained in the Zabriskie family until 1909, so today it is the only remaining XVIII century building that von Steuben owned. Von Steuben moved upstate and settled in Oneida County on a small estate in the vicinity of Rome, on land granted to him for his military service and where he had spent summers. He was later appointed a regent for what evolved into the University of the State of New York. Von Steuben died on November 28, 1794, and was buried at what became the Steuben Memorial State Historic Site (Starr Hill Rd, Remsen, NY 13438). The Steuben Memorial State Historic Site is a historic location and state park in the eastern part of Steuben, Oneida County, New York, that honors Baron von Steuben, the "Drillmaster of the American Revolution." He is buried at the memorial, a "Sacred Grove." The site includes the memorial tomb and reconstructed log cabin (1937) and several smaller elements including a memorial plaque bearing stone, a series of historic markers, and a landscaping structure. The Steuben House Commission was created in 1926 to purchase Baron Steuben’s home at New Bridge. The State took possession of the historic mansion and 1-acre (4,000 m2) of ground for $9,000 on June 27, 1928. It was renovated and opened as the museum headquarters of the Bergen County Historical Society in September, 1939. The Bergen County Historical Society continued stewardship of the site by purchase of land between the Steuben House and the encroaching autoparts yard in 1944. In 1954, the Society was able to persuade the County of Bergen to divert the planned 4-lane highway to the north of the site instead of alongside the historic site. The highway bridge opened in 1956 and the one-lane 1889 swing bridge was closed to vehicles. It remains open for pedestrians. The house is now the cornerstone of this historic district, spanning both sides of the river. Three additional buildings were moved onto the adjacent property of the Bergen County Historical Society, a private non-profit volunteer organization. The Demarest House was moved here from New Milford in 1956 and is maintained by the Blauvelt Demarest Foundation. The Westervelt-Thomas Barn was relocated from Washington Township in 1958. The County of Bergen moved the Campbell-Christie House here to lands of the Bergen County Historical Society in 1977. The Society erected a working replica of a Bergen Dutch Out-Kitchen in 1991 and an outhouse in 2009. The Historic New Bridge Landing Park Commission was established by law in 1995 to coordinate and implement all private and governmental plans and activities at Historic New Bridge Landing Park, which was named one of three new urban state parks in 2004.
Life
Who: Friedrich Wilhelm August Heinrich Ferdinand Steuben (born Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben; September 17, 1730 – November 28, 1794)
Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben legally adopted two handsome soldiers, William North (1755-1836, who later became a US senator) and Benjamin Walker (1753-1818.) A third young man, John W. Mulligan Jr. (1774-1862), also considered himself one of Steuben’s “sons.” His birth father, John “Hercules” Mulligan, had been Alexander Hamilton’s roommate many years before. Historian William Benemann believes that North was romantically involved with Steuben and another male companion, Captain Benjamin Walker. However, based on the limited historical record, Benemann said his research is not entirely conclusive, writing that "it is impossible to prove the nature of the relationships." (William Benemann, “Male-Male Intimacy in Early America: Beyond Romantic Friendships,” Haworth Press, 2006) Prior to moving in with Steuben, young Mulligan had been living with Charles Adams (1770-1800), son of then-Vice President John Adams. The future president and his wife, concerned about the intense nature of the relationship, insisted that Adams and Mulligan split up. The anguished boys wrote to Steuben of their devastation at being separated. With compassion for the heartbroken couple, Steuben offered to take both young men into his home, writing to Mulligan on January 11, 1793.
“Philadelphia, January 11, 1793
Your letter of the 7th was handed me yesterday by Mr. Hamilton. In vain, my dear child, should I undertake to explain to you the sensation which the letter created in my heart. Neither have I the courage to attempt to arrest the tears you have so great reason to shed. For a heart so feeling as yours this was the severest of trials, and nothing but time can bring consolation under circumstances so afflicting. Strength of mind in enfeebled by griefs of this nature; but, my friend, one ought not to suffer it to be entirely extinguished, for it is the duty of a sensible man to cherish the heavenly fire with which we are endowed by Providence. Despite moral philosophy I weep with you, and glory in the human weakness of mingling my tears with those of a friend I so tenderly love. My dear Charles ought, ere this, to have received my answer to the touching letter he wrote. I repeat my entreaties, to hasten your journey to Philadelphia as soon as your strength permits. My heart and my arms are open to receive you. In the midst of the attention and fetes which they have the goodness to give me, I enjoy not a moment’s tranquility until I hold you in my arms. Grant me this favor without delay, but divide your journey, that you may not be fatigued at the expense of your health.”
A principle source for Friedrich Kapp’s 1859 biography of Steuben was John W. Mulligan, Jr. Mulligan became acquainted with Steuben when the latter lived in New York at Walker’s; afterwards Mulligan moved with Charles Adams in von Steuben’s house, and continued to act as his secretary until his death. Kapp described Steuben’s meeting Mulligan in the biography, writing: “In 1791 Steuben made the acquaintance of John W. Mulligan, a young and promising man, whose father had been an active Whig in New York during the revolution. Mr. Mulligan, after having finished his studies in Columbia College, became Steuben’s secretary, and served him with a fidelity and love which won him the friendship and confidence of his protector. Steuben concentrated all the tenderness of his heart on his friend, as he had no family relations, and there are few examples to be found in which the feeling of kindness and good fellowship was so sincerely reciprocated as between Steuben and his friend.” Mulligan was with Steuben when he died in late November, 1794. The younger man read to his idol and they retired to bed. Mulligan slept in Steuben’s old bedroom in the older house and Steuben slept in the room in a new cottage not yet connected to the old. There were also two servants to serve the gentlemen. When a servant told Mulligan that Steuben was ill, Mulligan tried to give aid and comfort and sent for Walker and North. The latter came before Steuben died. Mulligan still cried out, in a letter, for the consolation of Walker. “O, Colonel Walker, our friend, my all; I can write no more. Come if you can, I am lonely. Oh, good God, what solitude is in my bosom. Oh, if you were here to mingle your tears with mine, there would be some consolation for the distressed.” Steuben did not marry and had no children. He did not much care for his European relatives. Thus, he left his estate to his companions and aides-de-camp, Captains Benjamin Walker and William North, with whom he had had an "extraordinarily intense emotional relationship ... treating them as surrogate sons.” John Mulligan inherited Von Steuben’s vast library, collection of maps and $2,500 in cash (a handsome sum in those days.) John Mulligan is buried at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, New York, Section S4, Southside.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Forest Hill Cemetery (2201 Oneida St, Utica, NY 13501) is buried Benjamin Walker (1753 – January 13, 1818), aide-de-camp to General Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben (during this appointment he was reputed to have been the male companion of the Baron) and subsequently as a member of the staff of General George Washington. Historian William Benemann wrote "Steuben was also attracted to his 'angel' Benjamin Walker, but while Walker held the Baron in high esteem, he does not appear to have been sexually interested."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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