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Christopher Tunnard was a Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape. He was the cousin of the British surrealist artist John Tunnard.
Born: July 7, 1910, Victoria, Canada
Died: February 13, 1979, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
Education: Westminster School of Art
Royal Horticultural Society
Harvard University
Lived: St. Ann’s Court, St Ann's Hill Road, Surrey KT16 9NW, UK (51.39332, -0.52049)
Buried: Oak Grove Cemetery, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, USA, Plot: Oak Grove, Plot 562
Find A Grave Memorial# 136084821
Books: Gardens in the modern landscape, Man-made America, more
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Humanities, US & Canada, more

St Ann's Court at Chertsey in Surrey is a reinforced concrete private house that was finished in 1936 by the Australian born architect, Raymond McGrath, for a stockbroker friend, AL Schlesinger. The house stands in 25 acres of parkland on the south slope of St Ann's Hill. Conservation work on the structure was completed in 1999 and included an authentic refurbishment of the interior at a total cost of around pounds 1 million.
Address: St Ann's Hill Road, Surrey KT16 9NW, UK (51.39332, -0.52049)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 361727 (Grade II, 1986)
Place
Built in 1936-7, Design by Raymond McGrath in consultation with Christopher Tunnard.
Reinforced concrete (L Mouchel and Partners), with internal cork insulation and vertical board-marked external finish originally painted pinkish grey, and smooth soffits (originally jade green) and beams. Flat roof; three storeys including roof terraces. Circular plan inspired by the surrounding landscape, likened by McGrath to “a big cheese, with a slice cut for the sunlight to enter the whole house.” Supporting columns set in circumference of outer walls, with solid supporting inner circle defining central circular living room and master bedroom, with semi-circle of copper-clad freestanding columns within. These constructional circles most clearly revealed on the “peeled away” south facade. Projecting winter garden and screen to west part are an integral part of McGrath's design. Metal casement windows with single transom, those to living room, master bedroom and winter garden of full height. Segmental balcony to first-floor (master bedroom) and bow-shaped terrace to second floor, served by external spiral stair with metal gate. The post and beam construction of the house is exposed and articulates the symmetrical form of the upper parts of the house. A counterpoise to the spiral stair is the rounded end of the study on the ground-floor of the other (east) side of the house. Timber door set under porch in angle created by protective wall of adjoining former tradesmen's entrance. Entrance leads into wedge-shaped terrazzo-floored hall, with terrazzo-clad stairs on outer face, having delicate metal balustrade and timber handrail. On inner face survives a mirror mosaic or “Vitroflex” panel etched with Tunnard’s layout for the garden. Principal rooms are the living room, flanked to east and west by study and dining room respectively. They form a bow-shaped plan within the circle, with service accommodation tucked discretely to the north behind projecting walls. Living room with original walnut panelling around marble-finished fireplace, timber floors and columns sheathed with polished copper. Central coved ceiling enforces the importance of the wholly circular inner area of the room. Directly above the master bedroom is also circular, with original fitted cupboards, and bed alcoves to either side, one with dressing room. Here the bow-shaped plan becomes more completely symmetrical, and this is continued on the second floor, which in addition to the roof terrace originally had the billiard room and a studio for Tunnard. McGrath described St Ann's Hill as “my most ambitious piece of domestic design in England” (Architectural Review, July, 1977). The circular plan was inspired by the surviving XVIII century landscape by Charles Hamilton, which Tunnard remodelled. Tunnard was just beginning then to practice as a full-time landscape architect, and his ideas of the integration house and landscape would only begin to have a real impact with rediscovery of the Picturesque in the '40s. As Brian Hanson says, St Ann's Hill demonstrates a genuine modern respect for genius loci as early as 1937, “without compromising the modernity of the house or resorting to gimmicks”. The building is significant too, for its structural honesty, and richness of surviving materials. The principal rooms, with their mirror design, walnut panelling and exploitation of the unusual plan form, are among the most interesting and complete surviving 1930s private house interiors to survive in England.
Life
Who: Gerald Schlesinger and Christopher Tunnard (July 7, 1910- February 13, 1979)
St Ann’s Court was commissioned as a main residence by Gerald Schlesinger and Christopher Tunnard. Schlesinger was a successful lawyer whilst Tunnard became one of the most important Modern landscape architects in Britain. The two men lived at St Ann's for most of the year (though they had a large London home) and the unusual first floor master bedroom enabled their double bed to be separated easily into two and rolled into the wings of the bow-tie shaped room. In this position the bedroom became two single bedrooms separated by movable screens and a circular dressing room. With this arrangement they could maintain the fiction when house guests were expected that they slept in separate rooms - which was essential when sex between men was illegal. From 1932-1935 Christopher Tunnard worked as a garden designer for Percy Cane, an exponent of the Arts and Crafts movement. One of Percy Cane’s jobs was for A.L. Schlesinger at 21 Addison Road, Kensington. This may have been how Tunnard came to be acquainted with Gerald L. Schlesinger, a prosperous lawyer who purchased the St. Ann’s estate in Chertsey when in 1935 he and his wife separated. The house was in poor condition, and it was decided to pull it down and build afresh. Tunnard became very involved in Schlesinger’s project, and moved there from Salcott, his house in Cobham, in September 1935. He gave “Aldbury,” in Chertsey, as his temporary address to the RHS, but from January 1936 his address changed to “The Studios, St. Ann’s Hill House.” Raymond McGrath was the architect, and he used Gordon Cullen (1914-1994) as draughtsman for the drawings. Tunnard effectively became the client, and took a very close interest in the designs. McGrath designed in a studio for Tunnard on the top floor, opening out onto the roof garden over the first floor. The structure was in reinforced concrete — very innovative for the time — with L.G. Mouchel and Partners acting as engineers. The house was under construction when the snow came in early 1936. Works continued throughout that year. Designs for the swimming pool had been drawn up in October 1935 and the working plan for the contractor a year later. The sculptor Willi Soukop, originally from Vienna but then residing at Dartington Hall, was commissioned to provide a fountain for it. Early in 1937 the finished work on the house was ready for photography and publicity.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Harvard professor and gardner designer, was drafted into the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1943 and after the war took a job teaching city planning at Yale. Enjoying the work, he did little further garden design, and reached the post of professor and chairman of the department of city planning. His publications in this area include articles such as America's super-cities and a number of books on city design in the U.S. Despite a previous long-term same-sex relationship with Gerald Schlesinger with whom he lived in England, Tunnard married Lydia Evans of Boston, Massachusetts in 1945. They had a son, Christopher. Tunnard died in New Haven in 1979. Tunnard and his wife are buried at Oak Grove Cemetery (Summer St, Plymouth, MA 02360), Plot: Oak Grove, Plot 562. In the nearby Vine Hills Cemetery (102 Samoset St, Plymouth, MA 02360) is buried Joseph Everett Chandler (1863–1946), Colonial Revival architect and pioneering designer of queer space.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Charlotte Anita Whitney, best known as "Anita Whitney," was an American women's rights activist, political activist, suffragist, and early Communist Labor Party of America and Communist Party USA organizer in California.
Born: 1867, San Francisco, California, United States
Died: February 1955, San Francisco, California, United States
Education: Wellesley College
Lived: 3938 Harrison Street, Oakland, CA 94611
Buried: Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Alameda County, California, USA

Charlotte Anita Whitney (1867–1955) is best remembered as the defendant in a landmark 1920 California criminal syndicalism trial, Whitney v. California, which featured a landmark U.S. Supreme Court concurring opinion by Justice Louis Brandeis that only a "clear and present danger" would be sufficient for the legislative restriction of the right of free speech. This standard would ultimately be employed against the Communists again during the Second Red Scare of the 1950s. She was close companion of Dr. Marie Equi. In the 1930s she lived at 3938 Harrison Street (Oakland, CA 94611) and is buried at Mountain View Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The Mountain View Cemetery is a large 226-acre (91 ha) cemetery in Oakland, Alameda County, California. It was established in 1863 by a group of East Bay pioneers under the California Rural Cemetery Act of 1859. The association they formed still operates the cemetery today. Mountain View was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, the landscape architect who also designed New York City's Central Park and much of UC Berkeley and Stanford University.
Address: 5000 Piedmont Ave, Oakland, CA 94611, USA (37.83222, -122.2442)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 510-658-2588
Place
Many of California's important historical figures, drawn by Olmsted's reputation, are buried here, and there are so many grandiose crypts in tribute to the wealthy that one section is known as "Millionaires' Row." Because of this, and its beautiful setting, the cemetery is a tourist draw and docents lead semi-monthly tours. Olmsted's intent was to create a space that would express a harmony between humankind and the natural setting. In the view of 19th century English and American romantics, park-like cemeteries, such as Mountain View, represented the peace of nature, to which humanity's soul returns. Olmsted, drawing upon the concepts of American Transcendentalism, integrated Parisian grand monuments and broad avenues. Adjoining Mountain View Cemetery is Saint Mary Cemetery and the Chapel of the Chimes mausoleum and columbarium.
Notable queer burials at Mountain View Cemetery:
• Glenn Burke (1952–1995), Major League Baseball (MLB) player for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Oakland Athletics from 1976 to 1979. Burke was the first and only MLB player to come out as gay to teammates and team owners during his professional career and the first to publicly acknowledge it. He died from AIDS-related causes in 1995. “They can't ever say now that a gay man can't play in the majors, because I'm a gay man and I made it."—Glenn Burke.
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880–1955), Dean of Women at University of California, Berkeley.
• Charlotte Anita Whitney (1867–1955), American women's rights activist, political activist, suffragist, and early Communist Labor Party of America and Communist Party USA organizer in California. She is best remembered as the defendant in a landmark 1920 California criminal syndicalism trial, Whitney v. California, which featured a landmark U.S. Supreme Court concurring opinion by Justice Louis Brandeis that only a "clear and present danger" would be sufficient for the legislative restriction of the right of free speech. This standard would ultimately be employed against the Communists again during the Second Red Scare of the 1950s. She was close companion of Dr. Marie Equi. In the 1930s she lived at 3938 Harrison Street (Oakland, CA 94611). Because she was such a controversial figure throughout her lifetime, when she died, no headstone was placed on her grave. Instead, she was buried with her parents, George E. Whitney and Mary L. Whitney.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Gian Carlo Menotti was an Italian-American composer and librettist. Although he often referred to himself as an American composer, he kept his Italian citizenship.
Born: July 7, 1911, Cadegliano-Viconago
Died: February 1, 2007, Monte Carlo, Monaco
Education: Curtis Institute of Music
Milan Conservatory
Lived: Capricorn, Capricorn, Haines Road, west of Croton Lake Road, Mt Kisco, NY 10549, USA (41.23958, -73.73527)
Yester House, Gifford, Haddington, East Lothian EH41 4JF, UK (55.89542, -2.73147)
Buried: Yester Kirk, Gifford, East Lothian, Scotland
Movies: The Medium, Menotti: Help, Help the Globolinks, Amahl and the Night Visitors, The Telephone
Children: Francis Menotti

Samuel Barber was a composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century: music critic Donal Henahan stated, "Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim." He was twice awarded the Pulitzer Prize for music, for his opera Vanessa and his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra. At 14, he entered the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, where he studied piano with Isabelle Vengerova, composition with Rosario Scalero, and voice with Emilio de Gorgoza. He began composing seriously in his late teenage years. Around the same time, he met fellow Curtis schoolmate Gian Carlo Menotti, who became his partner in life as well as in their shared profession. Menotti supplied the libretto (text) for Barber's opera, Vanessa. Menotti also contributed the libretto for Barber's chamber opera A Hand of Bridge. Barber's Antony and Cleopatra was commissioned to open the new Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center in 1966. In recent years, a revised version for which Menotti provided collaborative assistance has enjoyed some success.
Together from 1929 to 1981: 52 years.
Gian Carlo Menotti (July 7, 1911 – February 1, 2007)
Samuel Osmond Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Thomas Schippers was an American conductor. He was highly regarded for his work in opera. Regrettably, soon after building the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra's international reputation and recording with them, he died of lung cancer at the early age of 47. It was around 1949 that Thomas Schippers met the composer Gian Carlo Menotti while accompanying a singer for an audition. This eventually led to a long-term collaboration with Menotti. Following the 1950 premiere of Menotti's opera The Consul, Schippers began conducting it on Broadway and in 1951 directed the milestone premiere television performance of Menotti's Christmas Opera Amahl and the Night Visitors broadcast live on national television on Dec. 24. According to the professor, writer, and opera scholar John Louis DiGaetani, Schippers had a lengthy romantic relationship with Menotti, in addition to a shorter romantic relationship with mathematician Sean Clarke. A biography of Leonard Bernstein states that Schippers and Bernstein also were intimately involved.
They met in 1949 and remained friends until Schippers’s death in 1977: 28 years.
Gian Carlo Menotti (July 7, 1911 – February 1, 2007)
Thomas Schippers (March 9, 1930 – December 16, 1977)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1943, Samuel Barber and Gian Carlo Menotti purchased a house in Mount Kisco, New York.
Address: Capricorn, Haines Road, west of Croton Lake Road, Mt Kisco, NY 10549, USA (41.23958, -73.73527)
Type: Private Property
Place
Mount Kisco is a village and a town in Westchester County, New York. The Town of Mount Kisco is coterminous with the village. The population was 10,877 at the 2010 census. The Village of Mount Kisco was incorporated in 1875 and was partly in the towns of Bedford and New Castle. In 1978, the village chose to become a town in its own right and joined several villages in the state that have made same choice. According to the town’s official web site, Kisco is derived from an Indian word –either kiskamenahook meaning “settlement near a brook” or cisqua meaning “a muddy place.” Mount comes from the 623-foot hill northwest of town. The Mount Kisco Municipal Complex was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. Merestead, St. Mark’s Cemetery, and the United Methodist Church and Parsonage are also listed.
Life
Who: Samuel Osborne Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981)
For three years, 1939–42, Samuel Barber taught at the Curtis Institute, but in 1942 he joined the U.S. Army Air Forces, becoming its resident composer. In 1943, a gift from Bok enabled Barber and Menotti to buy a house in Mt. Kisco, New York, which they named Capricorn. They were regularly visited by a wide variety of artists and intellectuals, and their domestic happiness brought greater productivity for both composers. At the peak of his powers, Barber unveiled “Medea,” his ballet score for the Martha Graham Dance Company, in 1946; “Knoxville, Summer of 1915,” a song with orchestra, in 1947; and his lone piano sonata in 1949. (All are still in the world repertory; in 1953 Barber reworked his ballet score for orchestra and soprano, as “Medea’s Meditation and Dance of Vengeance,” Op. 23a.) His opera “Vanessa” (1958) received its premiere at the Metropolitan Opera, won a Pulitzer Prize, and became the first American opera performed at Austria’s Salzburg Festival. He wrote three works for the opening of Lincoln Center, including the opera “Antony and Cleopatra,” his second commission for the Met. When the premiere of “Antony and Cleopatra” was hammered by the critics, Barber withdrew to a villa in Italy, where he battled depression. He and his lifelong partner, Menotti, separated and Capricorn, their home, was sold. Barber continued to compose in New York City but drank too much. Cared for by Menotti, he died of cancer and was buried in Oaklands Cemetery in the town of his birth, West Chester, Pennsylvania.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Yester House is an early XVIII-century mansion near Gifford in East Lothian, Scotland. It was the home of the Hay family, later Marquesses of Tweeddale, from the XV century until the 1970s.
Address: Gifford, Haddington, East Lothian EH41 4JF, UK (55.89542, -2.73147)
Type: Private House
Historic Scotland Building ID: 14693 (Category A, 1971)
Place
Construction of the present house began in 1699, and continued well into the 18th century in a series of building phases. It is now protected as a category A listed building, and the grounds of the house are included in the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland, the national listing of significant gardens. The lands of Yester were granted to Hugo de Giffard, a Norman, in the XII century. Yester Castle, around 1 mile (1.6 km) south-east of the present house, was built by the Giffords in the later XIII century. The heiress of the Giffords married into the Hay family, who were raised to the peerage in 1488 as Lord Hay of Yester. In 1646 the 8th Lord Hay was created Earl of Tweeddale, and considered the building of a new house at Yester. The 1st Earl acquired his title for his support of Charles I, but later served in two Commonwealth Parliaments. His son, the 2nd Earl of Tweeddale, was appointed to the Privy Council of Scotland after the Restoration. He began improvements to the estate, including the planting of over 6,000 acres (2,400 ha) of woodland. It was around this time that the medieval village of Yester was moved to its current location at Gifford. The Earl consulted Sir William Bruce in 1670, with a view to commissioning a new house, although nothing was done at this time. Formal gardens were established and parkland laid out through the 1680s and 1690s. For his support of William of Orange, the 2nd Earl was appointed Lord Chancellor of Scotland in 1692 and 1st Marquess of Tweeddale in 1694. John Hay, 2nd Marquess of Tweeddale, who inherited the estate in 1697, appointed James Smith and Alexander McGill to begin work on a new house in 1697. The 2nd Marquess supported the Acts of Union and served at Westminster as a representative peer. When he died in 1713 the building work was still underway; the main house was complete by 1715, when the 3rd Marquess died. John Hay, 4th Marquess of Tweeddale, also served as a representative peer from 1722. The interior of the house was complete by 1728, but in 1729 the 4th Marquess appointed William Adam to make alterations to the roof and main façade, and in the mid-1730s to the interiors. William was succeeded as architect at Yester by his sons Robert and John, who carried out alterations inside in 1761, and another redesign of the façade in the 1780s, as well as redesigning the gardens in an informal style in the 1760s. The house was altered in the 1830s, with the entrance moved to the west front, and was modernised at the end of the XIX century by Robert Rowand Anderson for the 11th Marquess. The estate was sold after the death of David Hay, 12th Marquess of Tweeddale, in 1967. In 1972 it was bought by the Italian-American composer Gian Carlo Menotti because of the acoustics of the ballroom. After Menotti's death, the house was marketed by his family with a price of between £12 million and £15 million. According to the sales particulars the house has a gross internal area of 3,213 square metres (34,580 sq ft). In September 2010 the guide price was reduced to £8 million, with the exclusion of 120 hectares (300 acres) of woodlands from the sale.
Life
Who: Gian Carlo Menotti (July 7, 1911 – February 1, 2007)
Gian Carlo Menotti was an Italian-American composer and librettist. Although he often referred to himself as an American composer, he kept his Italian citizenship. Samuel Barber became Menotti's partner in life and in work, with Menotti crafting the libretto for Barber's most famous opera, “Vanessa,” which premiered at the Metropolitan Opera in 1958. As a student, Menotti spent much of his time with the Samuel Barber family in West Chester, Pennsylvania. After graduation, the two men bought a house together in Mount Kisco, New York, which they named "Capricorn" and shared for over forty years. In 1974, Menotti adopted Francis "Chip" Phelan, an American actor and figure skater he had known since the early 1960s. In the same year, Menotti, persuaded by the good acoustics of the main room, purchased the ancestral home of the Marquess of Tweeddale, Yester House, in the village of Gifford, East Lothian, in Scotland. While there, he jokingly referred to himself as "Mr McNotti". Menotti founded the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy in 1958, and its companion festival, Spoleto Festival USA, in Charleston, South Carolina in 1977. For three weeks each summer, Spoleto is visited by nearly a half-million people. Barber died of cancer in 1981 in New York City at the age of 70. He was buried in Oaklands Cemetery in his hometown of West Chester, Pennsylvania. The plot next to him was for Menotti, but when Menotti died in 2007 he chose to be buried at the Yester Kirk (Gifford, Haddington, East Lothian EH41).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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George Dewey Cukor was an American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
Born: July 7, 1899, Lower East Side, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 24, 1983, Los Angeles, California, United States
Lived: 9166 Cordell Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90069, USA (34.09418, -118.39137)
Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Garden of Honor (Private Garden), GPS (lat/lon): 34.12273, -118.23605
Awards: Academy Award for Best Director, more
Books: What Price Hollywood?

Florence Yoch and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California. Their landscape design works include The George Cukor gardens in the Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles - over several decades
Address: 9166 Cordell Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90069, USA (34.09418, -118.39137)
Type: Private Property
Place
Design by Roland E. Coate (1890-1958)
The legendary director George Cukor’s residence in the Hollywood Hills provided a luxurious backdrop to the director’s vibrant social life. At the height of his career, Cukor’s home served as an vital social center in Hollywood’s gay community. He hired former film actor William "Billy" Haines as his interior designer, who filled the home with elegant decor and dozens of photographs of Cukor’s Hollywood friends.
Life
Who: Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council (1898–1964)
Florence Yoch was a landscape architect in California who was active from 1915 through the 1950s. Her career included commissions for private residential clients, parks, public spaces, and film sets for Hollywood movies. Florence Yoch’s college education began in 1910 at the University of California, Berkeley and then at Cornell’s College of Agriculture. She would go on to earn her degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1915. Upon graduation, Yoch immediately went to work designing gardens in Pasadena and Orange County. In 1921, she hired as apprentices Katherine Bashford (who would leave to found her own solo practice in 1923) and Lucile Council, who had studied at both the Cambridge School of Domestic and Landscape Architecture and at Oxford. In 1925, Florence and Lucile formed a partnership, Yoch & Council, setting up shop in the garden studio at Council’s home in South Pasadena. From there they would enjoy a thriving business creating landscaping for a large roster of clients that ranged from wealthy clientele in Pasadena and Santa Barbara to Hollywood players. Other than George Cukor gardens, their landscape design works include: The estate of Howard Huntington, a Henry E. Huntington heir, in Pasadena; The equestrian estate of Will Keith Kellogg in the Pomona Valley, the present day campus of Cal Poly Pomona; Il Brolino estate with topiary garden in Montecito; The Getty House gardens in Windsor Square, Los Angeles; Rancho Los Alamitos in Long Beach, California; The Jack L. Warner estate in Beverly Hills - present day David Geffen estate; Film sets for the exterior of “Tara” in Gone with the Wind; The David O. Selznick estate in Beverly Hills. The works of Florence Yoch & Lucile Council are documented in the book "Landscaping the American dream: the gardens and film sets of Florence Yoch, 1890-1972.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.
Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Covina Hills), 21300 Via Verde Drive, Covina, CA 91724, USA (34.06783, -117.84183)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cypress), 4471 Lincoln Ave, Cypress, CA 90630, USA (33.8337, -118.0552)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Long Beach), 1500 E San Antonio Dr, Long Beach, CA 90807, USA (33.84384, -118.17116)
Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.
Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964), Section G, Lot 5 Space 9, Glendale. Florence Yoch (1890–1972) and Lucile Council were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California.
• George Cukor (1899-1983), Garden of Honor (Private Garden), Glendale. American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991), Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, G64054, Hollywood Hills. American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977), Ascension, L-7296, space 1, Glendale. For nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist Helen Ferguson had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959), Wee Kirk Churchyard, L-260, Space 4, Glendale. He was a British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (1936-1986) and Tory Damon (1939-1986), Hollywood Hills. Plot: Courts of Remembrance, wall crypt #3515. Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927), Glendale, Great Mausoleum, Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium. Composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970), Whispering Pines section, Map #03, Lot 994, Ground Interment Space 3, at the top of the hill. American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962), Court of Remembrance, C-310 (wall crypt), Hollywood Hills. English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994), Eternal Love, Map E09, Lot 1561, Space 3, Hollywood Hills. W. Dorr Legg was a landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) and James Whale (1889-1957), Columbarium, Glendale. When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987), Courts of Remembrance section, Map #A39, Distinguished Memorial – Sarcophagus 4, Hollywood Hills. American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986), Hollywood Hills. Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971), The Great Mausoleum, Dahlia Terrace, Florentine Columbarium, Niche 8446, Glendale. Choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985), Cenotaph, Cathedral City. Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945), actress,Whispering Pines, lot 1689, Glendale.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999), Columbarium of Providence, niche 64953, Hollywood Hills. He was one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957), Eventide Section - Lot 2116 - Space 1, Glendale. American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006), Glendale. Sandoval was a judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976), Sanctuary, Glendale. Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977), Ascension Garden, Glendale. African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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