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George Balanchine was a choreographer. Styled as the father of American ballet, he co-founded the New York City Ballet and remained its Artistic Director for more than 35 years.
Born: January 22, 1904, Saint Petersburg, Russia
Died: April 30, 1983, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Saint Petersburg Conservatory
Lived: Weston, CT 06883, USA (41.22837, -73.38265)
Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, New York, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 40.99193, -72.29418
Spouse: Tanaquil Le Clercq (m. 1952–1969), more
Books: Complete stories of the great ballets, more
Movies: A Midsummer Night's Dream
Association: School of American Ballet

In the XVII century, Weston’s first English settlers were mostly farmers living in the town of Fairfield, Connecticut, the boundaries of which extended to Weston until the late XVIII century. The Norfield Parish was created in the area now occupied by the towns of Weston and Easton. In 1787, the area was formally incorporated as the Town of Weston. In 1845, the Town of Easton was split off from Weston.
Address: Weston, CT 06883, USA (41.22837, -73.38265)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Kettle Creek Historic District (Roughly, Weston and Old Weston Rds. N of Broad St.), 95001348, 1995
Place
A meteor exploded above the town Dec. 14, 1807. Six pieces, totaling 28 pounds (13 kg), were recovered and examined by scientists, who issued a report. This was the first time that people realized the nature of meteors. Despite rocky soil, farmers in town grew apples, onions, and potatoes. Grist, cider, lumber, and fulling mills were built. The town had nine manufacturers by 1850, but two decades later only the Bradley Edge Tool Company still thrived. That factory burned down in 1911. Unlike other nearby towns, Weston never had a railroad built through it, which stifled the development of non-agricultural businesses. Between the Civil War and the Great Depression, the town’s population dropped from approximately 1,000 to a low of 670, by 1930. Artists, writers, and actors from New York became attracted to the community in the 1930s and began settling in it. Construction of the Merritt Parkway, which arrived to the south of Weston in 1938, resulted in further population growth.
Notable queer residents at Weston:
• George Balanchine (January 22 [O.S. January 9] 1904 – April 30, 1983), choreographer and influential figure in ballet, lived at 10 Ridge Road.
• Paul Cadmus (1904–1999), painter. Starting in 1975, Paul Cadmus produced one or two paintings a year, working out of a studio at his home in Weston, given to him by Lincoln Kirstein, who was married to Cadmus’s sister, Fidelma. Kirstein was general director of the New York City Ballet. Through Kirstein, Cadmus became friends with George Balanchine, who lived nearby in Weston, as well as with Alice De Lamar. Cadmus died just shy of 95 on Dec. 12, 1999, in Weston.
• In 1938 Alice De Lamar gave Pavel Tchelitchev (1898-1957) a studio on her property at Stonebrook. Here the artist became captivated by the rural landscape of New England.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale are buried together at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor.
Address: 62-298 Suffolk St, Sag Harbor, NY 11963, USA (40.99239, -72.29374)
Type: Cemetery (open to publich)
National Register of Historic Places: Sag Harbor Village District (Roughly bounded by Sag Harbor, Rysam, Hamilton, Marsden, Main and Long Island Ave.), 73001274, 1973 & (Roughly bounded by Sag Harbor, Bay, Eastville, Grand, Joel'sLn., Middle Line Hwy., Main, Glover and Long Island), 94000400, 1994
Place
Oakland Cemetery is a public, not-for-profit cemetery located in the village Sag Harbor, New York. It was founded in 1840 and currently sits on 26 acres bounded by Jermain Ave to the north, Suffolk St to the east, and Joels Ln to the west. It is the permanent resting place of over 4,000 people, including more XVIII and XIX century sea captains than in any other Long Island cemetery. It was incorporated in 1884. Prior to the opening of Oakland Cemetery in 1840, Sag Harbor’s most notable cemetery was the Old Burial Ground, opened in 1767 on the corner of Union and Madison Streets next to the First Presbyterian Church. At total of 17 veterans of the American Revolution and one representative to the New York Provincial Congress of 1775 are buried there. Unfortunately, years of neglect left the Old Burial Ground in a state of disrepair. In 1840 Oakland Cemetery was founded, covering just 4 acres, enclosed with stone posts and chestnut pickets. One hundred thirty nine graves from the Old Burial Ground were moved to Oakland Cemetery, including Ebenezer Sage and Captain David Hand and his five wives. During the mid-1800’s, in the center of the property which is now Oakland Cemetery, sat of a group of buildings known as Oakland Works. John Sherry had them built in 1850 to house his brass foundry. He soon took on a partner, Ephraim N. Byram, a clock maker and astronomer who was later buried in the cemetery. They enlarged the building to make room for Byram’s clock manufactory and named the place the Oakland Brass Foundry and Clock Works. The business was in operation for 12 years. In 1863 the building was leased to Abraham DeBevoise and B. & F. Lyon for use as a stocking factory. In 1865 a second building and another bleach house were added to the property. This business closed after three years. Over the next ten years two other industries occupied the Oakland Works. First, a barrel-head and stave factory owned by George Bush; then, a Morrocco leather business owned by Morgan Topping. Both proved unsuccessful. A final attempt to operate a business on the site was made in 1880 when Edward Chapman Rogers opened the Oakland Hat Manufactory. This venture also failed. In 1882, unoccupied for almost two years, the old wooden structures caught fire and burned to the ground. The site was purchased by Joseph Fahys and Stephen French and donated to the cemetery. In September, 1884 the Oakland Cemetery Association purchased the remaining Oakland Works property for $400, adding a third section and extending the cemetery east to its present boundary at Suffolk St for a total of ten acres. In October, 1903 the Ladies Village Improvement Society unveiled a new memorial gate. The Broken Mast Monument in Oakland Cemetery, sculpted by Robert Eberhard Launitz, commemorates those "Who periled their lives in a daring profession and perished in actual encounter with the monsters of the deep."
Notable queer burials at Oakland Cemetery:
• George Balanchine (1904-1983), ballet choreographer and co-founder of the New York City Ballet.
• Arthur Gold (February 6, 1917 – January 3, 1990) and Robert Fizdale (April 12, 1920 –December 6, 1995) were a two-piano ensemble; they were also authors and television cooking show hosts. Gold and Fizdale met during their student years at the Juilliard School. They formed a lifelong gay partnership and shared interests in music (forming one of the most important piano duos of the XX century), travel, and cooking. Works written for Gold and Fizdale: Paul Bowles, "Concerto for Two Pianos” (1946–47), "Sonata for Two Pianos” (1947), "Night Waltz for Two Pianos” (1949), "A Picnic Cantata for Two Pianos” (1953); John Cage, "A Book of Music for Two Pianos”; Francis Poulenc, “L’embarquement pour Cythère” (1951), “Sonate for Two Pianos” (1952-53), “Elegy for Two Pianos” (1959); Germaine Tailleferre, “Il était un Petit Navire Suite for Two Pianos,” “Paris-Magie version for Two Pianos,” “Toccata for Two Pianos,” “Sonata for Two Pianos”; Samuel Barber, “Souvenirs,” Op. 28.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Herbert Edwin Huncke was an American writer and poet, and active participant in a number of emerging cultural, social and aesthetic movements of the 20th century in America.
Born: January 9, 1915, Greenfield, Massachusetts, United States
Died: August 8, 1996, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Literary movement: Beat Generation
Books: Guilty of Everything: The Autobiography of Herbert Huncke, more
Lived: 271 E. 7th Street
Hotel Chelsea

Herbert Huncke lived from 1991 to 1994 in a garden apartment on 271 E. 7th Street near Avenue D in New York City. At first, he lived upstairs in an apartment owned by a wealthy arts patron named Paola Igliori, who divided her time between Italy and New York. Later, he moved downstairs to an apartment that Igliori also owned. An admirer and benefactor of Huncke’s, Igliori had set up a trust fund for him to which all of Huncke’s other admirers were welcome to donate. The fund covered his monthly rent at Igliori’s place, though Allen Ginsberg’s secretary Bob Rosenthal, who managed the fund, only learned of this salient detail belatedly.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The Hotel Chelsea – also called the Chelsea Hotel, or simply the Chelsea – is a historic New York City hotel and landmark, known primarily for the notability of its residents over the years.
Address: 222 W 23rd St, New York, NY 10011, USA (40.74431, -73.9969)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone:+1 616-918-8770
National Register of Historic Places: 77000958, 1977
Place
Built between 1883 and 1885, Design by Hubert, Pirsson & Company (Philip Gengembre Hubert (1830-1911) and James W. Pirrson (1833-1888))
Opened for initial occupation in 1884, the twelve-story red-brick building that is now the Hotel Chelsea was one of the city’s first private apartment cooperatives. It was designed in a style that has been described variously as Queen Anne Revival and Victorian Gothic. Among its distinctive features are the delicate, flower-ornamented iron balconies on its facade, which were constructed by J.B. and J.M. Cornell and its grand staircase, which extends upward twelve floors. Generally, this staircase is only accessible to registered guests, although the hotel does offer monthly tours to others. At the time of its construction, the building was the tallest in New York. Hubert and Pirsson had created a "Hubert Home Club" in 1880 for "The Rembrandt,” a six-story building on West 57th Street intended as housing for artists. This early cooperative building had rental units to help defray costs, and also provided servants as part of the building staff. The success of this model led to other "Hubert Home Clubs,” and the Chelsea was one of them. Initially successful, its surrounding neighborhood constituted the center of New York’s theater district. However within a few years the combination of economic stresses, the suspicions of New York’s middle class about apartment living, the opening up of Upper Manhattan and the plentiful supply of houses there, and the relocation of the city’s theater district, bankrupted the Chelsea. In 1905, the building reopened as a hotel, which was later managed by Knott Hotels and resident manager A.R. Walty. After the hotel went bankrupt, it was purchased in 1939 by Joseph Gross, Julius Krauss, and David Bard, and these partners managed the hotel together until the early 1970s. With the passing of Joseph Gross and Julius Krauss, the management fell to Stanley Bard, David Bard’s son. On 18 June, 2007, the hotel’s board of directors ousted Bard as the hotel’s manager. Dr. Marlene Krauss, the daughter of Julius Krauss, and David Elder, the grandson of Joseph Gross and the son of playwright and screenwriter Lonne Elder III, replaced Stanley Bard with the management company BD Hotels NY; that firm has since been terminated as well. In May, 2011, the hotel was sold to real estate developer Joseph Chetrit for US$80 million. As of August 1, 2011, the hotel stopped taking reservations for guests in order to begin renovations, but long-time residents remain in the building, some of them protected by state rent regulations. The renovations prompted complaints by the remaining tenants of health hazards caused by the construction. These were investigated by the city’s Building Department, which found no major violations. In Nov. 2011, the management ordered all of the hotel’s many artworks taken off the walls, supposedly for their protection and cataloging, a move which some tenants interpreted as a step towards forcing them out as well. In 2013, Ed Scheetz became the Chelsea Hotel’s new owner after buying back five properties from Joseph Chetrit, his partner in King & Grove Hotels, and David Bistricer. Hotel Chelsea is now managed by Chelsea Hotels, formerly King & Grove Hotels. Restoration and renovation is underway and Hotel Chelsea plans to reopen in 2016.
Notable queer resident at Hotel Chelsea:
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997), novelist, short story writer, satirist, essayist, painter, and spoken word performer. A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author who wrote in the paranoid fiction genre, he is considered to be "one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the XX century.”
• Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008) wrote “2001: A Space Odyssey” while staying at the Chelsea.
• Quentin Crisp (1908-1999), writer and raconteur. His first stay in the Hotel Chelsea coincided with a fire, a robbery, and the death of Nancy Spungen.
• Musician, gay civil rights icon and Stonewall veteran Stormé DeLarverie (1920-2014) resided at the hotel for several decades.
• Poets Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) and Gregory Corso (1930-2001) chose it as a place for philosophical and artistic exchange.
• Brad Gooch (born 1952), writer. His 2015 memoir “Smash Cut” recounts life in 1970s and 1980s New York City, including the time Gooch spent as a fashion model, life with his then-boyfriend filmmaker Howard Brookner, living in the famous Chelsea Hotel and the first decade of the AIDS crisis.
• Herbert Huncke (1915-1996), writer and poet. In his last few years, he lived in room 828, where his rent came from financial support from Jerry Garcia of The Grateful Dead, whom Huncke never met. Herbert Huncke died in 1996 at age 81.
• Iggy Pop (born 1947), singer-songwriter, musician and actor. Pop’s career received a boost from his relationship with David Bowie when Bowie decided in 1972 to produce an album with Pop in England.
• Charles R. Jackson (1903-1968), author of “The Lost Weekend,” committed suicide in his room on September 21, 1968.
• Jasper Johns (born 1930), painter and printmaker. In 1954, after returning to New York, Johns met Robert Rauschenberg and they became long-term lovers. For a time they lived in the same building as Rachel Rosenthal. In the same period he was strongly influenced by the gay couple Merce Cunningham (a choreographer) and John Cage (a composer.)
• Jack Kerouac (1922-1969), who wrote “On the Road” there.
• Lance Loud (1951-2001), television personality, magazine columnist and new wave rock-n-roll performer. Loud is best known for his 1973 appearance in “An American Family,” a pioneer reality television series that featured his coming out, leading to his status as an icon in the gay community.
• Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-1989), photographer, known for his sensitive yet blunt treatment of controversial subject-mater in the large-scale, highly stylized black and white medium of photography. The homoeroticism of this work fuelled a national debate over the public funding of controversial artwork.
• Larry Rivers (1923-2002), artist, musician, filmmaker and occasional actor. Poet Jeni Olin was his companion. Rivers also sustained a relationship with poet Frank O’Hara in the late 1950s and delivered the eulogy at O’Hara’s funeral in 1966.
• Patti Smith (born 1946), singer-songwriter, poet and visual artist. On November 17, 2010, she won the National Book Award for her memoir “Just Kids.” The book fulfilled a promise she had made to her former long-time roommate and partner, Robert Mapplethorpe.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989), composer and critic. In 1925 in Paris, he cemented his relationship with painter Maurice Grosser (1903-1986), who was to become his life partner and frequent collaborator. He and Grosser lived at Hotel Chelsea, where he presided over a largely gay salon that attracted many of the leading figures in music and art and theather, including Leonard Bernstein, Tennessee Williams, and many others. Virgil Thomson died on September 30, 1989, in his suite at the Hotel Chelsea in Manhattan, aged 92.
• Gore Vidal (1925-2012), writer and a public intellectual known for his patrician manner, epigrammatic wit, and polished style of writing.
• Rufus Wainwright (born 1973), lived in the Chelsea Hotel in New York City for six months, during which he wrote most of his second album.
• Tennessee Williams (1911-1983), playwright and author of many stage classics. Along with Eugene O’Neill and Arthur Miller he is considered among the three foremost playwrights in XX century American drama.
• Hotel Chelsea is often associated with the Warhol superstars, as Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey directed “Chelsea Girls” (1966), a film about his Factory regulars and their lives at the hotel. Chelsea residents from the Warhol scene included Edie Sedgwick, Viva, Ultra Violet, Mary Woronov, Holly Woodlawn, Andrea Feldman, Nico, Paul America, René Ricard, and Brigid Berlin.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Henry Blake Fuller was a United States novelist and short story writer, born in Chicago, Illinois.
Born: January 9, 1857, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Died: July 28, 1929, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Buried: Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 E 67th St, Chicago, IL 60637

Henry Blake Fuller was an American novelist and short story writer, born in Chicago, Illinois. The controversial Bertram Cope's Year (1919) is a subtle novel about homosexuals. Fuller self-published the novel in Chicago after unsuccessfully making the rounds of several New York publishing houses. Fuller never married. His journals from his teenage days make it clear he was in love with some dormitory roommates at Allison Classical Academy. At the age of nineteen, he wrote in an imaginary personal advertisement: "I would pass by twenty beautiful women to look upon a handsome man". In 1924 Fuller embarked upon the last of his many European tours with William Emery Shepherd, a 24-year-old college student. Their letters do not indicate their relationship was anything but a friendship. Fuller died in Chicago on July 28, 1929, "at the home of Wakeman T. Ryan, with whom he had lived for the last three years." His death was ascribed to "heart disease, aggravated by the heat." In 2000, Fuller was posthumously inducted into the Chicago Gay and Lesbian Hall of Fame for his contributions to gay literature.
Together from 1926 to 1929: 3 years.
Henry Blake Fuller (January 9, 1857 – July 28, 1929)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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At Oak Woods Cemetery (1035 E 67th St, Chicago, IL 60637) is buried Henry Blake Fuller (1857-1929), American novelist and short story writer. His finest achievement is the controversial “Bertram Cope's Year” (1919), a subtle novel about homosexuals.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Evelina "Eva" Palmer-Sikelianos was an American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music.
Born: January 9, 1874, Gramercy Park, New York City, New York, United States
Died: June 4, 1952, Delphi, Greece
Spouse: Angelos Sikelianos (m. 1907–1934)
Children: Glafkos Sikelianos
Parents: Catherine Amory Bennett, Courtlandt Palmer
Siblings: Courtlandt Palmer Jr.
People also search for: Angelos Sikelianos, Glafkos Sikelianos, more
Lived: 4 Rue Chalgrin, 75116 Paris, France (48.87412, 2.28996)
Silkelianos Museum, 33054 Delphi , Parnassida, Greece (38.48005, 22.49406)
Studied: Bryn Mawr College
Buried: Delphi, Delphi, Regional unit of Phocis, Central Greece, Greece

As young adults in Paris, Natalie Clifford Barney and Eva Palmer-Sikelianos shared an apartment at 4, rue Chalgrin.
Address: 4 Rue Chalgrin, 75116 Paris, France (48.87412, 2.28996)
Type: Private Property
Place
It was during the family’s summer vacations at Bar Harbor in Maine that Eva Palmer became acquainted with Natalie Barney. The two shared an interest in poetry, literature and horseback riding. Barney likened Palmer to a medieval virgin, an homage to her ankle-length red hair and fair countenance. The two would become young lovers and later be neighbors in Paris. Rue Chalgrin is a street in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, in the neighborhood of Chaillot. Named after Jean-François-Thérèse Chalgrin (1739-1811), architect of the Arc de Triomphe and the church of Saint-Philippe du Roule (in the 8th arrondissement.)
Life
Who: Natalie Clifford Barney (October 31, 1876 – February 2, 1972) and Evelina "Eva" Palmer-Sikelianos (January 9, 1874 – June 4, 1952)
Eva Palmer-Sikelianos was an American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music. Palmer’s life and artistic endeavors intersected with numerous noteworthy artists throughout her life. She was both inspired by or inspired the likes of dancers Isadora Duncan and Ted Shawn, the French literary great Colette, the poet and author Natalie Barney and the actress Sarah Bernhardt. She would go on to marry Angelos Sikelianos, a Greek poet and playwright. Together they organized a revival of the Delphic Festival in Delphi, Greece. Embodied in these festivals of art, music and theater she hoped to promote a balanced sense of enlightenment that would further the goals of peace and harmony in Greece and beyond.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Delphi is famous as the ancient sanctuary that grew rich as the seat of the oracle that was consulted on important decisions throughout the ancient classical world. Moreover, it was considered as the navel (or centre) of the world by the Greeks as represented by the Omphalos.
Address: 33054 Delphi , Parnassida, Greece (38.48005, 22.49406)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +30 22650 82175
Place
Delphi occupies an impressive site at the foot of a mountain and overlooking the coastal plain to the south, on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in the valley of Phocis. It is now an extensive archaeological site and the modern town is nearby. It is recognised by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in having had a phenomenal influence in the Ancient world, as evidenced by the rich monuments built there by most of the important ancient Greek city-states, demonstrating their fundamental Hellenic unity. The presence of Delphi in Greek literature is very intense. Poets such as Kostis Palamas, Nikephoros Vrettakos, Yannis Ritsos and Kiki Dimoula, to mention only the most renowned ones. Angelos Sikelianos wrote “The Dedication (of the Delphic speech)” (1927), the “Delphic Hymn” (1927) and the tragedy “Sibylla” (1940), whereas in the context of the Delphic idea and the Delphic festivals he published an essay titled "The Delphic union" (1930). The nobelist George Seferis wrote an essay under the titel "Delphi", comprised in the book "Dokimes". Fans of Greek drama should head to the intimate Sikelianos Museum in a classic mansion overlooking Delphi, dedicated to Greek poet Angelos Sikelianos and his American-born wife Eva Palmer, who together in the late 1920s established Delphi as a European centre for drama and the arts, with masks, costumes and photos on display. Every July, the European Cultural Centre of Delphi hosts a 10-day cultural festival.
Life
Who: Evelina "Eva" Palmer-Sikelianos (January 9, 1874 – June 4, 1952)
Eva Palmer-Sikelianos was an American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music. Palmer's life and artistic endeavors intersected with numerous noteworthy artists throughout her life. She was both inspired by or inspired the likes of dancers Isadora Duncan and Ted Shawn, the French literary great Colette, the poet and author Natalie Barney and the actress Sarah Bernhardt. She would go on to marry Angelos Sikelianos, a Greek poet and playwright. Together they organized a revival of the Delphic Festival in Delphi, Greece. Embodied in these festivals of art, music and theater she hoped to promote a balanced sense of enlightenment that would further the goals of peace and harmony in Greece and beyond. Palmer returned to Greece in the spring of 1952. Two weeks after her arrival she suffered a fatal stroke while attending a theatrical performance in Delphi. She was 77 years old. Pursuant to her wishes she was buried at Delphi, in the cemetery across the now Silkelianos Museum.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Lived: The Larches, 22 Eastfield, Westbury-on-Trym
Buried: St Mary the Virgin, Church Close, Henbury, Bristol, BS10 7QF

Amelia Blandford Edwards (1831-1892) was a novelist, explorer, travel writer and scholar. She co-founded the Egypt Exploration Fund. John Addington Symonds dedicated his poetry collection “Old and New” to Edwards. Symonds shared many poetic works with Edwards, and his poem “To a Friend Leaving England in September” is originally dedicated “To A.B.E.” Discussing the collaboration on “Sexual Inversion,” Symonds told Havelock Ellis that Edwards “made no secret to me of her Lesbian tendencies”, and formed a menage with an “English lady” and her clergyman/school inspector husband. “Miss Edwards told me that one day the husband married her to his wife at the altar of his church – having full knowledge of the state of affairs.” These were probably Mr and Mrs Byrne – a clergyman and his wife, whose departure from the area was “like a death-blow” to Edwards. Local census records show Ellen Gertrude Byrne living at 7 Cambridge Park, with her husband John Rice Byrne, a clergyman and school inspector. Among Edwards’ close friends and companions was Symonds’ sister-in-law, the artist and traveller Marianne North. The pair were frequent correspondents, and some of Edwards’ letters apparently ardent enough for North to respond “What love letters you do write, what a pity you waste them on a woman!” The two remained close friends for several decades, sharing news of North’s travels and Edwards’ literary career. Edwards is buried together with Ellen Drew Braysher (1804–1892), with whom she shared a home at The Larches for the last three decades of ther life; the house was destroyed by bombing in 1941, although its site is marked by a stone plaque on the front garden wall of 22 Eastfield, Westbury-on-Trym, which occupies part of the site. Braysher’s daughter had been buried in the same grave twenty-eight years earlier at St Mary the Virgin (Church Close, Henbury, Bristol, BS10 7QF), and on Edwards’ death the grave was covered with a large Egyptian ankh.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Countee Cullen, born as Coleman Rutherford, was an African American poet, author and scholar who was a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. He pronounced his name "Coun-tay", not "Coun-tee".
Born: May 30, 1903
Died: January 9, 1946, New York City, New York, United States
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada
Education: New York University
Harvard University
DeWitt Clinton High School
Plays: St. Louis Woman
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA

Although located in Woodlawn, Bronx and one of the largest cemeteries in New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery.
Address: 517 E 233rd St, Bronx, NY 10470, USA (40.89006, -73.87425)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 718-920-0500
National Register of Historic Places: 11000563, 2011 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Woodlawn Cemetery opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was later annexed to New York City in 1874. It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great figures in the American arts, such as authors Countee Cullen and Herman Melville, and musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, and Max Roach. “Memorial To A Marriage” has been erected by Patricia Cronin and her partner Deborah Kass. Sculptor Cronin did the original sculpture of Carrara marble in 2002, to address what she considered a Federal failure: not allowing gay Americans the right to marry. It has been replaced with a bronze casting, installed on the couple’s burial plot in 2011. Since 2002 when the marble was first installed, the memorial has become one of the most visited of Woodlawn. After 18 years together, Patricia Cronin and Deborah Kass went to City Hall on the morning of July 24, 2011, with nearly 900 other New York City couples, waiting for three hours in the heat to get legally married on the first day.
Notable queer burials at Woodlawn Cemetery:
• Diana Blanche Barrymore Blythe (1921-1960), known professionally as Diana Barrymore, was a film and stage actress. She was the daughter of renowned actor John Barrymore and his second wife, poet Blanche Oelrichs.
• Frances (Fannie) Evelyn Bostwick (died in 1921) was the mother of Marion “Joe” Carstairs. Bostwick was an American heiress who was the second child of Jabez Bostwick and his wife Helen. Joe Carstairs' legal father was Scottish army officer Captain Albert Carstairs. At least one biographer has suggested that the Captain may not have been Joe's biological father. Carstairs' mother, an alcoholic and drug addict, later married Captain Francis Francis. She divorced Captain Francis to marry French count Roger de Périgny in 1915, but eventually left him because of his infidelity. Her fourth and last husband, whom she married in 1920, was Serge Voronoff, a Russian–French surgeon who become famous in the 1920s and 1930s for his practice of transplanting monkey testicle tissue into male humans for the claimed purpose of rejuvenation. For some years Evelyn had believed in Voronoff's theories, and she funded his research and acted as his laboratory assistant at the Collège de France in Paris. Voronoff arrived in New York with his wife's body on the ship "S.S. France" in May, 1921.
• Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years. Under a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) born as Countee Porter, was a poet, author and scholar who was a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. It is rumored that Cullen was a homosexual, and his relationship with Harold Jackman ("the handsomest man in Harlem"), was a significant factor in his divorce. The young, dashing Jackman was a school teacher and, thanks to his noted beauty, a prominent figure among Harlem’s gay elite. Van Vechten had used him as a character model in his novel “Nigger Heaven” (1926.)
• Joseph Raphael De Lamar (1843-1918), a prominent mine owner and operator in the western United States and Canada, as well as a financier and speculator, from the late 1870s until his death in 1918. De Lamar married Nellie Virginia Sands, a direct descendant of John Quincy Adams, on 8 May, 1893, and they had one daughter together, Alice DeLamar.
• Marjory Lacey-Baker (died in 1971), actress, she was the long-time companion of Dr. Lena Madesin Phillips, founder of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. They met in 1919 and together until Ms Philipps’ death in 1955. Ms Phillips is buried at Maple Grove Cemetery (500 N Main St, Nicholasville, KY 40356).
• Joseph Christian “J.C.” Leyendecker (1874-1951) was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century.
• George Platt Lynes (1907-1955) was a fashion and commercial photographer.
• Elisabeth "Bessie" Marbury (1856–1933) was a pioneering American theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe (later known as Lady Mendl), a prominent socialite and famous interior decorator.
• Herman Melville (1819-1891) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet from the American Renaissance period.
• Blanche Marie Louise Oelrichs (October 1, 1890 – November 5, 1950) was a poet, playwright and theatre actress known by the pseudonym "Michael Strange.” Starting in the summer of 1940 until her death, Oelrichs was in a long-term relationship with Margaret Wise Brown, the author of many children’s books. The relationship began as something of a mentoring one, but became a romantic relationship including co-habitating at 10 Gracie Square beginning in 1943.
• Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was a suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women’s rights movement.
• John William Sterling (May 12, 1844 – July 5, 1918) was a founding partner of Shearman & Sterling LLP and major benefactor to Yale University. In Sterling's will, he directs: "no interment other than my own and that of my sister, Cordelia, shall ever take place" in his Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery. An exception is made, however, "in case my said friend, James O. Bloss (September 30, 1847 – December 18, 1918), who has lived with me for more than forty years, should desire to be interred in the said Mausoleum and should die without ever having been married." Cordelia Sterling is burried with her brother. Bloss died less than six months after Sterling, according to his sister, of a broken heart, and is not buried with his friend, though the reason is unknown. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester. Sterling's obituary in the New York Times referred to "his lifelong friend, James O. Bloss, a retired cotton broker, who made his home with the testator for more than forty years." James Orville Bloss died suddenly in New York City, on December 15, 1918.
• Bert Williams (1874-1922), was one of the pre-eminent entertainers of the Vaudeville era. He married Charlotte ("Lottie") Thompson, a singer with whom he had worked professionally, in a very private ceremony. Lottie was a widow eight years Bert's senior. The Williamses never had children biologically, but they adopted three of Lottie's nieces. In 1919 their niece Lottie Tyler met blues singer Alberta Hunter. In August 1927, Hunter sailed for France, accompanied by Lottie. Their relationship lasted until Ms. Tyler's death, many years later.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Carrie Chapman Catt was an American women's suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920.
Born: January 9, 1859, Ripon, Wisconsin, United States
Died: March 9, 1947, New Rochelle, New York, United States
Spouse: Leo Chapman (m. 1885–1886)
Organizations founded: National American Woman Suffrage Association, more
Lived: 20 Ryder Rd., Briarcliff Manor, New York 10510, USA (41.17418, -73.81508)
120 Paine Ave, New Rochelle, NY 10804, USA (40.93711, -73.78692)
257 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024, USA (40.78508, -73.96982)
Studied: Iowa State University
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA, Plot: Primrose Plot, Laurel Avenue, GPS (lat/lon): 40.88377, -73.87546
Buried alongside: Mary Garrett Hay

Carrie Chapman Catt was an American women's suffrage leader who campaigned for the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. She married twice, in 1885 to newspaper editor Leo Chapman, and in 1890 to George Catt, a wealthy engineer. However, Carrie Chapman Catt turned to romantic friendships with women for emotional sustenance. For example, Mary Peck, another active suffragist, would write to her: “Goodnight, darling, beautiful, glorious, priceless, peerless, unutterably precious Pandora. … I love you ardently.” Carrie would respond to her extravagances: “You wrote another letter concerning the charm of my lower lip! I took a day off and went cavorting from mirror to mirror and grinning like a Cheshire cat in hope of catching that ‘haunting smile.”’ Mary Garrett Hay was an active suffragist who worked closely with Carrie Chapman Catt. Hay became Catt’s chief assistant and, after Catt was widowed the second time, they made their home together at Juniper Ledge, located on Ryder Road in the town of New Castle, New York. She and Carrie Chapman Catt are buried side by side in the Bronx's Woodlawn Cemetery marked by a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
Together from 1890 to 1928: 38 years.
Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947)
Mary Garrett Hay (August 29, 1857 - August 29, 1928)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Carrie Chapman Catt House, also known as Juniper Ledge, is located on Ryder Road in the town of New Castle, New York. It is an Arts and Crafts-style building from the early XX century.
Address: 20 Ryder Rd., Briarcliff Manor, New York 10510, USA (41.17418, -73.81508)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 06000336, 2006
Place
While it is a fine example of its school of architecture, the house’s primary historical value is that it was the home of suffragette Carrie Chapman Catt and her partner Mary Hay from 1919 to 1928. That period was the height of her activism; it began with the passage and ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, which granted women the right to vote, and continued with her founding of the League of Women Voters and advocacy of women’s suffrage in other countries. She found the house an ideal place to rest her "tired nerves" since the land was too steep to farm productively. However, later on she did start limited farming, including raising cattle and chickens, on the land, and made some significant modifications to the property. She also claimed to a group of guests during the early years of Prohibition that she had bought the land to prevent anyone from using its juniper berries to make gin. During her times away, Hay, who felt isolated and lonely at Juniper Ledge, instead rented an apartment in New York. After nine years, she and Hay, who had never embraced the rural lifestyle, moved out. The land has been further subdivided but the house remains largely intact. It is still a private residence. Composer Carmino Ravosa, who learned of Catt’s residence there while researching a musical, has worked to preserve it.
Life
Who: Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947)
Carrie Chapman Catt was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. Catt served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and was the founder of the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women. She "led an army of voteless women in 1919 to pressure Congress to pass the constitutional amendment giving them the right to vote and convinced state legislatures to ratify it in 1920" and "was one of the best-known women in the United States in the first half of the XX century and was on all lists of famous American women.”


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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In 1928 Carrie Chapman Catt sold Juniper Ledge in New Castle and purchased a 1907 colonial revival house in New Rochelle.
Address: 120 Paine Ave, New Rochelle, NY 10804, USA (40.93711, -73.78692)
Type: Private Property
Place
Carrie Chapman Catt’s companion Mary Garrett Hay died of a cerebral hemorrhage shortly after they moved in a cottage near Long Island Sound in New Rochelle.
Life
Who: Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947)
Mary Garrett Hay (1857-1928)’s death at first had adverse effects on Catt, who suffered a shingles outbreak and then a heart attack. She recovered enough to live until a second heart attack in 1947, although her activism and public life were more limited during those years. On March 9, 1947, Catt died in her home in New Rochelle. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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257 Central Park West, constructed between 1905 and 1906, currently is a co-op apartment building located on the southwest corner of 86th Street and Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City.
Address: 257 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024, USA (40.78508, -73.96982)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Central Park West Historic District (Central Park West between 61st and 97th Sts.), 82001189, 1982
Place
Design by Mulliken and Moeller (Harry B. Mulliken (1872-1952) and Edgar Joachim Moeller (1873-1954))
According to the 1910 U.S. census, Mary Garrett Hay resided with the widowed Carrie Chapman Catt at 257 Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. Built by Gotham Building & Construction, the structure was erected as a luxury apartment house originally called the Central Park View. Mulliken and Moeller had recently finished The Lucerne, on the corner of 79th and Amsterdam, and the Bretton Hall hotel on the east side of Broadway from 85th to 86th Streets. When Mulliken and Moeller began working on the Central Park View in 1905 for an investor group known only as the Monticello Realty Company, they were also designing the Severn and Van Dyck apartments (found on the east side of Amsterdam Avenue between 72nd and 73rd streets) for a separate client. In the following year, Mulliken and Moeller designed Rossleigh Court, the adjoining and similarly designed apartment building located on the northwest corner of 85th Street and Central Park West. In 1909, Dr. H.F.L. Ziegel and his wife, Beatrice, added the adjoining Neo-Georgian residence at 8 West 86th Street. From 1918 to 1920, the building underwent its first major renovation, the conversion from luxury apartment to the Hotel Peter Stuyvesant sponsored by the Sonn Brothers and the Peter Stuyvesant Operating Company. Situated opposite the 86th Street transverse to Central Park West on the southwest corner, the Central Park View’s design followed the popular “French Flat” model in a Beaux Arts-style, modified to conform to the size of a twelve-story structure. Upon its completion, the new hotel anchored the eastern end of the developing West 86th Street. On the western end of West 86th Street, the Columbia Yacht Club had relocated to a site adjoining the Hudson River in 1874 and remained the other West 86th Street bookend until 1937. 257 Central Park West is located within the Upper West Side-Central Park West Historic District, designated on April 24, 1990. It is also located next to the 86th Street station of the New York City Subway (A B C trains.)
Life
Who: Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947)
Carrie Chapman Catt was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. Mary Garrett Hay (1857-1928) was an active suffragist who worked closely with Carrie Chapman Catt. Hay became Catt’s chief assistant and, after Catt was widowed the second time, they lived together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Although located in Woodlawn, Bronx and one of the largest cemeteries in New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery.
Address: 517 E 233rd St, Bronx, NY 10470, USA (40.89006, -73.87425)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 718-920-0500
National Register of Historic Places: 11000563, 2011 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Woodlawn Cemetery opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was later annexed to New York City in 1874. It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great figures in the American arts, such as authors Countee Cullen and Herman Melville, and musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, and Max Roach. “Memorial To A Marriage” has been erected by Patricia Cronin and her partner Deborah Kass. Sculptor Cronin did the original sculpture of Carrara marble in 2002, to address what she considered a Federal failure: not allowing gay Americans the right to marry. It has been replaced with a bronze casting, installed on the couple’s burial plot in 2011. Since 2002 when the marble was first installed, the memorial has become one of the most visited of Woodlawn. After 18 years together, Patricia Cronin and Deborah Kass went to City Hall on the morning of July 24, 2011, with nearly 900 other New York City couples, waiting for three hours in the heat to get legally married on the first day.
Notable queer burials at Woodlawn Cemetery:
• Diana Blanche Barrymore Blythe (1921-1960), known professionally as Diana Barrymore, was a film and stage actress. She was the daughter of renowned actor John Barrymore and his second wife, poet Blanche Oelrichs.
• Frances (Fannie) Evelyn Bostwick (died in 1921) was the mother of Marion “Joe” Carstairs. Bostwick was an American heiress who was the second child of Jabez Bostwick and his wife Helen. Joe Carstairs' legal father was Scottish army officer Captain Albert Carstairs. At least one biographer has suggested that the Captain may not have been Joe's biological father. Carstairs' mother, an alcoholic and drug addict, later married Captain Francis Francis. She divorced Captain Francis to marry French count Roger de Périgny in 1915, but eventually left him because of his infidelity. Her fourth and last husband, whom she married in 1920, was Serge Voronoff, a Russian–French surgeon who become famous in the 1920s and 1930s for his practice of transplanting monkey testicle tissue into male humans for the claimed purpose of rejuvenation. For some years Evelyn had believed in Voronoff's theories, and she funded his research and acted as his laboratory assistant at the Collège de France in Paris. Voronoff arrived in New York with his wife's body on the ship "S.S. France" in May, 1921.
• Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years. Under a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) born as Countee Porter, was a poet, author and scholar who was a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. It is rumored that Cullen was a homosexual, and his relationship with Harold Jackman ("the handsomest man in Harlem"), was a significant factor in his divorce. The young, dashing Jackman was a school teacher and, thanks to his noted beauty, a prominent figure among Harlem’s gay elite. Van Vechten had used him as a character model in his novel “Nigger Heaven” (1926.)
• Joseph Raphael De Lamar (1843-1918), a prominent mine owner and operator in the western United States and Canada, as well as a financier and speculator, from the late 1870s until his death in 1918. De Lamar married Nellie Virginia Sands, a direct descendant of John Quincy Adams, on 8 May, 1893, and they had one daughter together, Alice DeLamar.
• Marjory Lacey-Baker (died in 1971), actress, she was the long-time companion of Dr. Lena Madesin Phillips, founder of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. They met in 1919 and together until Ms Philipps’ death in 1955. Ms Phillips is buried at Maple Grove Cemetery (500 N Main St, Nicholasville, KY 40356).
• Joseph Christian “J.C.” Leyendecker (1874-1951) was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century.
• George Platt Lynes (1907-1955) was a fashion and commercial photographer.
• Elisabeth "Bessie" Marbury (1856–1933) was a pioneering American theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe (later known as Lady Mendl), a prominent socialite and famous interior decorator.
• Herman Melville (1819-1891) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet from the American Renaissance period.
• Blanche Marie Louise Oelrichs (October 1, 1890 – November 5, 1950) was a poet, playwright and theatre actress known by the pseudonym "Michael Strange.” Starting in the summer of 1940 until her death, Oelrichs was in a long-term relationship with Margaret Wise Brown, the author of many children’s books. The relationship began as something of a mentoring one, but became a romantic relationship including co-habitating at 10 Gracie Square beginning in 1943.
• Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was a suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women’s rights movement.
• John William Sterling (May 12, 1844 – July 5, 1918) was a founding partner of Shearman & Sterling LLP and major benefactor to Yale University. In Sterling's will, he directs: "no interment other than my own and that of my sister, Cordelia, shall ever take place" in his Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery. An exception is made, however, "in case my said friend, James O. Bloss (September 30, 1847 – December 18, 1918), who has lived with me for more than forty years, should desire to be interred in the said Mausoleum and should die without ever having been married." Cordelia Sterling is burried with her brother. Bloss died less than six months after Sterling, according to his sister, of a broken heart, and is not buried with his friend, though the reason is unknown. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester. Sterling's obituary in the New York Times referred to "his lifelong friend, James O. Bloss, a retired cotton broker, who made his home with the testator for more than forty years." James Orville Bloss died suddenly in New York City, on December 15, 1918.
• Bert Williams (1874-1922), was one of the pre-eminent entertainers of the Vaudeville era. He married Charlotte ("Lottie") Thompson, a singer with whom he had worked professionally, in a very private ceremony. Lottie was a widow eight years Bert's senior. The Williamses never had children biologically, but they adopted three of Lottie's nieces. In 1919 their niece Lottie Tyler met blues singer Alberta Hunter. In August 1927, Hunter sailed for France, accompanied by Lottie. Their relationship lasted until Ms. Tyler's death, many years later.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Alice French, better known as Octave Thanet, was an American novelist and short fiction writer.
Born: March 19, 1850, Andover, Massachusetts, United States
Died: January 9, 1934, Davenport, Iowa, United States
People also search for: Michael B Dougan, Frank Binding Designer Hazen, Carol W. Dougan
Lived: Alice French House, Alicia, AR 72410, USA (35.98204, -91.09424)
Alice French House, 321 E 10th St, Davenport, IA 52803, USA (41.5296, -90.57014)
Buried: Oakdale Memorial Gardens, Davenport, Scott County, Iowa, USA, Plot: Section 13, Lot 40 East 1/2
Buried alongside: Jane Allen Crawford

The Alice French House, also known as Thanford, was an historic house located near Clover Bend, Arkansas.
Address: Alicia, AR 72410, USA (35.98204, -91.09424)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Clover Bend Historic District (Jct. of AR 228 and Co. Rd. 1220), 90001368, 1990
Place
Alice French and Jane Crawford originally lived in a cabin on the plantation. It was destroyed in a fire in 1895 and they built Thanford in 1896 along the Black River. It was a three-story, fifteen room house, and its name is a combination of Alice French’s (Thanet, from her pen name) and June Allen Crawford’s last names. The estate was landscaped with shrubs imported from England. The stables housed fine horses and an elegant carriage. The house was the setting for their literary and social activities. French’s study was on the top floor of the house, where she had a commanding view of the river. They entertained many well known people, including Theodore Roosevelt, with fine dining and wines. French also created a woodworking shop, where she built shelves and simple furniture, and a darkroom, where she developed and printed her own photographs. The house was on the banks of Black River. It must have been a very grand sort of a house, especially for Clover Bend in the 1890s. It stood on a curve of the river, towering above clumps of cedar and oak that softened the conventionality of its architectural design and contrasted pleasantly with its white columns and walls. When the U.S. Government purchased the Clover Bend land, it began the task of rebuilding "Thanford," which, by 1937 had not only fallen into deterioration, but stood dangerously close to the encroaching Black River. The building was moved several hundred feet to a safer location, strengthened and thoroughly renovated. The structure was used as late as 1941 for a community recreation room. A framed photograph of Miss French hung above the fireplace.
Life
Who: Alice French (March 19, 1850 – January 9, 1934), aka Octave Thanet, and Jane Crawford (1851-1932)
Born in Andover, Massachusetts, Alice French was five when her family moved to Davenport, Iowa in 1855. She became the first writer from Iowa with a national reputation. Her first short story appeared in a local newspaper in 1871 and by the 1880s she was being published in The Atlantic and Harper’s. She wrote under the pen name Octave Thanet and her stories became popular in the 1890s and early 1900s. French, along with her widowed friend Jane Allen Crawford, spent their winters at Clover Bend Plantation in Lawrence County, Arkansas from 1883-1909. French expanded on the regionalist themes she started in Iowa with stories about the people in the Clover Bend area. She used the poor black and white sharecroppers as the subjects for her stories. As literary tastes changed French’s work fell out of favor. She abandoned writing and took up social work. She died in Davenport in 1934.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Alice French House, is located on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River on the east side of Davenport, Iowa.
Address: 321 E 10th St, Davenport, IA 52803, USA (41.5296, -90.57014)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 83002434, 1983
Place
Built in 1906
George French moved to Davenport from Andover, Massachusetts in 1855 and he served the city as mayor, banker, school board member and trustee of the local Unitarian society. His daughter Alice, who was five when the family moved to the Midwest, became the first writer from Iowa with a national reputation. Her first short story appeared in a local newspaper in 1871 and by the 1880s she was being published in The Atlantic and Harper’s. She wrote under the pen name Octave Thanet and her stories became popular in the 1890s and early 1900s. French was part of an informal literary circle known as the Davenport Writer’s Group. Other members included George Cram Cook, Susan Glaspell, Arthur Davison Ficke, Floyd Dell and Harry Hansen. While most of them had careers away from Davenport, their shared experiences in the city affected their writings. Alice French’s work was especially affected by Davenport and life on the Mississippi. She often wrote about life in a western town named Fairport, which was a fictionalized Davenport. She blended realistic details of daily life in the city with romantic ideals. “The Man of the Hour” (1905), set in Fairport, was her most popular novel. As literary tastes changed French’s work fell out of favor. She abandoned writing and took up social work. She would spend the spring, summer and autumn in Davenport and the winter in Arkansas. The Alice French House is a Queen Anne-Colonial Revival combination structure, a style that was popular in Davenport at the turn of the XX century. It sits on a corner lot that sits diagonally from Sacred Heart Cathedral. It is a large two-story building of wood construction. The home was originally a single-family dwelling that has been divided into a multiple-family dwelling.
Life
Who: Alice French (March 19, 1850 – January 9, 1934), aka Octave Thanet, and Jane Crawford (1851-1932)
By 1890, Alice French settled in her comfortable life-long lesbian partnership with a widowed friend, Jane Allen Crawford, dividing their year between their home in Davenport, Iowa, and their plantation in Arkansas. The two women shared their lives, except for Jane’s four-year marriage and then her European tour. In 1909, French and Crawford gave up their Thanford house, after which French traveled widely in the United States, speaking for the conservative causes she embraced, adding to them her opposition to woman suffrage. Her point of view remained fixed in the era of her youth. She developed diabetes, and complications from the disease caused the loss of one leg and most of her eyesight. She died on January 9, 1934, in Davenport. She is buried at Oakdale Memorial Gardens (2501 Eastern Ave, Davenport, IA 52803), alongside with Jane Crawford.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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March 2017

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All cover art, photo and graphic design contained in this site are copyrighted by the respective publishers and authors. These pages are for entertainment purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. Should anyone object to our use of these items please contact by email the blog's owner.
This is an amateur blog, where I discuss my reading, what I like and sometimes my personal life. I do not endorse anyone or charge fees of any kind for the books I review. I do not accept money as a result of this blog.
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Days of Love Gallery - Copyright Legenda: http://www.elisarolle.com/gallery/index_legenda.html

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