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David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life.
Born: March 9, 1892, Brighton, United Kingdom
Died: February 17, 1981, Montcuq, France
Lived: Wissett Lodge, Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Charleston Farmhouse, West Firle, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6LL, UK (50.84268, 0.11559)
Hilton Hall, High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Château de Charry, Le Verger de Charry, 46800 Montcuq, France (44.31818, 1.22313)
Find A Grave Memorial# 133696391
Spouse: Angelica Garnett (m. 1942)
Movies: The Sailor's Return
Children: Amaryllis Garnett

David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. As a child, he had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny", by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. A writer, he first met members of the Bloomsbury group in 1910 but was not fully accepted by them until 1914, when he became Duncan Grant's lover. Like Grant, Garnett was a conscientious objector and having worked in France in 1915 with the Friends War Victims Relief Mission, he worked as a farm laborer to avoid conscription on his return to England. Garnett moved with Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell to Charleston farmhouse in 1916. He married Grant’s daughter (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), Angelica, in 1942. He was present at her birth on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry, to the horror of her parents.
Together from 1914 to 1921: 7 years.
David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
Duncan Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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"Vanessa Bell, who had fallen in love with Duncan Grant before the start of the war, was painting in a farm-cottage on the Sussex coast, living in an uneasy triangle with Duncan and his new lover, David (known as Bunny) Garnett. In 1918 Bell gave birth to Grant’s child, Angelica Bell.” Hermione Lee, “Virginia Woolf” (1996)
Address: Lodge Ln, Wissett, Halesworth, Suffolk IP19 0JQ, UK (52.35866, 1.47037)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 01986 873173
Place
Wissett is a village and parish in the Waveney district of Suffolk located at 52.35N 01.46E TM3679 about 2 km (about 1.5 miles) northwest of Halesworth. Historically, it was in the hundred of Blything. It has a population of about 200, measured at 268 in the 2011 Census. Wisset manor was held by Ralph the staller, Baron of Gael in Brittany before the Norman Conquest. Ralph was created Earl of Suffolk and Norfolk in 1067, but his son lost the title and the manor passed to Count Alan of Brittany and Richmond in 1075. The Domesday Book shows that in 1086 Wissett had a church at Rumburgh with two carucates of free land, twelve monks, and a chapel in the village. The XI century flint parish church dedicated to Saint Andrew has a circular church tower with a floor dated to the XII Century. This is the oldest recorded church tower floor in the United Kingdom. Built as a chapel to Rumburgh Priory, the surviving elements of the Norman church are two doors to the nave and the tower arch. The parish is now part of the Blyth Valley Team Ministry in the diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich. Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and David Garnett lived in Wissett for the summer of 1916. Virginia Woolf (Vanessa’s sister) said after visiting them: "Wissett seems to lull asleep all ambition. Don’t you think they have discovered the secret of life? I thought it wonderfully harmonious." Wissett Hall is a red brick manor house owned by Colin Holmes, co-founder of Dencora PLC. The village pub is the Plough Inn. Wissett Wines are produced at the Valley Farm Vineyards by Elaine Heeler and Vanessa Tucker, who brought the business in 2014, Wissett Wines was established in 1987.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981), Duncan James Corrowr Grant (January 21, 1885 – May 8, 1978) and Vanessa Bell, née Stephen (May 30, 1879 – April 7, 1961)
David Garnett was a British writer and publisher. He was the son of Constance Clara Garnett (née Black), an English translator of XIX-century Russian literature, one of the first English translators of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Anton Chekhov who introduced them on a wide basis to the English-speaking public, and Edward William Garnett, an English writer, critic and a significant and personally generous literary editor, who was instrumental in getting D. H. Lawrence's “Sons and Lovers” published. As a child, David had a cloak made of rabbit skin and thus received the nickname "Bunny,” by which he was known to friends and intimates all his life. His first wife was illustrator Rachel "Ray" Marshall (1891–1940), sister of translator and diarist Frances Partridge. He and Ray, whose woodcuts appear in some of his books, had two sons, one of whom (Richard) went to Beacon Hill School. Ray died relatively young of breast cancer. Garnett was bisexual, as were several members of the artistic and literary Bloomsbury Group, and he had affairs with Francis Birrell and Duncan Grant. He was present at the birth of Grant’s daughter, Angelica (by Vanessa Bell, and accepted by her husband Clive Bell), on Dec. 25, 1918, and wrote to a friend shortly afterwards, "I think of marrying it. When she is 20, I shall be 46 – will it be scandalous?.” When Angelica was in her early twenties, they did marry (on May 8, 1942), to the horror of her parents.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1922 David Garnett published the highly successful novel, “Lady Into Fox.” The money he made from this book enabled him to buy Hilton Hall, an early XVII century house near Huntingdon.
Address: High St, Hilton, Huntingdon PE28 9NE, UK (52.31732, -0.09924)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 54022 (Grade II, 1951)
Place
Described as “The most beautiful of all the Bloomsbury houses” by biographer, critic and art historian Frances Spalding, Hilton Hall was bought by David Garnett Fox in 1924. There he entertained many literary friends: T.E. Lawrence would startle the village by roaring up unannounced on his motorbike; Virginia Woolf came and amused his boys by pretending to be a wolf. D.H. Lawrence teased him for living in a Hall, but added: “It’s not at all grand, except in the way a grandmother is grand, by being ancient.” Hilton Hall was built early in the XVII century perhaps by Robert Walpole, (a very distant relative of the prime minister) who died there in 1699 and is buried in Hilton Church. It was refronted and given new sash windows and panelling in the middle of the XVIII century but the fine Jacobean staircase, wide floorboards and moulded beams all remain. Otherwise it has been very little altered except by an extension containing panelling and a bay window salvaged from the ruins of Old Park Farm in Hilton. Behind the house there is a large dovehouse, also of the XVII century, which was used by Garnett’s second wife, Angelica, as a studio. She was the daughter of the Bloomsbury artists Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell, and was herself a noted artist. She has left her mark on the house with a decorated bedroom mantelpiece, a large mural in the dovehouse and a mosaic doorstep. Because of its place in the history of the Bloomsbury Group, and its collection of paintings and sculpture – especially by Angelica’s parents, it has been a popular destination for groups from the Cambridge branch of the Art Fund and the Friends of Kettle Yard. The grounds are all enclosed by hedging and fencing. Swimming pool, kitchen garden.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
The Garnetts lived at Hilton Hall, Hilton near St Ives in Cambridgeshire, where David Garnett kept a herd of Jersey cows. They had four daughters: in order, Amaryllis, Henrietta, and twins Nerissa and Frances; eventually the couple separated. Amaryllis Garnett (1943–1973) was an actress who had a small part in Harold Pinter’s film adaptation of “The Go-Between” (1970.) She drowned in the Thames, aged 29. Henrietta Garnett married Lytton Burgo Partridge, her father’s nephew by his first wife Ray, but was left a widow with a newborn infant when she was 18; she oversaw the legacies of both David Garnett and Duncan Grant. Nerissa Garnett (1946–2004) was an artist, ceramicist, and photographer. Fanny (Frances) Garnett moved to France where she became a farmer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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As one of David Garnett’s friends pointed out: "Here he bottled wine and cooked for his many visitors, and could be seen sitting out of doors under a large straw hat typing away at his latest book."
Address: Le Verger de Charry, 46800 Montcuq, France (44.31818, 1.22313)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in the XV century
The Château de Charry is a castle in the commune of Montcuq in the Lot département of France. The castle was built in three stages. It was initially a keep whose principal masonry was flanked by two polygonal towers. It was encircled by a fortified curtain wall; the remains of this are the third tower, though not connected to the main building, and a rectangular barbican. Cannon positions defended access to the well. An underground passage linked the barbican to one of the towers of the keep. A second period of building, in the XVII century, added the central building to the right of the tower, as well as buildings forming the court. In the XIX century, the main building was joined to the round tower of the ramparts. This keep provided a firing line between Montcuq and the keep at Marcilhac, and guaranteed the defence of the Charry valley The castle is privately owned. It has been listed since 1976 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.
Life
Who: David Garnett (March 9, 1892 – February 17, 1981)
After his separation from Angelica Bell, David Garnett, the British writer and publisher and a prominent member of the Bloomsbury Group, moved to France and lived in a pleasant house in the grounds at the Château de Charry, Montcuq (near Cahors) leased to him by the owners, Jo and Angela D’Urville. He continued to write, made friends among the local English community, and lived there until his death in 1981. The Frances and Ralph Partridge’s son, Burgo, had married Angelica and David Garnett’s daughter, Henrietta, but died of a heart attack on September 7, 1963, aged only 28.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Carrie Chapman Catt was an American women's suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920.
Born: January 9, 1859, Ripon, Wisconsin, United States
Died: March 9, 1947, New Rochelle, New York, United States
Spouse: Leo Chapman (m. 1885–1886)
Organizations founded: National American Woman Suffrage Association, more
Lived: 20 Ryder Rd., Briarcliff Manor, New York 10510, USA (41.17418, -73.81508)
120 Paine Ave, New Rochelle, NY 10804, USA (40.93711, -73.78692)
257 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024, USA (40.78508, -73.96982)
Studied: Iowa State University
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA, Plot: Primrose Plot, Laurel Avenue, GPS (lat/lon): 40.88377, -73.87546
Buried alongside: Mary Garrett Hay

Carrie Chapman Catt was an American women's suffrage leader who campaigned for the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. She married twice, in 1885 to newspaper editor Leo Chapman, and in 1890 to George Catt, a wealthy engineer. However, Carrie Chapman Catt turned to romantic friendships with women for emotional sustenance. For example, Mary Peck, another active suffragist, would write to her: “Goodnight, darling, beautiful, glorious, priceless, peerless, unutterably precious Pandora. … I love you ardently.” Carrie would respond to her extravagances: “You wrote another letter concerning the charm of my lower lip! I took a day off and went cavorting from mirror to mirror and grinning like a Cheshire cat in hope of catching that ‘haunting smile.”’ Mary Garrett Hay was an active suffragist who worked closely with Carrie Chapman Catt. Hay became Catt’s chief assistant and, after Catt was widowed the second time, they made their home together at Juniper Ledge, located on Ryder Road in the town of New Castle, New York. She and Carrie Chapman Catt are buried side by side in the Bronx's Woodlawn Cemetery marked by a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
Together from 1890 to 1928: 38 years.
Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947)
Mary Garrett Hay (August 29, 1857 - August 29, 1928)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Carrie Chapman Catt House, also known as Juniper Ledge, is located on Ryder Road in the town of New Castle, New York. It is an Arts and Crafts-style building from the early XX century.
Address: 20 Ryder Rd., Briarcliff Manor, New York 10510, USA (41.17418, -73.81508)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 06000336, 2006
Place
While it is a fine example of its school of architecture, the house’s primary historical value is that it was the home of suffragette Carrie Chapman Catt and her partner Mary Hay from 1919 to 1928. That period was the height of her activism; it began with the passage and ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, which granted women the right to vote, and continued with her founding of the League of Women Voters and advocacy of women’s suffrage in other countries. She found the house an ideal place to rest her "tired nerves" since the land was too steep to farm productively. However, later on she did start limited farming, including raising cattle and chickens, on the land, and made some significant modifications to the property. She also claimed to a group of guests during the early years of Prohibition that she had bought the land to prevent anyone from using its juniper berries to make gin. During her times away, Hay, who felt isolated and lonely at Juniper Ledge, instead rented an apartment in New York. After nine years, she and Hay, who had never embraced the rural lifestyle, moved out. The land has been further subdivided but the house remains largely intact. It is still a private residence. Composer Carmino Ravosa, who learned of Catt’s residence there while researching a musical, has worked to preserve it.
Life
Who: Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947)
Carrie Chapman Catt was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. Catt served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and was the founder of the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women. She "led an army of voteless women in 1919 to pressure Congress to pass the constitutional amendment giving them the right to vote and convinced state legislatures to ratify it in 1920" and "was one of the best-known women in the United States in the first half of the XX century and was on all lists of famous American women.”


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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In 1928 Carrie Chapman Catt sold Juniper Ledge in New Castle and purchased a 1907 colonial revival house in New Rochelle.
Address: 120 Paine Ave, New Rochelle, NY 10804, USA (40.93711, -73.78692)
Type: Private Property
Place
Carrie Chapman Catt’s companion Mary Garrett Hay died of a cerebral hemorrhage shortly after they moved in a cottage near Long Island Sound in New Rochelle.
Life
Who: Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947)
Mary Garrett Hay (1857-1928)’s death at first had adverse effects on Catt, who suffered a shingles outbreak and then a heart attack. She recovered enough to live until a second heart attack in 1947, although her activism and public life were more limited during those years. On March 9, 1947, Catt died in her home in New Rochelle. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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257 Central Park West, constructed between 1905 and 1906, currently is a co-op apartment building located on the southwest corner of 86th Street and Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City.
Address: 257 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024, USA (40.78508, -73.96982)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Central Park West Historic District (Central Park West between 61st and 97th Sts.), 82001189, 1982
Place
Design by Mulliken and Moeller (Harry B. Mulliken (1872-1952) and Edgar Joachim Moeller (1873-1954))
According to the 1910 U.S. census, Mary Garrett Hay resided with the widowed Carrie Chapman Catt at 257 Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. Built by Gotham Building & Construction, the structure was erected as a luxury apartment house originally called the Central Park View. Mulliken and Moeller had recently finished The Lucerne, on the corner of 79th and Amsterdam, and the Bretton Hall hotel on the east side of Broadway from 85th to 86th Streets. When Mulliken and Moeller began working on the Central Park View in 1905 for an investor group known only as the Monticello Realty Company, they were also designing the Severn and Van Dyck apartments (found on the east side of Amsterdam Avenue between 72nd and 73rd streets) for a separate client. In the following year, Mulliken and Moeller designed Rossleigh Court, the adjoining and similarly designed apartment building located on the northwest corner of 85th Street and Central Park West. In 1909, Dr. H.F.L. Ziegel and his wife, Beatrice, added the adjoining Neo-Georgian residence at 8 West 86th Street. From 1918 to 1920, the building underwent its first major renovation, the conversion from luxury apartment to the Hotel Peter Stuyvesant sponsored by the Sonn Brothers and the Peter Stuyvesant Operating Company. Situated opposite the 86th Street transverse to Central Park West on the southwest corner, the Central Park View’s design followed the popular “French Flat” model in a Beaux Arts-style, modified to conform to the size of a twelve-story structure. Upon its completion, the new hotel anchored the eastern end of the developing West 86th Street. On the western end of West 86th Street, the Columbia Yacht Club had relocated to a site adjoining the Hudson River in 1874 and remained the other West 86th Street bookend until 1937. 257 Central Park West is located within the Upper West Side-Central Park West Historic District, designated on April 24, 1990. It is also located next to the 86th Street station of the New York City Subway (A B C trains.)
Life
Who: Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947)
Carrie Chapman Catt was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. Mary Garrett Hay (1857-1928) was an active suffragist who worked closely with Carrie Chapman Catt. Hay became Catt’s chief assistant and, after Catt was widowed the second time, they lived together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Although located in Woodlawn, Bronx and one of the largest cemeteries in New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery.
Address: 517 E 233rd St, Bronx, NY 10470, USA (40.89006, -73.87425)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 718-920-0500
National Register of Historic Places: 11000563, 2011 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Woodlawn Cemetery opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was later annexed to New York City in 1874. It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great figures in the American arts, such as authors Countee Cullen and Herman Melville, and musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, and Max Roach. “Memorial To A Marriage” has been erected by Patricia Cronin and her partner Deborah Kass. Sculptor Cronin did the original sculpture of Carrara marble in 2002, to address what she considered a Federal failure: not allowing gay Americans the right to marry. It has been replaced with a bronze casting, installed on the couple’s burial plot in 2011. Since 2002 when the marble was first installed, the memorial has become one of the most visited of Woodlawn. After 18 years together, Patricia Cronin and Deborah Kass went to City Hall on the morning of July 24, 2011, with nearly 900 other New York City couples, waiting for three hours in the heat to get legally married on the first day.
Notable queer burials at Woodlawn Cemetery:
• Diana Blanche Barrymore Blythe (1921-1960), known professionally as Diana Barrymore, was a film and stage actress. She was the daughter of renowned actor John Barrymore and his second wife, poet Blanche Oelrichs.
• Frances (Fannie) Evelyn Bostwick (died in 1921) was the mother of Marion “Joe” Carstairs. Bostwick was an American heiress who was the second child of Jabez Bostwick and his wife Helen. Joe Carstairs' legal father was Scottish army officer Captain Albert Carstairs. At least one biographer has suggested that the Captain may not have been Joe's biological father. Carstairs' mother, an alcoholic and drug addict, later married Captain Francis Francis. She divorced Captain Francis to marry French count Roger de Périgny in 1915, but eventually left him because of his infidelity. Her fourth and last husband, whom she married in 1920, was Serge Voronoff, a Russian–French surgeon who become famous in the 1920s and 1930s for his practice of transplanting monkey testicle tissue into male humans for the claimed purpose of rejuvenation. For some years Evelyn had believed in Voronoff's theories, and she funded his research and acted as his laboratory assistant at the Collège de France in Paris. Voronoff arrived in New York with his wife's body on the ship "S.S. France" in May, 1921.
• Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years. Under a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) born as Countee Porter, was a poet, author and scholar who was a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. It is rumored that Cullen was a homosexual, and his relationship with Harold Jackman ("the handsomest man in Harlem"), was a significant factor in his divorce. The young, dashing Jackman was a school teacher and, thanks to his noted beauty, a prominent figure among Harlem’s gay elite. Van Vechten had used him as a character model in his novel “Nigger Heaven” (1926.)
• Joseph Raphael De Lamar (1843-1918), a prominent mine owner and operator in the western United States and Canada, as well as a financier and speculator, from the late 1870s until his death in 1918. De Lamar married Nellie Virginia Sands, a direct descendant of John Quincy Adams, on 8 May, 1893, and they had one daughter together, Alice DeLamar.
• Marjory Lacey-Baker (died in 1971), actress, she was the long-time companion of Dr. Lena Madesin Phillips, founder of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. They met in 1919 and together until Ms Philipps’ death in 1955. Ms Phillips is buried at Maple Grove Cemetery (500 N Main St, Nicholasville, KY 40356).
• Joseph Christian “J.C.” Leyendecker (1874-1951) was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century.
• George Platt Lynes (1907-1955) was a fashion and commercial photographer.
• Elisabeth "Bessie" Marbury (1856–1933) was a pioneering American theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe (later known as Lady Mendl), a prominent socialite and famous interior decorator.
• Herman Melville (1819-1891) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet from the American Renaissance period.
• Blanche Marie Louise Oelrichs (October 1, 1890 – November 5, 1950) was a poet, playwright and theatre actress known by the pseudonym "Michael Strange.” Starting in the summer of 1940 until her death, Oelrichs was in a long-term relationship with Margaret Wise Brown, the author of many children’s books. The relationship began as something of a mentoring one, but became a romantic relationship including co-habitating at 10 Gracie Square beginning in 1943.
• Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was a suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women’s rights movement.
• John William Sterling (May 12, 1844 – July 5, 1918) was a founding partner of Shearman & Sterling LLP and major benefactor to Yale University. In Sterling's will, he directs: "no interment other than my own and that of my sister, Cordelia, shall ever take place" in his Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery. An exception is made, however, "in case my said friend, James O. Bloss (September 30, 1847 – December 18, 1918), who has lived with me for more than forty years, should desire to be interred in the said Mausoleum and should die without ever having been married." Cordelia Sterling is burried with her brother. Bloss died less than six months after Sterling, according to his sister, of a broken heart, and is not buried with his friend, though the reason is unknown. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester. Sterling's obituary in the New York Times referred to "his lifelong friend, James O. Bloss, a retired cotton broker, who made his home with the testator for more than forty years." James Orville Bloss died suddenly in New York City, on December 15, 1918.
• Bert Williams (1874-1922), was one of the pre-eminent entertainers of the Vaudeville era. He married Charlotte ("Lottie") Thompson, a singer with whom he had worked professionally, in a very private ceremony. Lottie was a widow eight years Bert's senior. The Williamses never had children biologically, but they adopted three of Lottie's nieces. In 1919 their niece Lottie Tyler met blues singer Alberta Hunter. In August 1927, Hunter sailed for France, accompanied by Lottie. Their relationship lasted until Ms. Tyler's death, many years later.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Albert Mol was a popular Dutch author, actor and television personality.
Born: January 1, 1917, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Died: March 9, 2004, Laren, Gelderland, Netherlands
Spouse: Lucy Bor (m. 1948–1955)
Books: Haar van Boven
Children: Kika Mol
Married: March 16, 1998
Buried: Dieren Imboslaan Cemetery, Dieren, Rheden Municipality, Gelderland, Netherlands

Albert Mol was a popular Dutch author, actor and TV personality, who appeared in movies and TV shows in a career that spanned nearly 60 years. Mol was born in Amsterdam, and was one of the first openly gay actors in the Netherlands. He married Lucy Bor in 1948 and divorced her in 1955. They had a child together in 1949, the actress Kika Mol. On March 16, 1998, Albert Mol registered his relationship with his partner Guerdon "Geurt" J. Bill. Their relationship lasted until Guerdon's death on August 17, 2003. Mol died in Laren several months later, from an aneurysm. A previous partner of Mol was Dutch photographer Faan Nijhoff aka Stephen Storm, born in Breda as Wouter Stefan Nijhoff, a son to writer A.H. Nijhoff-Wind and poet Martinus Nijhoff. He studied photography in Paris (France) with Man Ray and settled in The Hague (Netherlands) under the name Stephen Storm. In 1920, A.H. Nijhoff-Wind moved to Italy to start a boarding house in Settignano, with her lover Maria Tesi, and experience she described in The Four Deaths. In 1929, A.H. Nijhoff-Wind, along with her son, moved to Paris, where she met the British visual artist Marlow Moss, who would become her lover.
Together from (before) 1976 to 2003: 27 years.
Albert Mol (January 1, 1917 – March 9, 2004)
Guerdon "Geurt" J. Bill (May 11, 1936 - August 17, 2003)
Married: March 16, 1998



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Albert Mol (1917-2004) was married from 1948 to 1955 to ballet dancer Lucy Bor. Together they had a daughter, the actress Kika Mol (born 1949). On March 16, 1998, Albert undertook a registered partnership in the town of Zutphen with Bill Guerdon (Geurt for friends), with whom he lived for thirty years. Mol was one of the first television personalities who openly came out as gay. In the last part of his life he worked for the emancipation of homosexuals. The last years were marked by a slow decline and many illness periods. Mol lived a secluded life in Laren in Gelderland. His partner Bill died in August 2003 at the age of 67. About half a year later, Albert Mol died at the age of 87 in his hometown Laren. He was cremated at Dieren Imboslaan Cemetery (6951 KA Dieren, Netherlands).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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