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George Francis Alexander Seymour, 7th Marquess of Hertford was the son of Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford.
Born: October 20, 1871
Died: February 16, 1940
Lived: Ragley Hall, Alcester B49 5NJ, UK (52.198, -1.89599)
Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA
Find A Grave Memorial# 173506576
Spouse: Alice Cornelia Thaw
Parents: Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford
Coronation date: 1912
Grandparent: Francis Seymour, 5th Marquess of Hertford

The country estate of George Seymour (1871-1940), Earl of Yarmouth and 7th Marquess of Hertford. Seymour inherited Ragley Hall in 1912 but never lived there, preferring the high life in London. Ragley Hall is a mid XVIII century park landscaped by Lancelot Brown, with late XIX century formal gardens and pleasure grounds laid out by Robert Marnock.
Address: Alcester B49 5NJ, UK (52.198, -1.89599)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1789 762090
English Heritage Building ID: 305020 (Grade I, 1967)
Place
Ragley Hall is located south of Alcester, Warwickshire, eight miles (13 km) west of Stratford-upon-Avon. It is the ancestral seat of the Marquess of Hertford and is one of the stately homes of England. The house, which was designed by Dr Robert Hooke, was built for the Edward Conway, 1st Earl of Conway and completed in 1680. The Great Hall is thought to have been decorated by James Wyatt in 1780. Financial instability of the Seymour family left the house threatened with demolition more than once. In 1912, following the death of Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford, the estate's trustees recommended that the house be demolished. However, during World War I and World War II, the house found use as a military hospital. Hugh Seymour, 8th Marquess of Hertford, who inherited Ragley Hall from his uncle in 1940, fought to save it after the war. It was refurbished between 1956 and 1958, when it became one of the first stately homes opened to the public. In 1983, the painter Graham Rust completed a huge mural including pets, friends and family members which is known as "The Temptation" and is exhibited on the Southern staircase. Ragley was the site of the Jerwood Sculpture Park, opened in July 2004. The Park included works that won the Jerwood Sculpture Prizes, and the work of Dame Elisabeth Frink, among others. However the site was closed in April 2012.
Life
Who: George Francis Alexander Seymour, 7th Marquess of Hertford (October 20, 1871 – February 16, 1940)
George Seymour, 7th Marquess of Hertford, was the son of Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford. Seymour became a Lieutenant in the Warwickshire regiment before joining the Black Watch. He became Earl of Yarmouth in 1884 and the 7th Marquess of Hertford in 1901. In 1895 he arrived at the sugar district of Mackay, Queensland, Australia, taking up a small mixed farm. Despite his senior rank and status, the local population showed him little respect, scandalised by his behaviour. The local paper called him a ‘skirt dancer’ and local memory is of him performing dances in a sequined outfit with butterfly wings and of hosting male-only parties on his isolated property. Seymour seems to have returned to England for Queen Victoria's Jubilee then travelled to the US, where he married Alice C. Thaw of Pittsburgh on 27 April 1903; their childless marriage was annulled in 1908 on the grounds of non-consummation. Alice Cornelia Thaw (January 2, 1880 – May 8, 1955) was an American philanthropist, born to William Thaw, Sr. and Mary Sibbet Copley. She was the younger sister of Harry Kendall Thaw. Lord Hertford filed for bankruptcy in 1910 and inherited Ragley Hall and its large Warwickshire estate in 1912, but never lived there, preferring the high life in London. Lord Hertford died in 1940, aged 68 and childless, and his titles passed to his nephew, Hugh Seymour.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Frances Alice Kellor was an American social reformer and investigator, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women.
Born: October 20, 1873, Columbus, Ohio, United States
Died: January 4, 1952, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Cornell University
University of Chicago
Cornell Law School
Lived: 118 E 54th St
19 E. 26th Street
Buried: Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA, Plot: Section 167, Lot 17004

Mary Dreier was a New York social reformer along with her sister Margaret. Two other sisters, Dorothea and Katherine, were painters. She never married, but shared a home with fellow reformer Frances Kellor from 1905 until the latter's death in 1952. Kellor was an American social reformer and chief investigator for the Bureau of Industries and Immigration of New York State in 1910-13, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women. Mary Elisabeth Dreier represents the involved philanthropist of the early 20th century. From a financially secure family, she constantly contributed time, funds, and organizing talents to a variety of feminist causes, most notably women workers and the suffrage movement. Her social prominence and social commitments led to her service on local and regional boards and commissions, particularly those dealing with labor and with penal reform. The correspondence between Kellor and Dreier spans the length of their almost fifty-year relationship. The letters document the close and affectionate nature of their friendship; there is some discussion of their work, especially in the early years. After Kellor’s death, Dreier lived alone for the rest of her life until dying in 1963, at her summer home in Bar Harbor, Maine.
Together from 1905 to 1952: 47 years.
Frances Alice Kellor (October 20, 1873 – January 4, 1952)
Mary Dreier (September 26, 1875 - August 15, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Born in 1875, Mary Dreier was a labor and social reform activist in New York. She served as president of the Women's Trade Union League. She and her partner Frances Kellor (herself an active social reformer) were together for 50 years. They lived at 118 E 54th St. Before Dreier lived at 6 Montague Terrace, Brooklyn, and Kellor at 19 E. 26th Street.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Kings County, New York.
Address: 500 25th St, Brooklyn, NY 11232, USA (40.65901, -73.99569)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 7.45-17.00
National Register of Historic Places: 97000228, 1977 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Located in Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, it lies several blocks southwest of Prospect Park, between Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Borough Park, Kensington, and Sunset Park. Paul Goldberger in The New York Times, wrote that it was said "it is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood.” The Pierrepont papers deposited at the Brooklyn Historical Society contain material about the organizing of Green-Wood Cemetery.
Notable queer burials at Green-Wood Cemetery:
• Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988), was one of the most important artists of the XX century. In 2006, Equality Forum featured Jean-Michel Basquiat during LGBT history month.
• Henry Ward Beecher (1813–1887), was a Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, and speaker, known for his support of the abolition of slavery.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990), was a composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. In a book released in October, 2013, “The Leonard Bernstein Letters,” his wife reveals his homosexuality.
• Elizabeth M. Cushier (died 1931). Doctors Emily Blackwell (1826-1910) and Elizabeth Cushier had a Boston Marriage. Blackwell co-founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children (1857) and its Women's Medical College. Cushier was professor of medicine at the college and Blackwell's life-partner for twenty-eight years. About the relationship, Dr. Cushier wrote, “Thus the years happily passed” until in 1910 “a sad blow came in the death of Dr. Blackwell, making an irreparable beak in my life.” Dr. Blackwell is buried at Chilmark Cemetery, Massachusetts.
• Mary Elisabeth Dreier (September 26, 1875- August 15, 1963), was a New York social reformer along with her sister Margaret. Two other sisters, Dorothea and Katherine, were painters. She never married, but shared a home with fellow reformer Frances Kellor (buried alongside her). After Kellor’s death, Dreier lived alone for the rest of her life until dying in 1963, at her summer home in Bar Harbor, Maine.
• Fred Ebb (1928–2004), was a musical theatre lyricist who had many successful collaborations with composer John Kander. Ebb is interred in a mausoleum with Edwin “Eddie” Aldridge (1929–1997) and Martin Cohen (1926–1995) on the banks of Sylvan Water. In addition to the names and dates of each man, the phrase, “Together Forever” is also chiseled on the front of the mausoleum.
• Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829–1869), was a composer and pianist, best known as a virtuoso performer of his own romantic piano works.
• Richard Isay (1934–2012), was a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, author and gay activist. Isay is considered a pioneer who changed the way that psychoanalysts view homosexuality.
• Paul Jabara (1948–1992), was an actor, singer, and songwriter. Paul Jabara died from AIDS complications after a long illness in Los Angeles, California.
• Frances Alice Kellor (October 20, 1873 – January 4, 1952), shared a home with fellow reformer Mary Dreier from 1905 until her death in 1952. Kellor was an American social reformer and chief investigator for the Bureau of Industries and Immigration of New York State in 1910-13, who specialized in the study of immigrants to the United States and women.
• Violet Oakley (1874–1961), was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. Oakley and her friends, the artists Elizabeth Shippen Green and Jessie Willcox Smith, all former students of Howard Pyle, were named the Red Rose girls by him.
• Emma Stebbins (1815–1882), was among the first notable American woman sculptors, companion to actress Charlotte Cushman.
• Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933), artist. His daughter, Dorothy Trimble Tiffany (1891–1979), as Dorothy Burlingham, became a noted psychoanalyst and lifelong friend and partner of Anna Freud.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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