reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Forman Brown was one of the world's leaders in puppet theatre in his day, as well as an important early gay novelist. He was a member of the Yale Puppeteers and the driving force behind Turnabout Theatre.
Born: 1901, Otsego, Michigan, United States
Died: 1996, Los Angeles, California, United States
Education: University of Michigan
Books: Better Angel, The Generous Jefferson Bartleby Jones
Movies: Bandits and Ballads, An Old Spanish Onion
People also search for: Leslie Trawin, Friedrich Hollaender, Alfred J. Goulding, Stanley Rauh, Edward Mann, Bert Gilroy
Lived: Turnabout House, 1141 N El Centro Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90038, USA (34.09186, -118.32464)

Forman Brown was one of the world's leaders in puppet theatre in his day, as well as an important early gay novelist. Along with Yale Puppeteers Harry Burnett and Richard Brandon (Brown's life-long lover), Brown launched Turnabout Theatre in 1941 as "a vehicle for performing both puppet plays and revues for adults.” It attracted celebrity attention and support from some of Hollywood's biggest names, e.g., Greta Garbo, Marie Dressler, and Douglas Fairbanks, as well as other notable figures including Albert Einstein. In 1933, Brown wrote, under the pseudonym Richard Meeker, a novel called Better Angel about a young man coming to terms with his homosexuality. This novel is regarded as "the first American novel to present the 'gay' experience in a healthy light." Richard Brandon, the youngest of the three Yale Puppeteers, was the first to die. He was 80 when he died at Turnabout House in Hollywood, the home the three men had occupied for the last several years.
Together from 1928 to 1985: 57 years.
Forman Brown aka Richard Meeker (January 8, 1901 - January 10, 1996)
Richard Brandon (1905 – May 4, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

This was the home of the Turnabout Players, Forman Brown, Harry Burnett, and Roddy Brandon. These three gay men, who lived together as a family for over sixty years, founded Hollywood's Turnabout Theater. They took the city by storm in the 1940s and 1950s. Forman Brown was also the author of “Better Angel,” an autobiographical novel published in 1933, often considered the first American gay novel. It was published under the pen name, Richard Meeker.
Address: 1141 N El Centro Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90038, USA (34.09186, -118.32464)
Type: Private Property
Place
“Since the mid-1970s, I’d been attending Harry and Forman’s annual birthday party or dragging friends to performances they presented for longtime fans on the small stage of a big, ramshackle Hollywood home they shared. Turnabout House was almost as enchanting as the theatre itself. Leaving today’s decaying Hollywood, one stepped back into 1927, to a world crowded with dusty photos of mostly forgotten stars, posters, and memorabilia from the puppeteers’ touring days, and pictures of the artists who populated their several theaters. Like most old troupers, whose real terror is that nobody will ask, Forman played the shy schoolboy then quickly let himself be talked into plunking down at the piano to sing three or four of his hundreds of songs. Before a heart condition forced him to spend his last months on the living room couch, Roddy was the busy mother hen, cooking, cleaning, and continuing to organize things as he’d done for more than 50 years. Harry kept manufacturing puppets in his garage workshop, until at 85 he tired of them. Then I’d usually find him in a favorite tattered chair, knitting little woollen hats that he gave to anyone who dropped by. He donated hundreds of them to a children’s hospital. Until his eyesight began to fail, he insisted on working his favorite puppet, Simon Legree, or he’d flourish a soiled handkerchief and do the same tricks for guests that he did for David and me on those distant yesterdays when we were kids. While their time necessarily kept Harry, Forman and Roddy circumspect about their homosexuality, they pretty much lived the lives they wanted to live, busy and content in their work, with a legion of friends, young and old, who popped in at Turnabout House on a regular basis. For those who didn’t know they were gay (or didn’t care to let on), it didn’t matter. Being “artistic” was quite acceptable.” Rare Birds, By Dan Bessie
Life
Who: Forman Brown aka Richard Meeker (January 8, 1901 - January 10, 1996) and Richard Brandon (1905 – May 4, 1985)
Forman Brown was one of the world's leaders in puppet theatre in his day, as well as an important early gay novelist. Along with Yale Puppeteers Harry Burnett and Richard Brandon (Brown's life-long lover), Brown launched Turnabout Theatre in 1941 as "a vehicle for performing both puppet plays and revues for adults.” It attracted celebrity attention and support from some of Hollywood's biggest names, e.g., Greta Garbo, Marie Dressler, and Douglas Fairbanks, as well as other notable figures including Albert Einstein. In 1933, Brown wrote, under the pseudonym Richard Meeker, a novel called Better Angel about a young man coming to terms with his homosexuality. This novel is regarded as "the first American novel to present the 'gay' experience in a healthy light." Richard Brandon, the youngest of the three Yale Puppeteers, was the first to die. He was 80 when he died at Turnabout House in Hollywood, the home the three men had occupied for the last several years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
David Robert Jones, known professionally as David Bowie, was an English singer, songwriter and actor. He was a figure in popular music for over five decades, regarded by critics and musicians as an innovator, particularly for his work in the 1970s.
Died: January 10, 2016, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Movies: Labyrinth, The Man Who Fell to Earth, The Prestige, more
Spouse: Iman (m. 1992–2016), Angie Bowie (m. 1970–1980)
Lived: 40 Stansfield Road, London
Studied: Ravens Wood School

English Heritage Blue Plaque: 14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Crescent, Henry Havelock Ellis (1859–1939), “Pioneer in the scientific study of sex lived here"
Address: Brixton, London SW9 7QF, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Brixton is a district of London, located in the borough of Lambeth in south London. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. The area remained undeveloped until the beginning of the XIX century, the main settlements being near Stockwell, Brixton Hill and Coldharbour Lane. The opening of Vauxhall Bridge in 1816 improved access to Central London and led to a process of suburban development. The largest single development, and one of the last in suburban character, was Angell Town, laid out in the 1850s on the east side of Brixton Road, and so named after a family that owned land in Lambeth from the late XVII century until well into the XX. One of a few surviving windmills in London, built in 1816, is just off Brixton Hill and surrounded by houses built during Brixton’s Victorian expansion. When the London sewerage system was constructed during the mid-XIX century, its designer Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated flows from the River Effra, which used to flow through Brixton, into his “high-level interceptor sewer,” also known as the Effra sewer. Brixton was transformed into a middle class suburb between the 1860s and 1890s. Railways linked Brixton with the centre of London when the Chatham Main Line was built through the area by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway in the 1860s. In 1880, Electric Avenue was so named after it became the first street in London to be lit by electricity. In this time, large expensive houses were constructed along the main roads in Brixton, which were converted into flats and boarding houses at the start of the XX century as the middle classes were replaced by an influx of the working classes. By 1925, Brixton attracted thousands of new people. It housed the largest shopping centre in South London at the time, as well as a thriving market, cinemas, pubs and a theatre. In the 1920s, Brixton was the shopping capital of South London with three large department stores and some of the earliest branches of what are now Britain’s major national retailers. Today, Brixton Road is the main shopping area, fusing into Brixton Market. A prominent building on Brixton High Street (at 472–488 Brixton Road) is Morleys, an independent department store established in the 1920s. On the western boundary of Brixton with Clapham stands the Sunlight Laundry, an Art Deco factory building. Designed by architect F.E. Simpkins and erected in 1937, this is one of the few art deco buildings that is still owned by the firm that commissioned it and is still used for its original purpose. The Brixton area was bombed during WWII, contributing to a severe housing crisis, which in turn led to urban decay. This was followed by slum clearances and the building of council housing. In the 1940s and 1950s, many immigrants, particularly from the West Indies, settled in Brixton. More recent immigrants include a large Portuguese community (Little Portugal) and other European citizens. Brixton also has an increasingly ageing population, which affects housing strategies in the area. The Brixton Gay Community of the 1970s formed around the UK’s first gay centre and a series of nearby squatted houses. Between 50 and 60 men lived in these squats for anything from a week to ten years. In oral testimonies many of them describe how their experience shaped their politics, their ideas about sexual identity and community, and their creative lives. The South London Gay Liberation Front, the journal Gay Left and the Brixton Faeries are each linked to the squatting community, which in the mid-1980s was absorbed into the Brixton Co-op. The houses – and the communal garden that connects them – are still reserved for gay and lesbian tenants: a tangible legacy of the earlier community.
Notable queer residents at Brixton:
• David Bowie (January 8, 1947 –January 10, 2016) was born at 40 Stansfield Road.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), pioneer sexologist lived at 14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Crescent.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Gypsy Rose Lee was an American burlesque entertainer famous for her striptease act. She was also an actress, author, and playwright whose 1957 memoir was made into the stage musical and film Gypsy.
Born: January 8, 1911, Seattle, Washington, United States
Died: April 26, 1970, Los Angeles, California, United States
Parents: John Hovick, Rose Thompson Hovick
Books: Gypsy: A Memoir, The G-String Murders, Mother finds a body, G-String Murders Counter Display
Siblings: June Havoc
Lived: February House, 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Buried: Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Pinecrest Plot, Lot 1087, Grave 8. Across from Utopia Plot

February House was the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the XX century. Its residents included, among others, Carson McCullers, W. H. Auden, Paul Bowles, and the famed burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 – April 26, 1970). This ramshackle Brooklyn brownstone was host to an explosion of creativity, an extraordinary experiment in communal living, and a nonstop yearlong party fueled by the appetites of youth. Here these burgeoning talents composed many of their most famous, iconic literary works while experiencing together a crucial historical moment--America on the threshold of WWII.
Address: 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In 1940, George Davis, an editor recently fired from Harper's Bazaar, rented a dilapidated house in Brooklyn Heights in which he installed brilliant, volatile artists, who spent the next year working, fighting, and drinking. Carson McCullers sipped sherry while, down the hall, the burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee typed her mystery novel with three-inch fingernails, and, downstairs, Benjamin Britten and Paul Bowles fought over practice space. W. H. Auden was housemother, collecting rent, assigning chores, and declaring no politics at dinner. Like all bohemian utopias, February House (so named because of the residents' February birthdays) was unable to withstand the centrifugal force of its constituent egos. The artists dispersed—to return home, serve in the military, or follow wayward lovers—and the house was demolished to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Edith Wynne Matthison (1875-1955), Anglo-American stage actress who also appeared in two silent films, is buried at Inglewood Park Cemetery (720 E Florence Ave, Inglewood, CA 90302). Rumored to have had a relationship with Edna St Vincent Millay (1892-1950). Oher notable queer burials at Inglewood Park Cemetery: Sylvester James, Jr. (1947-1988), who used the stage name of Sylvester, American singer-songwriter; Gypsy Rose Lee (1911–1970), actress and burlesque dancer; Cesar Romero (1907-1994), American actor, singer, dancer, voice artist, and comedian who was active in film, radio, and television for almost 60 years (Romero never married and had no children, but made frequent appearances at Hollywood events escorting actresses, such as Joan Crawford, Linda Darnell, Barbara Stanwyck, Lucille Ball, Ann Sheridan, Jane Wyman, and Ginger Rogers; he was almost always described in interviews and articles as a "confirmed bachelor". Many Hollywood historians have speculated that Romero was a closeted gay man); Lawrence W. Tonner (1861-1947), Jesse Shepard's devoted secretary and companion for over forty years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Graham Arthur Chapman was an English comedian, writer, actor, author and one of the six members of the surreal comedy group Monty Python.
Born: January 8, 1941, Stoneygate, Leicester, United Kingdom
Died: October 4, 1989, Maidstone, United Kingdom
Height: 1.88 m
Partner: David Sherlock (1966–1989)
Books: A Liar's Autobiography, The Pythons, more
Lived: 89 Southwood Lane, N6
Studied: University of Cambridge
King Edward VII School, Melton Mowbray
Emmanuel College, Cambridge
Buried: in Wales during a fireworks display on New Years Day, 2000

Graham Chapman (1941–1989) was an English comedian, writer, actor, and one of the six members of the surreal comedy group Monty Python. He played authority figures such as the Colonel and the lead role in two Python films, “Holy Grail” and “Life of Brian.” Chapman was openly homosexual and a strong supporter of gay rights, and was in a relationship with David Sherlock for most of his adult life. Chapman died of tonsil and spinal cancer on October 4, 1989, on the eve of Monty Python's 20th anniversary, and his life and legacy were commemorated at a private memorial service at St Bartholomew's with the other Pythons. Graham Chapman lived with his partner David Sherlock at 89 Southwood Lane, N6, from the late 1960s until his death in 1989. Ten years after Chapman's death, his ashes were first rumoured to have been "blasted into the skies in a rocket" with assistance from the Dangerous Sports Club. In a second rumour, Chapman's ashes had been scattered on Snowdon, North Wales. Since Chapman's death, subsequent gatherings of the Pythons have included an urn said to contain Chapman's ashes. At the 1998 Aspen Comedy Arts festival, the urn was "accidentally" knocked over by Terry Gilliam, spilling the "ashes" on-stage. The apparently cremated remains were then removed with a dust-buster. Idle recalled meeting Sherlock saying "I wish he [Chapman] was here now" and Sherlock replied "Oh, but he is. He's in my pocket!"



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Edward Perry Warren, known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum.
Born: January 8, 1860, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
Died: December 28, 1928, London, United Kingdom
Education: Harvard University
Books: A Defence of Uranian Love, A Defense of Uranian Love, more
People also search for: Osbert Burdett, Edgar Henry Goddard, Michael Matthew Kaylor
Lived: Lewes House, 23 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU, UK (50.87371, 0.01296)
Buried: English Cemetery, Bagni di Lucca, Provincia di Lucca, Toscana, Italy
Buried alongside: John Marshall

Ned Warren was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum, which he did not attempt to sell during his lifetime because of its explicit depiction of homoerotic scenes. At Oxford, he met John Marshall, whom he called "Puppy." Ned and John lived together at Lewes House in East Sussex, for a time with John’s wife, Mary. On February 15, 1928, John retired for the evening, saying that he was not feeling well. Ned gave him a kiss and joined him in bed, but John died during the night. Marshall's took his last breath while Ned sat at his bedside. Servants reported that Ned's final words to the dying man were, “Goodbye, Puppy." Warren died less than one year later. Mary, John and Ned were buried in the non-Catholic cemetery in Bagni di Lucca, Italy, a town known as a spa in Etruscan and Roman times; that was John and Ned’s expressed desire, including having Mary near them. The same cemetery is the final resting place of Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland.
Together from 1885 to 1928: 43 years.
Edward Perry "Ned" Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928)
John Marshall (1862 - February 15, 1928)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The principal rooms, known to Ned Warren as the Business Room, the Red Drawing Room, the Hepplewhite Bedroom and the Dining Room, remain as originally constructed and require only the return of some of their former furnishings to recreate the grace and elegance of a typical XVIII Century country gentleman’s retreat.
Address: 23 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU, UK (50.87371, 0.01296)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Phone: +44 01273 471600
English Heritage Building ID: 293121 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
Ned Warren and John Marshall lived together at Lewes House, a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. One account said that "Warren’s attempts to produce a supposedly Greek and virile way of living into his Sussex home" produced "a comic mixture of apparently monastic severity (no tea or soft chairs allowed) and lavish living." The early Georgian features of Lewes House probably date from 1733. The earlier two-storey part of the present house was probably built, or remodelled, around the late mediaeval core, either by John Tabor, a “Doctor of Physick” or his son-in-law, William Kempe. At the close of the XVIII Century, the property was in the ownership of Henry Humphrey. It was during his occupation that the building was sketched in 1783 by James Lambert. A copy of the drawing hangs in Lewes House and shows the house at that time to be of its original two storeys with a gabled roof and entrance porch with living accommodation over, supported by Ionic columns. A garden occupied the site of the front and western parts of the present house. It was enclosed by a high flint wall and entered by an imposing gateway on its High Street frontage. By 1812 the property had passed to Humphrey’s nephew, Henry Jackson, who was responsible for the addition of the west wing, rebuilding the front of the house and extending the property northwards to the High Street. Jackson’s new structure was of three storeys and incorporated the more fashionable high ceilings in the newly-created rooms. The work also included the construction of the present Doric porch and the flight of stone steps to pavement level, bringing the house to the appearance which it has today. By 1836 Lewes House was in the ownership of Edward Shewell, who died in 1838. Edward fathered no fewer than 20 children by two wives, the second of whom, having borne him six of those children, outlived her husband by 45 years. She died in the house on Mar. 22, 1883 aged 80 years. The property then descended to Edward’s grandsons of his first marriage, Edward Louis Shewell and Henry Shewell. E.L. Shewell was drowned at sea on May 5, 1887, during a voyage from Barcelona to Marseilles, in a collision between the two steamships “Asic” and “Ajaccio.” This left the property in the sole ownership of Henry, a Major General in the British Army, who sold the property in August 1887 to his distant aunt, Elizabeth Cooper. By 1890 the occupant was Edward Perry Warren, the third son of Samuel Denis Warren of Massachusetts who founded the Cumberland Paper Mills at Maine. He furnished the house with fine examples of antique furniture. Oriental carpets and rugs. He hung the walls with tapestries and primitive paintings, filled the bookcases with rare books and displayed his vast collection of vases, bronzes, ivories and other priceless antiquities throughout the house. In 1928 Warren had made a gift of this house (and also School Hill House, an adjoining Georgian property) to the man who began his association with Warren as Private Secretary but who was to become one of Warren’s most trusted and highly valued business associates and friend, H. Asa Thomas Esq. On April 1, 1974, following the reorganisation of local government, the house came into the ownership of the present occupant and custodian, Lewes District Council, whose principal offices are located here. The house itself is virtually unaltered except for the conversion of the domestic quarters into offices and storage accommodation.
Life
Who: Edward Perry “Ned” Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928) and John Marshall (1862–1928)
Edward Perry Warren was born in 1860, educated at Harvard (Class of 1883) and later entered Oxford to read Classics where he gained his MA degree. From an early age Warren’s interest was antiquities – particularly Grecian – and, like his father and mother, he became a great collector of pictures, fine arts and china. Edward had little interest in the family business and, following his father’s death in 1888 (at which time he was in England) he was happy to leave those affairs in the hands of a trust so that he was free to follow his own pursuits of travel and collecting on his recently acquired income of £10,000 a year. Warren did not enjoy good health and was plagued with eye problems which necessitated early withdrawal from his studies at Oxford. However, he found the lifestyle at Lewes House very much to his liking and, as his health improved, he began the serious collection of fine arts, not only for his own satisfaction, but also, for a time, on behalf of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in America. His extensive circle of friends reflected his interest in the arts and he entertained regularly. Large parties were common and included numerous members of the Bloomsbury Group, one of whom, the artist Roger Fry, painted a water colour of the house and garden in 1910 which was presented to the Council and is now on display in the house. Warren, his lifelong friend and resident assistant John Marshall, the constant stream of visitors, whose lifestyles were quite alien to the average Lewesian, the Arab horses and the six St. Bernard dogs gave the house a reputation of eccentricity and few local people, except for his household staff, ever saw it from the inside.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Bagni di Lucca (formerly Bagno a Corsena) is a comune of Tuscany, Italy, in the Province of Lucca with a population of about 6,500. Bagni di Lucca with its thermal baths reached its greatest fame during the XIX century, especially during the French occupation.
Address: Cimitero Inglese, Via Letizia, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00566, 10.58808)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Address: Via Bagno alla Villa, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00971, 10.5879)
Type: Private Property
Address: Villa San Francesco, Via S. Francesco, 6, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00832, 10.58725)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +39 333 765 8629
Place
The town became the summer residence of the court of Napoleon and his sister, Elisa Baciocchi. A casino was built, where gambling was part of social nightlife, as well as a large hall for dances. At the Congress of Vienna (1814), the Duchy of Lucca was assigned to Maria-Louisa of Bourbon as ruler of Parma. It continued as a popular summer resort, particularly for the English, who built a Protestant church there. The church now has been converted to the Bagni di Lucca Biblioteca (library) and holds archives and records that date back to centuries ago. In 1847 Lucca with Bagni di Lucca was ceded to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, under the domain of the Grand Duke Leopold II of Lorraine. His rule started a period of decline for the springs and casino as a destination, since he was used to a secluded life. In 1853 the casino was closed. It was reopened after 1861, when Lucca became part of the unified Kingdom of Italy. In the 1940s, during the German invasion of Italy, Bagni di Lucca, along with many other towns located in the Apennines, was occupied, as they were along the Gothic Line. Several houses and mansions in the area were used as residences for German soldiers and some residents born after 1940 in this region have German ancestry. The English cemetery is a sacred place which is located in Bagni di Lucca, about 300 meters from the Church of England, on the other side of the river Lima. In 1842 Carlo Ludovico di Borbone granted to the British colony of Bagni di Lucca the faculty to establish a Protestant cemetery. They chose a place called "al Prato Santo (the Holy Meadow)" and, although the works were finished in 1844, the first burial happened immediately after the purchase. The graveyard was in operation until 1953 and there are 137 people who rest there. In 1982, with the exhaustion of a legacy for maintenance, the holy site was purchased by the town of Bagni di Lucca. The cemetery is currently managed by the Fondazione Michel de Montaigne and Istituto Storico Lucchese and is accessible to visitors every day (except Sunday) from 10.00 to 18.00. Among the people buried here, often in tombs made by famous sculptors such as Benjamin Gibson, Joseph Norfini and Emilio Duccini, are the novelist Ouida, Henry and Elizabeth Stisted and Irish entomologist Alexander Henry Haliday.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Inglese di Bagni di Lucca:
• Rose Elizabeth Cleveland (June 13, 1846 – November 22, 1918), was the First Lady of the United States from 1885 to 1886, during the first of her brother U.S. President Grover Cleveland’s two administrations.
• Nelly Erichsen (1862-1918) was an English illustrator and painter. From 1912 until Nov. 1918, Erichsen was living in the quiet Tuscan spa town of Bagni di Lucca with two companions - Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland. Whipple was the widow of the American Episcopal Bishop Henry Whipple, known for his evangelical work among the native Indian population. Whipple and Cleveland had first met in the winter of 1889–1890, and resumed their relationship in 1901 (after the death of Henry Whipple), moving from the USA to Italy in 1910. In 1918 tragedy struck, when both Rose Cleveland and Nelly Erichsen were carried off by the 1918 flu pandemic which decimated the post-war World. Evangeline Whipple died in London in 1930, but she was laid to rest in Bagni di Lucca next to the tombs of the two friends who had preceded her.
• Ouida (1839-1908) was the pseudonym of the English novelist Maria Louise Ramé (although she preferred to be known as Marie Louise de la Ramée.)
• Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928), known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum. At Oxford Edward Perry Warren met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907. Beginning in 1888, Warren made England his primary home. He and Marshall lived together at Lewes House (with Marshall’s wife, Mary), a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. Ned Warren, John Marshall and Mary are all buried together in Bagni di Lucca.
• Evangeline Marrs Whipple (1860-1930), widow for the second time (she first married the wealthy businessman Michael Hodge Simpson and then bishop Henry Benjamin Whipple), visited Bagni di Lucca in 1910, lodging at Hotel Continental and then taking residence at Casa Bernardini at Bagno alla Villa. This is the house she shared with Rose Cleveland and Nelly Ericksen. Rose and Nelly died in 1918. In 1928 Evangeline wrote “A Famous Corner of Tuscany” about Bagni di Lucca. Around this time she bought Casa Burlamacchi, completing restoring the “Casa Piccola” (Little House, now Villa San Francesco), in front of the garden at the back of the “Casa Grande” (Big House.)



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Cecchino Bracci was a pupil of Michelangelo. He died at the age of sixteen and is buried in Santa Maria in Aracoeli, in a tomb designed by Michelangelo.
Born: 1527, Florence
Died: January 8, 1544, Rome
Buried: Chiesa di Santa Maria di Aracoeli, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy

Cecchino dei Bracci, a student of Michelangelo, died at age 16. His uncle, Luigi del Riccio, distraught at the death of the youth, prevailed on Michelangelo to write 40 verses as a tribute. He also designed the sepulture. He is buried inside the Chiesa di Santa Maria di Aracoeli (Scala dell'Arce Capitolina, 00186 Roma).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Profile

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
reviews_and_ramblings

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  1 2 34 5
6 7 8 9 1011 12
13141516 17 1819
20 212223242526
2728293031  

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Disclaimer

All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
I'm associated with Amazon/USA Affiliates Programs.
Books reviewed on this site were usually provided at no cost by the publisher or author. However, some books were purchased by the reviewer and not provided for free. For information on how a particular title was obtained, please contact by email the blog's owner.
Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 22nd, 2017 05:32 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios