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Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE was an English fashion, portrait and war photographer, diarist, painter, interior designer and an Academy Award–winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre.
Born: January 14, 1904, Hampstead, United Kingdom
Died: January 18, 1980, Broad Chalke, United Kingdom
Awards: Academy Award for Best Costume Design, more
Siblings: Nancy Beaton, Barbara Beaton, Reginald Beaton
Lived: Reddish House, South St, Broad Chalke, Salisbury SP5 5DH, UK (51.02717, -1.94577)
Ashcombe House, Cranborne Chase, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 5QG, UK (50.97478, -2.0967)
Studied: St John's College, Cambridge
Harrow School
St Cyprian's School
Buried: All Saints, South Street, Broadchalke, Wiltshire, SP5 5DH

Ashcombe House, also known as Ashcombe Park, is a Georgian manor house, set in 1,134 acres (4.59 km2) of land, on Cranborne Chase, in the parish of Berwick St John, near Salisbury, in Wiltshire. The house is about equidistant between the villages of Berwick St John and Tollard Royal.
Address: Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 5QG, UK (50.97478, -2.0967)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 320267 (Grade II, 1985)
Place
There have been several buildings on the site. The first house was built in 1686 by a local squire, Robert Barber. Only some fifty years later, in 1740, the Barber family entirely demolished the 1686 house and rebuilt on the site. In 1750 Anne Wyndham inherited the house. The next year she married the Hon. James Everard Arundell, third son of the 6th Baron Arundell of Wardour. In 1754 the architect Francis Cartwright largely remodelled the interior of the house for the Arundells. In 1815 the Ashcombe Estate was purchased from Lady Arundell by Thomas Grove the younger of Ferne House for £8,700. Thomas Grove’s grandson Sir Walter demolished most of the 1740 house in around 1870. Sir Walter later sold Ashcombe House to the 13th Duke of Hamilton, who in turn sold Ashcombe to Mr R. W. Borley of Shaftesbury after WWI. The current Ashcombe House was originally part of the much larger mid-XVIII century structure, and is an L-shaped three-bay survival of the eastern wing. There is a five-bay orangery close to the house.
Life
Who: Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE (January 14, 1904 – January 18, 1980)
The photographer and designer Cecil Beaton first visited the house in 1930, taken there by the sculptor Stephen Tomlin together with the writer Edith Olivier. He was later to write of his first impression of the house, as he approached it through the arch of the gatehouse: “None of us uttered a word as we came under the vaulted ceiling and stood before a small, compact house of lilac-coloured brick. We inhaled sensuously the strange, haunting - and rather haunted - atmosphere of the place ... I was almost numbed by my first encounter with the house. It was as if I had been touched on the head by some magic wand.” That same year Mr Borley leased Ashcombe House to Beaton for £50 a year, a very small rent, on the condition that Beaton would make improvements to the house, which was all-but derelict. Beaton employed the Austrian architect Michael Rosenauer to make substantial alterations to the material of the house, including a passageway through the house to unite the front and the back, and elongating the windows. Plumbing and electricity were installed. The artist Rex Whistler designed the Palladian front door surround, with its pineapple made from Bath stone. Urns were positioned on the roof and the orangery was converted into Beaton’s studio. Beaton entertained lavishly at Ashcombe House, and his houseguests included many notable people of the time, including actors and artists such as Tallulah Bankhead, Diana Cooper, Ruth Ford and Lord Berners. Artists Whistler, Salvador Dalí, Christian Bérard and Augustus John and stage designer Oliver Messel painted murals in the house, and Dalí used it as the backdrop of one of his paintings. Little remains of the Beaton-era interior design, although in the "circus room,” which once contained a Whister-designed bed shaped like a carousel, one mural of a lady on a circus horse remains, painted during a hectic weekend party when all guests wielded paintbrushes. Beaton’s lease expired in 1945, and he was heartbroken to be forced to leave the house: his biographer Hugo Vickers has stated that Beaton never got over the loss of Ashcombe. Beaton detailed his life at the house in his book “Ashcombe: The Story of a Fifteen-Year Lease,” first published in 1949 by B. T. Batsford. The dustjacket of the first edition of the book featured a painting by Whistler, with the orangery on the left of the painting (on the back cover) and Ashcombe House itself to the right, on the front cover; this image has been reproduced on the cover of the 1999 publication of the book. In 1948 Beaton designed a fabric, which is still available, which he named "Ashcombe Stripe" after Ashcombe House. Right up until his death in 1980 Beaton owned a late XVIII century painting of the house, thought to have been painted around 1770. It is now held at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum in Salisbury, Wiltshire, bought from a sale of Beaton’s collections held by Christie’s auctioneers. Beaton’s landlord, Hugh Borley, R. W. Borley’s son, lived in the house from 1946 until his death in 1993. He grew increasingly eccentric and resented the fame which Beaton’s book had brought to the house, refusing all offers to sell it and chasing off sight-seers with dogs or threatening them with guns. Shortly before Borley’s death, the house was sold in a private sale, to David and Toni Parkes, who set about restoring the house. They were friends with the director of the Dovecote Press, which republished Beaton’s book on Ashcombe on its fiftieth anniversary in 1999, and so a special launch party was held at the house. When the house came up for sale in 2001, the first time it had been on the open market since just after WWI, there was a great deal of interest. Madonna and Guy Ritchie were the successful purchasers, after they were told by Hugo Vickers, Beaton’s biographer, of its being up for sale.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Society photographer and artist Sir Cecil Beaton bought Reddish house in 1947 and transformed the interior. Beaton added rooms on the eastern side, extended the parlour southwards, and introduced many new fittings. Greta Garbo was a frequent visitor. The upper floor had been equipped for illegal cock-fighting at the beginning of the XX century but Beaton used the cages as wardrobes to store the oscar-winning costumes from his set design of “My Fair Lady.” He remained at the house until his death in 1980 and is buried in the churchyard at All Saints (South Street, Broadchalke, Wiltshire, SP5 5DH).
Address: South St, Broad Chalke, Salisbury SP5 5DH, UK (51.02717, -1.94577)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 320692 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Reddish House, also known as Reddish Manor, in the village of Broad Chalke in Wiltshire, England, is an early XVIII-century manor house possibly built in its current form for Jeremiah Cray, a clothier. Whilst the history of the property can be traced to the early XVI century, the house as it currently stands appears to have been developed in the early XVIII century, when owned by a series of three absentee landlords all sharing the name Jeremiah Clay. The construction and design appear to show a melange of influences of the architectural styles favoured during the reigns of Charles II (1660–1685); William and Mary (1689–1702); and Queen Anne (1702–1714). In the XX century the house was inhabited by Norah Young until 1918, and by Major C.A. Wells until 1929 when it was purchased by R.W. Williamson to amalgamate the 100 acres into the neighbouring Knowle farm. In 1935 Claude Williamson sold the house and its 2.5 acre gardens to Dr. Lucius Wood and his wife Clare who lived there from 1935 until 1947, running his General Practice and dentistry. Their son, the artist Christopher Wood is buried in the village churchyard; his headstone was carved by Eric Gill. In 1980 Ursula Henderson bought the house from the estate of Cecil Beaton and lived there until 1987 when she moved to the neighbouring village of Bishopstone before her death in 1989. She was born Ursula von Pannwitz and was once styled Countess of Chichester from her first marriage to John Pelham, 8th Earl of Chichester who died on active service in 1944. The house was owned and extensively renovated by musicians Robert Fripp and Toyah Willcox from Dec. 1987 until July 1999.
Life
Who: John Christopher Wood (April 7, 1901 – August 21, 1930), aka Kit Wood
Christopher Wood was an English painter born in Knowsley, near Liverpool. At Liverpool University, Wood met Augustus John, who encouraged him to be a painter. The French collector Alphonse Kahn invited him to Paris in 1920. From 1921 he trained as a painter at the Academie Julian in Paris, where he met Picasso, Jean Cocteau, Georges Auric and Diaghilev. Wood was bisexual. In the early summer of 1921, Wood met Antonio de Gandarillas, a Chilean diplomat. Gandarillas, a married homosexual fourteen years older than Wood, lived a glamorous life partly financed by gambling. Their relationship lasted through Wood's life, surviving his affair with Jeanne Bourgoint. In 1927 his plans to elope and marry heiress Meraud Guinness were frustrated by her parents whereupon he required emotional support from Winifred Nicholson. (Meraud went on to marry Alvaro Guevara in 1929.) Wood also had a liaison with a Russian émigrée, Frosca Munster, whom he met in 1928. By 1930, addicted to opium and painting frenetically in preparation for his Wertheim exhibition in London, he suffered paranoia and began carrying a revolver. On August 21 he travelled to meet his mother and sister for lunch at 'The County Hotel' in Salisbury and to show them a selection of his latest paintings. After saying goodbye he jumped under a train at Salisbury railway station, although in deference to his mother's wishes it was reported as an accident.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Ernest Frederic Graham Thesiger, CBE was an English stage and film actor. He is especially well-remembered for his performance as Doctor Septimus Pretorius in James Whale's film Bride of Frankenstein.
Born: January 15, 1879, Chelsea, London, United Kingdom
Died: January 14, 1961, London, United Kingdom
Spouse: Janette Mary Fernie Ranken (m. 1917–1961)
Education: Marlborough College
Lived: 6 Montpelier Terrace, SW7
8 St George’s Court, Gloucester Road, SW7
Buried: Brompton Cemetery, West Brompton, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Greater London, England

Ernest Thesiger was an English stage and film actor. He is remembered for his performance as Doctor Septimus Pretorius in James Whale's film Bride of Frankenstein (1935). In 1917, he married Janette Mary Fernie Ranken, sister of his close friend and fellow Slade graduate William Bruce Ellis Ranken. The writer Hilary Spurling, in her biography of Thesiger's friend, Ivy Compton-Burnett, suggests that Thesiger and Janette wed largely out of their mutual adoration of William, who shaved his head when he learned of the engagement. Another source states more explicitly that Thesiger made no secret of his homosexuality. Thesiger moved in several artistic, literary and theatrical circles. At various times, he frequented the studio of John Singer Sargent, befriended Mrs. Patrick Campbell, visited and corresponded with Percy Grainger and worked closely with George Bernard Shaw, who wrote the role of the Dauphin in Saint Joan for him. W. Somerset Maugham, on the other hand, responded to Thesiger's inquiry about why he wrote no parts for him with the quip "But I am always writing parts for you, Ernest. The trouble is that somebody called Gladys Cooper will insist on playing them.” Ranken’s friends included: composer Cole Porter; writer Violet Keppel Trefusis, the lover of Vite Sackville-West; Anne Morgan, daughter of the famous financer; decorator Elsie de Wolfe; the dynamic literary agent Elizabeth Marbury, de Wolfe's lover; Henry Davis Sleeper, the collector; and most significantly, William Lygon, Earl Beauchamp, and his middle son, the Honorable Hugh Lygon.
Ernest Frederic Graham Thesiger, CBE (January 15, 1879 – January 14, 1961)
William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1881 – 1941)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Ernest Thesiger (1879-1961), actor and social nonconformist, lived in a lavender marriage with William Ranken’s sister, Janette Ranken, herself in love with the poet Margaret Jourdain, at 6 Montpelier Terrace, SW7 from 1917 to 1939, and at 8 St George’s Court, Gloucester Road, SW7 from 1939 to 1961.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Consecrated by the Bishop of London in June 1840, Brompton Cemetery is one of Britain’s oldest and most distinguished garden cemeteries.
Address: Fulham Rd, London SW10 9UG, UK (51.48529, -0.19114)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-16.00, Sunday 9.00-20.00
Phone: +44 20 7352 1201
English Heritage Building ID: 203792 (Grade II, 1969)
Place
Brompton Cemetery is located near Earl’s Court in west London (postal districts SW5 and SW10), in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is managed by The Royal Parks, and is one of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries. Established by Act of Parliament, it opened in 1840 and was originally known as the West of London and Westminster Cemetery. Some 35,000 monuments, from simple headstones to substantial mausolea, mark the resting place of more than 205,000 burials. The site includes large plots for family mausolea, and common graves where coffins are piled deep into the earth, as well as a small columbarium. Brompton was closed to burials between 1952 and 1996, but is once again a working cemetery, with plots for interments and a “Garden of Remembrance” for the deposit of cremated remains. The cemetery has a reputation for being a popular cruising ground for gay men.
Notable queer burials at Brompton Cemetery:
• Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino, infamous Italian quaintrelle, muse, eccentric and patron of the arts. The quote "Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety," from Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, was inscribed on her tombstone.
• Geraldine Jewsbury (1812-1880), writer.
• Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928), leading suffragette.
• Ernest Thesiger (1879-1961), character actor, “The Old Dark House” and “Bride of Frankenstein.”
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
By 1930, Luisa Casati had amassed a personal debt of $25 million. Unable to pay her creditors, her personal possessions were auctioned off. Designer Coco Chanel was reportedly one of the bidders. Luisa Casati fled to London where she lived in comparative poverty in a one-room flat. She was rumoured to be seen rummaging in bins searching for feathers to decorate her hair. On June 1, 1957, Marchesa Casati died of a stroke at her last residence at 32 Beaufort Gardens, SW3 aged 76. Following a requiem mass at Brompton Oratory, the Marchesa was interred in Brompton Cemetery. She was buried wearing her black and leopard skin finery and a pair of false eyelashes. She was also interred with one of her beloved stuffed pekinese dogs. Her tombstone is a small grave marker in the shape of an urn draped in cloth with a swag of flowers to the front. The inscription on the tombstone misspells her "Louisa" rather than "Luisa.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Herbert "Harry" Stack Sullivan was an American Neo-Freudian psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who held that the personality lives in, and has his or her being in, a complex of interpersonal relations.
Born: February 21, 1892, Norwich, New York, United States
Died: January 14, 1949, Paris, France
Education: Cornell University
Organization founded: William Alanson White Institute
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia, USA, Plot: Section 11, Lot 753 SH

At Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, VA 22211), is buried John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963). In the same cemetery is buried Harry Stack Sullivan (1892-1949). An American Neo-Freudian psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who held that the personality lives in, and has his or her being in, a complex of interpersonal relations. Having studied therapists Sigmund Freud, Adolf Meyer, and William Alanson White, he devoted years of clinical and research work to helping people with psychotic illness. Beginning in 1927, Sullivan had a 22-year relationship with James Inscoe Sullivan, known as "Jimmie", 20 years his junior. In 1927, he reviewed the controversial anonymously published “The Invert and his Social Adjustment” and in 1929 called it "a remarkable document by a homosexual man of refinement; intended primarily as a guide to the unfortunate sufferers of sexual inversion, and much less open to criticism than anything else of the kind so far published." In 1940, he and colleague Winfred Overholser, serving on the American Psychiatric Society's committee on Military Mobilization, formulated guidelines for the psychological screening of inductees to the United States military. He believed, writes one historian, "that sexuality played a minimal role in causing mental disorders and that adult homosexuals should be accepted and left alone." Despite his best efforts, others included homosexuality as a disqualification for military service.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Gerald Arpino was an American dancer and choreographer. He was co-founder of the Joffrey Ballet and succeeded Robert Joffrey as its artistic director in 1988.
Born: January 14, 1923, Staten Island, New York City, New York, United States
Died: October 29, 2008, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Education: School of American Ballet
Current group: Joffrey Ballet
Organization founded: Joffrey Ballet

Robert Joffrey (born Abdullah Jaffa Bey Khan) was an American dancer, teacher, producer, choreographer, and co-founder of the Joffrey Ballet with Gerald Arpino in 1956. He is known for his highly imaginative modern ballets. The company grew from a small touring group to become one of the most prominent dance troupes in US. Gerald Arpino studied ballet with Mary Ann Wells, while stationed with the Coast Guard in Seattle, Washington. Arpino first met Robert Joffrey at Wells' school. After the death of Robert Joffrey in 1988, Arpino became the Artistic Director of the Joffrey Ballet. Joffrey was inducted into the National Museum of Dance's Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Hall of Fame in 2000. Malcolm McDowell plays a character loosely based on Arpino in the Robert Altman film The Company.
Together from (before) 1956 to 1988: 32 years.
Gerald Arpino (January 14, 1923 - October 29, 2008)
Robert Joffrey (December 24, 1930 – March 25, 1988)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lady Evelyn Barbara "Eve" Balfour, OBE was a British farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement.
Born: July 16, 1898, Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Died: January 14, 1990, Dunbar, United Kingdom
Education: University of Reading
Books: The Living Soil, more
Organizations founded: Soil Association, more
Lived: New Bells Farm, New Bells Ln, Haughley, Stowmarket IP14 3RW, UK (52.23719, 0.97931)
Buried: Whittingehame (near Dunbar), Whittingehame, East Lothian, Scotland

Lady Evelyn Barbara "Eve" Balfour was an English farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement. She was one of the first women to study agriculture at an English university, graduating from the University of Reading. The daughter of the second Earl of Balfour, she began farming in 1920, in Haughley Green, Suffolk, England. In 1939, with her friend and neighbor Ryan Nelson, she launched the Haughley Experiment, the first long-term, side-by-side scientific comparison of organic and chemical-based farming. Balfour, who lived on a farm with her companion Beryl ‘Beb’ Hearnden from 1919 to about 1951, and then lived with agriculturalist Kathleen Carnley until this latter's death, ‘discovered the freedom of breeches’ in the First World War; Elizabeth Lutyens remembered ‘She had an Egyptian face of great strength and charm, with cropped hair and masculine manners, in spite of a feminine heart.’ Hearnden's pursuit of paid journalism work in London coincided with her departure from the struggling farming cooperative.
Together from 1919 to 1951: 32 years.
Lady Evelyn "Eve” Barbara Balfour (July 16, 1898 - January 14, 1990)
Beryl “Beb” Hearnden (1897 – January 22, 1978)
Kathleen Carnley (1889-1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1919, at the age of 21, Lady Eve Balfour used her inheritance to buy New Bells Farm in Haughley Green, Suffolk. In 1939, she launched the Haughley Experiment, the first long-term, side-by-side scientific comparison of organic and chemical-based farming.
Address: New Bells Ln, Haughley, Stowmarket IP14 3RW, UK (52.23719, 0.97931)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 280574 (Grade II, 1955)
Place
New Bells has been formerly owned by Lady Eve Balfour, who originally founded the Soil Association. The Haughley Research Trust was set up to conduct a long term organic farming experiment at the property, and Lady Eve subsequently published her definitive book, “The Living Soil,” based on this research. Whilst the Trust no longer exists and the farm is no longer organic, the Soil Association continues to this day, promoting sustainable organic farming. The property is surrounded by its own land, which is located to the east of the Haughley to Bacton Road. Approached via a minor dead end lane, the Farmhouse has fully moated grounds offering a degree of privacy from the main yard and farm buildings. The property is situated some 1.5 miles from Haughley Village, near to both Stowmarket and Bury St Edmunds, about 4 miles and 14 miles away respectively. The farmhouse is believed to date back to around 1530 and is of timber frame construction with part herringbone brick and part lathe and plaster elevations under a tiled roof. The house stands in its own gardens and grounds, with numerous mature trees surrounding the property. The house enjoys views over open countryside and across to the traditional Suffolk Barn. The house has many interesting features, including a magnificent dragon beam located in the sitting room, supporting the jettied upper floor in the south-western corner of the house. The garden is completely surrounded by the attractive moat, which is believed to date originally from around 1150. It is mainly laid to lawn with flower borders adjacent to the house and numerous mature trees both in the garden and bordering the moat, including oak, ash, pine, copper maple and a large weeping ash.
Life
Who: Lady Evelyn Barbara "Eve" Balfour, OBE (July 16, 1898 – January 16, 1990)
Lady Eve Balfour was a British farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement. She was one of the first women to study agriculture at an English university, graduating from the institution now known as the University of Reading. Balfour, one of the six children of Gerald, Earl of Balfour, and the niece of former prime minister Arthur Balfour, had decided she wanted to be a farmer by the age of 12. In 1943, leading London publishing house Faber & Faber published Balfour’s book, “The Living Soil.” Reprinted numerous times, it became a founding text of the emerging organic food and farming movement. The book synthesized existing arguments in favor of organics with a description of her plans for the Haughley Experiment. In 1946, Balfour co-founded and became the first president of the Soil Association, an international organization which promotes sustainable agriculture (and the main organic farming association in the UK today.) She continued to farm, write and lecture for the rest of her life. In 1958, she embarked on a year-long tour of Australia and New Zealand, during which she met Australian organic farming pioneers, including Henry Shoobridge, president of the Living Soil Association of Tasmania, the first organization to affiliate with the Soil Association. Lady Eve Balfour died in 1990 and her ashes were buried beside her sister Mary at Whittingehame, the home where they had first dreamed of a life together in farming.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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