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Hilda Maria Käkikoski was a Finnish politician, writer and schoolteacher. She was one of the first nineteen women elected to Finnish parliament in 1906.
Born: January 31, 1864
Died: November 14, 1912, Helsinki, Finland
Buried: Karjalohja
Buried alongside: Hildi Ennola

Karjalohja, or Karislojo in Swedish, is a former municipality of Finland. It is located in the province of Southern Finland and is part of the Uusimaa region. The municipality has a population of 1,474 (31 December 2012) and covers an area of 163.40 square kilometres (63.09 sq mi) of which 42.11 km2 (16.26 sq mi) is water. Karjalohja was consolidated with the town of Lohja on 1 January 2013. The municipality is unilingually Finnish.
Address: Keskustie 30, 09120 Karjalohja, Finland (60.24211, 23.71949)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Life
Who: Hilda Maria Käkikoski (January 31, 1864 – November 14, 1912)
Hilda Käkikoski was a Finnish politician, writer and schoolteacher. She was one of the first nineteen women elected to Finnish parliament in 1906. Käkikoski was born Hilda Maria Sjöström in Lapinjärvi in 1864. She moved to Helsinki by herself at the age of 14 to attend a girls' high school with a scholarship. There, she changed her Swedish surname to Käkikoski, the Finnish surname of her neighbours. After finishing school, she worked as a home tutor until 1888 when she enrolled in university; she completed a PhD in Finnish and Nordic history in 1895. She went on to become a teacher at a Helsinki school, teaching classes in history and the Finnish language from 1891 until 1902. As Käkikoski developed an interest in feminism and women's suffrage, she became an active member of the Finnish Women's Association, and wrote numerous articles for the association's magazine. She was elected its vice president in 1895 and held the position until 1904. In 1906, she ran for election with the conservative Finnish Party to the newly established Parliament of Finland; the 1906 election marked the first that women were able to vote and be voted in. Käkikoski won the vote in her district, Uusimaa, and became one of the first 19 women elected to parliament. She did not stand for re-election in 1910 due to health problems. Käkikoski's literary work included children's songs, poetry and short stories. In 1902, she began writing a four-volume account of Finnish history. She continued working on the project until her death in 1912, but the work was never completed. One of her early relationships was with schoolteacher and activist Fanny Pajula, with whom she lived for six years until 1895. Later in life, Käkikoski was romantically involved with her married friend Hildi Ennola, her American friend Frances Weiss, deaconess Hanna Masalin, and political activist Helmi Kivalo; Käkikoski maintained involvement in all of these relationships until her death in 1912. Käkikoski is buried in Karjalohja, close to the grave of Hildi Ennola. A statue honouring her can be found in Porlammi.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Florence Yoch was an American landscape architect in California who was active from 1915 through the 1950s. Her career included commissions for private residential clients, parks, public spaces, and film sets for Hollywood movies.
Born: July 15, 1890
Died: 1972
Education: Cornell University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Florence Yoch and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the 20th century in Southern California. Yoch began practicing in 1918 and in over 53 years completed more than 250 projects. Council became an apprentice to the firm in 1921 and as partners they lived and worked together until Council’s death in 1964. Their work range from grand estates to campuses, parks, even a botanical garden and five movie sets. The works of Florence Yoch & Lucile Council are documented in the book Landscaping the American dream: the gardens and film sets of Florence Yoch, 1890-1972. Film director Dorothy Arzner introduced Yoch to such distinguished Hollywood personages as Jack Warner and David Selznick, for whom Yoch designed the Tara set for Gone with the Wind. Architect W. C. Tanner designed a Greek temple mansion for Arzner and her lifelong companion, dancer-choreographer Marion Morgan in 1930. Florence Yoch designed the original gardens, with "elaborate horticultural layouts" i.e. hanging gardens. The property, declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, is currently available for sale priced at $3,495,000. “Florence Yoch and Lucille Council were widely recognized as two of the finest garden designers and landscape architects in California.” --U.S. News & World Report.
Together from 1921 to 1964: 43 years.
Florence Yoch (1890 – January 31, 1972)
Lucile Council (1898–1964)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Dora Lewis, also known as Mrs. Lawrence Lewis, was an American suffragist. She was active in the National American Woman Suffrage Association and later helped found the National Woman's Party.
Born: 1862
Died: 1928
Buried: Saint James the Less Episcopal Churchyard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA

Dora Lewis (1862-1928) was an American suffragist. She was active in the National American Woman Suffrage Association and later helped found the National Woman's Party. She was a long-life friend of Alice Paul. She is buried at Saint James the Less Cemetery (3227 W Clearfield St, Philadelphia, PA 19132).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Michael Derek Elworthy Jarman was an English film director, stage designer, diarist, artist, gardener and author.
Born: January 31, 1942, Northwood, London, United Kingdom
Died: February 19, 1994, London, United Kingdom
Education: Slade School of Fine Art
King's College London
Canford School
University College London
Lived: Prospect Cottage, Dungeness Rd, Romney Marsh TN29 9NE, UK (50.92251, 0.97607)
104 Charing Cross Road, WC2H
51 Upper Ground, SE1
13 Bankside, SE1
Block A1, 3rd floor, Butler's Wharf West, 40 Shad Thames, SE1
Buried: St Clement, Old Romney & Midley, Kent, TN299QH
Books: Derek Jarman's Garden, more
Artwork: TB or Not TB, Sightless, more
Awards: Teddy Award for Best Feature Film, more

In both his films and his writings, Derek Jarman's explicit project was to celebrate gay sexuality and imagine a place for it in English culture. At the Tyneside Film festival in 1987, he met Kevin Collins who was then 21. He had recently graduated and was writing software for the Government. He had been brought up in a village near Newcastle by parents who were socialists and devout Methodists. Jarman pursued Collins by letter and within a few months, Collins went to London and moved in with Jarman. They both were committed campaigners with OutRage! Collins nursed Jarman for the final seven years of his life. The Garden is a 1990 British art-house film by director Derek Jarman produced by James Mackay for Basilisk Communications in association with Channel 4, British Screen and ZDF. It focuses on homosexuality and Christianity set against a backdrop of Jarman's bleak coastal home of Dungeness in Kent, and his garden and the nearby landscape surrounding a nuclear power station, a setting Jarman compares to the Garden of Eden. Collins continues to oversee and manage the famous gardens built by Jarman at his house 'Prospect Cottage,' in Dungeness, Kent, England.
Together from 1987 to 1994: 7 years.
Derek Jarman (January 31, 1942 – February 19, 1994)
Kevin Collins (born 1966)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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“The Garden” is a 1990 British arthouse film by director Derek Jarman produced by James Mackay for Basilisk Communications in association with Channel 4, British Screen and ZDF. It focuses on homosexuality and Christianity set against a backdrop of Jarman’s bleak coastal home of Dungeness in Kent, and his garden and the nearby landscape surrounding a nuclear power station, a setting Jarman compares to the Garden of Eden. Kevin Collins plays the role of one of the two gay lovers.
Address: Dungeness Rd, Romney Marsh TN29 9NE, UK (50.92251, 0.97607)
Type: Private Property
Place
Prospect Cottage was the home of film maker Derek Jarman at the end of his life. Despite being an inexperienced gardener and living in one of the most hostile gardening environments imaginable, he created a masterpiece, near Dungeness nuclear power station, using tolerant plants and materials found discarded nearby. Jarman believed that the Pilot Inn, nearby, provides “Simply the finest fish and chips in all England.” The garden design style is postmodern and highly context-sensitive - a complete rejection of modernist design theory. He disliked the sterility of modernism; he despised its lack of interest in poetry, allusion and stories; he deplored the techno-cruelty exemplified in Dr. D. G. Hessayon’s “How to be an expert” series of garden books. Jarman’s small circles of flint reminded him of standing stones and dolmens. He remarked that “Paradise haunts gardens, and some gardens are paradises. Mine is one of them. Others are like bad children, spoilt by their parents, over-watered and covered with noxious chemicals.” The poem on the black timber wall of Derek Jarman’s cottage is from John Donne’s poem “The Sun Rising” and reads:
Busy old fool, unruly Sun,
Why dost thou thus,
Through windows, and through curtains, call on us ?
Must to thy motions lovers’ seasons run ?
Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide
Late school-boys and sour prentices,
Go tell court-huntsmen that the king will ride,
Call country ants to harvest offices;
Love, all alike, no season knows nor clime,
Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.
In that the world’s contracted thus;
Thine age asks ease, and since thy duties be
To warm the world, that’s done in warming us.
Shine here to us, and thou art everywhere;
This bed thy center is, these walls thy sphere
Life
Who: Michael Derek Elworthy Jarman (January 31, 1942 – February 19, 1994)
Derek Jarman was a film director, stage designer, diarist, artist, gardener and author. On Dec. 22, 1986, Jarman was diagnosed as HIV positive and discussed his condition in public. His illness prompted him to move to Prospect Cottage. In 1994, he died of an AIDS-related illness in London, aged 52. Jarman was buried in the graveyard at St Clement (Old Romney & Midley, Kent, TN299QH). Jarman’s surviving muse Keith Collins and Siouxsie and the Banshees founder Steven Severin both participated in the making of the film “Delphinium: A Childhood Portrait of Derek Jarman” (2009), which had its world premiere at the 2009 Reykjavik International Film Festival in Iceland, its UK premiere at the Raindance Film Festival in London, and its California premiere at the 2010 Frameline International Film Festival in San Francisco. In 2011 the film was permanently installed in the British Film Institute’s National Film Archive in London.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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The artist and filmmaker Derek Jarman rented a studio flat at 104 Charing Cross Road, WC2H from 1984 until his death from AIDS in 1994. He shared it with Keith Collins. The flat is in the same building as the Phoenix Theatre, on the fourth floor. Jarman lived there from the early 1980s until he moved full-time to Prospect Cottage in Dungeness. Jarman wrote much in his published diaries about life at number 19 Phoenix House, which he used as the production office for several of his films, including “Caravaggio” and “War Requiem,” and for the music videos he made for The Smiths, Pet Shop Boys and Bob Geldof. There are no reminders of the Jarman era, except on film, but the flat does still have its original 1930s kitchen - retro chic amid the white walls and pale wood floors - and the same terrific view. The building, once the Phoenix Theatre, is Grade II listed, built in 1929-30 by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, Cecil Masey & Bertie Crewe. For Sydney Bernstein. Interior by Theodore Komisarjevsky.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1968, Derek Jarman had his first taste of riverside living in a house on the South Bank awaiting demolition, where he shared studio space with Peter Logan and the painter Tony Fry. Shortly afterwards he moved to a warehouse at 51 Upper Ground, SE1 near the corner of Blackfriars Road, a place that was to become “a Mecca for London's avant-garde” with its parties thrown by Jarman with Peter and Andrew Logan. Guests at the farewell party in the summer of 1970 included Tennessee Williams and “Ossie Clark, dispensing joints on the stairs.” Shortly afterwards the building was demolished to make way for the IPC Tower. Next stop was 13 Bankside, SE1 on the top floor of a riverside warehouse alongside Southwark Bridge. To cope with the cold in the warehouse, Jarman famously set up a greenhouse for his bedroom. Bankside too became famous for parties, and for film showings as Jarman began experimenting with Super 8. In summer 1972, Jarman had to move again to make way for another demolition, filming a final walk of the area called “One Last Walk One Last Look.” The following year, Jarman moved to a new home/studio in a semi-derelict warehouse at Butler's Wharf West, 40 Shad Thames, SE1 next to Tower Bridge. Jarman lived on the third floor of Block A1, with neighbours including Andrew and Peter Logan. On the waste ground next door Jarman filmed the ritualistic fire scenes for “In the Shadow of the Sun,” with a fire maze, candles and flashing mirrors. The finished film was finally released in 1981 with a soundtrack from Throbbing Gristle. “Jubilee” was also filmed locally in Southwark and Rotherhithe, and at the former dockside in Deptford where Jordan was filmed dancing round a fire including a burning Union Jack. Parties at Butlers Wharf included the 1975 Alternative Miss World, which Jarman took part in as “Miss Crepe Suzette” and one in 1978 when Adam and the Ants played. Jarman moved out in 1979. Revisiting in 1991, Jarman noted “The money has gilded the heart of it... everything else is scrubbed all the fun vanished.” (Source: Neil Gordon-Orr)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Brad Gooch is an American writer.
Born: January 31, 1952 (age 64), Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Columbia University
Lived: Hotel Chelsea
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada
Nominations: Lambda Literary Award for Gay Men's Biography/Autobiography

The Hotel Chelsea – also called the Chelsea Hotel, or simply the Chelsea – is a historic New York City hotel and landmark, known primarily for the notability of its residents over the years.
Address: 222 W 23rd St, New York, NY 10011, USA (40.74431, -73.9969)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone:+1 616-918-8770
National Register of Historic Places: 77000958, 1977
Place
Built between 1883 and 1885, Design by Hubert, Pirsson & Company (Philip Gengembre Hubert (1830-1911) and James W. Pirrson (1833-1888))
Opened for initial occupation in 1884, the twelve-story red-brick building that is now the Hotel Chelsea was one of the city’s first private apartment cooperatives. It was designed in a style that has been described variously as Queen Anne Revival and Victorian Gothic. Among its distinctive features are the delicate, flower-ornamented iron balconies on its facade, which were constructed by J.B. and J.M. Cornell and its grand staircase, which extends upward twelve floors. Generally, this staircase is only accessible to registered guests, although the hotel does offer monthly tours to others. At the time of its construction, the building was the tallest in New York. Hubert and Pirsson had created a "Hubert Home Club" in 1880 for "The Rembrandt,” a six-story building on West 57th Street intended as housing for artists. This early cooperative building had rental units to help defray costs, and also provided servants as part of the building staff. The success of this model led to other "Hubert Home Clubs,” and the Chelsea was one of them. Initially successful, its surrounding neighborhood constituted the center of New York’s theater district. However within a few years the combination of economic stresses, the suspicions of New York’s middle class about apartment living, the opening up of Upper Manhattan and the plentiful supply of houses there, and the relocation of the city’s theater district, bankrupted the Chelsea. In 1905, the building reopened as a hotel, which was later managed by Knott Hotels and resident manager A.R. Walty. After the hotel went bankrupt, it was purchased in 1939 by Joseph Gross, Julius Krauss, and David Bard, and these partners managed the hotel together until the early 1970s. With the passing of Joseph Gross and Julius Krauss, the management fell to Stanley Bard, David Bard’s son. On 18 June, 2007, the hotel’s board of directors ousted Bard as the hotel’s manager. Dr. Marlene Krauss, the daughter of Julius Krauss, and David Elder, the grandson of Joseph Gross and the son of playwright and screenwriter Lonne Elder III, replaced Stanley Bard with the management company BD Hotels NY; that firm has since been terminated as well. In May, 2011, the hotel was sold to real estate developer Joseph Chetrit for US$80 million. As of August 1, 2011, the hotel stopped taking reservations for guests in order to begin renovations, but long-time residents remain in the building, some of them protected by state rent regulations. The renovations prompted complaints by the remaining tenants of health hazards caused by the construction. These were investigated by the city’s Building Department, which found no major violations. In Nov. 2011, the management ordered all of the hotel’s many artworks taken off the walls, supposedly for their protection and cataloging, a move which some tenants interpreted as a step towards forcing them out as well. In 2013, Ed Scheetz became the Chelsea Hotel’s new owner after buying back five properties from Joseph Chetrit, his partner in King & Grove Hotels, and David Bistricer. Hotel Chelsea is now managed by Chelsea Hotels, formerly King & Grove Hotels. Restoration and renovation is underway and Hotel Chelsea plans to reopen in 2016.
Notable queer resident at Hotel Chelsea:
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997), novelist, short story writer, satirist, essayist, painter, and spoken word performer. A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author who wrote in the paranoid fiction genre, he is considered to be "one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the XX century.”
• Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008) wrote “2001: A Space Odyssey” while staying at the Chelsea.
• Quentin Crisp (1908-1999), writer and raconteur. His first stay in the Hotel Chelsea coincided with a fire, a robbery, and the death of Nancy Spungen.
• Musician, gay civil rights icon and Stonewall veteran Stormé DeLarverie (1920-2014) resided at the hotel for several decades.
• Poets Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) and Gregory Corso (1930-2001) chose it as a place for philosophical and artistic exchange.
• Brad Gooch (born 1952), writer. His 2015 memoir “Smash Cut” recounts life in 1970s and 1980s New York City, including the time Gooch spent as a fashion model, life with his then-boyfriend filmmaker Howard Brookner, living in the famous Chelsea Hotel and the first decade of the AIDS crisis.
• Herbert Huncke (1915-1996), writer and poet. In his last few years, he lived in room 828, where his rent came from financial support from Jerry Garcia of The Grateful Dead, whom Huncke never met. Herbert Huncke died in 1996 at age 81.
• Iggy Pop (born 1947), singer-songwriter, musician and actor. Pop’s career received a boost from his relationship with David Bowie when Bowie decided in 1972 to produce an album with Pop in England.
• Charles R. Jackson (1903-1968), author of “The Lost Weekend,” committed suicide in his room on September 21, 1968.
• Jasper Johns (born 1930), painter and printmaker. In 1954, after returning to New York, Johns met Robert Rauschenberg and they became long-term lovers. For a time they lived in the same building as Rachel Rosenthal. In the same period he was strongly influenced by the gay couple Merce Cunningham (a choreographer) and John Cage (a composer.)
• Jack Kerouac (1922-1969), who wrote “On the Road” there.
• Lance Loud (1951-2001), television personality, magazine columnist and new wave rock-n-roll performer. Loud is best known for his 1973 appearance in “An American Family,” a pioneer reality television series that featured his coming out, leading to his status as an icon in the gay community.
• Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-1989), photographer, known for his sensitive yet blunt treatment of controversial subject-mater in the large-scale, highly stylized black and white medium of photography. The homoeroticism of this work fuelled a national debate over the public funding of controversial artwork.
• Larry Rivers (1923-2002), artist, musician, filmmaker and occasional actor. Poet Jeni Olin was his companion. Rivers also sustained a relationship with poet Frank O’Hara in the late 1950s and delivered the eulogy at O’Hara’s funeral in 1966.
• Patti Smith (born 1946), singer-songwriter, poet and visual artist. On November 17, 2010, she won the National Book Award for her memoir “Just Kids.” The book fulfilled a promise she had made to her former long-time roommate and partner, Robert Mapplethorpe.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989), composer and critic. In 1925 in Paris, he cemented his relationship with painter Maurice Grosser (1903-1986), who was to become his life partner and frequent collaborator. He and Grosser lived at Hotel Chelsea, where he presided over a largely gay salon that attracted many of the leading figures in music and art and theather, including Leonard Bernstein, Tennessee Williams, and many others. Virgil Thomson died on September 30, 1989, in his suite at the Hotel Chelsea in Manhattan, aged 92.
• Gore Vidal (1925-2012), writer and a public intellectual known for his patrician manner, epigrammatic wit, and polished style of writing.
• Rufus Wainwright (born 1973), lived in the Chelsea Hotel in New York City for six months, during which he wrote most of his second album.
• Tennessee Williams (1911-1983), playwright and author of many stage classics. Along with Eugene O’Neill and Arthur Miller he is considered among the three foremost playwrights in XX century American drama.
• Hotel Chelsea is often associated with the Warhol superstars, as Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey directed “Chelsea Girls” (1966), a film about his Factory regulars and their lives at the hotel. Chelsea residents from the Warhol scene included Edie Sedgwick, Viva, Ultra Violet, Mary Woronov, Holly Woodlawn, Andrea Feldman, Nico, Paul America, René Ricard, and Brigid Berlin.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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