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Frances "Fannie" Benjamin Johnston was an early American female photographer and photojournalist whose career lasted for almost half a century.
Born: January 15, 1864, Grafton, West Virginia, United States
Died: May 16, 1952, French Quarter, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Education: Académie Julian
Lived: 1332 V St NW, Washington, DC 20009
1132 Bourbon St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA (29.96226, -90.06205)
536 Fifth Avenue
Buried: Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA

Fannie Johnston was one of the earliest American female photographers and photojournalists. She took portraits of many famous contemporaries including Susan B. Anthony, Mark Twain and Booker T. Washington. She was dubbed the "Photographer to the American court." She photographed Admiral Dewey on the deck of the USS Olympia, Alice Roosvelt's wedding portrait, the Roosevelt children playing at the White House and the gardens of Edith Wharton’s famous villa near Paris. In 1901, Mattie Edwards Hewitt traveled to the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, where she met Fannie. Hewitt divorced her husband, photographer Arthur Hewitt, in 1909 and moved with Johnston to New York City. The two women embarked as partners, seizing the opportunity presented by a wave of public building in New York to establish themselves as architectural photographers. They photographed the new Public Library, Hotel Manhattan, the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, West Point Academy and the New Theatre. Despite their successes, the partnership ended in a bitter conflict in 1917, leaving both Hewitt and Johnston to pursue independent careers.
Together from 1901 to 1917: 16 years.
Frances "Fannie" Benjamin Johnston (January 15, 1864 – May 16, 1952)
Mattie Edwards Hewitt (died in 1956)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1894 Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) opened her own photographic studio on 1332 V St NW (Washington, DC 20009), and at the time was the only woman photographer in the city. She took portraits of many famous contemporaries including Susan B. Anthony, Mark Twain and Booker T. Washington.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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While other great mansions along Central Park were being converted to museums or condominiums, the Henry Cook house remained intact. In 1977 it was purchased by highly-successful businessman Victor Shafferman for $600,000. Shafferman died in 2009 leaving No. 973 Fifth Avenue with much of the original interior detailing: plaster moldings, marble mantles and paneled rooms.
Address: 5th Ave, New York, NY 10075, USA
Type: Private Property
Notable queer residents at Fifth Avenue:
- No. 973 Fifth Avenue: Victor Shafferman (November 8, 1941- October 19, 2009) Henry H. Cook made his fortune in railroads and banking. When he began planning to build his enormous mansion in 1880 at the north corner of 5th Avenue and 78th Street across from Central Park he had no intentions of commercial interlopers in his neighborhood. That year Cook purchased the entire block from Fifth Avenue to Madison Avenue, between 78th and 79th Streets for $500,000 and laid out stringent building restrictions: no structure other than a private home could be built on what was known as the Cook Block. The restrictions survive today. The Cook and Whitney houses were completed in 1907, architect Stanford White. By 1912 James B. Duke had demolished the original Cook mansion to erect his own white marble mansion that survives today. Henry Cook left the house to his daughter but, according to Christopher Gray, she rarely used it. In 1919 Cook’s daughter sold the house to the socially-prominent Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Fuller Feder. A year after their daughter Odette’s debut, a glittering reception was held on Dec. 26, 1921 for her wedding to the dashing British Royal Air Force Major J. Ronald McCrindle. (Eight years later Odette filed for divorce.) Mrs. Feder continued to entertain lavishly in the house until her husband’s death on 11 May, 1944. Mr. Feder lived there with his wife and family, 29 years later in 1948, the family sold it to the Mormon Church. The Mormons used it as a training center. In 1978, they sold it to Victor Shafferman, a real estate investor, for a reported $600,000. The estate of Victor Shafferman, who died in 2009, sold 973 5th Avenue in 2011 for $49 million.
- No. 907 Fifth Avenue: In the 1950s Pola Negri resided at 907 Fifth Avenue. Neighbors reported that a great portrait of Valentino hung in a prominent place in her foyer. By the end of the decade, she had moved into the San Antonio mansion of oil heiress Margaret West. When Miss West died in 1963, she willed Pola her jewelry and lifetime use of her Texas house. When Pola died in 1987, she was still living in Texas. The twelve-story, limestone-faced building is located at Fifth Avenue and 72nd Street on a site once occupied by the 1893 residence of James A. Burden, which had been designed by R. H. Robertson. The apartment block, built in 1916, was the first apartment building to replace a private mansion on Fifth Avenue above 59th Street. It was converted to a cooperative in 1955. J. E. R. Carpenter was the architect; he would be called upon to design many of the luxury apartment buildings that gave a new scale to Fifth Avenue in the ‘teens and twenties of the XX century. The building won him the 1916 gold medal of the American Institute of Architects. The building has the aspect of an Italian Renaissance palazzo, built around a central court. Its first four floors are lightly rusticated; deep quoins carry the rusticated feature up the corners to the boldly projecting top cornice. A strong secondary cornice above the fourth floor once made a conciliatory nod to the cornice lines of the private houses that flanked it, whose owners had fought its construction in court. When it opened, there were two twelve-room apartments on most floors.
- No. 820 Fifth Avenue: a luxury cooperative in Manhattan, New York City, located on Fifth Avenue at the Northeast corner of East 63rd Street on the Upper East Side. The 12 story limestone-clad neo-Italian Renaissance palazzo is one of the most expensive and exclusive apartment houses in the city. It was designed by Starrett & Van Vleck and built by Fred T. Ley in 1916. The land upon which it was built was previously occupied by the Progress Club. The frontage was 100.5 feet on Fifth Avenue and 100 feet on 63rd Street. Construction cost was 1 million dollars, exclusive of the land (which cost another million.) The building comprises 12 apartments. The fourth floor is one of only a couple of units at 820 that have changed hands multiple times in the last 10 or 20 years. For many years, the 18-room sprawler was owned by poet, philanthropist, and paper heiress Louise Crane whose family concern, Crane & Co., manufactures high-grade stationary and has provided the paper on which U.S. currency has been printed for nearly 150 years. Crane was about as old as money gets in America young country. After Crane’s death in 1997, the apartment was sold to khaki pants king Tommy Hilfiger who somehow scooched by the notoriously fussy and stringent board and reportedly scooped the apartment up in the spring of 1999 for around $10,000,000. After jumping through all the board’s crazy hoops and demands and finally finessing his way into the building, Hilfiger did the unthinkable, he quickly changed his mind about living up in 820 and flipped the apartment back onto the market at a much higher price than he paid.
- No. 536 Fifth Avenue: With her partner, Mattie Edwards Hewitt, a successful freelance home and garden photographer in her own right, Francis Benjamin Johnston opened a studio in New York in 1913 at 536 Fifth Avenue, and moved in with her mother and aunt. She lectured at New York University on business for women and they produced a series of studies of New York architecture through the 1920s. In early 1920 her mother died in New York.


680 & 684 Fifth Ave Residences | 684 Fifth Ave was built as wedding gift of William H. Vanderbilt for his daughter Florence and her husband Hamilton Twombly. The other mansion (left) at 680 was the home of his daughter Eliza Osgood Vanderbilt Webb and her husband, Dr. William Seward Webb.

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Frances Benjamin Johnston acquired a home in the French Quarter of New Orleans in 1940, retiring there in 1945, where she died in 1952 at the age of eighty-eight.
Address: 1132 Bourbon St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USA (29.96226, -90.06205)
Type: Private Property
Place
The noted photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston made her home at 1132 Bourbon Street. In the 1930s she received a Carnegie Foundation grant to photograph southern architecture. Her photos are now in the Library of Congress. The Greek Revival style house was erected for Mme. Julie Duralde, the widow of John Clay, Henry Clay’s brother. She purchased the property in 1835 and owned it until her death in 1861. A bronze plaque identifying this building was affixed by the Orleans Parish Landmarks Commission in 1985.
Life
Who: Frances "Fannie" Benjamin Johnston (January 15, 1864 – May 16, 1952)
Frances Benjamin Johnston was one of the earliest American female photographers and photojournalists. Well connected among elite society, she was commissioned by magazines to do "celebrity" portraits, such as Alice Roosevelt’s wedding portrait. She photographed the gardens of Edith Wharton’s famous villa near Paris. Johnston also photographed the famous American heiress and literary salon socialite Natalie Barney in Paris but perhaps her most famous work is her self-portrait of the liberated "New Woman,” petticoats showing and beer stein in hand.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In Nov. 2003, Howard Austen died; later, in Feb. 2005, he was re-buried at Rock Creek Cemetery, in Washington, D.C., in a joint grave meant for both Gore Vidal and Austen.
Address: 201 Allison St NW, Washington, DC 20011, USA (38.94744, -77.01203)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 (202) 726-2080
National Register of Historic Places: 77001498, 2010
Place
Rock Creek Cemetery is an 86-acre (350,000 m2) cemetery with a natural rolling landscape located at Rock Creek Church Road, NW, and Webster Street, NW, off Hawaii Avenue, NE in Washington, D.C.’s Petworth neighborhood. It is across the street from the historic Soldiers’ Home and the Soldiers’ Home Cemetery. It also is home to the InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington. It was first established in 1719 as a churchyard within the glebe of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish. The Vestry later decided to expand the burial ground as a public cemetery to serve the city of Washington and this was established through an Act of Congress in 1840. The expanded Cemetery was landscaped in the rural garden style, to function as both a cemetery and a public park. It is a ministry of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish with sections for St. John’s Russian Orthodox Church and St. Nicholas Orthodox Church. Rock Creek Cemetery’s park-like setting has many notable mausoleums, sculptures, and tombstones. The best known is Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Stanford White’s Adams Memorial, a contemplative, androgynous bronze sculpture seated before a block of granite. It marks the graves of Marian Hooper “Clover" Adams and her husband, Henry Adams, and sometimes mistakenly, the sculpture is referred to as Grief. Saint-Gaudens entitled it The Mystery of the Hereafter and The Peace of God that Passeth Understanding. Other notable memorials include the Frederick Keep Monument, the Heurich Mausoleum, the Hitt Monument, the Hardon Monument, the Kauffman Monument, known as The Seven Ages of Memory, the Sherwood Mausoleum Door, and the Thompson-Harding Monument.
Notable queer burials at Rock Creek Cemetery:
• Henry Brooks Adams (1838-1918)
• Howard Auster (1929–2003)
• Frances Benjamin "Fannie" Johnston (1864-1952), pioneering photojournalist and documentary photographer. She was cremated and her ashes scattered over the family plot.
• James Trimble, III (1925-1945)
• Gore Vidal (1925–2012)
Life
Who: Eugene Louis Vidal (October 3, 1925 – July 31, 2012) aka Gore Vidal and Howard Auster (1929 – September 22, 2003) aka Howard Austen
Gore Vidal and Howard Austen are buried side by side at Rock Creek Cemetery. Near them there is also Henry Adams, the American journalist, novelist, academic and historian who featured in Vidal’s books, and the great love of Gore Vidal’s life, Jimmy Trimble. Gore Vidal’s second novel, “The City and the Pillar” (1948) caused a moralistic furor over his dispassionate presentation of a young protagonist coming to terms with his homosexuality and a male homosexual relationship. The novel was dedicated to "J.T."; decades later, Vidal confirmed that the initials were those of James Trimble III, killed in the Battle of Iwo Jima on March 1, 1945; and that Jimmie Trimble was the only person Gore Vidal ever loved.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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