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Manuel Ramos Otero (July 20, 1948 - October 7, 1990) was a Puerto Rican writer. He is widely considered to be the most important openly gay twentieth-century Puerto Rican writer who wrote in Spanish, and his work was often controversial due to its sexual and political content. Ramos Otero died in San Juan, Puerto Rico, due to complications from AIDS.

Jesús Manuel Ramos Otero was born in Manatí, Puerto Rico, and spent his childhood in his home town, living in the second location of the old building of the Puerto Rican Casino of Manatí. He began his studies at the Colegio La Inmaculada in Manatí. His family then moved to San Juan when he was seven years old. He later attended the University of Puerto Rico High School in Río Piedras (1960–1965) and went on to receive a B.A. in Social Sciences (with a major in sociology and a minor in political sciences) from the University of Puerto Rico, graduating in 1969. In 1979 he received an M.A. in literature from New York University. While living in New York, he worked as a social researcher, and later as a professor at diverse universities including Rutgers University, LaGuardia Community College, York College, and Lehman College. He also established a small publishing house, El Libro Viaje. He organized conferences and gatherings of Puerto Rican writers in the United States such as Giannina Braschi and Luis Rafael Sanchez. He is best remembered as a poet and the author of short stories, but he also wrote a novel and several essays on literary criticism.


Manuel Ramos Otero, 1988, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1124011)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Ramos_Otero

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More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
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Barbara Deming (July 23, 1917 – August 2, 1984) was an American feminist and advocate of nonviolent social change.

Barbara Deming was born in New York City. She attended a Friends (Quaker) school up through her high school years.

Deming directed plays, taught dramatic literature and wrote and published fiction and non-fiction works. On a trip to India, she began reading Gandhi, and became committed to a non-violent struggle, with her main cause being Women's Rights. She later became a journalist, and was active in many demonstrations and marches over issues of peace and civil rights. She was a member of a group that went to Hanoi during the Vietnam War, and was jailed many times for non-violent protest.

At sixteen, she had fallen in love with a woman her mother's age, and thereafter she was openly lesbian. She was the romantic partner of writer and artist Mary Meigs from 1954 to 1972. Their relationship eventually floundered, partially due to Meigs's timid attitude, and Deming's unrelenting political activism.

During the time that they were together, Meigs and Deming moved to Wellfleet, Massachusetts, where she befriended the writer and critic Edmund Wilson and his circle of friends. Among them was the Québécois author Marie-Claire Blais, with whom Meigs became romantically involved. Meigs, Blais, and Deming lived together for six years.


Barbara Deming was an American feminist and advocate of nonviolent social change. She was the romantic partner of writer and artist Mary Meigs from 1954 to 1972. During the time that they were together, Meigs and Deming moved to Wellfleet, Massachusetts, where she befriended the writer and critic Edmund Wilson and his circle of friends. Among them was the Québécois author Marie-Claire Blais, with whom Meigs became romantically involved. Meigs, Blais, and Deming lived together for six years.


In 1976, Deming moved to Florida with her partner, artist Jane Verlaine. Verlaine painted, did figure drawings and illustrated several books written by Deming. Verlaine was a tireless advocate for abused women. Deming died in 1984. In 1975, Deming founded the The Money for Women Fund to support the work of feminist artists. Deming helped administer the Fund, with support from artist Mary Meigs. After Deming's death in 1984, the organization was renamed as The Barbara Deming Memorial Fund.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Deming

Marie-Claire Blais, CC OQ (born 5 October 1939) is a Canadian author and playwright.

Born in Quebec City, Quebec, she was educated at a convent school and at Université Laval. It was at Laval that she met Jeanne Lapointe and Father Georges Lévesque, who encouraged her to write and, in 1959, to publish her first novel, La Belle Bête (trans. Mad Shadows) in 1959 when she turned 20. She has since written over 20 novels, several plays, collections of poetry and fiction, as well newspaper articles. Her works have been translated into numerous languages, including English and Chinese. With the support of the eminent American critic Edmund Wilson, Blais won two Guggenheim Fellowships.

In 1963, Blais moved to the United States, initially living in Cambridge, Massachusetts. There, in 1964, she met her partner, American artist Mary Meigs. Marie-Claire Blais was working on her second and third novels, Une saison dans la vie d'Emmanuel and Les manuscrits de Pauline Archange. (Her first, La belle bête, rocked Quebec in 1959; Ms. Blais figures prominently in Mr. Wilson's 1965 book On Canada: An American's Notes on Canadian Culture.) Ms. Meigs began a tempestuous affair with Ms. Blais, and moved to Montreal in the mid-1970s; she and Ms. Blais lived with each other on and off over the next 15 or so years. Fluent in French, a respected painter -- she illustrated several of Ms. Blais's works, including Emmanuel and Pauline Archange -- and as Ms. Blais's long-time companion, she moved easily in both French and English artistic communities.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie-Claire_Blais

Mary Meigs (April 27, 1917-November 15, 2002) was an American-born painter and writer.

Meigs was born in Philadelphia and raised in Washington, DC. She studied at Bryn Mawr College, and subsequently taught English literature and creative writing at that school. She served in the United States Navy's WAVES corps during World War II.

She subsequently studied art in New York City, and had her first exhibition of paintings in 1950.

Openly lesbian, Meigs met author Barbara Deming in 1954. Deming and Meigs became a couple and moved to Wellfleet, Massachusetts, where they joined a Cape Cod artistic circle that included abstract painter Mark Rothko, critic Edmund Wilson, and writer Mary McCarthy.

In 1963, Wilson introduced Meigs to Marie-Claire Blais, a writer from Quebec who became romantically involved with Meigs and Deming, and moved to Brittany with Meigs in 1972. The couple subsequently returned to Montreal, where Meigs spent the remainder of her life, in 1976.

Also in the 1970s, Meigs returned to writing, publishing books such as Lily Briscoe: A Self-Portrait (1981), The Medusa Head (1983) and The Box Closet (1987). In addition to her writing, she became a prominent spokesperson in Canada for lesbian, feminist and seniors' issues. She died in Montreal in 2002, following a series of strokes.


Mary Meigs, 1992, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1123973)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Meigs

Further Readings )

More LGBT Couples at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
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Bernard Cooper is an American novelist and short story writer. He was born on October 3, 1951 in Hollywood, California. His writing is in part autobiographical and influenced by his own experiences as a gay man. Bernard Cooper's fiction and essays have received several awards. He has both his BFA and MFA in art from California Institute of the Arts.

With his razor-sharp wit and unsparing honesty, Bernard Cooper peels back layers of the familiar, exposing the surprising truths that shape our lives. Cooper’s prose is resonant and exquisitely crafted. Often described as a “writer’s writer,” his disarming memoirs and fiction and his open-hearted, humorous readings and lectures have won him a loyal audience. Growing up gay in the Los Angeles of the 1950s and 60s, sexuality, familial relationships, loss, and AIDS — these are among Bernard Cooper’s primary subjects. Through them all, he expresses his deepest concern: how the writer explores identity and human nature by traveling the terrain of memory. Recalling details with delicacy and inventiveness, Cooper’s sensibility ultimately transforms the way we examine our own lives.

Bernard Cooper has written two collections of memoirs, Maps to Anywhere and Truth Serum, as well as a novel, A Year of Rhymes, and a collection of short stories, Guess Again. His work has appeared in Story, Ploughshares, Harper’s, The Paris Review, The New York Times Magazine. His work has been included in five volumes of The Best American Essays, and in anthologies such as The Oxford Book of Literature on Aging, and the Library of America’s Writing Los Angeles. He is the author of The Bill From My Father: A Memoir (paperback 2007). He is completing a collection of essays entitled My Avant Gard Education (an excerpt of the book will appear in Granta in 2014).


Bernard Cooper, 1989, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1123755)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://barclayagency.com/cooper.html
Maps to Anywhere is Bernard Cooper's first book and his best book -- a book of autobiographical essays that is completely singular and contains some of the best first sentences I've ever read. --Michael Klein
Further Readings:

The Bill from My Father: A Memoir by Bernard Cooper
Paperback: 256 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (January 9, 2007)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0743249631
ISBN-13: 978-0743249638
Amazon: The Bill from My Father: A Memoir

Edward Cooper is a hard man to know. Dour and exuberant by turns, his moods dictate the always uncertain climate of the Cooper household. Balding, octogenarian, and partial to a polyester jumpsuit, Edward Cooper makes an unlikely literary muse. But to his son he looms larger than life, an overwhelming and baffling presence.

Edward's ambivalent regard for his son is the springboard from which this deeply intelligent memoir takes flight. By the time the author receives his inheritance (which includes a message his father taped to the underside of a safe deposit box), and sees the surprising epitaph inscribed on his father's headstone, The Bill from My Father has become a penetrating meditation on both monetary and emotional indebtedness, and on the mysterious nature of memory and love.

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
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Assotto Saint (October 2, 1957 - June 29, 1994) was a poet, dancer with the Martha Graham company, and playwright. He appeared in Marlon Riggs' No Regrets.

Through his contributions to literary and popular culture, Haitian-born American poet, performance artist, musician, and editor and publisher Assotto Saint increased the visibility of black queer authors and themes during the 1980s and early 1990s. In addition, Saint was both one of the first black activists to disclose his HIV-positive status and one of the first poets to respond to the AIDS crisis in his work.

His legacy includes his own literary and theatrical work and his role as publisher and editor of other writers. His theatrical and multimedia productions made him one of the central figures in the black gay cultural arts movement of his time; and as the editor and publisher of several important literary anthologies, he helped to make queerness an important element within the black literary community.

Saint was born Yves François Lubin in Haiti on October 2, 1957. He was raised by his mother and did not meet his father until he was an adult. He recognized that he was attracted to men when he was seven years old, but did not realize that there was a gay community until he left Haiti and settled in New York.

While visiting his mother in the United States in 1970, he decided to relocate to New York. He enrolled in Queens College in a pre-med curriculum, but soon left to pursue his interests in dance and theater.


Assotto Saint, 1987, by Robert Giard
Assotto Saint (born Yves François Lubin) was a poet, dancer with the Martha Graham Company, and playwright. Jan Holmgren was a composer for theatrical works of Saint and his companion of 13 years. Saint was known for his acting up and acting out: at fellow black gay poet Donald W. Woods's funeral, Saint openly confronted the family for their hypocritical elision of Woods's gayness; outraged, especially since Woods had fought to end the repressive forms of silence that equal death for gay individuals and AIDS victims, Saint stood up and "testified" on his brother's behalf.
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)

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Citation Information
Author: Prono, Luca
Entry Title: Saint, Assotto
General Editor: Claude J. Summers
Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Culture
Publication Date: 2011
Date Last Updated January 23, 2011
Web Address www.glbtq.com/literature/saint_assotto.html
Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL 60607
Today's Date June 29, 2012
Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.
Entry Copyright © 2011 glbtq, Inc.

Donald W. Woods (1958 - June 25, 1992), the head of an AIDS education organization and a former museum official, died of cardiac arrest on June 25, 1992, at New York Hospital in Manhattan. He was 34 years old and lived in Brooklyn.

Mr. Woods was the executive director of AIDS Films, a nonprofit company that produces AIDS education and prevention movies, and had worked there for the last two years.

Before that, he was the public affairs director of the Brooklyn Children's Museum for five years.

He was also active in other organizations, including Art Against Apartheid, the Other Countries Cultural Foundation, the Hetrick-Martin Institute for gay and lesbian youth and the Brooklyn Arts Council.

Mr. Woods was one of several authors of "Tongues Untied," a documentary by Marlon T. Riggs about black gay men that was shown on PBS. He also appeared in another film by Mr. Riggs, "No Regrets."

Mr. Woods was born in Queens. He earned a bachelor's degree at the New School of Social Research and did postgraduate study in arts administration.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/1992/06/29/obituaries/donald-w-woods-34-aids-film-executive.html
Assotto Saint was known for his acting up and acting out: at fellow black gay poet Donald W. Woods's funeral, Saint openly confronted the family for their hypocritical elision of Woods's gayness; outraged, especially since Woods had fought to end the repressive forms of silence that equal death for gay individuals and AIDS victims, Saint stood up and "testified" on his brother's behalf. Saint's acting up, like Woods's life, was memorialized in a short story entitled "The Final Inning" written by the Jamaican American black gay writer Thomas Glave and published in his story collection Whose Song?, which won the O. Henry Award for Fiction. --Artists, Performers, and Black Masculinity in the Haitian Diaspora by Jana Evans Braziel
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Jan Holmgren (April 25, 1939, Alno, Sweden - March 29, 1993, New York, New York) was a composer for theatrical works of Assotto Saint, his companion of 13 years.

Jan Holmgren began writing music at age ten. After a tour of duty in the Swedish Army, he received musical education in Sweden and immigrated to the United States in 1965. He worked as a flight attendant for American Airlines for 25 years.

In 1980, Holmgren became lovers with the Haitian-American poet, writer and performer Assotto Saint (born Yves F. Lubin) (1957-1994), who also died of AIDS. Together they collaborated on a variety of artistic creations. Holmgren wrote songs for all of Saint's many theatre pieces on gay black life which they produced themselves for their Metamorphosis Theatre. They formed a "techno pop duo band," Xotika, for which Saint was lead singer. Xotika's dance song "Forever Gay" was released on the CD Feeding the Flame by Flying Fish Records in 1990.

Holmgren is usually credited as a composer under the names: Jaan Urban or Jan Urban.

Jan Holmgren died of AIDS in New York at the age of 53 on March 29, 1993. —Joseph Dalton



Source: http://www.artistswithaids.org/artforms/music/catalogue/holmgren.html

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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Irish American novelist, poet, memoirist, fabulist, and short fictionist. John Gilgun is openly gay and sees coming out and homosexuality as a struggle for self-identity fighting against the back-drop of the repressive and oppressive traditional Catholic Church of the Boston Irish, the United States Army, and family. His works include Everything That Has Been Shall Be Again: The Reincarnation Fables of John Gilgun (1981), the novel Music I Never Dreamed Of (1989), the poetry collections The Dooley Poems (1991) and From The Inside Out (1991), and Your Buddy Misses
You: Stories {1994). Additionally, his stories and poems have been published in many journals and anthologies.

Everything That Has Been Shall Be Again: The Reincarnation Fables of John Gilgun is a collection of first-person fables about humans reincarnated as animals, such as an ant, a bear, a cow, a worm, and a fox, among others. Overall, Gilgun's fables are intensely sarcastic and mocking. Although the tract of the worker ant can be read as an attack on the conformity of communism with its reference to "the Party," Gilgun seems more concerned with and against conformity of any kind. The ant has a vision of a revolution of individualization, but this is just that: a vision. The state is too powerful, ideas are poison, and nonconforming individualism leads to
imprisonment. Although the animals tell the truth of their existence, this truth is most often that they are suffering failures. ln the tract on the bear, Gilgun mocks organized religion, showing it as something to which the weak turn. The leaders of the religion seem determined to keep the weak powerless, take their money, and make it seem like this is the Lord's will. The religious leaders create a world in which one can never know the truth, so it should not be pursued, just accepted. Furthering his attack on religion, in the tract of the cow, Gilgun shows the members of religious congregations to be stupid, gluttonous hypocrites. Extremely sarcastic with anti-responsibility messages, these are not fables meant for children, but rather for adults like Gilgun who have felt oppressed and repressed by traditions that do not welcome alternative lifestyles.


John Gilgun, 1988, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1123795)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: Rosco, Jerry "John Gilgun." Contemporary Gay American Novelists: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook. Ed. Emmanuel S. Nelson. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1993. l49—54.
When John returned to his teaching job in St. Joseph, his novel came out. So did he, in a public address. To their great credit his students were behind him, petitioning the college to add John‘s novel to the curriculum. As a result, John was able to teach Music I Never Dreamed Of to his literature classes. When I think of those students, most of them encountering an authentic gay voice for the first time in this heartfelt, exuberant novel, it gives me a great feeling. Suddenly I‘m right back there in South Boston in 1954, with Stevie Riley, and we‘re both feeling frightened and confused, yet alive — gloriously alive, in ways we never dreamed of. --Wayne Courtois, The Lost Library
Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
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Born in 1925 in South Dakota, Boyd McDonald entered Harvard as a high-school dropout after serving in the army in World War II: "I was a pioneer high school dropout," he writes, "leaving school to play badly in a bad traveling dance band. I was drafted into the Army, graduated from Harward and came to New York, where my principal activity was taking advantage of the city's public sexual recreation facilities. As a sideline I worked as a back writer at Time, Forbes, IBM and even more sordid companies. In 1970 I started the magazine, S.T.H. (Straight to Hell), the Manhattan Review of Unnatural Acts, later re-named the New York Review of Cocksucking".

Jobs with Time, IBM, and several Wall Street firms preceded Boyd's career as a chronicler of gay sex. He was the founder and editor of Straight to Hell (alternatively the Manhattan Review of Cocksucking), and later published a number of anthologies of true sex histories, the final three of which were Raunch, Lewd, and Scum. Boyd died in September 1993, two months after completing his final book.


Boyd McDonald, 1987, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1121533)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://helmyishere.blogspot.com/2008/01/straight-to-hell_14.html

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
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Wesley Gibson is the author of Shelter, a novel, and You Are Here, a memoir. His work has appeared in The Village Voice Literary Supplement, Men on Men 5, Blackbird, Out Magazine, The New Art Examiner, and The Lambda Book Report, among others. He has been the recipient of a New York Foundation on the Arts Grant, a Mississippi Review Fiction Prize and a Virginia Commission on the Arts Grant, among others. He lives in San Francisco and teaches in the MFA Program at St. Mary’s College.

Source: http://www.chelseastationeditions.com/gibson-saviors.html


Wesley Gibson by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
James McCourt (born July 4, 1941) is an American writer and novelist.

McCourt is openly gay. His life partner since 1964 is novelist Vincent Virga; they met in graduate school at Yale.
"I went through college with no sexual adventures. Several guys expressed their love for me, but I took it in stride. Never took it to heart or bed.
Enter Jimmy at Yale. When we met, I had never been to a gay bar. I had never tricked. When he told me late Spring 1965 that he was in love, I assumed it was with one of the other guys in our class. I can still see us crossing Chapel Street in New Haven going to my apartment after class having this conversation: Is it Bill? Is it Gary? Who is it?
”It’s you,” he said.
I was beyond stunned. There were no women in my life. There were no men in my life. All of that had been put on hold. I was a spiritual hooker, as I came to call myself. I was the center of the social life of my class at Yale. My apartment was the meeting place. Everyone loved me. Safety in numbers, no? I was offered a beginner’s place in Pearl Lang’s & Martha Graham’s dance companies. I came to hate Yale because the drama teacher was not a fan of my work and was pretty up-front with her rejections. I was contemplating transferring into the Director’s class where I knew I probably really belonged. But, then, Jimmy told me he loved me and I began to look at him in a different way. And then one Saturday morning when my roommate was away, Jimmy boldly slipped into my bed.
We left Yale and went to the London School of Drama. I was still not fully committed to having a love-life with Jimmy though you would never have known that from the way I behaved with him. We were lovers, passionately and relentlessly and shamelessly physical with one another whenever possible, which was all of the time. I was still not altogether convinced I was gay. Then in Paris–of all unoriginal places!?–I told him while we were walking by the Seine that I had decided I didn’t think a life with him was a good idea. He said okay. He also said goodbye and walked away leaving me standing by the Seine. I followed him back to the hotel and watched him pack his bags to go back to London alone. And then the bubble of denial burst. I began to cry hysterically. He took me in his arms. Boy, did I cry! And what did he say?
“We all have to come out in our own way.”" --Vincent Virga

Vincent Virga and James McCourt, 1987, by Robert Giard
James McCourt is an American writer and novelist. His life partner since 1964 is novelist Vincent Virga. "I told him while we were walking by the Seine [...] I didn’t think a life with him was a good idea. He said okay [...] and walked away leaving me standing [...] I followed him back to the hotel and watched him pack his bags to go back to London alone [...] I began to cry hysterically. He took me in his arms [...] And what did he say? “We all have to come out in our own way.”" --Vincent Virga

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_McCourt_(writer)
Read Time Remaining — and McCourt‘s other books — like installments of the thinking gay man‘s Encyclopédie. Absorb the crowded intensity of this novel: old movie plots, snippets of fine poetry (Schuyler! Auden! Ashbery!), situationist arguments, modern art, sassy banter on a midnight train, bad puns and brilliant ones. He helps explain the world, through a thousand little examples and citations. Maybe the texts won‘t, in the end, point to the big answer, but, to let Odette have the last word, ―All a body wants, really, is a little emphasis now and again. --Timothy Young, The Lost Library: Gay Fiction Rediscovered
James McCourt, 1987, by Robert Giard )

I’m a native New Yorker born September 28, 1942.

That day, my orphaned mother was mistakenly told by her surrogate mother, Mamie O’Neill, that two tablespoons of bicarbonate of soda (instead of two teaspoons) would ease her discomforts. Soon, an ambulance rushed Frances to St. Vincent’s Hospital with me being propelled into the world. In shock, my mother asked a passing nun, “Where am I?” When another nun followed hard upon to ask for my name my mother announced, “Vincent!” Turns out, St. Vincent de Paul is the patron saint of orphans....

We moved into a large city project on the East River opposite the present site of the UN until my dad moved us to Lindenhurst, Long Island in 1952. I felt kidnapped. I loved the city, especially the local movie theater–The Beacon–where they showed reruns of the golden Hollywood movies. That is where my visual vocabulary, my acute visual literacy, was born and nurtured. I learned how to look at what I see from the movies and from picture books. I joke that I look therefore I am.

I’m also a compulsive reader. I cannot remember a time when I couldn’t read. Dizzy Gillespie said that when he found the trumpet he found the best part of himself. Well, when I found the word and the image I, too, entered a luminous realm of existence.

After Lindenhurst High School, I went to St. Bonaventure University, and then to Yale Graduate School where in 1964 I met my life-partner, the writer James McCourt who had a deep and abiding friendship with the musical genius Victoria de los Angeles. (Her love and her art became a cornerstone of our lives together.) Jimmy and I went to live in London for nearly 5 years before returning home to NYC for the publication of his story Mawrdew Czgowchwz and for the making of a life in the city of my dreams.

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Source: http://www.vincentvirga.com/
I loved Gothic romantic suspense novels when I was a teenager (Mary Stewart, Victoria Holt, Phyllis A. Whitney), so I was absolutely delighted when a copy of Gaywyck passed my desk when I was editor of Lambda Book Report. Alyson republished this classic from the late 70’s in 2000; and I was thrilled to read a gay Gothic romantic suspense. Virga channeled the Bronte Sisters when he was writing this classic, in which a handsome young gay orphan goes to work as a tutor at a gorgeous brooding (and possibly haunted) mansion on Long Island (Gaywyck), complete with a sexy but mysterious master of the estate, and secrets galore. Set just before the turn of the twentieth century, Virga’s attention to historical detail gives the book an authenticity so many other, similar books sadly lack. --Greg Herren
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Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Robert Patrick (born September 27, 1937) is a gay American playwright, poet, lyricist, and short-story writer and novelist. He was born Robert Patrick O'Connor in Kilgore, Texas.

Patrick was born to migrant workers in Texas. Because his parents moved around the southwest constantly, looking for work, he never went to one school for an entire year until his senior year of high school in Roswell, New Mexico. The only cultural constants in his life were books, movies, and radio. His mother made sure he learned to read, and arranged that he start school a year early. Unsocialized due to constant displacement, he always made poor grades, and dropped out of college after two years. Having experienced no live theatre but a few school shows, he fell in love with stage work while washing dishes at the Kennebunkport Playhouse one summer. Stopping off in New York on his way back to Roswell, he stumbled into the Caffe Cino, the first underground or Off-Off Broadway theatre, on September 14, 1961. He remained there working for free in any required capacity, supporting himself with temporary typing jobs while observing and participating in the production of dozens of plays. Having long been a poet, in 1964 he got an idea for a play, "The Haunted Host," and because of the casualness of the Cino, was allowed to mount it almost at once. It was something of a success, and playwrighting became his main focus.

His first play, The Haunted Host, was produced in 1964 and premiered at the Caffe Cino in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City, New York. Because Patrick refused the offer of Neil Flanagan, the Caffe Cino's star performer, to play the title role (because Flanagan had recently played Lanford Wilson's gay character, Lady Bright) Patrick himself wound up appearing in the play with fellow playwright William M. Hoffman.


Robert Patrick and Bette Bourne at Phebe's, 1988, by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Patrick_(playwright)

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Stephen McCauley (born June 26, 1955) is an American author. He has written six novels to date including most recently Insignificant Others. His most famous novel is The Object of My Affection, which was made into a movie starring Jennifer Aniston and Paul Rudd. McCauley and longtime partner Sebastian Stuart (born September 27, a Ferro-Grumley Award winner for The Hour Between and an alum of the Ragdale Foundation) live in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 2010 Sebastian Stuart and Stephen McCauley celebrated twenty years together.

McCauley was raised outside of Boston and went to public schools for his education. Later, as an undergraduate, he attended the University of Vermont and then spent a year in France at the University of Nice. Stephen worked a series of unrelated jobs including teaching yoga, working at a hotel, a kindergarten, and manning an ice cream stand. He worked as a travel agent for many years before moving to Brooklyn in the 1980s. There he attended adult learning centers to take some writing classes before enrolling in Columbia University's writing program. The writer Stephen Koch gave him the idea to begin work on his first novel.

His stories, articles and reviews have appeared in Gay Community News, Bay Windows, the Boston Phoenix, the New York Times Book Review, Vogue, House & Garden, Details, Vanity Fair, Harper's, and Travel and Leisure, among others.

His first novel, "The Object of My Affection" was adapted in 1998 into a Hollywood feature starring Jennifer Aniston and Paul Rudd, whilst his fourth, "True Enough" was adapted in France in 2007 with the title "La Verite ou Presque".


Stephen McCauley with authors Christopher Castellani and Sebastian Stuart at Porter Square Books, February 1st, 2012
Stephen McCauley is an American author. He has written six novels to date including most recently Insignificant Others. His most famous novel is The Object of My Affection, which was made into a movie starring Jennifer Aniston and Paul Rudd. McCauley and longtime partner Sebastian Stuart (a Ferro-Grumley Award winner for The Hour Between and an alum of the Ragdale Foundation) live in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 2010 Sebastian Stuart and Stephen McCauley celebrated twenty years together.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_McCauley
In many respects Stephen McCauley’s charming novel, “The Object of My Affection”, first published in 1987, could be seen as the precursor to the entire genre of urban gay romance. George is a gay kindergarten teacher trying to get over an ex-boyfriend and living with Nina, a single, pregnant woman. I think this book continues to deserve all of its many fans. McCauley’s subsequent novels are equally as delightful. --Jameson Currier
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Sebastian Stuart (born September 27, a Ferro-Grumley Award winner for The Hour Between and an alum of the Ragdale Foundation) has written novels, plays, and screenplays. His last novel was ghostwritten (with acknowledgment): Charm! by Kendall Hart, a character on the soap opera All My Children. Charm! spent five weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

Stuart and longtime partner Stephen McCauley live in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 2010 Sebastian Stuart and Stephen McCauley celebrated twenty years together.

Further Readings:

Alternatives to Sex: A Novel by Stephen McCauley
Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (January 9, 2007)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0743453190
ISBN-13: 978-0743453196
Amazon: Alternatives to Sex: A Novel

Boston real estate agent William Collins knows that his habits are slipping out of control. Due to obsessive-compulsive daily cleaning binges and a penchant for nightly online cruising for hookups, he finds his sales figures slipping despite a booming market. There's also his ongoing struggle to collect the rent from his passive-aggressive tenant and his worries about his best friend, Edward, whom he's certainly not in love with. Just as he decides to do something about his life, he meets Charlotte and Samuel, wealthy suburbanites looking for the perfect city apartment. "Happy couple," he writes in his notes. "Maybe I can learn something from them." What he ultimately discovers challenges his own assumptions about real estate, love, and desire; and what they learn from him might unravel a budding friendship, not to mention a very promising sale.
Full of crackling dialogue delivered by a stellar ensemble of players, Alternatives to Sex is a smart, hilarious chronicle of life in post-traumatic, morally ambiguous America -- where the desire to do good is constantly being tripped up by the need to feel good. Right now.

The Hour Between: A Novel by Sebastian Stuart
Paperback: 248 pages
Publisher: Alyson Books (September 1, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1593501269
ISBN-13: 978-1593501266
Amazon: The Hour Between: A Novel
Amazon Kindle: The Hour Between: A Novel

“I love stories about friendship, particularly those in which friendship is recalled under a nostalgic haze...I found the whole thing quite lovely...Stuart knows how to cut the pathos with some sharp wit.”—Daniel Goldin of Boswell Book Company for National Public Radio

When Arthur McDougal is kicked out of Manhattan’s toniest boys’ school, his parents ship him off to the only place that will take him in—the Christian Science–inflected Spooner School. There, in the woods of Connecticut, Arthur meets Katrina Felt, the charming, troubled daughter of a Hollywood movie star. As Arthur struggles with his sexuality and Katrina’s beauty and talent land her in a Broadway musical, the two forge a tender friendship. But while Arthur’s confidence grows, Katrina is pulled down by the heartbreaking secrets and sorrows of her past. By year’s end, their lives will be changed forever, and their friendship will be over. Set in the late 1960s, The Hour Between is a compelling portrait of a time and place, replete with drugs, sex, Andy Warhol, a cast of truly memorable secondary characters, and some of the sharpest and funniest dialogue in recent memory.

More Spotlights at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Lists/Gay Novels

More Real Life Romances at my website:
http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
George Davis Whitmore was a poet, playwright, critic, novelist, and freelance writer, whose lifetime of publishing began with his essays appearing in school literary magazines and ended with his major volume on the AIDS epidemic. He was born in Denver, Colorado, on September 27, 1945, to Lowell and Irene Davis Whitmore. Raised in Denver, he received a BA degree in English and Theatre from MacMurray College in Jacksonville, Illinois, in 1967. Whitmore was awarded a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship and pursued graduate studies in the Theatre Department at Bennington College, Bennington, Vermont. He remained at the college from 1967 to 1968, after which he moved to New York.

Once in the city, Whitmore found employment as an editorial and administrative assistant at two non-profit agencies, Planned Parenthood (1968-1972) and the Citizens Housing and Planning Council of New York (1972-1981); both positions gave him experience in writing copy, reviewing books, and turning out concise feature articles under deadline. Concurrently, Whitmore maintained a parallel career as a freelance writer, reporter, and critic for several gay periodicals including The Body Politic, Christopher Street, Gay Sunshine, and Gaysweek, as well as serving as contributing editor and literary critic at the San Francisco Advocate from 1974 to 1976. In addition, he wrote on topics of interest to the gay community for other magazines such as the Soho Weekly News, Harper's Weekly, and the Washington Post Book World. His book-length study of Henry David Thoreau was published by the Gay Academic Union in 1977-1978.


George Whitmore at the World's Fair, 1987, by Robert Giard
George Whitmore was a poet, playwright, critic, novelist, and freelance writer. He was a member of the Violet Quill with Christopher Cox, Michael Grumley and Robert Ferro, Andrew Holleran, Felice Picano and Edmund White. He met his partner Michael Canter in 1984 and after 6 months, George was diagnosed with HIV. “I miss the brave books I‘m sure he would have written. But I miss his humor and his penetrating smile more. I miss his phone calls. The missing never stops.” Victor Bumbalo.
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://drs.library.yale.edu:8083/HLTransformer/HLTransServlet?stylename=yul.ead2002.xhtml.xsl&pid=beinecke:whitmore&clear-stylesheet-cache=yes
George was living with AIDS. It should be remembered that he sued the Northern Dispensary, a Greenwich Village clinic, after it refused to treat him because he had AIDS. The clinic was fined $47,000 by the City‘s Human Rights Commission. It closed.
After the book party for Nebraska, a group of us went to a restaurant. George, always a great looker, was in a wonderful mood and looking quite handsome. He was surrounded by his friends and his dear lover, Michael Canter. I was unusually quiet. At one point George turned to me and asked, ―What‘s wrong with you?‖ I lied and told him that I was fine. George could read me, and I could tell if I continued to sit there withdrawn, he would get really pissed. So I started to yak it up, but didn‘t do a very good job of acting. I couldn‘t stop myself from foreseeing what was going to happen to my friend. We‘d seen too many friends in hospitals and sat together at too many of their funerals. That night I was down that road, somewhere in the future. And in doing so, I was ruining that most special moment — mainly for myself. I was missing the opportunity to bathe in the love and success of a close friend who was such a part of me. George, wiser than I was, did not ruin that night for himself. [...]
In his life, he loved order, quiet, loyalty and the company of his friends. In his work he was a true daredevil.
I miss the brave books I‘m sure he would have written. But I miss his humor and his penetrating smile more. I miss his phone calls. The missing never stops. George died in 1989, two years after Nebraska was published and a year after Someone Was Here. He was 43 years old. -- From Victor Bumbalo's essay on Nebraska for The Lost Library
Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Anne Fausto-Sterling (born July 30, 1944) is the Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Biology and Gender Studies at Brown University. She participates actively in the field of sexology and has written extensively on the fields of biology of gender, sexual identity, gender identity, and gender roles. Fausto-Sterling is married to Paula Vogel, a Yale professor and Pulitzer-winning playwright. Fausto-Sterling's mother, Dorothy Sterling, was a noted writer and historian, and her father was also a published writer.

Fausto-Sterling received her Bachelor of Arts degree in zoology from University of Wisconsin in 1965 and her Ph.D. in developmental genetics from Brown University in 1970. She has taught at Brown since earning her Ph.D.

She has written two books intended for the general audience. The second edition of the first of those books, Myths of Gender, was published in 1992.

Her second book for the general public is Sexing the Body, published in 2000. She stated that in it she sets out to "convince readers of the need for theories that allow for a good deal of human variation and that integrate the analytical powers of the biological and the social into the systematic analysis of human development."

In a paper entitled "The Five Sexes", in which, according to her, "I had intended to be provocative, but I had also written with tongue firmly in cheek," Fausto-Sterling laid out a thought experiment considering an alternative model of gender containing five sexes: male, female, merm, ferm, and herm. This thought experiment was interpreted by some as a serious proposal or even a theory; advocates for intersexual people stated that this theory was wrong, confusing and unhelpful to the interests of intersexual people. In a later paper ("The Five Sexes, Revisited") she has acknowledged these objections.


Paula Vogel is an American playwright and university professor. She received the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play, How I Learned to Drive. Vogel married Brown University professor and author Ann e Fausto-Sterling in Truro, Massachusetts, on September 26, 2004. "We've been together for 16 years, and we are already accepted within our community and embraced within our family. What is surprising is the emotion of it being legal - to realize that marriage is not just a personal commitment"

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Fausto-Sterling

Paula Vogel (born 16 November 1951) is an American playwright and university professor. She received the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play, How I Learned to Drive.

Vogel was born in Washington, D.C. to Donald Stephen Vogel, an advertising executive, and Phyllis Rita Bremerman, a secretary for United States Postal Service Training and Development Center. She is a graduate of The Catholic University of America (1974, B.A.) and Cornell University (1976, M.A.). Vogel also attended Bryn Mawr College from 1969 to 1970 and 1971 to 1972.

A productive playwright since the late 1970s, Vogel first came to national prominence with her AIDS-related seriocomedy The Baltimore Waltz, which won the Obie award for Best Play in 1992. She is best known for her Pulitzer Prize-winning play How I Learned to Drive (1997), which examines the impact and echoes of child sexual abuse and incest. Other notable plays include Desdemona, A Play About A Handkerchief (1979); The Oldest Profession (1981); And Baby Makes Seven (1984); Hot 'N Throbbing (1994); and The Mineola Twins (1996).

Although no particular theme or topic dominates her work, she often examines traditionally controversial issues such as sexual abuse and prostitution. Asserting that she "writes the play backwards," moving from emotional circumstances and character to craft narrative structure, Vogel says, "My writing isn't actually guided by issues.... I only write about things that directly impact my life." Vogel adds, "If people get upset, it's because the play is working." Vogel's family, especially her late brother Carl Vogel, influences her writings. Vogel says, "In every play, there are a couple of places where I send a message to my late brother Carl. Just a little something in the atmosphere of every play to try and change the homophobia in our world." Carl's likeness appears in such plays as The Long Christmas Ride Home (2003), The Baltimore Waltz, and And Baby Makes Seven.


Paula Vogel, 1999, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1125724)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paula_Vogel

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

More Real Life Romances at my website:
http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Bill T. Jones (born February 15, 1952) is an American artistic director, choreographer and dancer. Jones has received numerous awards for his work and is the co-founder of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Arnie Zane met Jones, the man who would later become his lifelong partner, while visiting his Alma mater. The story goes that the 22-year-old Zane was immediately enamored of Bill T. Jones (a freshman studying dance and theater at SUNY) when he spied him across campus in 1971. During that spring semester, Zane convinced Jones to travel to Amsterdam with him and explore their burgeoning romantic relationship. After living and working together in Amsterdam, Zane and Jones eventually returned to New York. (P: Russell Jenkins. Choreographer Bill T. Jones at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield, Illinois, 2009)

Jones was born in Bunnell, Florida, and his family moved North as part of the Great Migration in the first half of the twentieth century. They settled in Wayland, New York, where Jones attended Wayland High School. He began his dance training at Binghamton University, where he studied classical ballet and modern dance.

Jones choreographed and performed worldwide as a soloist and duet company with his late partner, Arnie Zane, before forming the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company in 1982.

Creating more than 100 works for his own company, Jones has also choreographed for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, AXIS Dance Company, Boston Ballet, Lyon Opera Ballet, Berlin Opera Ballet and Diversions Dance Company, among others. In 1995, Jones directed and performed in a collaborative work with Toni Morrison and Max Roach, Degga, at Alice Tully Hall, commissioned by Lincoln Center’s "Serious Fun" Festival. His collaboration with Jessye Norman, How! Do! We! Do!, premiered at New York’s City Center in 1999.


Arnie Zane met Bill T. Jones, the man who would later become his lifelong partner, while visiting his Alma mater. The 22-year-old Zane was immediately enamored of Bill T. Jones when he spied him across campus in 1971. During that spring semester, Zane convinced Jones to travel to Amsterdam with him and explore their burgeoning romantic relationship. After living and working together in Amsterdam, Zane and Jones eventually returned to New York, where they lived together until Arnie's death.


Bill T. Jones, right, and Bjorn Amelan found a second chapter in love after both losing their long-term partners. Jones is most identified with Arnie Zane, with whom he cofounded Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. But he’s spent the last 20 years living and collaborating with Amelan, who had a long romantic and professional relationship with famed fashion designer Patrick Kelly before he died. Since they met in Paris on February 16, 1992, the two have successfully entwined their creative work and domestic lives.
"If we get married, it’s for the legal reasons. I don’t feel a need for it emotionally," Bill T. Jones said in 2012. "I love him with all of my heart. Marriage is a public acknowledgment. And doing this is more a part of that. I guess we’re saying, 'I do thee wed -- in the public imagination.'”
(http://www.out.com/out-exclusives/2012/01/18/bill-t-jones-dance-bjorn-amelan-couple)

Read more... )

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_T._Jones

Arnie Zane (September 26, 1948 – March 30, 1988) was an American photographer, choreographer, and dancer. He is best known as the co-founder and co-artistic director of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company.

The second son of an Italian-Jewish family, Zane was born in the Bronx, New York on September 26, 1948. Zane graduated from State University of New York at Binghamton (SUNY) with a degree in theater and art history. Not long afterward, Zane began pursuing an interest in photography. Though he is best known for being a dancer and choreographer, Zane began his career as a photographer. Zane was immensely interested in the human body, particularly its gestures, its movement, and its essence. Critic Jeffrey Green has characterized Zane’s portraits as “breaking down boundaries of race and age”. Zane's exploration of these themes is evidenced in his famous pictorials of a dancing Bill T. Jones. He met Jones, the man who would later become his lifelong partner, while visiting his Alma mater. The story goes that the 22-year-old Zane was immediately enamored of Bill T. Jones (a freshman studying dance and theater at SUNY) when he spied him across campus in 1971. During that spring semester, Zane convinced Jones to travel to Amsterdam with him and explore their burgeoning romantic relationship. After living and working together in Amsterdam, Zane and Jones eventually returned to New York.

Zane’s interest in dance began when he and Jones took Lois Welk’s contact improvisation class at SUNY/Brockport. Welk’s improvisational workshop stressing the physical interdependence between dancers, fascinated Zane and sparked his passion for dance. The three (Zane, Jones, Welk) collaborated and formed the American Dance Asylum which was heavily influenced by the work of experimental dancers of the time, namely Yvonne Rainer and other members of Grand Union. Zane’s photographic interest in the body and his interest in visual design shaped his approach to choreography. Zane and Jones would utilize their physical differences (Zane was short and white, and moved with an agitated energy; Jones was tall and black, and moved with a generous grace) to create an image that was beautiful in its oddity. Their pieces would fuse Jones' power and grace with Zane’s quick and wiry movement. Indeed, the still pictures of their dances together are especially striking and memorable.


Arnie Zane, 1987, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1124099)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Read more... )

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnie_Zane

Read more... )

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 – September 25, 1999) was an American author of fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and the Darkover series. Many critics have noted a feminist perspective in her writing. Her first child, David R. Bradley, and her brother, Paul Edwin Zimmer were also published science fiction and fantasy authors in their own right.

Born on a farm in Albany, New York, during the Great Depression, she began writing in 1949. She was married to Robert Alden Bradley from October 26, 1949 until their divorce on May 19, 1964. They had a son, David Robert Bradley (1950–2008). During the 1950s she was introduced to the cultural and campaigning lesbian group the Daughters of Bilitis.

After her divorce Bradley married numismatist Walter H. Breen on June 3, 1964. They had a daughter, Moira Greyland, who became a professional harpist and singer, and a son, Patrick.

In 1965, Bradley graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas. Afterward, she moved to Berkeley, California, to pursue graduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley between 1965 and 1967. In 1966, she helped found and named the Society for Creative Anachronism and was involved in developing several local groups, including in New York after her move to Staten Island.

Bradley and Breen separated in 1979 but remained married, and continued a business relationship and lived on the same street for over a decade. They officially divorced on May 9, 1990, the year Breen was arrested on child molestation charges.


Marion Zimmer Bradley, 1994, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1123912)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Zimmer_Bradley
The Catch Trap is the emotionally devastating story of a young gay boy adopted into a family of trapeze artists who falls in love with the angst-ridden and repressed family star. An unbelievably accurate depiction of the pain of young gay love and the battle some of us go through to come out yet, this is far from a standard coming out story; the novel borders on the epic. --Hal Bodner
I liked The Mists of Avalon for many reasons, most notably because it dealt with the legend of King Arthur. Told from the point of view of the women in Arthur's life I felt it gave an alternative view. A true fantasy that, at least in my mind, was rooted in history. It led me to buy actual history books that dealt with Arthurian Legend. Also, even though the entire book is grand, and worth re-reading, there is a scene that always stuck in my head, and again I believe it was just foreshadowing of what I truly enjoyed. Midway through the book, at Beltane, Arthur takes both Gwenhwyfar and Lancelet to his bed. I remember reading between the lines at that scene, and being floored at the images. I think this book just further cemented my love for the Cornish, the Welsh, and all things mystical. --Rowena Sudbury
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Cherríe L. Moraga (born 25 September 1952) is a Chicana writer, feminist activist, poet, essayist, and playwright. The Sexuality of Latinas, edited by Norma Alarcón, Ana Castillo, and Cherríe Moraga, is a collage of essays, poetry, fiction, and artwork from the "actively heterosexual, to the celibate, to the secretly sexual, to the politically visible lesbian." Both poignant and humorous, it's thirty-seven contributors examine attitudes toward and representations of sexuality. Among others, it features Gloria Anzuldúa, Elvia Alvarado, Julia Alvarez, Ana Castillo, Barbara Brinson Curiel, Denise Chavéz, Sandra Cisneros, Lucha Corpi, Arcelia Ponce, Ana María Simo, Carmen Tafolla, and Luz María Umpierre.

Moraga was born in Whittier, California. She earned her Bachelor's degree from Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles, California and her Master's from San Francisco State University in 1980. Of both Anglo and Mexican American heritage, her writing focuses on her experiences as a Chicana lesbian.

Moraga has taught courses in dramatic arts and writing at various universities across the United States and is currently an artist in residence at Stanford University. Her play, Watsonville: Some Place Not Here, performed at the Brava Theatre Company of San Francisco in May, 1996, won the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Fund for New American Plays Award. Barbara Smith, Audre Lorde and Moraga started Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, the first publisher dedicated to the writing of women of color in the United States.

She is perhaps best known for co-editing, with Gloria Anzaldúa, the anthology of feminist thought This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. Along with Ana Castillo and Norma Alarcon, she adapted this anthology into the Spanish-language Esta puente, mi espalda: Voces de mujeres tercermundistas en los Estados Unidos. Writings in the anthology, along with works by other prominent feminists of color, call for a greater prominence within feminism for race-related subjectivities, and ultimately laid the foundation for third wave feminism or Third World Feminism in the USA. Her first sole-authored book, Loving in the War Years: lo que nunca pasó por sus labios (1983), a combination of autobiographically modulated prose and poetry, is also an influential critical work among Chicana feminists and other feminists of color, and among scholars working in Chicano Studies.


Ana Castillo and Cherrie Moraga, 1989, by Robert Giard
Cherríe Moraga is a Chicana writer, feminist activist, poet, essayist, and playwright. The Sexuality of Latinas, edited by Norma Alarcón, Ana Castillo, and Cherríe Moraga, is a collage of essays, poetry, fiction, and artwork from the "actively heterosexual, to the celibate, to the secretly sexual, to the politically visible lesbian." Both poignant and humorous, it's thirty-seven contributors examine attitudes toward and representations of sexuality.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherrie_Moraga

Cherrie Moraga, 1989, by Robert Giard )

Further Readings )

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Ana María Simo is a New York playwright, essayist and novelist. Born in Cuba, educated in France, and writing in English, she has collaborated with such experimental artists as composer Zeena Parkins, choreographer Stephanie Skura and filmmakers Ela Troyano and Abigail Child.

She has also made important contributions as a lesbian activist, co-founding projects such as Medusa's Revenge, the first lesbian theater in New York, the direct action group The Lesbian Avengers, Dyke TV, and The Gully online magazine.

Ana María Simo was born in Cienfuegos, Cuba in 1943, and moved to Havana with her grandmother on the eve of the 1959 revolution. She was 15 when she began working as a journalist and 18 when her first book was published: Las fábulas (The Fables), a short story collection. The book was published by Ediciones El Puente, a literary and publishing project (1961 to 1965) which Simo co-directed along with its founder, the poet José Mario Rodríguez.

Simo immigrated first to Paris (Dec. 1967), where she attended Roland Barthes’ seminar and studied sociology and linguistics at the University of Paris VIII-Vincennes (1968-1972). In the mid-1970s she settled in New York, where she began her career as an English-language writer. Her association with playwright/director Maria Irene Fornes’ theater workshop throughout the 1980s was pivotal in her development as a writer.

Some of her most notable works includes her 1990 play "Going to New England" produced at the INTAR theater. The New York Time's Stephen Holden gave the production mixed reviews, but also wrote that the play itself succeeded as "a study in physical and emotional claustrophobia" examining the traditions of Latin American machismo, Roman Catholic values, and erotic taboos.


Ana Maria Simo, 1990, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1125711)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ana_Maria_Simo

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Douglas Sadownick (born April 20) is a gay American writer and psychologist. He co-created The Buddy Systems (1985) with Tim Miller, with whom Sadownick was involved in a 14-year relationship.

Born in the Bronx, he attended Columbia College for his B.A., New York University for his graduate work in English, and the graduate program in clinical psychology at Antioch College in clinical psychology. He received his Ph.D. from Pacifica Graduate Institute in Clinical Psychology in 2006. His dissertation was entitled, Homosexual Enlightenment: A Gay Science Perspective on Friedrich Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra.

He is the director of the nation's first LGBT Specialization in Clinical Psychology, at Antioch University. He is also the co-founder of the Institute for Contemporary Uranian Psychoanalysis, which offers continued education units to licensed psychotherapists on the issues of gay-affirmative psychotherapy. He was also a principal co-founder of Highways Performance Art Space in 1989. (Picture: Tim Miller)

His work Sacred Lips of the Bronx was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. His second book was called Sex Between Men: An Intimate History of the Sex Lives of Gay Men, Postwar to Present. His articles have appeared in the Advocate, the Los Angeles Times, Genre, High Performance, the New York Native, and the L.A. Weekly. He received a GLAAD award for excellence in reporting. He works as a private practice psychotherapist in Los Angeles. His most recent paper, "Reading Literature Gay-Affirmatively: A Homosexual Individuation Story," was published in Spring 2006 in the journal Arts and Humanities.


Tim Miller has been an inspiring figure for 25 years and is the author of The Buddy Systems, created with writer Douglas Sadownick, with whom Miller was involved in a 14yo relationship. Douglas Sadownick is the director of the nation's first LGBT Specialization in Clinical Psychology, at Antioch University. His work Sacred Lips of the Bronx was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. His second book was called Sex Between Men: An Intimate History of the Sex Lives of Gay Men, Postwar to Present. 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Sadownick
In researching this essay I located a New York Times article from 1994: Coping: Growing up Gay in the Heart of the Bronx, a short profile of the author in the year his novel was published. The article contained a surprising confession: Hector didn‘t exist. While Mike found first love in the Bronx, in real life the young Sadownick never repeated any of his rendezvous with the boys he met on the Grand Concourse. ―Hector in the book was a way for me to redeem what I see now as a lot of missed opportunities.
How discourteous to contradict an author‘s interpretations concerning his book, much less his own life, but Sadownick made that observation while still pretty young; the longing and unusual jealousy that Sacred Lips of the Bronx inspired dissipated once I kissed the right boy. What I had considered ―missed opportunities‖ were simply the necessary preparations for the experiences that ended up counting the most. That rush to recapture what I had mistakenly considered lost had nearly cost me everything. The book at the bottom of my sleeping bag was in no way illicit but a rather splendid and sturdy diving board. --Tom Cardamone, The Lost Library: Gay Fiction Rediscovered
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A pathbreaking performance artist and dancer, John Jeffery Bernd (May 8, 1953 - August 28, 1988) melded dance with "out" gay performance, thereby establishing himself as a prime mover in the downtown performance scene. Also an activist and organizer, Bernd organized a weekly improvisation group called "Open Movement" held at P.S. 122. Originally from Nebraska, Bernd graduated from Antioch College in Ohio with a B.A. in Dance and Performance Studies. After moving to New York, he worked at P.S. 122 and frequently collaborated with Tim Miller, ex-lover and friend. He was one of the first New York performers to die of AIDS.

His large circle of surviving friends included Jennifer Monson, Ishmael Houston-Jones, Michael Stiller, Lori E. Seid, Yvonne Meier, Lucy Sexton, Annie Iobst, Jeff McMahon, Richard Elovich, Fred Holland, Jeannie Hutchins, Dona McAdams, and Johnny Walker.

Other dancers who knew or worked with Bernd include Joe Pupello, Suchi Bronfman, Deborah Oliver, and Donald Byrd.

According to Tim Miller and Ishmael Houston-Jones, Dona Ann McAdams was Bernd's main photographer, she shot practically everything he did at P.S. 122 and most pieces at other places as well. A beautiful photo of John, as well as some of his drawings, appears in her book Caught in the Act (Aperture). Photographer Kirk Winslow, with whom John collaborated on several projects, passed away from AIDS complication on summer 2002. Kirk was the son of the artist Maryette Charlton who is responsible for getting John's archives to Harvard. Maryette Charlton was a New York artist and filmmaker who had a particular interest in performance art and apparently knew Bernd.


Tim Miller and John Bernd in Live Boys (1981), ©Gene Bagnato
A pathbreaking performance artist and dancer, John Bernd melded dance with "out" gay performance, thereby establishing himself as a prime mover in the downtown performance scene. Bernd organized a weekly improvisation group called "Open Movement" held at P.S. 122. Bernd graduated from Antioch College. After moving to New York, he worked at P.S. 122 and frequently collaborated with Tim Miller, ex-lover and friend. He was one of the first New York performers to die of AIDS.

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Source: http://www.artistswithaids.org/artforms/dance/catalogue/bernd.html

Tim Miller (born September 22, 1958 in Pasadena, California) is an American performance artist and writer, whose pieces frequently involve gay identity, marriage equality and immigration issues. He was one of the NEA Four, four performance artists whose National Endowment for the Arts grants were vetoed in 1990 by NEA chair John Frohnmayer.

Miller was born in Pasadena, California but grew up in nearby Whittier.

He has developed shows based on his personal life as a gay man and as an activist. A member of ACT UP and other campaigning organizations, Miller has participated in numerous demonstrations to call for funding of AIDS research and treatment and to promote equal rights. His civil disobedience has led to his arrest on several occasions.
I was seventeen going on eighteen and I was desperate for love and dick. I searched everywhere for it. I hung around the Whittier Public Library, leaning suggestively against the stacks in the psychology section, waiting to be picked up by some graduate student. I leaned too far, once, and almost knocked over an entire row of bookshelves. -— Tim Miller, Boys like us, 1996
Miller's interest in performance began in high school, where he took classes in theater and dance. He played the lead role of John Proctor in Lowell High School's production of The Crucible by Arthur Miller. At nineteen he moved to New York and studied dance with Merce Cunningham.


In 1999 in Glory Box, Tim Miller took on the topic of immigration rights for gay and lesbian partners of American citizens, the immigration issue a personal cause as Alistair McCartney, his partner since 1994, is Australian. In 2003 in Us, Miller returned to the theme of the problems of Americans with same-sex life partners, the title refers both to his relationship with McCartney and to the laws in the US which could prevent them from being together. Miller & McCartney married on June 26, 2013.


Tim Miller and Douglas Sadownick, 1994-1996, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1082041)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Miller_(performance_artist)

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More Real Life Romances at my website:
http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
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Kenny Fries (born September 22, 1960) is an American memoirist and poet. He is the author of The History of My Shoes and the Evolution of Darwin's Theory (2007), Body, Remember: A Memoir (1997), and editor of Staring Back: The Disability Experience from the Inside Out (1997). He received a 2009 Creative Capital grant in Innovative Literature, the 2007 Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, the Gregory Kolovakos Award, a Creative Arts Fellowship from the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission and the National Endowment, and was a Fulbright Scholar to Japan.

Fries was born in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated with an MFA from Columbia University's School for the Arts. He currently teaches in the MFA in Creative Writing Program at Goddard College.

Kenny Fries was born to a fainting father and a grandmother who ran through the hospital screaming “My daughter gave birth to a freak!” Fries entered the world with only three toes on each foot and undersized legs that were twisted like pretzels and lacked the basic number of bones. At the time of his birth, there was no medical name for his condition so it was referred to as “congenital deformities of the lower extremities.” When he was an infant, many doctors advised Fries' parents to amputate his legs, but instead, his parents took the advice of a prominent doctor who was convinced that one day Kenny could walk. From the age of 6 months until he was in the fifth grade, Fries underwent many surgeries in attempt to “fix” his legs. However, for most of his childhood Kenny was able to get around fine and even participate in sports. Fries opens up about his childhood experiences in his book “Body, Remember: A Memoir” in which he uses his surgical scars as a guide to his book.


Kenny Fries, 1994, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1123792)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenny_Fries

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Bette Bourne (born Peter Bourne, 22 September 1939) is a British actor, drag queen and equal rights activist.

Born Peter Bourne in Hackney, east London, he made his stage debut at the age of four as one of the members of Madame Behenna and her Dancing Children. Encouraged to take part in amateur dramatics by his mother, he chose a career in the theatre at 16, working backstage at the Garrick Theatre, London.

He studied drama at Central School of Speech and Drama in London and went on to act on stage and on television throughout the 1960s. He appeared in TV series such as The Avengers and The Prisoner, and in 1969, he appeared alongside Sir Ian McKellen in a touring double bill of Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II and Shakespeare’s Richard II.

In the 1970s, he put his acting career on hold to become an activist with the Gay Liberation Front, becoming part of a gay commune in London. It was during this period that he started wearing drag and changed his name to “Bette”.

In 1976, he joined the New York-based gay cabaret group, the Hot Peaches, performing with them in Europe, culminating in a show at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London. When this group went back to New York, Bourne formed his own troupe, Bloolips. Featuring songs such as Let's Scream Our Tits Off, the shows were mostly written by playwright John Taylor with titles like Lust in Space and The Ugly Duckling. He toured the UK and the rest of Europe throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, winning an Obie Award (Off Broadway Theater Award) for the New York production of Lust in Space.


Robert Patrick and Bette Bourne at Phebe's, 1988, by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
read more )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bette_Bourne

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John D'Emilio (born 1948, New York City) is a professor of history and of women's and gender studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He taught at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1982, where his advisor was William Leuchtenburg. A Guggenheim fellow in 1998 and National Endowment for the Humanities fellow in 1997, he served as Director of the Policy Institute at the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force from 1995 to 1997.

D'Emilio was awarded the Stonewall Book Award in 1984 for his most widely cited book, Sexual politics, sexual communities, which is considered the definitive history of the U.S. homophile movement from 1940 to 1970. His biography of the civil-rights leader Bayard Rustin, Lost prophet: Bayard Rustin and the quest for peace and justice in America, won the Stonewall Book Award for non-fiction in 2004. He was the 2005 recipient of the Brudner Prize at Yale University.

His and Estelle Freedman's book Intimate matters: A history of sexuality in America was cited in Justice Anthony Kennedy's opinion in Lawrence v. Texas, the 2003 American Supreme Court case overturning all remaining anti-sodomy laws.


John D'Emilio by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D%27Emilio

Further Readings )

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Jim Grimsley (born September 21, 1955) is an American novelist and playwright.

Born to a troubled rural family in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, Grimsley said of his childhood that "for us in the South, the family is a field where craziness grows like weeds".

After moving to Atlanta he would spend nearly twenty years as a secretary at Atlanta's Grady Memorial Hospital before joining the creative-writing faculty at Emory University. During those years, Grimsley wrote prolifically, with fourteen of his plays produced between 1983 and 1993.

His initial forays into novel writing were less successful than his dramatic work. The semiautobiographical Winter Birds was rejected as "too dark" by American publishers for ten years before appearing in a German edition; it only appeared in English two years later. The novel then brought Grimsley much recognition: the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a PEN/Hemingway Award citation.

It was followed by Dream Boy which received the American Library Association's Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Book Award for Literature (Stonewall Book Award), and My Drowning, which won the Lila Wallace-Readers Digest Writers' Award. Subsequently he wrote the high fantasy novel Kirith Kirin, which won the Lambda Literary Award, or 'Lammy', for best gay-themed science fiction or fantasy for the year 2000. This classically-themed fantasy work was followed by two science fiction novels, The Ordinary and The Last Green Tree (2006 sequel to The Ordinary). His novel Forgiveness (ISBN 9780292716698) was published in 2007. Four of Grimsley's plays are collected in Mr. Universe and Other Plays.


Jim Grimsley, 1992, by Robert Giard (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_crosscollex/brbldl_getrec.asp?fld=img&id=1123806)
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Grimsley
Any list of great gay writers of our time that does not include Jim Grimsley cannot be taken seriously. All of his work is extraordinary; Comfort and Joy is my personal favorite. A beautifully written love story about two men from different classes in Atlanta (one from a poor background, the other from a wealthy society family in Savannah), their romance is juxtaposed against their extremely different relationships with their families, culminating with Christmas visits to both. Complex and richly drawn, this book will make you laugh and cry, and ultimately leaves the reader the better for having read it. --Greg Herren
The combined delicacy and force of this love story, Comfort and Joy, is one that has drawn me back to re-read it several times. Grimsely’s writing has a lyrical quality that appeals to the poet in me and he has a poet’s eye for acutely conveyed detail and nuance. This is a subtle but powerful of the challenges of gay male relationships that manages to be both romantic and real and poignant without ever becoming maudlin or melodramatic. His Danny and Ford are men navigating the always tricky and often turbulent waters of a gay relationship in ways that I think any gay man who’s ever been in love can recognize and feel in his gut. --Dan Stone
Comfort & Joy by Jim Grimsley is a story of a couple struggling through their past, through family relations, and through each other over the holidays. Expertly written, evocative and with real, painful characters that pull you through to the end. --Astrid Amara
Jim Grimsley's Dream Boy is about the discovery and flowering of same-sex love in high school, with a touch of magical realism. The familiar themes of social pressure, closeted sneaking around, and bruised innocence all come into play in this well-written novel, and yet Grimsley makes something new and surprising out of them. --Kyell Gold
Further Readings:

Comfort and Joy by Jim Grimsley
Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Algonquin Books (October 16, 2003)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1565123964
ISBN-13: 978-1565123960
Amazon: Comfort and Joy
Amazon Kindle: Comfort and Joy

Ford McKinney leads a charmed life: he's a young doctor possessing good looks, good breeding, and money. He comes from an old Savannah family where his parents, attentive to his future, focus their energies on finding their son--their golden boy--a girl to marry. But how charmed is this life when Ford's own heart suspects that he is not meant to spend his life with a woman? His suspicions are confirmed when he meets Dan Crell.

Dan is a quiet man with a great voice. Behind the tempered facade of the shy hospital administrator is a singer who can transform a room with his soaring voice, leaving his listeners in awe and reverence. Ford catches one such Christmas concert and his life is never quite the same; he is touched in a place he keeps hidden, forbidden. When Ford and Dan begin to explore the limits of their relationship, Dan's own secrets are exposed--and his mysterious and painful childhood returns to haunt him.

In Comfort and Joy Jim Grimsley finds a marriage between the stark and stunning pain of his prize-winning Winter Birds and the passion of critically acclaimed Dream Boy. In this, his fourth novel, he considers pressing questions. How does a man reconcile the child he was raised to be with the man that he truly is? What happens when an adult has to choose between his parents and a lover?

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

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Tobias Schneebaum (March 25, 1922 – September 20, 2005) was an American artist, anthropologist, and AIDS activist. He is best known for his experiences living, and traveling among the Harakmbut people of Peru, and the Asmat people of Papua, Western New Guinea, Indonesia then known as Irian Jaya.

He was born on Manhattan's Lower East Side and grew up in Brooklyn. In 1939 he graduated from the Stuyvesant High School, moving on to the City College of New York, graduating in 1943 after having majored in mathematics and art. During World War II he served as a radar repairman in the U.S. Army.

In 1947, after briefly studying painting with Rufino Tamayo at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Schneebaum went to live and paint in Mexico for three years, living among the Lakadone tribe. In 1955 he won a Fulbright fellowship to travel and paint in Peru. After hitch-hiking from New York to Peru, he lived with the Harakambut people for seven months, where he slept with his male subjects and claimed to have joined the tribe in cannibalism on one occasion.

Until 1970 he was the designer at Tiber Press, then in 1973 he embarked on his third overseas trip, to Irian Jaya in South East Asia, living with the Asmat people on the south-western coast. He helped establish the Asmat Museum of Culture and Progress. Schneebaum would return there in 1995 to revisit a former lover, named Aipit. He recounted his journey into the jungles of Peru in the 1961 memoir Keep the River on Your Right. In 1999, he revisited both Irian Jaya and Peru for a documentary film, also titled Keep the River on Your Right

.
Tobias Schneebaum, 1991, by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tobias_Schneebaum



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Jill Johnston (May 17, 1929 – September 18, 2010) was an American feminist author and cultural critic who wrote Lesbian Nation in 1973 and was a longtime writer for The Village Voice. She was also a leader of the lesbian separatist movement of the 1970s. Johnston also wrote under the pen name F. J. Crowe.

Born as Jill Crowe in London, England in 1929, the only child of Olive Marjorie Crowe (born 1901), an American nurse, and Cyril F. Johnston (1884-1950), a British bellfounder and clockmaker whose family firm, Gillett & Johnston, created the carillon of Riverside Church in New York City. Her parents, who never married, separated when their daughter was an infant, and Johnston's mother took her to Little Neck, Long Island, New York, where she was raised.

After attending college in Massachusetts and Minnesota, Johnston received an M.F.A. from the University of North Carolina.

In 1958 Johnston married Richard John Lanham, whom she divorced in 1964. They had two children, a son, Richard Renault Lanham, and a daughter, Winifred Brook Lanham.

In 1993, in Odense, Denmark, she married Ingrid Nyeboe. The couple married again, in Connecticut, in 2009. After being widowed in 2010, Ingrid Nyeboe married Louise Fishman, on June 22, 2012.


Louise Fishman & Ingrid Nyeboe (Photo: Dixie Sheridan, Copyright 2012 The New York Times Company)
Jill Johnston (1929 – 2010) was an American feminist author and cultural critic who wrote Lesbian Nation in 1973 and was a longtime writer for The Village Voice. In 1993, in Odense, Denmark, she married Ingrid Nyeboe. The couple married again, in Connecticut, in 2009. After being widowed in 2010, Ingrid Nyeboe married Louise Fishman, on June 22, 2012. Johnston was described by one critic as "part Gertrude Stein, part E. E. Cummings, with a dash of Jack Kerouac thrown for good measure,"


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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jill_Johnston & http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/24/fashion/weddings/louise-fishman-ingrid-nyeboe-weddings.html?_r=0

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Michael Angel Nava (born September 16, 1954 in Stockton, California) is an American attorney and writer. He has worked on the staff for the California Supreme Court, and ran for a Superior Court position in 2010. He authored a seven-volume mystery series featuring Henry Rios, an openly gay protagonist who is a criminal defense lawyer. His novels have received six Lambda Literary Awards and critical acclaim in the GLBT and Latino communities. In October 2008, Nava married his partner since 2001, George Herzog, an oncology nurse at the Veteran's Administration hospital in San Francisco. California Supreme Court justice Carlos R. Moreno presided over the ceremony. They live in Daly City, California.

Nava grew up in Gardenland, a predominantly working-class Mexican neighborhood in Sacramento, California that he described as "not as an American suburb at all, but rather as a Mexican village, transported perhaps from Guanajuato, where my grandmother's family originated, and set down lock, stock and chicken coop in the middle of California.” His maternal family settled there in 1920 after escaping from the Mexican Revolution. Nava's grandmother was an "influential force" whose "piety and humility that was highlighted by her Catholic beliefs."

At 12 years old, he started writing and it was also around that time he recognized that he was gay. He was the first person in his family to go to college; he attended Colorado College and "acquired a special affinity for literature and writing." He joined a group of young poets that included writer and humorist David Owen and the poet David Mason. He graduated in 1976 cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in History.


Michael Nava is an American attorney and writer. He authored a seven-volume mystery series featuring Henry Rios, an openly gay protagonist who is a criminal defense lawyer. His novels have received six Lambda Literary Awards. In October 2008, Nava married his partner since 2001, George Herzog, an oncology nurse at the Veteran's Administration hospital in San Francisco. California Supreme Court justice Carlos R. Moreno presided over the ceremony. They live in Daly City, California.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Nava
Without doubt, Michael Nava's entire Henry Rios series was a powerful motivator to me. It began my understanding that a mystery series with a gay protagonist could be about more than sex and snarky one-liners (not that there is anything wrong with that). It could be smart, serious, the hero could be flawed in many ways, and still draw in readers. Before I began writing my own series, I'd read all of the Rios books and thought: yeah, this is the kind of writing I want to do. As it turns out, I was wrong. My character, Russell Quant, is no where even close to being a Henry Rios wannabe. My voice on the page turned out to be something entirely different. Thinking about it now, I think I was attracted to the fact that there could be so many different perspectives on how to tell a story within the gay genre. That still excites me today. --Anthony Bidulka
One of my Internet friends introduced me to the work of Michael Nava. I love the Henry Rios series. Not only are they set in my hometown of Los Angeles, they just feel so familiar to me. Henry Rios is deeply flawed. The series starts with “The Little Death”. While I appreciate that Mr. Nava has both a successful career as an attorney and political aspirations I kind of wish he could still find time to write. --Z.A. Maxfield
Michael Nava is one of the three writers I consider the Grand Masters of Gay Mystery (the other two are Joseph Hansen and John Morgan Wilson). It was Nava’s stunning Henry Rios series that inspired me to write gay mysteries. Each one of these books is masterfully plotted, beautifully written, and every character, no matter how important or not to the story, is realistic and three-dimensional. The Burning Plain, however, is my favorite of the series; it concerns a pedophilia ring with ties to a major Hollywood studio, and is absolutely riveting. --Greg Herren
Michael Nava coupled great story telling with great writing and taught me you can do both. So not just Goldenboy, but all of his books are in my must read pile. --P.A. Brown
Michael Nava, 1988, by Robert Giard )

Further Readings:

Rag and Bone (Henry Rios Mysteries) by Michael Nava
Series: Henry Rios Mysteries
Mass Market Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Berkley Trade (June 1, 2002)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0425184706
ISBN-13: 978-0425184707
Amazon: Rag and Bone (Henry Rios Mysteries)
Amazon Kindle: Rag and Bone (Henry Rios Mysteries)

One of the most highly acclaimed writers in the mystery genre "explores new emotional depths" in this last Henry Rios novel. The gay Mexican-American attorney, after the loss of his lover, must face his own mortality while recovering from a heart attack-and reach out to a family he didn't know he had.

"For more years than we've noticed, Michael Nava has been creating an intricate series of fictions about Henry Rios...to give voice to the voiceless, the outsiders...to remind us that these outsiders are our kin." (Washington Post Book World)

"In 1986, Michael Nava began a series about Los Angeles investigator Henry Rios, a character with three strikes against him: He was gay, he was Chicano, and he was a lawyer. He also had a wry sense of humor, a formidable intelligence and a great deal of insight, so the series, without being preachy, cumulatively had a lot to say about certain aspects of the human condition...With Rag and Bone, Nava brings this wonderful and often moving series to an unexpected close...we thank him for illuminating the life of an always fascinating character and perhaps educating a few people along the way." (Denver Post)

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Ann Bannon (pseudonym of Ann Weldy, born September 15, 1932) is an American author who, from 1957 to 1962, wrote six lesbian pulp fiction novels known as The Beebo Brinker Chronicles. The books' enduring popularity and impact on lesbian identity has earned her the title "Queen of Lesbian Pulp Fiction". Bannon was a young housewife trying to address her own issues of sexuality when she was inspired to write her first novel. Her subsequent books featured four characters who reappeared throughout the series, including her eponymous heroine, Beebo Brinker, who came to embody the archetype of a butch lesbian. The majority of her characters mirrored people she knew, but their stories reflected a life she did not feel she was able to live. Despite her traditional upbringing and role in married life, her novels defied conventions for romance stories and depictions of lesbians by addressing complex homosexual relationships.

Her books shaped lesbian identity for lesbians and heterosexuals alike, but Bannon was mostly unaware of their impact. She stopped writing in 1962. Later, she earned a doctorate in linguistics and became an academic. She endured a difficult marriage for 27 years and, as she separated from her husband in the 1980s, her books were republished; she was stunned to learn of their influence on society. They were released again between 2001 and 2003 and were adapted as an award-winning Off-Broadway production. They are taught in Women's and LGBT studies courses, and Bannon has received numerous awards for pioneering lesbian and gay literature. She has been described as "the premier fictional representation of US lesbian life in the fifties and sixties", and it has been said that her books "rest on the bookshelf of nearly every even faintly literate Lesbian".

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_Bannon

Ann Bannon by Robert Giard )

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Kate Millett (born Katherine Murray Millett; September 14, 1934) is an American feminist writer, artist and activist. A seminal influence on second-wave feminism, Millett is best known for her 1970 book Sexual Politics.

Millett received her B.A. at the University of Minnesota in 1956, where she was a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. She later obtained a first-class degree, with honors, from St Hilda's College, Oxford in 1958. She was the first American woman to be awarded a postgraduate degree with first-class honors by St. Hilda's.

Millett moved to Japan in 1961, where she taught English at Waseda University and pursued a career as a sculptor. Two years later, Millett returned to the United States with fellow sculptor Fumio Yoshimura, whom she married in 1965. The two divorced in 1985. She was active in feminist politics in late 1960s and the 1970s. In 1966, she became a committee member of National Organization for Women.

Sexual Politics originated as Millett's Ph.D. dissertation and was published in 1970, the same year that she was awarded her doctorate from Columbia University. The book, a critique of patriarchy in Western society and literature, addressed the sexism and heterosexism of the modern novelists D. H. Lawrence, Henry Miller, and Norman Mailer contrasted their perspectives with the dissenting viewpoint of the homosexual author Jean Genet. Millett questioned the origins of patriarchy, argued that sex-based oppression was both political and cultural, and posited that undoing the traditional family was the key to true sexual revolution.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Millett

Kate Millett - N.Y.C, 1987-88, by Robert Giard )

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Eric Bentley (born September 14, 1916) is a British-born American critic, playwright, singer, editor and translator. In 1998, he was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame and is a member of the New York Theater Hall of Fame in recognition of his many years of cabaret performances.

Born in Bolton, Lancashire, England, Bentley attended Oxford University, receiving his degree in 1938, and subsequently attended Yale University (B.Litt, 1939 and PhD., 1941), where he received the John Addison Porter Prize.

Beginning in 1953, Bentley taught at Columbia University and simultaneously was a theatre critic for The New Republic. Known for his blunt style of theatre criticism, Bentley incurred the wrath of playwrights Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller, both of whom threatened to sue him for his unfavorable reviews of their work. From 1960-1961, Bentley was the Norton professor at Harvard University.

Bentley is considered one of the preeminent experts on Bertolt Brecht, whom he met at UCLA as a young man and whose works he has translated extensively. He edited the Grove Press issue of Brecht's work, and recorded two albums of Brecht's songs for Folkways Records, most of which had never before been recorded in English.

In 1968, he signed the “Writers and Editors War Tax Protest” pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Bentley

Eric Bentley, 1986, by Robert Giard )

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Alison Bechdel (born September 10, 1960) is an American cartoonist. Originally best known for the long-running comic strip Dykes To Watch Out For, in 2006 she became a best-selling and critically acclaimed author with her graphic memoir Fun Home.

Alison Bechdel was born in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania to Roman Catholic parents who were teachers. Bechdel's brother is keyboard player John Bechdel, who has worked with many bands including Ministry. Her family also owned and operated a funeral home. She attended Simon's Rock College and then Oberlin College, graduating in 1981.

Bechdel moved to New York City and applied to many art schools but was rejected and worked in a number of office jobs in the publishing industry.

She began Dykes To Watch Out For as a single drawing labeled "Marianne, dissatisfied with the morning brew: Dykes to Watch Out For, plate no. 27". An acquaintance recommended she send her work to Womannews, a newspaper, which began to publish the strip regularly beginning with the July—August 1983 issue. After a year, other outlets began running the strip.

In the first years, Dykes To Watch Out For consisted of unconnected strips without a regular cast or serialized storyline. Bechdel introduced her regular characters, Mo and her friends, in 1987 while living in St. Paul, Minnesota. She became a full-time cartoonist in 1990 and later moved near Burlington, Vermont. She currently resides in Bolton, Vermont.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alison_Bechdel
No argument Alison Bechdel’s first books, “Dykes To Watch Out For,” are jewels in the crown of gay literature. But even their brilliance did not prepare me for the emotional depth and narrative complexity of “Fun Home.” Just when I thought the memoir had been thoroughly exhausted, Bechdel made two brilliant decisions. She used her skill as an artist to tell her story through amazing, detailed drawings. The pictures are so good she almost didn’t need words, but her writing is amazing. Bechdel is so concise (she has to be to fit a whole book into speech balloons!) I kept flipping back and re-reading pages to slow the book down.--Aaron Krach
Alison Bechdel, 1995, by Robert Giard  )

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Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer Elizabeth Bowen (June 7, 1899 – February 22, 1973) sprinkled her fiction with people and relationships, usually coded, of either clear or ambiguous homosexuality.

In 1923 she married Alan Cameron, an educational administrator who subsequently worked for the BBC. The marriage has been described as "a sexless but contented union". She had various extra-marital relationships, including one with Charles Ritchie, a Canadian diplomat seven years her junior, which lasted over thirty years. She also had an affair with the Irish writer Seán Ó Faoláin and a relationship with the American poet May Sarton.
You knew Elizabeth Bowen. "Oh, yes. I was in love with her. I've said what I really want to say about her in the portrait [A World of Light]. She was a marvelous friend. A very warm and giving person." --May Sarton (http://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/3040/the-art-of-poetry-no-32-may-sarton)
Elizabeth Dorothea Cole Bowen was born on June 7, 1899, in Dublin. According to her biographer, Victoria Glendinning, Bowen came from a long line of Bowens, originally Welsh, who settled in County Cork, Ireland. Elizabeth Bowen inherited the family country house, Bowen's Court, the names of her ancestors, and an Anglo-Irish heritage that would mark her life and work. By the time she died on February 22, 1973, Bowen had led an exciting life and one important to modern literature: She wrote ten novels, several volumes of short stories, and countless reviews, articles, and other journalism. 


May Sarton (©2)
Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer Elizabeth Bowen sprinkled her fiction with people and relationships of either clear or ambiguous homosexuality. She had various extra-marital relationships: Charles Ritchie, a Canadian diplomat seven years her junior, which lasted over thirty years; Irish writer Seán Ó Faoláin; American poet May Sarton. "I was in love with her. I've said what I really want to say about her in the portrait [A World of Light]. She was a marvelous friend. A very warm and giving person." --May Sarton


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Citation Information 
Author: Dukes, Thomas 
Entry Title: Bowen, Elizabeth 
General Editor: Claude J. Summers 
Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Culture 
Publication Date: 2002 
Date Last Updated January 4, 2005 
Web Address www.glbtq.com/literature/bowen_e.html 
Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL 60607 
Today's Date February 22, 2013 
Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc. 
Entry Copyright © 1995, 2002 New England Publishing Associates

May Sarton is the pen name of Eleanore Marie Sarton (May 3, 1912 – July 16, 1995), an American poet, novelist, and memoirist.

Sarton was born in Wondelgem, Belgium (today a part of the city of Ghent). Her parents were science historian George Sarton and his wife, the English artist Mabel Eleanor Elwes. When German troops invaded Belgium after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in 1914, her family fled to Ipswich, England where Sarton's maternal grandmother lived. One year later, they moved to Boston, Massachusetts. She went to school in Cambridge, Massachusetts, graduating from Cambridge High and Latin School in 1929. She started theatre lessons in her late teens, but continued writing poetry, eventually publishing her first collection in 1937 entitled Encounter in April.

In 1945 she met her partner for the next thirteen years, Judy Matlack (September 9, 1898 – December 1982), in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They separated in 1956, when Sarton's father died and Sarton moved to Nelson, New Hampshire. Honey in the Hive (1988) is about their relationship. In her memoir At Seventy, she reflected on Judy's importance in her life and how her Unitarian Universalist upbringing shaped her.

Sarton later moved to York, Maine. In 1990, she suffered a stroke, severely reducing her ability to concentrate and write. After several months, she was able to dictate her final journals, which celebrated the joys of her life. She died of breast cancer on July 16, 1995, and is buried in Nelson, New Hampshire.


May Sarton is the pen name of Eleanore Marie Sarton (May 3, 1912 – July 16, 1995), an American poet, novelist, and memoirist. In 1945 she met her partner for the next thirteen years, Judy Matlack, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They separated in 1956, when Sarton's father died and Sarton moved to Nelson, New Hampshire. Honey in the Hive (1988) is about their relationship. In her memoir At Seventy, she reflected on Judy's importance in her life and how her Unitarian Universalist upbringing shaped her.


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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_Sarton

May Sarton, 1994, by Robert Giard  )

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
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In 2010, BigKugels Photographic acquired the complete collection of respected New York male nude photography collector Carl Morse (1935-2008)

Morse was one of the best known and most astute private photography dealers in New York City during the 1990s and 2000s, and became one of our mentors, not just for his knowledge of the material, but more importantly his love of its artistic and historic merit, and respect for its value.

He was responsible for a 1990s exhibit at the New York Public Library examining the history of male nude photography, and a consultant to the photography department of the New York Metropolitan Museum.

A respected poet and playwright, Morse was an important influence on British gay and lesbian writers and performing artists of the 1980s and '90s, through his inclusion in gay literary anthologies, performances of his work in London, and as co-editor of Gay and Lesbian Poetry in Our Time.

As Steve Cranfield wrote in an obituary for The Guardian (September 4, 2008) "His plays, like his poetry, were fuelled by rage, leavened by humor and punctuated with a surprise tenderness."

Born in working-class Maine, Morse studied English and foreign languages at Yale, and spent his Fulbright scholarship (1956-58) in Europe.

He was a frequent correspondent with and editor for EM Forster, and an accomplished translator whose work included a biography of Verlaine, the essays of André Maurois, and even the 1961 French version of Snow White.

He lived his final decades in London Terrace, in Chelsea, New York.

American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2008/sep/04/poetry

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Paul Landry Monette (October 16, 1945 – February 10, 1995) was an American author, poet, and activist best remembered for his essays about gay relationships.

Monette was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and graduated from Phillips Academy in 1963 and Yale University in 1967. Conflicted about his sexual identity, he moved to Boston, Massachusetts, where he taught writing and literature at Milton Academy for a number of years. On September 3, 1974, Monette was introduced to lawyer Roger Horwitz at a party given by Richard Howard in Boston. In Horwitz, Monette had met the "laughing man," and together they brought it off: "And from that moment on the brink of summer's end, no one would ever tell me again that men like me couldn't love." They moved to West Hollywood, a neighbourhood in Los Angeles which has a large population of gay men, in 1978. Monette's most acclaimed book, Borrowed Time, chronicles Horwitz's fight against and eventual death from AIDS in 1986. His 1992 memoir, Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story, tells of his life in the closet before coming out, culminating with his meeting Horwitz in 1974.Becoming a Man won the 1992 National Book Award in the nonfiction category. Monette also wrote the novelizations of the 1988 film Midnight Run, the 1979 film Nosferatu the Vampyre, the 1987 film Predator and 1983 film Scarface.

Monette's last years, before his own AIDS-related death, are chronicled in the film named after him, Paul Monette: On the Brink of Summer's End by Monte Bramer and Lesli Klainberg. By the end of his life, Monette had healed most of his psychic wounds, but his rage persisted. Monette died in Los Angeles, California, where he lived with his partner of five years, Winston Wilde. Monette was survived by his lover, Winston Wilde; his father, Paul Monette Sr., and his brother, Robert Monette who remains the appointed Trustee of the Monette Horwitz Trust.


Paul Monette was an American author, poet, and activist best remembered for his essays about gay relationships. On September 3, 1974, Monette was introduced to lawyer Roger Horwitz at a party given by Richard Howard in Boston. "And from that moment on the brink of summer's end, no one would ever tell me again that men like me couldn't love." Monette's most acclaimed book, Borrowed Time, chronicles Horwitz's fight against and eventual death from AIDS in 1986.



Paul Monette & Roger Horwitz are both buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills), Los Angeles, California. Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Monette
Paul Monette succumbed to AIDS in 1995; thus was silenced one of our most articulate and brave voices. However, Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir will serve future GLBT generations as a vivid time capsule for that tragic and toxic era when lots of nice, educated people actually believed that homosexuals were perverts, and AIDS was ‘God’s Punishment.’ This book served as the greatest single inspiration for me to become a writer, while giving reassurance to thousands of gay men suffering (or providing comfort to someone) with AIDS that they were not alone. If I were teaching ‘Gay History 101,’ this would be required reading. --Nick Nolan
Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir, an harrowing tale of the last 19 AIDS-wracked months of Monette’s lover, is not for the faint of heart. I remember being overcome with despair as Monette’s powerful love and practical intervention are not enough to save the man who means more to him than life itself. Heartbreaking. An important historical document of the calamitous 1980’s. --Lee Bantle
Becoming a Man: Half a Life Story is an autobiography, a writer’s autobiography, which fascinated me because not only was the writer (Paul Monette) a gay man, but one I already admired from his amazing memoir of AIDS, Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir. I remember looking for some hint in these pages of how I should live my own life, what experiences I should have as a gay man in Los Angeles, how I should think about them, how I should write about them. As much as a kind of blueprint for an existence as a window into someone else’s remarkable life, as gay men have had so few role models. It’s hard not to fall in love with the spirit of this beautiful but very human and flawed man, which infuses each and every page --Jim Arnold.
Paul Monette, Los Angeles, CA, 1988, by Robert Giard  )

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Leslie Feinberg (September 1, 1949 – November 15, 2014) was a transgender lesbian and communist activist, speaker, and author. Feinberg's first novel Stone Butch Blues is widely considered a groundbreaking work about gender. Feinberg's partner was the prominent lesbian poet-activist Minnie Bruce Pratt. "I share my home and life with Leslie Feinberg, the novelist, historian, and transgender activist. In 1992 I met Leslie at hir slideshow/lecture in Washington, D.C., where s/he spoke on the historical basis for unity among people who experience different oppressions—and where s/he read, looking up at me, from hir classic "Letter to a Fifties Femme." Now, seven years later, s/he is my "one and only," my beloved lesbian husband.

I fell in love with Leslie because of hir voice, hir vision, and hir revolutionary optimism.

My adult life has been an exhilarating struggle to understand how to resist, militantly, the oppressive categories that the ruling status quo places on us, and how to live, triumphantly, the identities and complexities that we feel to be true for ourselves. As my life and Leslie’s flowed together, I gained immeasurably in my understanding of that struggle—in my understanding of how we live all our sexualities, sex identities, and gender expressions.

The stories in my book S/HE are about these complexities in our daily life—and many of them are also love tributes to Leslie. I could write a book about how much I love hir—and I have!" --Minnie Bruce Pratt (http://www.mbpratt.org/mylove.html)

Feinberg's 1993 first novel, Stone Butch Blues, won the Lambda Literary Award and the 1994 American Library Association Gay & Lesbian Book Award. While there are parallels to Feinberg's experiences as a working-class dyke, the work is not an autobiography.


Leslie Feinberg was a transgender lesbian and communist activist, speaker, and author. Feinberg's first novel Stone Butch Blues is widely considered a groundbreaking work. Feinberg's partner is the prominent lesbian poet-activist Minnie Bruce Pratt. Pratt is an U.S. educator, activist, and award-winning poet, essayist, and theorist. "In 1992 I met Leslie at hir slideshow/lecture in Washington, D.C. I fell in love with Leslie because of hir voice, hir vision, and hir revolutionary optimism."


Minnie Bruce Pratt and Leslie Feinberg -Jersey City, N.J, 1993/95, by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leslie_Feinberg
I was pretty young when I read Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg, maybe 20, and it was one of the first books I read that really challenged the way I thought about gender and identity. The novel is a book about just getting through life, too, about facing challenges and fighting to make the world a better place. --Kate McMurray
Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg is arrestingly plainspoken, deeply felt, passionate, heartbreaking, and yet profoundly consoling and hopeful. This book is also proof that not every novel now has to come out of a workshop or from someone with an MFA in Creative Writing. One shudders to think how a workshop might have sapped Feinberg's vision and passion. But we need not worry: s/he had the good sense to avoid it, and hir novel is better for it. --David Pratt
Minnie Bruce Pratt (b. September 12, 1946 in Selma, Alabama) is an U.S. educator, activist, and award-winning poet, essayist, and theorist.

Pratt was born in Selma, Alabama, grew up in Centreville, Alabama and graduated with an honors B.A. from the University of Alabama (1968) and a Ph.D. in English literature from the University of North Carolina (1979).

She is a Professor of Writing and Women’s Studies at Syracuse University where she was invited to help develop the university’s first Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender Study Program.

She emerged out of the women’s liberation movement in the 1970s and 1980s and has written extensively about race, class, gender and sexual theory. Pratt, along with lesbian writers Chrystos and Audre Lorde, received a Lillian Hellman-Dashiell Hammett award from the Fund for Free Expression to writers "who have been victimized by political persecution." Pratt, Chrystos and Lorde were chosen because their experience as "a target of right-wing and fundamentalist forces during the recent attacks on the National Endowment for the Arts."

Her political affiliations include the International Action Center, the National Women's Fightback Network, and the National Writers Union. She is a contributing editor to Workers World newspaper.

Pratt's partner is author and activist Leslie Feinberg.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minnie_Bruce_Pratt

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Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

More Real Life Romances at my website:
http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
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Bruce Boone (born 1940) is the author of Century of Clouds, My Walk with Bob, The Truth about Ted, and LaFontaine (in collaboration with Robert Gluck). He has translated works by Georges Bataille, Pascale Quignard, and Jean-Francois Lyotard. Ghosts preoccupy Bruce Boone, who lives alone now in San Francisco with only dog Sadie. He wants to write a love story about Jamie, his late beloved. But they come at him like bats.

Searching for info about what is Mr. Boone currently doing, I found this wonderful blog about the loss of his partner Jamie, A stele for Jamie, posted on August 31, 2010. It brought tears to my eyes, and it still does, every time I read it.

"It struck me pretty forceably this morning that in the last year I’ve created a giant spidersweb of Jamie references here and there, in stories, notes, prose-writing, whatever and yet, who from this crazed mess when arbitrarily assembled in a heap—could by any stretch begin to grasp who or what Jamie is and was to me. I’ll attempt a beginning this morning and see how far I get.

To have as much generosity toward other people as he had and in death still has: remembering even on his deathbed (noted a mistranslation in Richard Howard’s translation of the Barthes book on the effects on him of his mother’s death, a small thing, and though Howard’s certainly become a far better translator than the man who so monstrously translated the Baudelaire FLEURS DE MAL/FLOWERS OF EVIL ugh! Still that was decades ago and he’s much, no vastly improved in my opinion. But, this may be nitpicking but it stands for more than the one given instance, why in the world would he refer to the mother’s deathbed, or passing, or being taken as we say sometimes, or used to, “in the throes of death”—all of these apply to the French word “agonie”. Or have I already said that? Hope not. When H decides to translate the underlying French word “agonie” by the English agony it therefore gives a false impression. For in the French, unlike the English cognate you have the impression of great suffering, of, indeed—agony. Whereas the word in French simpy refers to someone’s being on their last legs, on their deathbed, that and nothing more, there’s no pain necessarily implied by the usage.

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Bruce Boone, 1988, by Robert Giard  )

Futher Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
"Gee, what do you want to know?

I'm in my 50s. Fighting the physical aging process, tooth and claw. Married to my college sweetheart (legally married on August 30, 2008, after 32 years together).

I started writing gay fiction in the mid-1980s, and I wrote and published four novels in eight years. And then stopped. I hadn't sold many books, made much money, or become even passably famous. So I took a little break from writing. A 15 year little break.

I sang - in choirs, in a barbershop quartet. I formed a band, cut an album, then left the band. I took up the ukulele (no, really), and played the ukulele circuit for a few years. Yes, there's a ukulele circuit. I wrote some songs, and made a little DYI ("do it yourself") CD.

Then, in 2005, I started writing another book, Got 'til it's Gone, winner of the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, Gay Romance category.

I work as a secretary in a Los Angeles law firm. It's a living.

I work out with weights. I hope it shows.

I sing first tenor in the Chancel Choir of Westwood Presbyterian Church. My husband sings second tenor.


Larry Duplechan's life partner, since March 30, 1976, is his college sweetheart Greg Harvey, legally married on August 30, 2008. For years, Duplechan struggled in the music business. "I was in a relationship with a man who, while he really admired my talent, really, really wanted me to be home having dinner with him. He said, 'You can continue to do this singing thing, or you can be with me, but you can't do both.' I actually chose the guy and stopped singing. So I wrote instead."

Read more... )

Source: http://www.larry-d.com/about_me


Larry Duplechan, 1988, by Robert Giard.
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)
Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Jim Van Buskirk was born in Los Angeles and grew up in Buena Park, California. A resident of San Francisco since 1972, Jim received a B.A. in Sociology in 1977 and an M.L.I.S. in 1981, both from University of California, Berkeley. As part of his course work, he helped develop and install “Out of the Closet,” an exhibit sponsored by the Pacific Center for Human Growth, which was installed during 1979-80 in public and college libraries throughout the Bay Area. An account of the project, “On Display: Presenting Gay Culture in a Library Setting,” appeared in a special issue of Catalyst: A Socialist Journal of the Social Services (No. 12, 1981). Contributing book and video reviews to Library Journal from 1981- 2000, Jim received the first Library Journal Reviewer of the Year: Nonfiction Award in June 1997.

His reviews have also appeared in James White Review, Art Documentation, Photo Metro, Lambda Book Report, Library Quarterly, Bay Area Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Bay Guardian and the Harvard Gay and Lesbian Review and on culturevulture.net. He has made presentations at American Library Association (ALA), California Library Association (CLA), Special Libraries Association, College Art Association, Art Libraries Society/North America (ARLIS/NA) and at the library schools of University of California, Berkeley and San Jose State University .

He is a founding member of the Gay and Lesbian Interests Round Tables of both CLA and ARLIS/NA. At the 20th annual conference of ARLIS/NA in Chicago, Jim planned and participated in a panel entitled “Sexual Perversity in Chicago: Researching the Impact of Artists’ Sexuality on Their Work” presenting the paper “Between the Lines: The Often Fruitless Quest for Gay and Lesbian Materials,” published in Art Documentation (11:4, Winter 92). He served as one of the editors of the Bibliography of Gay and Lesbian Art published in 1994 by the Gay and Lesbian Caucus of the College Art Association and his regular book review column appears in the Newsletter of the Gay and Lesbian Caucus of CAA. His essay “Queer Impressions of Gustave Caillebotte” launched on Queer Arts Resource in June 1998.

Read more... )

Source: http://www.jimvanbuskirk.com/bio.html

Jim Van Buskirk at library reading room, 2000, by Robert Giard  )

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
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Thom Gunn, born Thomson William Gunn (29 August 1929 – 25 April 2004), was an Anglo-American poet who was praised both for his early verses in England, where he was associated with The Movement and his later poetry in America, even after moving toward a looser, free-verse style. After relocating from England to San Francisco, Gunn, who became openly gay, wrote about gay-related topics — particularly in his most famous work, The Man With Night Sweats in 1992 — as well as drug use, sex, and topics related to his bohemian lifestyle. He won numerous major literary awards.

In 2004, he died at his home in the Haight Ashbury neighborhood in San Francisco, in the same bed he shared with Mike Kitay since 1960.

Gunn was born in Gravesend, Kent, the son of Bert Gunn. Both of his parents were journalists, and they divorced when he was 10 years old. His life was marked by tragedy when, as a teenager, his mother committed suicide. It was she who had sparked in him a love of reading, including an interest in the work of Christopher Marlowe, John Keats, John Milton, and Alfred Tennyson, along with several prose writers. In his youth, he attended University College School in Hampstead, London, then spent two years in the British national service and six months in Paris. Later, he studied English literature at Trinity College, Cambridge, graduated in 1953, and published his first collection of verse, Fighting Terms, the following year. Among several critics who praised the work, John Press wrote, "This is one of the few volumes of postwar verse that all serious readers of poetry need to possess and to study."


Thom Gunn was an Anglo-American poet who was praised for both his early verses in England, where he was associated with The Movement and his later poetry in America. In 1950, then a student at Cambridge's Trinity College, he met his life partner, Mike Kitay, an American student. In 1954, Gunn immigrated to the US to teach writing at Stanford University and to remain close to Kitay. In 2004, he died at his home in San Francisco, in the same bed he shared with Mike Kitay since 1960.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thom_Gunn

Thom Gunn, 1988, by Robert Giard  )

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Andrew Kopkind (August 24, 1935 – October 23, 1994) was an American journalist. He was renowned for his reporting during the tumultuous years of the late 1960s; he wrote about the anti-Vietnam War protests, American Civil Rights Movement, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Students for a Democratic Society, the Black Panther Party, the Weathermen, President Johnson's "Great Society" initiatives, and California gubernatorial campaign of Ronald Reagan.

Kopkind was born in New Haven, Connecticut. He received a B.A. from Cornell University (1957), where he was editor of the Cornell Daily Sun.

From 1958 to 1959, Kopkind worked as a reporter for the Washington Post. He then studied at the London School of Economics, receiving an M.S. in 1961.

In 1961, Kopkind joined staff of Time Magazine, reporting mainly from California. From 1965 to 1967, he was associate editor of The New Republic; from 1965 to 1969 he was a correspondent for New Statesman. In 1968, he founded Hard Times and worked briefly for Ramparts (1970).

In 1968, he signed the “Writers and Editors War Tax Protest” pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War.

From the 1970s onwards, he contributed regularly to The Village Voice, New York Review of Books, The Nation, and Grand Street.


Andrew Kopkind, far left, and John Scagliotti, far right, sit with journalist Alexander Cockburn, seated on hood of car, and his daughter, Daisy Cockburn, in Guilford in 1985.
Andrew Kopkind was an American journalist. He was renowned for his reporting during '60s; he wrote about the anti-Vietnam War protests, American Civil Rights Movement, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Students for a Democratic Society, the Black Panther Party, the Weathermen, President Johnson and Reagan. In the early 1970s he and his long-time companion, John Scagliotti (they would remain together for 24 years), hosted the "Lavender Hour," the first commercial gay/lesbian radio show.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Kopkind

Andrew Kopkind, 1993, by Robert Giard )

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Terry Wolverton (born 1954) is an American novelist, memoirist, poet, and editor. Her book Insurgent Muse: Life and art at the Woman’s Building, a memoir published in 2002 by City Lights Books, was named one of the “Best Books of 2002” by the Los Angeles Times, and was the winner of the 2003 Publishing Triangle Judy Grahn Award, and a finalist for the Lambda Book Award. Her Embers: A novel in poems was a finalist for the PEN USA Litfest Poetry Award and the Lambda Book Award.

Born August 23, 1954 in Cocoa Beach, Florida, Wolverton grew up in Detroit, Michigan. Her grandmother, Elsba Mae Miller, a former English teacher, would often read and recite poetry to her, and Wolverton credits this for inspiring her love of language. Even as a child Wolverton was interested in the arts, especially writing, music, and drama; she graduated from the Performing Arts curriculum of Cass Technical High School in 1972.

Terry Wolverton attended the University of Detroit as a student in its BFA Theatre Program. In 1973, she transferred to the University of Toronto, majoring in Theatre, Psychology, and Women's Studies.

Wolverton participated in Sagaris, an independent institute for the study of feminist political theory, in 1975. She next enrolled in Thomas Jefferson College, an experimental school based at Grand Valley State Colleges in Western Michigan, and participated in its feminist Women, World, and Wonder program.

Wolverton moved to Los Angeles in 1976, enrolling in the Feminist Studio Workshop at the Woman's Building. She spent the next thirteen years at the Woman's Building where, in addition to writing and performing, she was also instrumental in the Lesbian Art Project, the Incest Awareness Project, the Great American Lesbian Art Show (GALAS), and a White Women's Anti-Racism Consciousness-Raising Group. From 1987-88, she served as the nonprofit organization's Executive Director.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Wolverton

Terry Wolverton, 1989, by Robert Giard )

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices
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Alfred Corn (born August 14, 1943) is an American poet and essayist.

Alfred Corn was born in Bainbridge, Georgia in 1943 and raised in Valdosta, Georgia.

Corn graduated from Emory University in 1965 with a B.A. in French literature. Corn earned an M.A. in French literature at Columbia University in 1967.

Corn travelled to France on a Fulbright Scholarship where he met Ann Jones, whom he would later marry. After he and Ann Jones divorced, he was partnered with the architect Walter Brown in the years 1971-1976,and then with J.D. McClatchy from 1977 until 1989.

His first book of poems, All Roads at Once, appeared in 1976, followed by A Call in the Midst of the Crowd (1978), The Various Light (1980), Notes from a Child of Paradise (1984), The West Door (1988), Autobiographies (1992). His seventh book of poems, titled Present, appeared in 1997, along with a novel titled 'Part of His Story'., and a study of prosody, The Poem’s Heartbeat (Story Line Press, 1997; Copper Canyon Press, 2008). Stake: Selected Poems, 1972-1992, appeared in 1999, followed by Contradictions in 2002. He has also published a collection of critical essays titled The Metamorphoses of Metaphor (1988) and a work of art criticism, Aaron Rose Photographs (Abrams Books, 2001). In January 2013, Tables, a volume of poems, was published by Press53.


Alfred Corn and J.D. McClatchy, 1987, by Robert Giard
Alfred Corn is an American poet and essayist. Corn travelled to France on a Fulbright Scholarship where he met Ann Jones, whom he would later marry. After he and Ann Jones divorced, he was partnered with the architect Walter Brown in the years 1971-1976, and then with J.D. McClatchy from 1977 until 1989. Corn received an Award in Literature from the Academy of Arts and Letters in 1983 and a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1986. In 1987, he was awarded a Fellowship of the Academy of American Poets.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Corn  

Chip Kidd (born 1964) is an American author, editor, and graphic designer, best known for his book covers. Kidd lives on Manhattan's Upper East Side. His partner is poet and literary critic J. D. McClatchy. J. D. "Sandy" McClatchy (born August 12, 1945) is an American poet and literary critic. He is editor of the Yale Review and president of The American Academy of Arts and Letters. McClatchy was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, in 1945. He was educated at Georgetown and Yale, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1974. From 1977 to 1989 he was partner of fellow poet and essayist Alfred Corn. He lives in Stonington, Connecticut and New York. (Photo: Comic book creator Chip Kidd at a June 28, 2012 signing of Daredevil Born Again: Artist Edit by David Mazzucchelli at Midtown Comics Downtown in Manhattan. © Luigi Novi / Wikimedia Commons.)

Mr. McClatchey calls their apartment the Bat Cave. When he and Mr. Kidd met, at a party for a book one had edited and the other designed, he was 50 years old, a grown man for whom much of pop culture, he said, was a foreign country. But he learned the language quickly, its codes, its neighborhoods and its citizens, and he cherished the experience. ''The trouble with falling in love when you are a certain age is you bring a wary experience to things,'' he said, marveling at how he shed his wariness. ''You also trail an accumulation of tastes and objects that, when they are different from your beloved's, have to be accommodated. It's like a third person in the marriage.''


J. D. "Sandy" McClatchy (born August 12, 1945) is an American poet and literary critic. He is editor of the Yale Review and president of The American Academy of Arts and Letters. McClatchy was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, in 1945. He was educated at Georgetown and Yale, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1974. From 1977 to 1989 he was partner of fellow poet and essayist Alfred Corn. He lives in Stonington, Connecticut and New York. His partner is graphic designer Chip Kidd.

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Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chip_Kidd

J. D. "Sandy" McClatchy (born August 12, 1945) is an American poet and literary critic. He is editor of the Yale Review and president of The American Academy of Arts and Letters.

McClatchy was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, in 1945. He was educated at Georgetown and Yale, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1974. From 1977 to 1989 he was partner of fellow poet and essayist Alfred Corn. He lives in Stonington, Connecticut and New York. His partner is graphic designer Chip Kidd.

"Before I met him," says the poet J. D. McClatchy of his partner, Chip Kidd, "My idea of rock music was Die Walküre, and Superman a character in Nietzsche. Now I live in the pinball machine of pop culture."

McClatchy is an adjunct professor at Yale University and editor of the Yale Review. He also edits the "Voice of the Poet" series for Random House AudioBooks.

His book Hazmat (Alfred A. Knopf, 2002) was nominated for the 2003 Pulitzer Prize. He has written texts for musical settings, including eight opera libretti, for such composers as Elliot Goldenthal, Daron Hagen, Lowell Liebermann, Lorin Maazel, Tobias Picker, Ned Rorem, Bruce Saylor, and William Schuman. His honors include an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters (1991). He has also been one of the New York Public Literary Lions, and received the 2000 Connecticut Governor’s Arts Award.

Read more... )

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J.D._McClatchy

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Alfred Corn, 1987, by Robert Giard  )

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

More LGBT Couples at my website:
http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance
reviews_and_ramblings: (Default)
Mark Doty (born August 10, 1953) is an American poet and memoirist, and the winner of the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. From 1995 until 2010, his partner was the writer Paul Lisicky. They were married in 2008 and divorced in 2013. He currently lives with his partner Alexander Hadel in New York City and in the hamlet of The Springs in East Hampton, New York.

Doty was born in Maryville, Tennessee. He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, and received his Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from Goddard College in Plainfield, Vermont.

His first collection of poems, "Turtle, Swan," was published by David R. Godine in 1987; a second collection, "Bethlehem in Broad Daylight," appeared from the same publisher in 1991. While some poems in these two volumes are concerned with gay identity and the encroachment of the AIDS epidemic, the two books are largely centered on an autobiographical exploration of family, in which the poet examines the forces that have shaped his adult consciousness.

His third book, "My Alexandria" (University of Illinois Press, 1993), is entirely informed by the AIDS epidemic. In 1989, Doty's partner Wally Roberts tested positive for HIV.[1] The collection, written while Roberts had not yet become ill, contemplates the prospect of mortality, desperately attempting to find some way of making the prospect of loss even momentarily bearable. "My Alexandria" was chosen for the National Poetry Series by Philip Levine, and won the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. When the book was published in the U.K. by Jonathan Cape, Doty became the first American poet to win the T.S. Eliot Prize, Britain's most significant annual award for poetry.


Mark Doty is an American poet and memoirist, and the winner of the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. From 1995 until 2010, his partner was the writer Paul Lisicky. They were married in 2008 and divorced in 2013. He currently lives with his partner Alexander Hadel in New York City and in the hamlet of The Springs in East Hampton, New York. He is the inaugural judge of the White Crane/James White Poetry Prize for Excellence in Gay Men's Poetry and for the 2013 Griffin Poetry Prize.


Mark Doty, at far left, and Paul Lisicky on a boardwalk near their Fire Island Pines home. Doug Kuntz for The New York Times
Paul Lisicky is an American novelist and memoirist. From 1995 until 2010, his partner was the writer Mark Doty. Doty is an American poet and memoirist, and the winner of the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. They were married in 2008 and divorced in 2013. "Mark and I have separated after 16 years together. We're still close, of course, and maybe there's something to say about all that. Maybe one could have a real life romance, and there could be more life to come beyond that"

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Doty
It’s so easy to fall into hyperbole when writing about books, but I firmly believe that Mark Doty’s Heaven’s Coast is one of the most beautiful books ever written. A memoir about the AIDS-related death of his partner Wally Roberts in 1993, Doty explores love, loss, and grief with the tender yet thorough tenacity of a poet. As a result of his journey he comes to accept the reality of death, and even find value in it: “Could we ever really know anything that wasn’t transient, not becoming more itself in the strange, unearthly light of dying?” Anyone who is facing grief or has ever known grief could profit from reading this book. --Wayne Courtois
Mark Doty, 1992, by Robert Giard )

Further Readings )

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

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http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance

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