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Duncan James Corrowr Grant was a British painter and designer of textiles, pottery, theatre sets and costumes. He was a member of the Bloomsbury Group.
Born: January 21, 1885, Aviemore, United Kingdom
Died: May 8, 1978, Aldermaston, United Kingdom
Education: Westminster School of Art
Lived: Wissett Lodge, Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Charleston Farmhouse, West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Hilton Hall, High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
24 Victoria Square, SW1W
26a Canonbury Square, N1
19 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
22 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
26 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
8 Fitzroy Street, W1T
28 Percy Street, W1T
1 Taviton Street, WC1H
143 Fellows Road, NW3
Doune of Rothiemurchus, The Polchar, Aviemore PH22, UK (57.1649, -3.83368)
45 Quai de Bourbon, Ile-St.-Louis, Paris
3 Park Square West, NW1
Buried: St Peter, The Street, West Firle, East Sussex, BN8 6LP
Books: Private

John Maynard Keynes, Baron Keynes of Tilton, was the preeminent economist of the 20th century. The artist Duncan Grant, whom he met in 1908, was one of Keynes's great loves. He was with Grant for nearly eight years and supported him financially even after they broke up. Keynes was also involved with Lytton Strachey. Keynes had won the affections of Arthur Hobhouse, as well as Grant, both times falling out with a jealous Strachey for it. Strachey had previously found himself put off by Keynes, not least because of his manner of "treat[ing] his love affairs statistically". Keynes' friends in the Bloomsbury Group were initially surprised when, in his later years, he began dating and pursuing affairs with women, demonstrating himself to be bisexual. Ray Costelloe (who would later marry Oliver Strachey) was an early heterosexual interest of Keynes. In 1906, Keynes had written of this infatuation that, "I seem to have fallen in love with Ray a little bit, but as she isn't male I haven't [been] able to think of any suitable steps to take.” In 1921, Keynes wrote that he had fallen "very much in love" with Lydia Lopokova, a well-known Russian ballerina, and one of the stars of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. In the early years of his courtship, he maintained an affair with a younger man, Sebastian Sprott, in tandem with Lopokova, but eventually chose Lopokova exclusively. They married in 1925.
Together from 1908 to 1916: 8 years.
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes (June 5, 1883 – April 21, 1946)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. A writer, he first met members of the Bloomsbury group in 1910 but was not fully accepted by them until 1914, when he became Duncan Grant's lover. Like Grant, Garnett was a conscientious objector and having worked in France in 1915 with the Friends War Victims Relief Mission, he worked as a farm laborer to avoid conscription on his return to England. Garnett moved with Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell to Charleston farmhouse in 1916. He married Grant’s daughter (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), Angelica, in 1942. He was present at her birth on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry, to the horror of her parents.
Together from 1914 to 1921: 7 years.
David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Duncan Grant was a British painter and designer. He was a cousin, and for some time a lover, of Lytton Strachey. Through the Stracheys, Duncan was introduced to the Bloomsbury Group, where John Maynard Keynes became another of his lovers. Grant is best known for his painting style, which developed in the wake of French post-impressionist exhibitions mounted in London in 1910. He often worked with, and was influenced by, another member of the group, art critic and artist Roger Fry. Grant was in a relationship with Vanessa Bell and is the father of her daughter, Angelica. Duncan had many serious relationships with men, most notably David Garnett, who will marry his daughter. In Grant's later years, the poet Paul Roche, whom he had known since 1946, took care of him and enabled Grant to maintain his way of life. Roche was a British poet, novelist, and professor of English. Roche returned to England from New York to be with Grant after Bell's death, eventually joined by his entire family. Clarissa Tanner, Roche’s wife, came to accept Grant's role in Roche's life, although sexual relations between Roche and Grant cooled off out of respect for Tanner. Roche was devastated by Grant’s death at the age of 93.
Together from 1946 to 1978: 32 years.
Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
Donald Robert Paul Roche (September 26, 1916 - October 30, 2007)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Doune of Rothiemurchus, two miles south of Aviemore in Strathspey is an XVII-century mansion which replaced an earlier castle. The lands were held by the Shaws, Mackintoshes and by the Dallases of Cantray. James Shaw of Rothiemurchus was killed at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411.
Address: The Polchar, Aviemore PH22, UK (57.1649, -3.83368)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Historic Scotland Building ID: 253 (Grade B, 1978)
Place
An elegant country house, the home of the Grants of Rothiemurchus for centuries. The Doune stands beside an ancient motte, or hill fort (Doune comes from 'dun' for a fortified place). The house dates to the XVI century, and was probably built by the Shaw family. The house was extended in the 1780s and again in 1803 when the Georgian frontage was added. For a time in the 1930s the house was operated as a hotel, and it was used by the army as a base during WWII. After the war the house was abandonned, and by 1975 it was derelict and in danger of being lost forever. An ambitious programme of ongoing restoration work has restored it to something approaching its former glory. Doune of Rothiemurchus was the home of Elizabeth Grant, who wrote her “Memoires of a Highland Lady” here. Visitors can explore the Doune as part of a themed “Highland Lady Safari,” or a Rothiemurchus Experience Safari Land Rover tour. The Doune is set in the midst of a glorious outdoor estate, with a location on the edge of Britain's winter playground; the Cairngorms National Park. The estate offers superb scenery and a huge variety of outdoor recreational activities.
Life
Who: Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)
Duncan Grant was a British painter and designer of textiles, pottery, theatre sets and costumes. He was a member of the Bloomsbury Group.He was a grandson of Sir John Peter Grant, 12th Laird of Rothiemurchus, KCB, GCMG, sometime Lieutenant-Governor of Bengal. Grant was also the first cousin twice removed of John Grant, 13th Earl of Dysart (b. 1946). Grant was born on January 21, 1885 to Major Bartle Grant, a "poverty-stricken" major in the army, and Ethel McNeil in Rothiemurchus, Aviemore, Scotland. Between 1887-94 the family lived in India and Burma, returning to England every two years. During this period Grant was educated by his governess, Alice Bates. Along with Rupert Brooke, Grant attended Hillbrow School, Rugby (between 1894–99). During this period, Grant would spend his school holidays at Hogarth House, Chiswick with his grandmother, Lady Grant. He attended St Paul's School, London (as a boarder for two terms) between 1899-91 where he was awarded several art prizes. Between 1899/1900-1906, Grant lived with his aunt and uncle, Sir Richard and Lady Strachey and their children. Lady Strachey was able to persuade Grant's parents that he should be allowed to pursue an education in art. In 1902 Grant was enrolled by his aunt at Westminster School of Art; he attended for the next three years. While at Westminster, Grant was encouraged in his studies by Simon Bussy, a French painter and lifelong friend of Matisse, who went on to marry Dorothy Strachey.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Back in London in 1905, Duncan Grant lived again with his parents at 143 Fellows Road, NW3 on the lower slopes of Hampstead. The Stracheys were nearby, having moved in June to 67 Belsize Park Gardens.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 33 Fitzroy Square, Roger Fry (1866–1934), “In this house Roger Fry 1866–1934 Artist and Art Critic ran the Omega Workshops 1913–1919"
Address: Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Fitzroy Square is one of the Georgian squares in London and is the only one found in the central London area known as Fitzrovia. The square, nearby Fitzroy Street, and the Fitzroy Tavern in Charlotte Street have the family name of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, into whose ownership the land passed through his marriage. His descendant Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton developed the area during the late XVIII and early XIX century. Fitzroy Square was a speculative development intended to provide London residences for aristocratic families, and was built in four stages. Leases for the eastern and southern sides, designed by Robert Adam, were granted in 1792; building began in 1794 and was completed in 1798 by Adam’s brothers James and William. These buildings are fronted in Portland stone brought by sea from Dorset. The Napoleonic Wars and a slump in the London property market brought a temporary stop to construction of the square after the south and east sides were completed. According to the records of the Squares Frontagers’ Committee, 1815 residents looked out on “vacant ground, the resort of the idle and profligate.” Another contemporary account describes the incomplete square: “The houses are faced with stone, and have a greater proportion of architectural excellence and embellishment than most others in the metropolis. They were designed by the Adams, but the progress of the late war prevented the completion of the design. It is much to be regretted, that it remains in its present unfinished state.” The northern and western sides were subsequently constructed in 1827-1829 and 1832-1835 respectively, and are stucco-fronted. The south side suffered bomb damage during WWII and was rebuilt with traditional facades to remain in keeping with the rest of the square.
Notable queer residents at Fitzroy Square:
• No. 8, W1T was the home of the painter James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903.)
• No. 19, W1T was the base for the “International School” run by Louise Michel in the 1890s. Later, from 1909 to 1911, was the home of Bloomsbury Group artist Duncan Grant (1885-1978.)
• No. 21, W1T was Roger Fry (December 14, 1866 –September 9, 1934)’s studio
• No. 22, W1T was Duncan Grant’s studio.
• No. 26, W1T Duncan Grant and John Maynard Keynes shared a flat.
• Engligh Heritage Blue Plaque: 29 Fitzroy Square, W1T Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (1882–1941), "Novelist and Critic lived here 1907–1911" Also George Bernard Shaw lived here from 1887 until his marriage in 1898.
• No. 33, W1T housed Roger Fry (1866-1934)’s Omega Workshop, creating avant-garde furniture from 1913 to 1919.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Charleston, in East Sussex is a property associated with the Bloomsbury group, that is open to the public.
Address: West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1323 811265
English Heritage Building ID: 292908 (Grade II, 1965)
Place
The interior of the XVIII century farmhouse contains an important series of mural and furniture decorations painted between 1916-1939 by Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell. Charleston was the country home of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant and is an example of their decorative style within a domestic context, representing the fruition of over sixty years of artistic creativity. Vanessa Bell wrote of this time; "It will be an odd life, but ... it ought to be a good one for painting." In addition to the house and artists’ garden, there is an exhibition gallery showing a mix of contemporary and historical shows of fine and decorative art, a Crafts Council selected shop selling applied art and books relating to Bloomsbury, a small tea room and a video presentation. Charleston hosts a number of special events throughout the year, most notably the Charleston Festival which is centred on talks and drama relating to literary, artistic and Bloomsbury themes. The house is located in the village of Firle, in the Lewes District of East Sussex. As you enter the street in Firle village, continue up the street after the Ram Inn and you will see Little Talland House on the left, opposite the village hall. Little Talland House was rented by Virginia Woolf from January 1911 to January 1912. “I'm very much excited - furnishing my cottage, and staining the floors the colours of the Atlantic in a storm.” (Virginia Woolf, Letters, no. 552) “I've got to go down [to Firle] and make curtains and move beds at the cottage, having been so rash as to ask 5 people to stay the week after. Nessa is bringing a sewing machine; and in the intervals, I shall spur her to bouts of talk.” (Letters, no. 553) “I spent yesterday finishing off the cottage. Its right underneath the downs, and though itself an eyesore, still that dont matter when one's inside. I have one gooseberry bush; 3 mongrels, thought by some to grow currants. Shall you ever come and stay there? There is a Bath, and a W. C.” (Letters, no. 554, to Violet Dickinson) “The villa is inconceivably ugly, done up in patches of post-impressionist colour.” (Letters, no. 561). The graves of Vanessa and Quentin Bell and Duncan Grant are quite close to the wall on the North side of the churchyard at St Peter (The Street, West Firle, East Sussex, BN8 6LP).
Life
Who: Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 –April 7, 1961)
In 1916 the artists Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant moved to Sussex with their unconventional household when Grant, under the terms of his exemption from military service, was employed at a nearby farm together with David Garnett (1892-1981.) Over the following half century Charleston became the country meeting place for the group of artists, writers and intellectuals known as Bloomsbury. Garnett, Clive Bell and John Maynard Keynes lived at Charleston for considerable periods; Virginia and Leonard Woolf, E. M. Forster, Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry were frequent visitors. Inspired by Italian fresco painting and the Post-Impressionists, the artists decorated the walls, doors and furniture at Charleston. The walled garden was redesigned in a style reminiscent of southern Europe, with mosaics, box hedges, gravel pathways and ponds, but with a touch of Bloomsbury humour in the placing of the statuary. "It’s most lovely, very solid and simple, with ... perfectly flat windows and wonderful tiled roofs. The pond is most beautiful, with a willow at one side and a stone or flint wall edging it all round the garden part, and a little lawn sloping down to it, with formal bushes on it." — Vanessa Bell. The rooms on show form a complete example of the decorative art of the Bloomsbury artists: murals, painted furniture, ceramics, objects from the Omega Workshops, paintings and textiles. The collection includes work by Auguste Renoir, Picasso, Derain, Matthew Smith, Sickert, Stephen Tomlin (1901-1937) and Eugène Delacroix.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

"Vanessa Bell, who had fallen in love with Duncan Grant before the start of the war, was painting in a farm-cottage on the Sussex coast, living in an uneasy triangle with Duncan and his new lover, David (known as Bunny) Garnett. In 1918 Bell gave birth to Grant’s child, Angelica Bell.” Hermione Lee, “Virginia Woolf” (1996)
Address: Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 01986 873173
Place
Wissett is a village and parish in the Waveney district of Suffolk located at 52.35N 01.46E TM3679 about 2 km (about 1.5 miles) northwest of Halesworth. Historically, it was in the hundred of Blything. It has a population of about 200, measured at 268 in the 2011 Census. Wisset manor was held by Ralph the staller, Baron of Gael in Brittany before the Norman Conquest. Ralph was created Earl of Suffolk and Norfolk in 1067, but his son lost the title and the manor passed to Count Alan of Brittany and Richmond in 1075. The Domesday Book shows that in 1086 Wissett had a church at Rumburgh with two carucates of free land, twelve monks, and a chapel in the village. The XI century flint parish church dedicated to Saint Andrew has a circular church tower with a floor dated to the XII Century. This is the oldest recorded church tower floor in the United Kingdom. Built as a chapel to Rumburgh Priory, the surviving elements of the Norman church are two doors to the nave and the tower arch. The parish is now part of the Blyth Valley Team Ministry in the diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich. Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and David Garnett lived in Wissett for the summer of 1916. Virginia Woolf (Vanessa’s sister) said after visiting them: "Wissett seems to lull asleep all ambition. Don’t you think they have discovered the secret of life? I thought it wonderfully harmonious." Wissett Hall is a red brick manor house owned by Colin Holmes, co-founder of Dencora PLC. The village pub is the Plough Inn. Wissett Wines are produced at the Valley Farm Vineyards by Elaine Heeler and Vanessa Tucker, who brought the business in 2014, Wissett Wines was established in 1987.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981), Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 – April 7, 1961)
David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. He was the son of Constance Clara Garnett (née Black), an English translator of XIX-century Russian literature, one of the first English translators of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Anton Chekhov who introduced them on a wide basis to the English-speaking public, and Edward William Garnett, an English writer, critic and a significant and personally generous literary editor, who was instrumental in getting D. H. Lawrence's “Sons and Lovers” published. As a child, David had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny,” by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. His first wife was illustrator Rachel "Ray" Marshall (1891–1940), sister of translator and diarist Frances Partridge. He and Ray, whose woodcuts appear in some of his books, had two sons, one of whom (Richard) went to Beacon Hill School. Ray died relatively young of breast cancer. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. He was present at the birth of Grant’s daughter, Angelica (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?.” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry (on May 8, 1942), to the horror of her parents.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The house at 45 Quai de Bourbon, on the Ile-St.-Louis, was owned by Prince Antoine Bibesco (who died in 1951). Mina Curtiss, editor of the letters of Marcel Proust, describes it as “the most heavenly house on the prow of the Ile-St.-Louis, with a view of both sides of the Seine… with a room so beautiful it took my breath away – full length Vuillard panels obviously painted to fit on the walls… a princely residence… all elegant, ancient stone…” Duncan Grant stayed here in 1920.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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From 1920 to 1940 Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell had their studio at 8 Fitzroy Street, W1T. “The Armchair, 8 Fitzroy Street” by Duncan Grant, 1925, originally in the Collection of H. Trevor Williams, from whom the paiting was purchased by the Leicester Galleries, and subsequently purchased by the Ministry of Works in Dec. 1958, now hangs at Downing Street. The studio was destroyed by a bombing during WWII.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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In 1922 David Garnett published the highly successful novel, “Lady Into Fox.” The money he made from this book enabled him to buy Hilton Hall, an early XVII century house near Huntingdon.
Address: High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 54022 (Grade II, 1951)
Place
Described as “The most beautiful of all the Bloomsbury houses” by biographer, critic and art historian Frances Spalding, Hilton Hall was bought by David Garnett Fox in 1924. There he entertained many literary friends: T.E. Lawrence would startle the village by roaring up unannounced on his motorbike; Virginia Woolf came and amused his boys by pretending to be a wolf. D.H. Lawrence teased him for living in a Hall, but added: “It’s not at all grand, except in the way a grandmother is grand, by being ancient.” Hilton Hall was built early in the XVII century perhaps by Robert Walpole, (a very distant relative of the prime minister) who died there in 1699 and is buried in Hilton Church. It was refronted and given new sash windows and panelling in the middle of the XVIII century but the fine Jacobean staircase, wide floorboards and moulded beams all remain. Otherwise it has been very little altered except by an extension containing panelling and a bay window salvaged from the ruins of Old Park Farm in Hilton. Behind the house there is a large dovehouse, also of the XVII century, which was used by Garnett’s second wife, Angelica, as a studio. She was the daughter of the Bloomsbury artists Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell, and was herself a noted artist. She has left her mark on the house with a decorated bedroom mantelpiece, a large mural in the dovehouse and a mosaic doorstep. Because of its place in the history of the Bloomsbury Group, and its collection of paintings and sculpture – especially by Angelica’s parents, it has been a popular destination for groups from the Cambridge branch of the Art Fund and the Friends of Kettle Yard. The grounds are all enclosed by hedging and fencing. Swimming pool, kitchen garden.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
The Garnetts lived at Hilton Hall, Hilton near St Ives in Cambridgeshire, where David Garnett kept a herd of Jersey cows. They had four daughters: in order, Amaryllis, Henrietta, and twins Nerissa and Frances; eventually the couple separated. Amaryllis Garnett (1943–1973) was an actress who had a small part in Harold Pinter’s film adaptation of “The Go-Between” (1970.) She drowned in the Thames, aged 29. Henrietta Garnett married Lytton Burgo Partridge, her father’s nephew by his first wife Ray, but was left a widow with a newborn infant when she was 18; she oversaw the legacies of both David Garnett and Duncan Grant. Nerissa Garnett (1946–2004) was an artist, ceramicist, and photographer. Fanny (Frances) Garnett moved to France where she became a farmer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Soon after Duncan Grant and Paul Roche’s initial meeting in 1946, Roche moved into the flat owned by Marjorie Strachey (sister of Lytton Strachey) at 1 Taviton Street, WC1H where Grant had the use of a room for three days a week. Although still serving as a priest at St Mary’s, Cadogan Gardens, Roche often wore a sailor suit (a habit begun during the War) to meet Grant at Victoria Station.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 145 North End Road, Golders Green, Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966) "Writer lived here"
Address: Canonbury Square, London N1 2AL, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Canonbury is a residential district in the London Borough of Islington in the north of London. It is roughly in the area between Essex Road, Upper Street and Cross Street and either side of St Paul’s Road. In 1253 land in the area was granted to the Canons of St Bartholomew’s Priory, Smithfield and became known as Canonbury. The area continued predominantly as open land until it was developed as a suburb in the early XIX century. In common with similar inner London areas, it suffered decline when the construction of railways in the 1860s enabled commuting into the city from further afield. The gentrification of the area from the 1950s included new developments to replace war-damaged properties in Canonbury Park North and South as well as restoration of older buildings. East Canonbury is the south-eastern corner of the district, bordering on the Regents Canal. Parts of this area were transferred to the district from the London Borough of Hackney in a boundary adjustment (along the line of the northern tow-path of the canal), in 1993. In the east is the New River Estate (formerly the Marquess Estate), a 1,200 dwelling council estate, completed in 1976 on 26 acres (110,000 m2), and designed by Darbourne & Darke. A dark red brick, traffic free estate, it was praised as an example of municipal architecture, but acquired a bad reputation and has since been extensively redeveloped to improve security for residents. Canonbury Square is an attractive square, developed between 1805 and 1830, it includes a variety of distinct styles. In 1812, when few properties had been built, the New North Road turnpike, now known as Canonbury Road, was constructed and bisects the square. Many significant figures from the arts and literary worlds have lived on the square, including George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh and Samuel Phelps.
Notable queer residents at Canonbury Square:
• Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626), King James I’s Lord Chancellor, lived in Canonbury Tower, N1 1616-1626
• Evelyn Waugh (October 28, 1903- April 10, 1966), writer, lived at 17a Canonbury Square, N1; he left after a couple of years in 1930, claiming he was tired of having to explain to friends why he was livng in so appalling a district. Waugh lived also at 145 North End Road (London, W14)
• Duncan Grant (1885-1978) and Vanessa Bell (1879-1961), painters and designers, lived at 26a Canonbury Square, N1 from 1949 to 1955.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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28 Percy Street, W1T was the London base for Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant from 1955 to 1961.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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From 1961 to 1970 Duncan Grant stayed at 24 Victoria Square, SW1W. Grant moved here soon after Vanessa Bell’s death, and Paul Roche found him sitting among his unsorted belongings and furniture there in a state of emotional collapse, unable to focus on the mess. “I think it’s simpler just to die,” he told Paul. Clarissa Roche helped brighten his rooms by renewing curtains and covers.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

3 Park Square West, NW1, is part of John Nash's grand scheme for Regent's Park as a setting for the Regent's own palace (never built). It was home of Professor Patrick Trevor-Roper, eminent eye surgeon, from the 1960s to his death in 2004. Trevor-Roper was one of only three witnesses to the Wolfenden Committee on Homosexual Law Reform to identify themselves as gay men - a powerful demonstration of the legal and social pressure on gay men to remain discrete about their sexuality in the early 1960s. Trevor-Roper was committed to homosexual law reform throughout his life. Patrician in his manner, he had many liberal and bohemian friends as well as establishment connections. 3 Park Square West was the venue for the first meeting of the founders of the Terrence Higgins Trust. From 1970, gay artist Duncan Grant spent the last fifteen years of his life as a lodger, living and working in the basement areas of the house and often audible throughout the building due to his love of playing very loud rock music. Led Zeppelin was one of his favourites. Trevor-Roper furnished the house in Regency taste and was a long-standing campaigner - ultimately successful - against the opticians dispensing monopoly of spectacles. He also supported conservationists battles against the destruction by developers of historic areas of London; the house was the initial office of both the Spitalfields Trust and Twentieth Century Society.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cristóbal Balenciaga Eizaguirre was a Spanish Basque fashion designer and the founder of the Balenciaga fashion house.
Born: January 21, 1895, Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain
Died: March 23, 1972, Xàbia, Spain
Lived: Cristobal Balenciaga Museum, Aldamar Parkea, 6, 20808 Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain (43.30188, -2.20494)
Buried: Cementerio de Getaria (Getaria), San Sebastian, Provincia de Guipuzcoa, País Vasco, Spain
Label: Balenciaga
Other name: Cristobal Balentziaga Eizagirre (Basque)
Parents: Martina Eizaguirre Embil, José Balenciaga Basurto
Organization founded: Balenciaga

The Balenciaga Museum is located in Getaria, just 25Km from San Sebastian, and makes an ideal daytrip from Guipuzcoa’s capital. Whilst the museum is well worth a visit in itself, Getaria is also one of the prettiest coastal towns in the region.
Address: Aldamar Parkea, 6, 20808 Getaria, Gipuzkoa, Spain (43.30188, -2.20494)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +34 943 00 88 40
Place
The Balenciaga Museum (Cristobal Balenciaga museoa) opened on June 7th 2011. Getaria was chosen as it is the birthplace of the renowned designer, and the museum became the first in the world to be dedicated entirely to the work of a fashion designer. The museum is housed in a building connected to the Aldamar Palace, the former residence of the Marquis and Marquise of Casa Torre, grandparents of Queen Fabiola of Belgium and mentors to Balenciaga in his early days. The building consists of four floors divided into three large spaces and six halls. One section of the museum showcases a rotating selection of the designer’s pieces, some of which are part of the Balenciaga Foundation’s own Collection, as well as others belonging to private individuals. In addition to this, the museum plays host to various temporary exhibitions and leisure activities. The building itself is also well worth seeing for its interesting combination of tradition and modernity in a single structure.
Life
Who: Cristóbal Balenciaga Eizaguirre (January 21, 1895 – March 23, 1972)
Cristóbal Balenciaga was a Spanish Basque fashion designer and the founder of the Balenciaga fashion house. He had a reputation as a couturier of uncompromising standards and was referred to as "the master of us all" by Christian Dior and as "the only couturier in the truest sense of the word" by Coco Chanel, who continued "The others are simply fashion designers". He continues to be revered as the supreme deity of the European salons. On the day of his death, in 1972, Women's Wear Daily ran the headline "The king is dead" (no one in the fashion world had any doubt as to whom it referred). Balenciaga was born in Getaria, a fishing town in the Basque province of Gipuzkoa, on January 21, 1895. His mother was a seamstress, and as a child Balenciaga often spent time with her as she worked. At the age of twelve, he began work as the apprentice of a tailor. When Balenciaga was a teenager, the Marchioness de Casa Torres, the foremost noblewoman in his town, became his customer and patron. She sent him to Madrid, where he was formally trained in tailoring. Balenciaga was homosexual, although he kept his sexuality private throughout his life. The love of his life and long time partner was Franco-Russian milliner Vladzio Zawrorowski d'Attainville, who he met in the 1920s and had helped fund setting him up. When d'Attainville died in 1948, Balenciaga was so broken he almost considered closing the business. In 1960 he made the wedding dress for Fabiola de Mora y Aragón when she married king Baudouin I of Belgium. The Queen later donated her wedding dress to the Cristóbal Balenciaga Foundation. On 7 June 2011, the Balenciaga Museum was inaugurated in his hometown of Getaria by Queen Sofía of Spain and with the presence of Hubert de Givenchy, honorific president of the Balenciaga Foundation. The museum has a collection of more than 1,200 pieces designed by Balenciaga, part of them donations by disciples like Givenchy or clients, like Queen Fabiola of Belgium and the heirs of Grace Kelly. Balenciaga is buried at Cementerio de Getaria, San Sebastian.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Christian Dior was a French fashion designer, best known as the founder of one of the world's top fashion houses, also called Christian Dior, which is now owned by Groupe Arnault.
Born: January 21, 1905, Granville, France
Died: October 23, 1957, Montecatini Terme
Education: Sciences Po
Lived: 220, Route Départementale 562, 83440 Montauroux, France (43.59805, 6.78831)
Buried: Cimetière de Callian, Callian, Departement du Var, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Siblings: Catherine Dior, Raymond Dior, Jacqueline Dior, Bernard Dior
Parents: Maurice Dior, Isabelle Cardamone

Christian Dior’s love for this land was born in the 1930s, when his family, ruined by the stock market crash, had to leave Normandy to take refuge in the South. Dior’s father acquired a modest home, Les Nayssées, in Callian, and it is here that his son discovered himself "peasant in the heart".
Address: 220, Route Départementale 562, 83440 Montauroux, France (43.59805, 6.78831)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +33 4 94 39 01 40
Place
The château de La Colle Noire is a residence located at the entrance of the Pays de Fayence, on the border of the Alpes-Maritimes and the Var. It is built on a promontory overlooking the plain of Montauroux. The castle is surrounded by a park with a chapel dedicated to Sainte-Anne. The ensemble dates back to the mid-XIX century and was completely redesigned by Christian Dior from 1950. It is property of Parfums Christian Dior since 2013. From the XV century to the beginning of the XIX century, the site is described in various ways: La Colle Narbonne, La Colle, La Colle Noire, logis de La Colle. However, it was from 1826 that the domain really took shape, when Henri-Emmanuel Poulle (1792-1877), lawyer, first president of the Court of Aix-en-Provence and deputy of the Var, from an old family of Montauroux, becomes owner of the "domaine de La Colle", which by extension will take the name of the neighboring hamlet to become the "domaine de La Colle Noire". Beginning in 1839, Henri-Emmanuel Poulle created a relais des Postes on the estate, the building of which would probably serve as a base for the future castle. Over time, through various acquisitions, the estate reaches an area of more than 100 hectares, becoming a vast agricultural operation, composed mainly of plowing, pastures, vines and muriers. It was in 1858, at the age of 66, that Henri-Emmanuel Poulle decided to build a residence there for his retirement. The construction will last three years, from 1858 to 1861. The facade with its two emblematic towers, dominating the valley, dates from that time. It was also during this period that Poulle had a chapel dedicated to Sainte Anne, referring to her daughter Anne-Victoire. Henri-Emmanuel Poulle also built a chapel dedicated to Saint Barthélémy in the village of Montauroux, near the parish church. Due to the loss of his title, it could not be sold as a national asset during the French Revolution and was removed from vandalism during the revolution of 1870. It passed into the patrimony of Poulle and was transmitted to Christian Dior who offered it to the commune of Montauroux in 1953. Built in 1634 by the Pénitents Blancs (White Penitents,) it still presents today a decor painted on wood of which are adorned the walls as well as the vault. At the death of Henri-Emmanuel Poulle in 1877, the property passed to his daughter, Anne-Victoire (1827-1894), married to Félix Reibaud, maître des Postes du secteur. Anne-Victoire, very pious, obtained from the Bishop of Frejus that the priest of Montauroux could say mass at the Sainte-Anne chapel on the property every Sunday except at Christmas, Easter and other feasts. The inhabitants of the neighborhood then took the habit of coming to hear Mass at La Colle Noire. The Sainte-Anne chapel is still consecrated today. On the death of Anne-Victoire in 1894, his son Paul Félix Honoré Reibaud inherited the estate of La Colle Noire. Head of office at the Ministry of Justice in Paris, he had no interest in this property. Abandoned, the property was sold to a businessman named Fayolle, whose widow resold the estate in 1921 to Pierre Grosselin. On October 25, 1950, the property, with an area of 50 hectares, made up of a noble house, agricultural buildings and land cultivated mainly in vines and flowers, was bought by Christian Dior.
Life
Who: Christian Dior (January 21, 1905 – October 24, 1957)
Christian Dior acquires the property in a region that he knew well. His father, widow since 1931, lived in the plain of Callian with his young sister Catherine, inspiration of the perfume Miss Dior. "And then Miss Dior was born. It was born from those evenings of Provence crossed by fireflies where the green jasmine serves as a counter-song to the melody of the night and the earth". It is therefore in this Provence dear to his heart, in the inaccessible Var inland that Christian Dior will develop his house, far from Paris and 30 Avenue Montaigne, home of his couture house. "It is in Montauroux, near Callian, where a good star had allowed me, fifteen years ago, to find tranquility and prepare a new existence. Of the house, I cannot say much because I'm doing it. It is simple, solid and noble, and its serenity suits the period of life that I will have to tackle in a few years. That house, I wish it to be my real home. Where - if God lends me long life - I can retire. Where - if I have the means - I can close the loop of my existence and find, under another climate, the closed garden that protected my childhood. That is where I can finally live quiet, forgetting Christian Dior to just become Christian again. It is at Montauroux that I write these last lines." It was to the Russian architect André Svétchine that Christian Dior entrusted the restoration and renovation of La Colle Noire from 1955 onwards. His friends Raymonde Zehnacker in Mougins and then Marc Chagall in Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat and in Saint-Paul-de-Vence also used the same architect, then specialized in the transformation of "rural dwellings, neither simple farms nor real castles". The stone was laid bare, the perspectives restored and enlarged, the accesses rethought with the transformation of the service wing into a main entrance. Planted with cypresses, this walkway leads to the hexagonal entrance hall, a sort of atrium designed by Christian Dior himself, where the Provençal calade floor draws a pattern of wind-colored roses, dear to his childhood in Normandy. To this facade located in the North responds the South facade, asymmetric, in the style of Provençal villa of the years 1940-50. It is reflected in a 45 meter long water mirror, also designed by Christian Dior, showing a contrast between the sinuosity of the landscape and the rigor of its straight lines. Completely redesigned, the distribution includes a large staircase with zenital lighting leading to "rooms to give" to friends of passage, a succession of reception rooms, including the large living room measuring more than 18 meters opening onto a terrace overlooking the mirror of water. Combining vintage furniture, comfort from the 1950s, references to Provence or England, "it is an art of living that Christian Dior wanted to invent at the Colle Noire", André Svétchine declared. The reception rooms and apartment of Christian Dior are furnished with eclecticism, decorated with objects of the XVIII and XIX centuries bought from antique dealers, while some rooms have the Louis XV or Louis XVI styles "among a multitude of other styles”. If Provence has inspired Christian Dior to create Miss Dior in 1947, it is the lily of the valley of the Colle Noire that is at the origin of Diorissimo, created in 1956 by Edmond Roudnitska. It is this tradition that inspired to François Demachy, perfume-creator of Parfums Christian Dior, La Col Noire, whose flowers come from the rose field in May, planted as a tribute in the park of the estate. After the death of Christian Dior on October 23, 1957, her sister Catherine inherited the estate but she cannot keep it and in 2013 the company Parfums Christian Dior bought La Colle Noire. Before this acquisition, the property belonged to the Laroche, owners of La Reserve in Beaulieu, then to Mr. and Mrs. Tassou. After an intense restoration begun in 2015, La Colle Noire was inaugurated by the Parfums Christian Dior on May 9, 2016 in the presence of Charlize Theron, regaining its vocation to welcome "the friends of the house". Christian Dior lies in a very simple tomb near his father, his housekeeper and his sister Catherine, who died in 2008, in the cemetery of Callian, near the chapel of Saint-Barthélemy.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Antonio D'Amico is a model and fashion designer. He is best known as the partner of Gianni Versace.
Born: January 21, 1959 (age 57), Mesagne

Gianni Versace’s influence and artistic vision are evident throughout the gated property, which features an opulent 10-bedroom, 11-bathroom Mediterranean villa decorated with hand-painted walls and ceiling frescos.
Address: 1116 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach, FL 33139, USA (25.7819, -80.13044)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 786-485-2200
Place
Built in 1930
The house was built in Mediterranean Revival style, commissioned by architect Alden Freeman. There is a rumour that during construction a time capsule was hidden in one of the walls. When Freeman died in 1937 the house was bought by Jacques Amsterdam who changed it into an apartment building naming it The Amsterdam Palace. In 1992 it was purchased by Gianni Versace to become his residence in South Beach. He restored and expanded the building by adding a south wing and a pool. Versace completely redecorated it. Gianni Versace and his partner Antonio D’Amico were regulars on the international party scene. A lot of famous people stayed in the house. Versace was murdered outside his Miami Beach home, the former Casa Casuarina now known as The Villa, at the age of 50 by Andrew Cunanan, a male prostitute and crazed C.S. Lewis fan. The Mansion now operates as a hotel, restaurant and event location. The restaurant is Il Sole at The Villa Casa Casuarina.
Note: The Hilton Garden Inn Miami South Beach - Royal Polo, formerly Embassy Hotel (2940 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, FL 33140) was the early location of Miami's Jewel Box Revue, from 1936 to 1939, featuring several dozen female impersonators and one male impersonator.
Life
Who: Giovanni Maria Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997)
Gianni Versace was an Italian fashion designer and founder of Versace, an international fashion house, which produces accessories, fragrances, make-up and home furnishings as well as clothes. He also designed costumes for the theatre and films. As a friend of Eric Clapton, Diana, Princess of Wales, Naomi Campbell, Madonna, Elton John, Cher, Sting and many other celebrities, he was the first designer to link fashion to the music world. Versace met his partner Antonio D’Amico, a model, in 1982. Their relationship lasted until Versace’s murder. During that time, D’Amico worked as a designer for the company, becoming head designer for Istante and Versus Sport. Versace’s will left D’Amico with a lifelong pension of 50 million lire (about US$26,000) per month, and the right to live in any of Versace’s homes in Italy and the United States. However, due to Versace family’s interference he only obtained a fraction of these allowances.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Villa Fontanelle is a villa (sometimes called a Palazzo) near Moltrasio on Lake Como, Lombardy, Italy, about 50 kilometres (31 mi) from Milan. The four-storey yellow-painted building was built in the first half of the XIX century by the eccentric Lord Charles Currie, a visiting Englishman who fell in love with Lake Como. Failing to find a villa for sale, he decided to create his own, right on the water’s edge.
Address: 22010 Moltrasio CO, Italy (45.85111, 9.08944)
Type: Private Property
Place
By 1977, when it was bought by the Italian designer Gianni Versace, it was in a state of abandonment, and the designer set about restoring it to its former neoclassical glory. The work, completed in December 1980, included landscaping the three acres (1.2 Ha) of ornamental gardens, which include three cottages, a tennis court, water frontage of some 800m and a private mooring. Versace personally chose hundreds of oil paintings and with other artworks displayed throughout the interior and exterior, he created a mini-palace that was a personal shrine. Before Versace’s death celebrities, such as Sir Elton John, Sting, Diana, Princess of Wales and Madonna, were regular guests at the property. Since the death of Versace in 1997, however, only American singer Jennifer Lopez and her husband Chris Judd were known to have visited, having spent their honeymoon there in 2001. Otherwise the property was a largely lifeless temple to Gianni Versace, and his taste for the adolescent male body. The estate is now owned by Russian millionaire restaurateur Arkady Novikov who bought it for 33 million Euros in early 2008 and retained Milanese architect Claudio Pozza to undertake restoration works at the property.
Life
Who: Gianni Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997)
Gianni Versace was an Italian fashion designer and founder of Versace. As a friend of Eric Clapton, Diana, Princess of Wales, Naomi Campbell, Madonna, Elton John, Cher, Sting, and many other celebrities, he was the first designer to link fashion to the music world. Openly homosexual, Versace and his partner Antonio D'Amico were regulars on the international party scene. Versace was murdered outside his Miami Beach home, the former Casa Casuarina now known as "The Villa," at the age of 50 by Andrew Cunanan. Versace's body was cremated and his ashes returned to the family's estate near Cernobbio, Italy. He is buried at Moltrasio cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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