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Frances "Fannie" Benjamin Johnston was an early American female photographer and photojournalist whose career lasted for almost half a century.
Born: January 15, 1864, Grafton, West Virginia, United States
Died: May 16, 1952, French Quarter, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Education: Académie Julian
Lived: 1332 V St NW, Washington, DC 20009
1132 Bourbon St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA (29.96226, -90.06205)
536 Fifth Avenue
Buried: Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA

Fannie Johnston was one of the earliest American female photographers and photojournalists. She took portraits of many famous contemporaries including Susan B. Anthony, Mark Twain and Booker T. Washington. She was dubbed the "Photographer to the American court." She photographed Admiral Dewey on the deck of the USS Olympia, Alice Roosvelt's wedding portrait, the Roosevelt children playing at the White House and the gardens of Edith Wharton’s famous villa near Paris. In 1901, Mattie Edwards Hewitt traveled to the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, where she met Fannie. Hewitt divorced her husband, photographer Arthur Hewitt, in 1909 and moved with Johnston to New York City. The two women embarked as partners, seizing the opportunity presented by a wave of public building in New York to establish themselves as architectural photographers. They photographed the new Public Library, Hotel Manhattan, the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, West Point Academy and the New Theatre. Despite their successes, the partnership ended in a bitter conflict in 1917, leaving both Hewitt and Johnston to pursue independent careers.
Together from 1901 to 1917: 16 years.
Frances "Fannie" Benjamin Johnston (January 15, 1864 – May 16, 1952)
Mattie Edwards Hewitt (died in 1956)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1894 Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) opened her own photographic studio on 1332 V St NW (Washington, DC 20009), and at the time was the only woman photographer in the city. She took portraits of many famous contemporaries including Susan B. Anthony, Mark Twain and Booker T. Washington.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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While other great mansions along Central Park were being converted to museums or condominiums, the Henry Cook house remained intact. In 1977 it was purchased by highly-successful businessman Victor Shafferman for $600,000. Shafferman died in 2009 leaving No. 973 Fifth Avenue with much of the original interior detailing: plaster moldings, marble mantles and paneled rooms.
Address: 5th Ave, New York, NY 10075, USA
Type: Private Property
Notable queer residents at Fifth Avenue:
- No. 973 Fifth Avenue: Victor Shafferman (November 8, 1941- October 19, 2009) Henry H. Cook made his fortune in railroads and banking. When he began planning to build his enormous mansion in 1880 at the north corner of 5th Avenue and 78th Street across from Central Park he had no intentions of commercial interlopers in his neighborhood. That year Cook purchased the entire block from Fifth Avenue to Madison Avenue, between 78th and 79th Streets for $500,000 and laid out stringent building restrictions: no structure other than a private home could be built on what was known as the Cook Block. The restrictions survive today. The Cook and Whitney houses were completed in 1907, architect Stanford White. By 1912 James B. Duke had demolished the original Cook mansion to erect his own white marble mansion that survives today. Henry Cook left the house to his daughter but, according to Christopher Gray, she rarely used it. In 1919 Cook’s daughter sold the house to the socially-prominent Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Fuller Feder. A year after their daughter Odette’s debut, a glittering reception was held on Dec. 26, 1921 for her wedding to the dashing British Royal Air Force Major J. Ronald McCrindle. (Eight years later Odette filed for divorce.) Mrs. Feder continued to entertain lavishly in the house until her husband’s death on 11 May, 1944. Mr. Feder lived there with his wife and family, 29 years later in 1948, the family sold it to the Mormon Church. The Mormons used it as a training center. In 1978, they sold it to Victor Shafferman, a real estate investor, for a reported $600,000. The estate of Victor Shafferman, who died in 2009, sold 973 5th Avenue in 2011 for $49 million.
- No. 907 Fifth Avenue: In the 1950s Pola Negri resided at 907 Fifth Avenue. Neighbors reported that a great portrait of Valentino hung in a prominent place in her foyer. By the end of the decade, she had moved into the San Antonio mansion of oil heiress Margaret West. When Miss West died in 1963, she willed Pola her jewelry and lifetime use of her Texas house. When Pola died in 1987, she was still living in Texas. The twelve-story, limestone-faced building is located at Fifth Avenue and 72nd Street on a site once occupied by the 1893 residence of James A. Burden, which had been designed by R. H. Robertson. The apartment block, built in 1916, was the first apartment building to replace a private mansion on Fifth Avenue above 59th Street. It was converted to a cooperative in 1955. J. E. R. Carpenter was the architect; he would be called upon to design many of the luxury apartment buildings that gave a new scale to Fifth Avenue in the ‘teens and twenties of the XX century. The building won him the 1916 gold medal of the American Institute of Architects. The building has the aspect of an Italian Renaissance palazzo, built around a central court. Its first four floors are lightly rusticated; deep quoins carry the rusticated feature up the corners to the boldly projecting top cornice. A strong secondary cornice above the fourth floor once made a conciliatory nod to the cornice lines of the private houses that flanked it, whose owners had fought its construction in court. When it opened, there were two twelve-room apartments on most floors.
- No. 820 Fifth Avenue: a luxury cooperative in Manhattan, New York City, located on Fifth Avenue at the Northeast corner of East 63rd Street on the Upper East Side. The 12 story limestone-clad neo-Italian Renaissance palazzo is one of the most expensive and exclusive apartment houses in the city. It was designed by Starrett & Van Vleck and built by Fred T. Ley in 1916. The land upon which it was built was previously occupied by the Progress Club. The frontage was 100.5 feet on Fifth Avenue and 100 feet on 63rd Street. Construction cost was 1 million dollars, exclusive of the land (which cost another million.) The building comprises 12 apartments. The fourth floor is one of only a couple of units at 820 that have changed hands multiple times in the last 10 or 20 years. For many years, the 18-room sprawler was owned by poet, philanthropist, and paper heiress Louise Crane whose family concern, Crane & Co., manufactures high-grade stationary and has provided the paper on which U.S. currency has been printed for nearly 150 years. Crane was about as old as money gets in America young country. After Crane’s death in 1997, the apartment was sold to khaki pants king Tommy Hilfiger who somehow scooched by the notoriously fussy and stringent board and reportedly scooped the apartment up in the spring of 1999 for around $10,000,000. After jumping through all the board’s crazy hoops and demands and finally finessing his way into the building, Hilfiger did the unthinkable, he quickly changed his mind about living up in 820 and flipped the apartment back onto the market at a much higher price than he paid.
- No. 536 Fifth Avenue: With her partner, Mattie Edwards Hewitt, a successful freelance home and garden photographer in her own right, Francis Benjamin Johnston opened a studio in New York in 1913 at 536 Fifth Avenue, and moved in with her mother and aunt. She lectured at New York University on business for women and they produced a series of studies of New York architecture through the 1920s. In early 1920 her mother died in New York.


680 & 684 Fifth Ave Residences | 684 Fifth Ave was built as wedding gift of William H. Vanderbilt for his daughter Florence and her husband Hamilton Twombly. The other mansion (left) at 680 was the home of his daughter Eliza Osgood Vanderbilt Webb and her husband, Dr. William Seward Webb.

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Frances Benjamin Johnston acquired a home in the French Quarter of New Orleans in 1940, retiring there in 1945, where she died in 1952 at the age of eighty-eight.
Address: 1132 Bourbon St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA (29.96226, -90.06205)
Type: Private Property
Place
The noted photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston made her home at 1132 Bourbon Street. In the 1930s she received a Carnegie Foundation grant to photograph southern architecture. Her photos are now in the Library of Congress. The Greek Revival style house was erected for Mme. Julie Duralde, the widow of John Clay, Henry Clay’s brother. She purchased the property in 1835 and owned it until her death in 1861. A bronze plaque identifying this building was affixed by the Orleans Parish Landmarks Commission in 1985.
Life
Who: Frances "Fannie" Benjamin Johnston (January 15, 1864 – May 16, 1952)
Frances Benjamin Johnston was one of the earliest American female photographers and photojournalists. Well connected among elite society, she was commissioned by magazines to do "celebrity" portraits, such as Alice Roosevelt’s wedding portrait. She photographed the gardens of Edith Wharton’s famous villa near Paris. Johnston also photographed the famous American heiress and literary salon socialite Natalie Barney in Paris but perhaps her most famous work is her self-portrait of the liberated "New Woman,” petticoats showing and beer stein in hand.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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In Nov. 2003, Howard Austen died; later, in Feb. 2005, he was re-buried at Rock Creek Cemetery, in Washington, D.C., in a joint grave meant for both Gore Vidal and Austen.
Address: 201 Allison St NW, Washington, DC 20011, USA (38.94744, -77.01203)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 (202) 726-2080
National Register of Historic Places: 77001498, 2010
Place
Rock Creek Cemetery is an 86-acre (350,000 m2) cemetery with a natural rolling landscape located at Rock Creek Church Road, NW, and Webster Street, NW, off Hawaii Avenue, NE in Washington, D.C.’s Petworth neighborhood. It is across the street from the historic Soldiers’ Home and the Soldiers’ Home Cemetery. It also is home to the InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington. It was first established in 1719 as a churchyard within the glebe of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish. The Vestry later decided to expand the burial ground as a public cemetery to serve the city of Washington and this was established through an Act of Congress in 1840. The expanded Cemetery was landscaped in the rural garden style, to function as both a cemetery and a public park. It is a ministry of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish with sections for St. John’s Russian Orthodox Church and St. Nicholas Orthodox Church. Rock Creek Cemetery’s park-like setting has many notable mausoleums, sculptures, and tombstones. The best known is Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Stanford White’s Adams Memorial, a contemplative, androgynous bronze sculpture seated before a block of granite. It marks the graves of Marian Hooper “Clover" Adams and her husband, Henry Adams, and sometimes mistakenly, the sculpture is referred to as Grief. Saint-Gaudens entitled it The Mystery of the Hereafter and The Peace of God that Passeth Understanding. Other notable memorials include the Frederick Keep Monument, the Heurich Mausoleum, the Hitt Monument, the Hardon Monument, the Kauffman Monument, known as The Seven Ages of Memory, the Sherwood Mausoleum Door, and the Thompson-Harding Monument.
Notable queer burials at Rock Creek Cemetery:
• Henry Brooks Adams (1838-1918)
• Howard Auster (1929–2003)
• Frances Benjamin "Fannie" Johnston (1864-1952), pioneering photojournalist and documentary photographer. She was cremated and her ashes scattered over the family plot.
• James Trimble, III (1925-1945)
• Gore Vidal (1925–2012)
Life
Who: Eugene Louis Vidal (October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) aka Gore Vidal and Howard Auster (1929 – September 22, 2003) aka Howard Austen
Gore Vidal and Howard Austen are buried side by side at Rock Creek Cemetery. Near them there is also Henry Adams, the American journalist, novelist, academic and historian who featured in Vidal’s books, and the great love of Gore Vidal’s life, Jimmy Trimble. Gore Vidal’s second novel, “The City and the Pillar” (1948) caused a moralistic furor over his dispassionate presentation of a young protagonist coming to terms with his homosexuality and a male homosexual relationship. The novel was dedicated to "J.T."; decades later, Vidal confirmed that the initials were those of James Trimble III, killed in the Battle of Iwo Jima on March 1, 1945; and that Jimmie Trimble was the only person Gore Vidal ever loved.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Ernest Frederic Graham Thesiger, CBE was an English stage and film actor. He is especially well-remembered for his performance as Doctor Septimus Pretorius in James Whale's film Bride of Frankenstein.
Born: January 15, 1879, Chelsea, London, United Kingdom
Died: January 14, 1961, London, United Kingdom
Spouse: Janette Mary Fernie Ranken (m. 1917–1961)
Education: Marlborough College
Lived: 6 Montpelier Terrace, SW7
8 St George’s Court, Gloucester Road, SW7
Buried: Brompton Cemetery, West Brompton, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Greater London, England

Ernest Thesiger was an English stage and film actor. He is remembered for his performance as Doctor Septimus Pretorius in James Whale's film Bride of Frankenstein (1935). In 1917, he married Janette Mary Fernie Ranken, sister of his close friend and fellow Slade graduate William Bruce Ellis Ranken. The writer Hilary Spurling, in her biography of Thesiger's friend, Ivy Compton-Burnett, suggests that Thesiger and Janette wed largely out of their mutual adoration of William, who shaved his head when he learned of the engagement. Another source states more explicitly that Thesiger made no secret of his homosexuality. Thesiger moved in several artistic, literary and theatrical circles. At various times, he frequented the studio of John Singer Sargent, befriended Mrs. Patrick Campbell, visited and corresponded with Percy Grainger and worked closely with George Bernard Shaw, who wrote the role of the Dauphin in Saint Joan for him. W. Somerset Maugham, on the other hand, responded to Thesiger's inquiry about why he wrote no parts for him with the quip "But I am always writing parts for you, Ernest. The trouble is that somebody called Gladys Cooper will insist on playing them.” Ranken’s friends included: composer Cole Porter; writer Violet Keppel Trefusis, the lover of Vite Sackville-West; Anne Morgan, daughter of the famous financer; decorator Elsie de Wolfe; the dynamic literary agent Elizabeth Marbury, de Wolfe's lover; Henry Davis Sleeper, the collector; and most significantly, William Lygon, Earl Beauchamp, and his middle son, the Honorable Hugh Lygon.
Ernest Frederic Graham Thesiger, CBE (January 15, 1879 – January 14, 1961)
William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1881 – 1941)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Ernest Thesiger (1879-1961), actor and social nonconformist, lived in a lavender marriage with William Ranken’s sister, Janette Ranken, herself in love with the poet Margaret Jourdain, at 6 Montpelier Terrace, SW7 from 1917 to 1939, and at 8 St George’s Court, Gloucester Road, SW7 from 1939 to 1961.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Consecrated by the Bishop of London in June 1840, Brompton Cemetery is one of Britain’s oldest and most distinguished garden cemeteries.
Address: Fulham Rd, London SW10 9UG, UK (51.48529, -0.19114)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-16.00, Sunday 9.00-20.00
Phone: +44 20 7352 1201
English Heritage Building ID: 203792 (Grade II, 1969)
Place
Brompton Cemetery is located near Earl’s Court in west London (postal districts SW5 and SW10), in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is managed by The Royal Parks, and is one of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries. Established by Act of Parliament, it opened in 1840 and was originally known as the West of London and Westminster Cemetery. Some 35,000 monuments, from simple headstones to substantial mausolea, mark the resting place of more than 205,000 burials. The site includes large plots for family mausolea, and common graves where coffins are piled deep into the earth, as well as a small columbarium. Brompton was closed to burials between 1952 and 1996, but is once again a working cemetery, with plots for interments and a “Garden of Remembrance” for the deposit of cremated remains. The cemetery has a reputation for being a popular cruising ground for gay men.
Notable queer burials at Brompton Cemetery:
• Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino, infamous Italian quaintrelle, muse, eccentric and patron of the arts. The quote "Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety," from Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, was inscribed on her tombstone.
• Geraldine Jewsbury (1812-1880), writer.
• Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928), leading suffragette.
• Ernest Thesiger (1879-1961), character actor, “The Old Dark House” and “Bride of Frankenstein.”
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
By 1930, Luisa Casati had amassed a personal debt of $25 million. Unable to pay her creditors, her personal possessions were auctioned off. Designer Coco Chanel was reportedly one of the bidders. Luisa Casati fled to London where she lived in comparative poverty in a one-room flat. She was rumoured to be seen rummaging in bins searching for feathers to decorate her hair. On June 1, 1957, Marchesa Casati died of a stroke at her last residence at 32 Beaufort Gardens, SW3 aged 76. Following a requiem mass at Brompton Oratory, the Marchesa was interred in Brompton Cemetery. She was buried wearing her black and leopard skin finery and a pair of false eyelashes. She was also interred with one of her beloved stuffed pekinese dogs. Her tombstone is a small grave marker in the shape of an urn draped in cloth with a swag of flowers to the front. The inscription on the tombstone misspells her "Louisa" rather than "Luisa.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Lived: Hotel Continental, Bagni di Lucca
Casa Bernardini, Bagno alla Villa
Casa Burlamacchi, Bagni di Lucca
Buried: English Cemetery, Bagni di Lucca, Provincia di Lucca, Toscana, Italy
Buried alongside: Rose Cleveland

Rose Cleveland was the sister of Pres. Grover Cleveland, who was unmarried during his first two years in office. Rose lived with him in the White House at that time and took over the hostess duties of the First Lady. She later became the principal of the Collegiate Institute of Lafayette, Indiana, a writer and lecturer, and the editor of the Chicago-based magazine Literary Life. At age 44, she started a passionate correspondence with a wealthy widow, Evangeline Simpson, with explicitly erotic correspondence. Things cooled off when 36 yo Evangeline married an Episcopal bishop from Minnesota, Henry Benjamin Whipple, 74 yo. By 1910, after his death, the two women rekindled their relationship and eventually moved to Bagni di Lucca, Italy, to live together. They shared the house with the English illustrator and artist Nelly Erichsen. Rose died at home during the 1918 flu pandemic, within one week of Nelly. They were buried in the English Cemetery at Bagni di Lucca. Before Evangeline’s death in 1930, she directed her executors to bury her next to Rose. “Ah, how I love you, it paralyzes me—it makes me heavy with emotion…. I tremble at the thought of you—all my whole being leans out to you…. I dare not think of your arms.” --Rose to Evangeline. “Oh, darling, come to me this night—my Clevy, my Viking, my Everything—Come! —Evangeline to Rose
Together from 1890 to 1918: 28 years.
Evangeline Marrs Simpson Whipple (January 15, 1862 - September 1, 1930)
Rose Elizabeth Cleveland (June 13, 1846 - November 22, 1918)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Bagni di Lucca (formerly Bagno a Corsena) is a comune of Tuscany, Italy, in the Province of Lucca with a population of about 6,500. Bagni di Lucca with its thermal baths reached its greatest fame during the XIX century, especially during the French occupation.
Address: Cimitero Inglese, Via Letizia, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00566, 10.58808)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Address: Via Bagno alla Villa, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00971, 10.5879)
Type: Private Property
Address: Villa San Francesco, Via S. Francesco, 6, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00832, 10.58725)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +39 333 765 8629
Place
The town became the summer residence of the court of Napoleon and his sister, Elisa Baciocchi. A casino was built, where gambling was part of social nightlife, as well as a large hall for dances. At the Congress of Vienna (1814), the Duchy of Lucca was assigned to Maria-Louisa of Bourbon as ruler of Parma. It continued as a popular summer resort, particularly for the English, who built a Protestant church there. The church now has been converted to the Bagni di Lucca Biblioteca (library) and holds archives and records that date back to centuries ago. In 1847 Lucca with Bagni di Lucca was ceded to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, under the domain of the Grand Duke Leopold II of Lorraine. His rule started a period of decline for the springs and casino as a destination, since he was used to a secluded life. In 1853 the casino was closed. It was reopened after 1861, when Lucca became part of the unified Kingdom of Italy. In the 1940s, during the German invasion of Italy, Bagni di Lucca, along with many other towns located in the Apennines, was occupied, as they were along the Gothic Line. Several houses and mansions in the area were used as residences for German soldiers and some residents born after 1940 in this region have German ancestry. The English cemetery is a sacred place which is located in Bagni di Lucca, about 300 meters from the Church of England, on the other side of the river Lima. In 1842 Carlo Ludovico di Borbone granted to the British colony of Bagni di Lucca the faculty to establish a Protestant cemetery. They chose a place called "al Prato Santo (the Holy Meadow)" and, although the works were finished in 1844, the first burial happened immediately after the purchase. The graveyard was in operation until 1953 and there are 137 people who rest there. In 1982, with the exhaustion of a legacy for maintenance, the holy site was purchased by the town of Bagni di Lucca. The cemetery is currently managed by the Fondazione Michel de Montaigne and Istituto Storico Lucchese and is accessible to visitors every day (except Sunday) from 10.00 to 18.00. Among the people buried here, often in tombs made by famous sculptors such as Benjamin Gibson, Joseph Norfini and Emilio Duccini, are the novelist Ouida, Henry and Elizabeth Stisted and Irish entomologist Alexander Henry Haliday.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Inglese di Bagni di Lucca:
• Rose Elizabeth Cleveland (June 13, 1846 – November 22, 1918), was the First Lady of the United States from 1885 to 1886, during the first of her brother U.S. President Grover Cleveland’s two administrations.
• Nelly Erichsen (1862-1918) was an English illustrator and painter. From 1912 until Nov. 1918, Erichsen was living in the quiet Tuscan spa town of Bagni di Lucca with two companions - Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland. Whipple was the widow of the American Episcopal Bishop Henry Whipple, known for his evangelical work among the native Indian population. Whipple and Cleveland had first met in the winter of 1889–1890, and resumed their relationship in 1901 (after the death of Henry Whipple), moving from the USA to Italy in 1910. In 1918 tragedy struck, when both Rose Cleveland and Nelly Erichsen were carried off by the 1918 flu pandemic which decimated the post-war World. Evangeline Whipple died in London in 1930, but she was laid to rest in Bagni di Lucca next to the tombs of the two friends who had preceded her.
• Ouida (1839-1908) was the pseudonym of the English novelist Maria Louise Ramé (although she preferred to be known as Marie Louise de la Ramée.)
• Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928), known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum. At Oxford Edward Perry Warren met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907. Beginning in 1888, Warren made England his primary home. He and Marshall lived together at Lewes House (with Marshall’s wife, Mary), a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. Ned Warren, John Marshall and Mary are all buried together in Bagni di Lucca.
• Evangeline Marrs Whipple (1860-1930), widow for the second time (she first married the wealthy businessman Michael Hodge Simpson and then bishop Henry Benjamin Whipple), visited Bagni di Lucca in 1910, lodging at Hotel Continental and then taking residence at Casa Bernardini at Bagno alla Villa. This is the house she shared with Rose Cleveland and Nelly Ericksen. Rose and Nelly died in 1918. In 1928 Evangeline wrote “A Famous Corner of Tuscany” about Bagni di Lucca. Around this time she bought Casa Burlamacchi, completing restoring the “Casa Piccola” (Little House, now Villa San Francesco), in front of the garden at the back of the “Casa Grande” (Big House.)



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Brian Christian de Claiborne Howard was an English poet and later a writer for the New Statesman.
Born: March 13, 1905, Hascombe, United Kingdom
Died: January 15, 1958, Nice, France
Education: Eton College
Lived: Cobblestone House, Hascombe, Godalming GU8 4BT, UK (51.14153, -0.54976)
Chemin du Col de Bast, 06100 Nice, France (43.7373, 7.24177)
Buried: Cimetière Caucade, Nice, Departement des Alpes-Maritimes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Buried alongside: Sam Langford

Brian Howard was an English poet, whose work belied a spectacularly precocious start in life; in the end, he became more of a journalist. He published only one substantial poetry collection God Save the King. Irish-born Sam Langford was his companion, from 1943 onwards. Langford liked to sail and commanded an Air-Sea Rescue Launch in the British navy during the war. He was invalidated out of the navy with a foot problem and briefly worked for the BBC before travelling and living abroad with Howard. Like Howard, Langford became addicted to drugs. He died in his bath when he was gassed by a faulty water heater at the house he shared with Howard and Howard's mother in the south of France. A few days later, Howard committed suicide by taking an overdose of sedatives. Howard will write: "I am doing my utmost to involve myself emotionally with Sam, and have only succeeded so far physically. I feel quite unsafe still. But I never intend to let Sam go." And later: "I am now really, to tell the truth, violently in love with Sam.” After a double funeral, they were buried together at the Cimetière Caucade de Nice, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France.
Together from 1943 to 1958: 15 years.
Brian Christian de Claiborne Howard (March 13, 1905 – January 15, 1958)
Sam Langford (died in 1958)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Dirk Bogarde purchased the large farmhouse Cobblestone House (formerly Nore House) at Hascombe, near Godalming in 1962. He lived there with his partner and manager, Anthony Forwood, until 1971.
Address: Hascombe, Godalming GU8 4BT, UK (51.14153, -0.54976)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 291246 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Built in XVII century with XIX and XX century additions to right.
Timber framed, clad in whitewashed and rendered brick below, tile hung above, some in diamond pattern, with sandstone rubble and brick extensions to right, all under plain tiled roofs, some hipped and half-hipped. Two storeys with end stack to left and offset square end stack to right; square ridge stack to right of centre dated 1750 on top. Four leaded casements to first floor and three larger leaded casements to ground floor. Panelled door to right of centre. Wings at right angles to rear. Dormered extensions to right, once a barn converted in circa 1900 of no especial architectural interest, although it was formerly the home of Brian Howard. Dirk Bogarde entertained several of his Hollywood co-stars at Nore. Among them was Ingrid Bergman, who came to stay for six weeks in 1965 while she was playing “A Month in the Country,” the first production at the newly opened Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford. He wrote of her in his autobiography that she “was constantly amused by my evening walk down to the vegetable gardens to pick the mint for supper”. Screen legend Judy Garland also came to Nore, in 1963, to show Bogarde a script of her semi-autobiographical film “I Could Go On Singing.” After filming “Death in Venice” in 1971, Bogarde moved to West Sussex and then France; Nore estate was sold and subsequently divided up. Bogarde describes leaving Cobblestone House in his biography “Snakes and Ladders” (1978): “…The removal vans trundled slowly down the long drive in a flurry of sleet and snow-showers, leaving the house empty, bare and strangely silent after the long racketing week of packing and crating-up of one’s life.”…
Life
Who: Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde (March 28, 1921 – May 8, 1999) aka Dirk Bogarde
Of all Dirk Bogarde's houses in the fifties and sixties, Nore was the finest. Reached by a long private drive through woodland, and much more secluded than Drummers Yard had been, it was officially described as “a large, three-bay continuous jetty house of two storeys and attics”, a yeoman's house, dating in large part from the late XVI century. It stood in about ten acres, with breathtaking views across the Surrey countryside towards the South Downs. It had ten bedrooms, eight bathrooms and six reception rooms, two cottages, a separate studio, a tennis court, a garage block and four pools, “two for water-lilies, one for ducks and one for humans”. There was also a contractual right to a free daily supply of 500 gallons of water. Above all, there were extensive gardens. In the twenties and early thirties Nore had been home to the parents of Brian Howard, the American-born, Eton-educated poet, wit, aesthete, homosexual, “charismatic failure” and “the oddest aircraftman since T. E. Shaw”. He was dark and handsome, had a Machiavellian streak and was “quasi-sadistic mentally, quasi-masochistic physically”; he also had “pity and compassion for all human suffering, he loved the beauties of nature, literature and the arts”, and according to Evelyn Waugh was “mad, bad and dangerous to know”. A great platonic love of his was Daphne Fielding, and although she never saw him at Nore, when she went to stay with Dirk and Tony (Anthony Forwood), she “was conscious of Brian all the time, and his own very particular atmosphere seemed to dominate even Dirk's.” Which was indeed saying something. Howard's parents had rented Nore from Robert Godwin-Austen, a descendant of the topographer who “discovered” the Himalayan peak now known as K2, and whose travels yielded a miniature temple, with a “lion-dog” at each of the four corners, which Dirk found, buried in brambles, and with “a rather curious, and very detailed, phallic symbol standing erect in the very center! So I am not absolutely certain that it was only spirits who went there to worship.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

After a double funeral, Brian Howard and Sam Langford were buried together at the Cimetière Caucade de Nice, Provence-Alpes-Cote d’Azur, France. Brian Howard failed to fulfil his early promise and published little.
Address: Chemin du Col de Bast, 06100 Nice, France (43.7373, 7.24177)
Type: Private Property
Place
In the summer of 1949 Brian Howard and Sam Langford were looking for a house in the south of France, and started their search in Grasse, but could not find anything they liked and so they took a flat in Nice. They then went to Aix-en-Provence, where Brian Howard got jaundice. They continued to look for a house in the south of France hoping that Brian’s mother, Lura (Laura) Chess Howard, would provide the money. When they found a house at Le Rouret near Grasse she failed to provide the cash. With the death of Brian Howard’s father in October 1954 his mother inherited shares and paintings, and the sale of pictures in Nov. 1955 at Christies raised £20000. Brian Howard and Sam were still keen to settle in France and so she bought a house near Nice - Le Verger, at Col de Bast, Vallon Obscur. Brian Howard and Sam moved into the house at the beginning of January 1958 but disaster struck within two weeks of their arrival. In the morning of January 11, 1958 Sam went to have a bath but workmen had removed an exhaust pipe from the bathroom and Sam died accidentally of asphyxiation from fumes from a gas heater. He was 32. Four days later Howard killed himself by taking an overdose of sedatives. He was 52. Lura Chess Howard continued to live at Le Verger, dying there on May 29, 1965.
Life
Who: Brian Christian de Claiborne Howard (March 13, 1905 – January 15, 1958) and Sam Langford (1926-1958)
Brian Howard was an English poet and later a writer for the New Statesman. He was educated at Eton College, where he was one of the Eton Arts Society group including Harold Acton, Oliver Messel, Anthony Powell and Henry Yorke. He entered Christ Church, Oxford in 1923, not without difficulty. He was prominent in the group later known as the Oxford Wits. He was one of the Hypocrites group that included Harold Acton, Lord David Cecil, L. P. Hartley and Evelyn Waugh. It has been suggested that Howard was Waugh’s model for Anthony Blanche in “Brideshead Revisited.” Waugh wrote, to Lord Baldwin: "There is an aesthetic bugger who sometimes turns up in my novels under various names -- that was 2/3 Brian [Howard] and 1/3 Harold Acton. People think it was all Harold, who is a much sweeter and saner man [than Howard]." In the late 1920s, he was a key figure among London’s "Bright Young Things" - a privileged, fashionable and bohemian set of relentless party-goers, satirised in such novels as Evelyn Waugh’s 1930 "Vile Bodies" where the character of Miles Malpractice owes something to Howard. Apart from Waugh, Howard knew all this circle, including Nancy Mitford, Henry Yorke, Harold Acton, and especially Nancy Cunard with whom he shared artistic and political interests, maintaining contact throughout his life. In 1929 he was famously involved in the "Bruno Hat" hoax when the fashionable Hon Mr & Mrs Bryan Guinness promoted a spoof London art exhibition by an apparently unknown German painter Bruno Hat (impersonated by the German-speaking Tom Mitford, brother of Nancy and Diana Mitford - the latter a socialite, arts patron and friend of Howard, Lytton Strachey, Evelyn Waugh, Boris Anrep, Dora Carrington John Betjeman and other artistic and literary figures, before her second marriage to British fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley.) Bruno Hat’s paintings were the work of Brian Howard. Subsequently he led a very active social life, tried to come to terms with his homosexuality, and published only one substantial poetry collection “God Save the King” (1930.) During WWII took part in the Dunkirk evacuation and later worked for MI5 but was dismissed from the War Office in June 1942, after which he was conscripted to the Royal Air Force with a low-level clerk’s job at Bomber Command, High Wycombe, and an Air Ministry note on his file that he should never be given a commission. Transferred to another posting, where he referred to his commanding officer as “Colonel Cutie” (a trait Evelyn Waugh gave his rebellious rogue Basil Seal in the novel "Put Out More Flags"), Howard was dismissed in Dec. 1944, by which time he had formed a longstanding open relationship with Sam Langford, an Irishman serving in the Air Sea Rescue. After the war, Howard drifted around Europe with Sam, continuing to write occasional articles and reviews for the New Statesman, BBC and others, fitfully working on an uncompleted biography of the gay English writer Norman Douglas (author of the novel "South Wind") and doing no substantial work. Indiscreetly promiscuous, drinking heavily, taking drugs and behaving outrageously, they were expelled in turn from Monaco, France, Italy and Spain, the French authorities noting their "moralité douteuse" (dubious morality.) Evelyn Waugh wrote: "I used to know Brian Howard well—a dazzling young man to my innocent eyes. In later life he became very dangerous—constantly attacking people with his fists in public places—so I kept clear of him. He was consumptive but the immediate cause of his death was a broken heart."



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Alma Vilibalda Maximiliana Karlin was a Slovene-Austrian traveler, writer, poet, collector, polyglot and theosophist.
Born: October 12, 1889, Celje, Slovenia
Died: January 15, 1950, Pečovnik, Slovenia
Books: The death-thorn
Lived: Pečovnik 26, 3000 Celje, Slovenia (46.19918, 15.26535)
Buried: Svetina, Svetina, Obcina Store, Savinjska, Slovenia
Buried alongside: Thea Schreiber Gammelin

Alma Karlin was a Slovene-Austrian traveler, writer, poet, collector, polyglot and theosophist. In 1932, Alma visited Stockholm and gave a talk about her travel on the radio. After the broadcast, painter Thea Schreiber Gammelin contacted her. This meeting evolved into longstanding friendship. Thea introduced Alma to the Nobel Prize for literature, Selma Lagerlöf, who evaluated her work very positively. Alma asked seventeen years younger Thea to become her personal secretary. After the occupation of Yugoslavia, in 1941, Gestapo persecuted Alma and finally arrested her, confiscated all her property and sent her to Dachau. However, she somehow succeeded to escape from the transport and fled to partisans. During the war, Thea joined the partisans too and was severely wounded. After the war, the authorities did not want to have anything to do with the writer who wrote in German. Alma’s and Thea’s spared founds were in foreign banks and therefore inaccessible, so they moved in a small house on the hill Pečovnik above Celje and lived humbly with Thea’s pension, often in shortage. Alma died from cancer in 1950 and was buried in the church's courtyard at Svetina. Thea died 38 years later, and is buried near Alma.
Together from 1932 to 1950: 18 years.
Alma Vilibalda Maximiliana Karlin (October 12, 1889 – January 14, 1950)
Thea Schreiber Gammelin (1906-1988)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Pečovnik, at the city outskirts, is the house where Alma M. Karlin resided together with her friend Thea during the final years of her life. The residence at Pečovnik was named a cultural landmark of local importance and hosts the exhibition “The Lonely Voyage of Alma M. Karlin.”
Address: Pečovnik 26, 3000 Celje, Slovenia (46.19918, 15.26535)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Place
Pečovnik is a settlement on the left bank of the Savinja River in the City Municipality of Celje in eastern Slovenia. The area was traditionally part of the Styria region. It is now included with the rest of the municipality in the Savinja Statistical Region. The writer Alma Karlin lived the last years of her life and died in the village. Her house is now a small museum.
Life
Who: Alma Vilibalda Maximiliana Karlin (October 12, 1889 – January 15, 1950) and Thea Schreiber Gammelin (1906-1988)
Alma Karlin was an extraordinary traveller, polyglot, theosophist, and writer from Celje. From 1919 to 1927 she travelled to South and North America, the Pacific Islands, Australia, and various Asian countries and supported herself with odd jobs and writing. Her travel and fiction novels (written in German) became very popular in the 1930s (“The Odyssey of a Lonely Woman” and “The Spell of the South Sea,” a novel in two volumes was reprinted several times in the edition of over 100,000 copies.) During the war her work was banned and in 1944 she joined the Partisans. After the war she lived in a small house in Pečovnik above Celje in straitened circumstances together with her companion Thea Schreiber Gamelin. Alma’s work had been forgotten till the 1960s when ethnologists began to study her collections. Nowadays Alma Karlin inspires artists, feminists, historians as well as the inhabitants of Celje and the general public. Alma Karlin and Thea Schreiber Gammelin are buried together at the church’s courtyard at Svetina. The parish church is dedicated to the Mother of God and belongs to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Celje. It predates its earliest mention in written documents in 1480. Next to the church is a chapel dedicated to the Holy Cross. It dates to the late XV century, but was extensively rebuilt after a fire in 1714 that destroyed most of the village.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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