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George Henry Boker was an American poet, playwright, and diplomat.
Born: October 6, 1823, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: January 2, 1890, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Princeton University
People also search for: Thomas Buchanan Read, Henry Taylor, Sculley Bradley
Buried: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA, Plot: Section A, Lot 91

Bayard Taylor was an American poet, literary critic, translator, and travel author. Taylor had a close relationship with poet/diplomat George Henry Boker, founder of Nassau Monthly. Taylor was famous for his books about the Gold Rush in California, including Eldorado and California Life. He also wrote about passionate relationships between men, including Twin Love and the poem To a Persian Boy. Joseph and His Friend is considered the first American novel to deal with gay feelings. It recounts an intimate friendship between two men and is believed to be inspired by the poets Fitz-Greene Halleck and Joseph Rodman Drake, who died in young age: during a train ride Joseph Asten's eyes settle on a stranger, passenger Philip Held. Feeling his stare, Philip looks back. “[t]he usual reply to such a gaze is an unconscious defiance…but the look which seems to answer, 'We are men, let us know each other!' is, alas! Too rare in this world.” In time, yielding to “manly love...as tender and true as the love of woman,” they kiss. Yet, Joseph finds a potential bride, leaving Philip “vicariously happy, warmed in [his] lonely sphere by the far radiation of [Joseph's] nuptial bliss.”
They met in 1848, friends until Bayard Taylor’s death in 1878: 30 years
Bayard Taylor (January 11, 1825 – December 19, 1878)
George Henry Boker (October 6, 1823 - January 2, 1890)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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At Laurel Hill Cemetery (3822 Ridge Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19132) is buried George Henry Boker (1823-1890), American poet, playwright, and diplomat. Bayard Taylor and Richard Henry Stoddard would be long-lasting friends. Also buried here is Anna Lukens (1844-1917), graduated from the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, in 1870. A member of the class attending clinics in the Pennsylvania Hospital, November, 1869, when the students from the Woman's Medical College were hissed by the male members of the clinic. Miss Lukens and a Miss Brumall led the line of women students who passed out of the hospital grounds amid the jeers and insults of the male students, who even threw stones and mud at them, but these brave women were not discouraged by such conduct and might be considered to have blazed the way for other women who today enjoy the privilege.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Lived: Greenwood Plantation, GA 84, Thomasville, GA 31792, USA
The Book Basement, 9 College Way, Charleston
Buried: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Thomasville, Thomas County, Georgia, USA

Edwin Tralona Davis married Martha Tallulah Jones, daughter of Thomas Jones and his wife Lavinia Young. They had two daughters, Martha Davis (b. 28 Feb. 1867), who married Edmund Dutcher on 28 Aug. 1902, and Marion Davis (b. 26 Sep 1873), who married J. W. Peacock on 12 Sep. 1893, 8 children, one of whom was Edwin Peacock.
Address: GA 84, Thomasville, GA 31792, USA (30.85423, -84.01696)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 76000650, 1976
Place
Greenwood Plantation is a plantation in the Red Hills Region of southern Georgia, just west of Thomasville. The original Greek Revival mansion on the property was designed by British architect John Wind and built about 1838 for Thomas and Lavinia Jones. The house was completed in 1844, and the Jones family occupied the plantation until it was sold in 1889 to S.R. Van Duzer of New York. Van Duzer later sold the home Col. Oliver Hazard Payne, who bequeathed the home in 1916 to his nephew, the millionaire and horse racing enthusiast Payne Whitney. After Payne's death, Greenwood was inherited in 1944 by his son Jock Whitney, who was responsible for arranging the financing for the movie version of “Gone with the Wind,” which premiered in Atlanta in December 1939, with Jock Whitney in attendance. The plantation reportedly served as "a model of southern elegance for the movie." In 1899, Payne engaged noted architect Stanford White of the firm McKim, Mead & White to add two small, symmetric side wings and additional living and kitchen space in the rear of the main house. In 1942, Jock married Betsey Cushing, former wife of James Roosevelt. The Whitneys, who also owned a number of other homes in New York and England, regularly visited Greenwood as their winter home, often bringing their thoroughbred race horses with them. Jock served as the American ambassador to the Court of St. James's from 1957 to 1961 under President Dwight Eisenhower, who while a visitor at Greenwood enjoyed quail and turkey hunting. Many other famous friends of the Whitneys stayed at Greenwood over the years, including the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Fred Astaire. In February 1964, shortly after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, his widow Jackie spent several weeks at the plantation as a guest of the Whitneys, who provided her a much-needed refuge from media attention. Mrs. Kennedy's visit again in 1967 provided some fodder for the tabloids of the day as Lord Harlech, the ambassador to the US from the Court of St. James's, was also a guest during her stay. The main house was renovated and restored in 1965, and redecorated by society decorator Sister Parish in 1993; but just when the redecoration had been completed, a fire broke out, gutting the interior but leaving the external walls intact. Jock died in 1982, and his widow in 1998; upon her death, she left the plantation to the family's Greentree Foundation, who maintained the property according to a conservation plan created by her and expert consultants. In 2013, the foundation offered the plantation for sale. The plantation includes 5,200 acres of forest used for quail hunting with 1,000 acres of old-growth longleaf pines, some up to 500 years old.
Life
Who: Edwin D. “Eager Wings” Peacock (January 2, 1910 – August 23, 1989) and John Asbury Zeigler, Jr (February 5, 1912 – October 2, 2015)
Edwin Peacock and John Zeigler, Jr. were together for 50 years. Edwin was born in Thomasville, Georgia in 1910; John was born in Manning, South Carolina two years later. “Edwin and John: A Personal History of the American South” is a Southern love story set against the backdrop of WWII and the post-war South, where they opened a bookshop in what was then the small town of Charleston. How these two men forged a relationship that endured the conflicts of war and emotion, openly shared their lives, and dealt with tragedy and death is Edwin and John's story. This is also a tale of two boys growing up gay in the South during an era in which "gay" was simply an ordinary word and discussion of any type of sexuality was, at the very least, impolite. Edwin was raised in a large family. His father was a druggist, and his mother, born on her family's ante-bellum Greenwood Plantation, had moved to Thomasville at the turn of the century. While Edwin had few sexual experiences growing up, he knew his attractions were to men. He enjoyed the friendship of women, telling stories and pulling harmless pranks. His greatest childhood love, though, was botany. After graduating from high school and a couple of years working in his father's drugstore, the twenty-something Edwin moved to Columbus, Georgia for work in the Civilian Conservation Corps. It was there he met Carson Smith, an adolescent pianist who had suffered from rheumatic fever. The two formed a lifelong friendship as Edwin encouraged her writing interest. Carson would later fictionalize Edwin as the homosexual deaf-mute, John Singer, in her first novel, “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter.” John's family moved from town to town before settling in Florence, South Carolina when he was five years old. His father also had been a druggist but soon began a newspaper, in which he editorialized against the Klan and venal Southern politicians. Although less outgoing than Edwin, John found more opportunities for same-sex relationships, including a lad who became his lifelong friend. John moved to Charleston to enter The Citadel in 1928, where he fell in love with poetry and with his second-year roommate. Edwin died in 1989 and is buried alongside his parents at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Thomasville. John died in 2015 and his body was donated to medical science, to The Medical University of South Carolina.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The ground floor of 9 College Way, owned by relatives of John Zeigler, housed The Book Basement, the leading independent bookstore in the city of Charleston for decades; it was where most College of Charleston library books were purchased. It was owned and run by Edwin Peacock (1910-1989) and John Zeigler, (born 1912) one of the city’s most prominent gay couples. Not only was it a meeting place for various civil rights groups, but gay people visiting and passing through Charleston, including the likes of children’s author Maurice Sendak and Harlem Renaissance poet and writer Langston Hughes, stopped here and became friends of the owners. Edwin Peacock introduced bisexual southern writer Carson Smith (1917-1967) to her eventual husband Reeves McCullers. Carson McCullers is remembered today for “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter,” “The Member of the Wedding” and other works. Peacock was a good friend to her for her entire life, and some believe that Peacock, hard of hearing and universally pleasant to all, may have been an inspiration for John Singer, the central mute character in “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter.” Peacock and Zeigler opened their bookstore on Carson’s birthday in 1946 and she was a frequent guest here. This might be the only site in Charleston mentioning a gay couple. Although their names are linked only as business partners, their names are together on the plaque in front of the building. Their relationship is detailed in Zeigler’s’ cycle of memorial poems, “The Edwin Poems” and in his autobiography, “Edwin and John: A Personal History of the American South.” A drawing of the building by gay artist Prentiss Taylor was often used on postcards advertising events at the store. Of further gay interest is the fact that John Zeigler appears renamed as “Nicky” in the book “Jeb and Dash: A Gay Life, 1918-1945” published from the diaries of Carter Bealer, edited by his niece Ina Russell.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Married: June 13, 2014

Mark Merlis is an American writer, author of the novels American Studies and An Arrow’s Flight. His new novel JD is coming soon from the University of Wisconsin Press. His work has won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Lambda Literary Award, and the Ferro-Grumley Award for distinction in gay writing. Bob Ashe retired as an executive of Janssen Pharmaceuticals, part of Johnson & Johnson. They live in Philadelphia, where they were married on June 13, 2014. “We met in Leon’s, a dive bar in Baltimore, in 1982. Each of us was cruising someone else; each of us struck out; it was last call. We saw each other and thought, ‘This will do for one night.’ We’ve been together ever since.”
Together since 1982: 32 years.
Bob Ashe (born January 2, 1954)
Mark Merlis (born March 9, 1950)
Married: June 13, 2014



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Buried: Taos Pueblo Cemetery, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, New Mexico, USA

Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy American patron of the arts. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly detailed her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography Intimate Memories (1933). Her first marriage was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner in 1900. Karl died in a hunting accident leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Later she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. The Dodges lived in Florence from 1905 to 1912. At her palatial Medici villa—the Villa Curonia in Arcetri, not far from Florence—she entertained local artists, as well as Gertrude Stein, her brother Leo, Alice B. Toklas, and other visitors from Paris, including André Gide. In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. Often in attendance were such luminaries as Carl Van Vechten, Margarett Sargent, Emma Goldman, Charles Demuth, "Big Bill" Haywood, Max Eastman, Lincoln Steffens, Hutchins Hapgood, Neith Boyce, Walter Lippmann, and John “Jack” Reed (who became her lover). In 1916, Dodge married Maurice Sterne. In 1919 Dodge, her husband, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. In 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she married Tony Luhan, a Native American. The couple lived together until Mabel died, a year before Tony did.
Together from 1923 to 1962: 39 years
Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Tony Luhan (died in 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Mabel Dodge Luhan House, also known as Big House and St. Teresa House, is a house in Taos, New Mexico. It was a home of artist Mabel Dodge Luhan and was a haven for artists and writers.
Address: 240 Morada Ln, Taos, NM 87571, USA (36.40837, -105.56653)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 575-751-9686
National Register of Historic Places: 78001832, 1978. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The house is "one of the earliest examples of Pueblo Revival style in Taos." It is located on Luhan Lane, off Morada Lane, in Taos. It is now used as a hotel and conference center.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy patron of the arts. She is particularly associated with the Taos art colony. Her first marriage, in 1900 at the age of 21, was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner. They had one son, and Karl died in a hunting accident two and a half years later, leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Her family sent her to Paris because she was having an affair with a prominent Buffalo gynecologist. Later that year she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly details her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography “Intimate Memories” (1933.) In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. She sailed to Europe at the end of June 1913. Her new acquaintance John Reed (Jack)—worn out from having recently organized the Paterson Pageant—travelled with her. They became lovers after arriving in Paris, where they socialized with Stein and Pablo Picasso. They moved down to the Villa Curonia, where the guests this time included Arthur Rubinstein. They returned to New York in late September 1913. In October 1913 Reed was sent to report on the Mexican Revolution by Metropolitan Magazine. Dodge followed him to Presidio, a border town, but left after a few days. Over 1914–16 a deep and continuing relationship developed between the intelligentsia of Greenwich Village and Provincetown. In 1915 she went to Provincetown with painter Maurice Sterne. She then moved to Finney Farm, a large Croton estate. In 1919 Dodge, her by then husband, Maurice Sterne, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. On the advice of Tony Luhan, a Native American whom she would marry in 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she bought a 12-acre (49,000 m2) property. D.H. Lawrence accepted an invitation from her to stay in Taos and he arrived, with Frieda his wife, in early September 1922. Dodge and Luhan hosted a number of influential artists and poets including Marsden Hartley, Arnold Ronnebeck, Louise Emerson Ronnebeck, Ansel Adams, Willa Cather, Robinson Jeffers and his wife Una, Florence McClung, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mary Hunter Austin, Frank Waters, Jaime de Angulo, and others. Dennis Hopper bought the Mabel Dodge Luhan House after seeing it while filming “Easy Rider.” Dodge died at her home in Taos in 1962 and was buried in Kit Carson Cemetery (Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos, NM 87571). Antonio "Tony" Lujan (1879-1963) is buried at Taos Pueblo Cemetery (Taos Pueblo, NM).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
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