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2017-07-03 07:34 pm

West Midlands - Day 5



House: Langlar Rectory (Church Ln, Langar, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG13 9HG) was the birthplace of Samuel Butler (1835–1902), a great Victorian iconoclast and novelist. Samuel Butler never married, and although he did for years make regular visits to a woman, Lucie Dumas, he also "had a predilection for intense male friendships, which is reflected in several of his works." The property now known as Langar House on Church Lane, Langar was originally built as Langar Rectory in 1721/2 to replace an earlier parsonage, which had fallen into disrepair.

Newstead Abbey (NG15 8GE)

House: Newstead Abbey was formerly an Augustinian priory. Converted to a domestic home following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, it is now best known as the ancestral home of George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824).



Address: Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG15 8GE, UK

Place
The priory of St. Mary of Newstead, a house of Augustinian Canons, was founded by King Henry II of England about the year 1170, as one of many penances he paid following the murder of Thomas Becket. Contrary to its current name, Newstead was never an abbey: it was a priory. Sir John Byron of Colwick in Nottinghamshire was granted Newstead Abbey by Henry VIII of England on May 26, 1540 and started its conversion into a country house. By the time Lord Byron inherited the property, it was practically a ruin. He and his mother soon moved to Nottingham and neither lived permanently at Newstead for any extended period. Byron had a beloved Newfoundland dog named Boatswain, who died of rabies in 1808. Boatswain was buried at Newstead Abbey and has a monument larger than his master's at St Mary Magdalene (Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, NG15 7AS), by the Market Place in the centre of the town. Byron finally sold the property in 1818. The Abbey is now publicly owned, by Nottingham City Council, and houses a museum containing Byron memorabilia.



D. H. Lawrence Birthplace Museum (NG16 3AW)

House: The D.H. Lawrence Birthplace Museum is a writer’s home museum dedicated to the writer D.H. Lawrence situated in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, near Nottingham.

Address: 8A Victoria Street, Eastwood, Nottinghamshire NG16 3AW, UK (53.01859, -1.30706)
Phone: +44 1773 717353
Website: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/dhlheritage/visitor-attractions/birthplace-museum.aspx
English Heritage Building ID: 429408 (Grade II, 1972)



Place
It is the house in which D.H. Lawrence was born in 1885 and one of the four houses the family occupied in Eastwood. Like its sister site Durban House Heritage Centre it belongs to D.H. Lawrence Heritage and is managed by Broxtowe Borough Council. Visitors enter the museum through the house next door, through the museum shop. The house has been laid out in the style of a late XIX century working class miner’s house, with the furniture being mostly from the family of the women who founded it. There are a few original items from Lawrence’s family; the artifacts are as close to the 1880s as possible and from Nottinghamshire to make the contents as authentic as possible for the period. The house is set out as it was thought to have been when the Lawrences lived there. Visitors are given a guided tour which takes approximately 45 minutes. The significance of each room (parlour, kitchen, communal yard, washhouse, parents’ bedroom, children’s bedroom and attic) is explained and questions encouraged. There is a small exhibition of Lawrence’s early original water colour paintings and a DVD room that starts the tour giving basic information on his life in Eastwood and thereafter. Photocopies of his later paintings are also displayed. A recent addition to the collection was Lawrence’s original gravestone, which has been on display since September 11, 2009, the anniversary of his birthday.
Source: A Dream House: Exploring the Literary Homes of England, By Carol Chernega

Durban House Heritage Centre (NG16 3DZ)

House: The D.H. Lawrence Heritage Centre is closed to the public since April 2016.

Address: Mansfield Rd, Eastwood, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG16 3DZ, UK (53.02176, -1.30734)



Place
D. H. Lawrence Heritage Centre was formally known as the Durban House Heritage Centre and was the sister site of the D.H. Lawrence Birthplace Museum in Eastwood, near Nottingham. Both sites formally went under the name of D.H. Lawrence Heritage. The D.H. Lawrence Heritage Centre contained an exhibition on the social history of Eastwood during the time that the writer lived there, including information on the educational system, mining, trams, retail along with D.H. Lawrence and the people who were affiliated with him. In addition there was an art gallery, a bistro, conference rooms, civil wedding, funeral, birthday and education facilities.

Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930) aka D.H. Lawrence
D.H. Lawrence was a novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter. His collected works, among other things, represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. In them, some of the issues Lawrence explores are emotional health, vitality, spontaneity and instinct. In March 1912 Lawrence met Frieda Weekley (née von Richthofen), with whom he was to share the rest of his life. Six years older than her new lover, she was married to Ernest Weekley, his former modern languages professor at University College, Nottingham, and had three young children. She eloped with Lawrence to her parents’ home in Metz, a garrison town then in Germany near the disputed border with France. Lawrence and Frieda returned to Britain in 1913 for a short visit, during which they encountered and befriended critic John Middleton Murry and New Zealand-born short story writer Katherine Mansfield. While writing “Women in Love” in Cornwall during 1916–17, Lawrence developed a strong and possibly romantic relationship with a Cornish farmer named William Henry Hocking. Although it is not clear if their relationship was sexual, Frieda said she believed it was. After being discharged from a sanatorium, Lawrence died March 2, 1930 at the Villa Robermond in Vence, France, from complications of tuberculosis. Frieda Weekley commissioned an elaborate headstone for his grave bearing a mosaic of his adopted emblem of the phoenix. After Lawrence’s death, Frieda lived with Angelo Ravagli on the ranch in Taos and eventually married him in 1950. In 1935 Ravagli arranged, on Frieda’s behalf, to have Lawrence’s body exhumed and cremated and his ashes brought back to the ranch to be interred there in a small chapel amid the mountains of New Mexico, while instead the original tombstone was later taken to Eastwood.
Source: A Dream House: Exploring the Literary Homes of England, By Carol Chernega



School: The King's School (Brook St, Grantham NG31 6RP) is a British grammar school with academy status for boys, in the market town of Grantham, in Lincolnshire. The King's School has an unbroken history on the same site since its re-endowment in 1528 by Richard Foxe, although its history can be traced back to 1329. Nicholas Pevsner in his Buildings of England, dates the original School building to 1497. Isaac Newton (1655–1659) was a King's School scholar between 1655 and 1660. As was customary in his time, he carved his signature on the wall of what is today's school side hall, although the signature has never been confirmed as authentic; visitors from around the world come to view this indication of Newton's education. A replica of the signature is on display in Grantham Museum. The novelist and eccentric Frederick Rolfe “Baron Corvo” (1860–1913) was briefly a teacher at the school.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Queer Places, Vol. 2.2 (Color Edition): Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-07-02 11:28 pm

West Midlands - Day 4

Salisbury Avenue, Coventry (CV3 5DA)

House: E.M. Forster died of a stroke on June 7, 1970 at the age of 91, at the Buckinghams’ home in Coventry.

Address: 11 Salisbury Ave, Coventry, West Midlands CV3 5DA, UK (52.38834, -1.50951)



Place
Coventry is a city and metropolitan borough in the centre of England. It was the capital of England more than once in the XV century when the seat of Government was held in Coventry. Coventry’s heritage includes the Roman Fort at Baginton, Lady Godiva, St Mary’s Guildhall (where kings and queens were entertained) and three cathedrals. Located in the county of West Midlands, historically part of Warwickshire, Coventry is the 10th largest city in England and the 13th largest UK city overall. It is also the second largest city in the West Midlands region, after Birmingham, with a population of 337,400 in 2014.



Life
Who: Edward Morgan Forster OM CH (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970)
For 40 years, E.M. Forster and the policeman Bob Buckingham were in a loving relationship. Buckingham was 28, Forster 51, when the two met. They shared holidays, friends, interests, and – on many weekends – a domestic and sexual life in Forster’s Brunswick Square flat. Buckingham’s wife, May – also became E.M. Forster’s friend and nursemaid. Perhaps this is not so surprising for the writer who valued personal relationships above all else, and for whom the motto "only connect" applied as much to his private life as to his novels. Buckingham was a large, good-humoured man, with a nose flattened in the boxing ring, a wide smile and a deep, loud laugh. On the day they met, he impressed Forster with his knowledge of the Thames and told him he was reading Dostoevsky. Forster invited Buckingham to his flat, and soon the two became close, with Forster taking over Buckingham’s reading list, and Buckingham thrilled to become something of a highbrow. Soon Forster was in a position to write of Buckingham’s falling "violently in liking" with him. To his friend Sebastian Sprott, Forster wrote with rather old-maidish coyness that the "spiritual feeling" between him and Buckingham had now "extended to my physique.” During these early years of their relationship, Forster seems to have at last found happiness. In his Commonplace Book, he reported that "From 51 to 53 I have been happy, and would like to remind others that their turn can come too." This was in spite of Buckingham finding a girlfriend – May Hockey, a nurse – not long after he’d met Forster. In 1932 Buckingham announced that he was to marry May; the register-office wedding took place in August, with Forster as witness. Once Buckingham was married, Forster’s worst fears seemed to come true – Buckingham became rather unreliable about their meetings, and Forster panicked, calling his rival "domineering, sly and knowing" and wondering if he should break with his lover and go abroad to escape the situation. Buckingham, ever the voice of calm sense, wrote that the two of them simply had "to go without pleasure for a bit.” Following his final stroke in May 1970, Forster was fetched from his rooms at King’s College by the Buckinghams and put to bed at their Coventry house, where he died. For most of that morning, he held May’s hand. After his death, May wrote: "I now know that he was in love with Robert and therefore critical and jealous of me and our early years were very stormy, mostly because he had not the faintest idea of the pattern of our lives and was determined that Robert should not be engulfed in domesticity. Over the years he changed us both and he and I came to love one another, able to share the joys and sorrows that came." E.M. Forster’s ashes were mingled with those of his friend Robert Buckingham and scattered in the rose garden of Canley Garden crematorium, Canley, Coventry, West Midlands near Warwick University (Cannon Hill Rd, Coventry, West Midlands CV4 7DF).
Source: Connecting with E. M. Forster: A Memoir, By Tim Leggatt



House: Rupert Brooke (1887-1915) was born at 5 Hillmorton Rd, Rugby CV22 5DF, the second of the three sons of William Parker Brooke, a Rugby schoolmaster, and Ruth Mary Brooke, née Cotterill. At the end of Regent Street, there is a bronze statue of him. He was educated at two independent schools in Rugby: Hillbrow School and Rugby School.



School: Rugby School (Lawrence Sheriff St, Rugby CV22 5EH) is a day and boarding public school (private and co-educational) in Rugby, Warwickshire. It is one of the oldest private schools in Britain. Rugby School was founded in 1567 as a provision in the will of Lawrence Sheriff, who had made his fortune supplying groceries to Queen Elizabeth I of England. In many ways the stereotype of the English public school is a reworking of Thomas Arnold's Rugby. It is one of the original seven English public schools defined by the Public Schools Act 1868. Rugby School was purportedly the birthplace of Rugby football. In 1845, three Rugby School pupils produced the first written rules of the "Rugby style of game". Notable queer alumni and faculty: Christopher Lloyd (1921–2006), Rupert Brooke (1887–1915).



House: Born to a wealthy Plymouth Brethren family at 30 Clarendon Square, Leamington Spa CV32 5QX, Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) rejected the fundamentalist Christian faith to pursue an interest in Western esotericism. He was educated at the University of Cambridge, where he focused his attentions on mountaineering and poetry, resulting in several publications. Some biographers allege that here he was recruited into a British intelligence agency, further suggesting that he remained a spy throughout his life.

Warwick Castle (CV34 4QX)

House: Warwick Castle is a medieval castle developed from an original built by William the Conqueror in 1068.

Address: 51 Mill Street, Warwick CV34 4QX, UK (52.27966, -1.58522)
Phone: +44 871 265 2000
Website: www.warwick-castle.com
English Heritage Building ID: 307361 (Grade I, 1953)



Place
Early site, probably dating from pre-Norman times. Much mediaeval work remains. Good XVIII century and later additions. In 1871 a fire gutted the Great Hall and East Wing, these being restored by Anthony Salvin. This castle, (containing a fine collection of antiques and works of art) is considered of very great national interest. Main block with XIV century walls and vaulted undercroft. Caesan's tower and Guy's tower, the Gatehouse and its Barbican also XIV century. The curtain walls may date from this period. Bear and Clarence towers XV century, left incomplete 1485 and later given battlements; probably intended as a stronghold within the castle similar to that at Raglan. Late XVII century internal features include exceptional plasterwork and wood carvings to the Cedar Room by Roger and William Hurlbut, completed 1678. Altered 1753-5 by Lancelot Brown, who rebuilt the porch and stairway to the Great Hall. Porch extended forward and additional rooms built beside it, 1763-9, by Timothy Lightoler. Watergate tower restored by A Salvin 1861-3. It was used as a stronghold until the early XVII century, when it was granted to Sir Fulke Greville by James I in 1604. Greville converted it to a country house. Fulke Greville spent over £20,000 (£3 million as of 2016) renovating the castle; according to William Dugdale, a XVII-century antiquary, this made it "a place not only of great strength but extraordinary delight, with most pleasant gardens, walks and thickets, such as this part of England can hardly parallel". It was owned by the Greville family, who became Earls of Warwick in 1759, until 1978 when it was bought by the Tussauds Group. In 2007, the Tussauds Group merged with Merlin Entertainments, which is the current owner of Warwick Castle.

Life
Who: Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, de jure 13th Baron Latimer and 5th Baron Willoughby de Broke KB PC (October 3, 1554 – September 30, 1628) and Sir Philip Sidney (November 30, 1554 – October 17, 1586)
Sir Philip Sidney was a poet, courtier, scholar, and soldier, who is remembered as one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age. Returning to England in 1575, Sidney met Penelope Devereux, the future Lady Rich; though much younger, she would inspire his famous sonnet sequence of the 1580s, “Astrophel and Stella.” His artistic contacts were more peaceful and more significant for his lasting fame. During his absence from court, he wrote “Astrophel and Stella” and the first draft of “The Arcadia and The Defence of Poesy.” Somewhat earlier, he had met Edmund Spenser, who dedicated “The Shepheardes Calender” to him. Other literary contacts included membership, along with his friends and fellow poets Fulke Greville, Edward Dyer, Edmund Spenser and Gabriel Harvey, of the (possibly fictitious) “Areopagus,” a humanist endeavour to classicise English verse. Sidney had returned to court by the middle of 1581 and in 1584 was MP for Kent. That same year Penelope Devereux was married, apparently against her will, to Lord Rich. Sidney was knighted in 1583. An early arrangement to marry Anne Cecil, daughter of Sir William Cecil and eventual wife of de Vere, had fallen through in 1571. In 1583, he married Frances, teenage daughter of Sir Francis Walsingham. In the same year, he made a visit to Oxford University with Giordano Bruno, who subsequently dedicated two books to Sidney. Later that year, he joined Sir John Norris in the Battle of Zutphen, fighting for the Protestant cause against the Spanish. During the battle, he was shot in the thigh and died of gangrene 26 days later, at the age of 31. As he lay dying, Sidney composed a song to be sung by his deathbed. Sidney’s body was returned to London and interred in the Old St. Paul’s Cathedral on February 16, 1587. The grave and monument were destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. A modern monument in the crypt lists him among the important graves lost. An early biography of Sidney was written by his friend and schoolfellow, Fulke Greville. While Sidney was traditionally depicted as a staunch and unwavering Protestant, recent biographers such as Katherine Duncan-Jones have suggested that his religious loyalties were more ambiguous. Sir Fulke Greville, was an Elizabethan poet, dramatist, and statesman who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1581 and 1621, when he was raised to the peerage. Greville is best known today as the biographer of Sir Philip Sidney, and for his sober poetry, which presents dark, thoughtful and distinctly Calvinist views on art, literature, beauty and other philosophical matters. In 1628 Greville was stabbed inside Warwick Castle by Ralph Heywood (or Haywood), a servant who believed that he had been cheated in his master’s will (he had been left only £8,000) Heywood then turned the knife on himself. Greville’s physicians treated his wounds by filling them with pig fat rather than disinfecting them, the pig fat turned rancid and infected the wounds, and he died in agony four weeks after the attack.

Collegiate Church of St Mary (CV34 4RB)

Church: The legend is that Sir Philip Sidney might have been secretly buried in Fulke Greville’s monument, without a tomb, in St Mary’s Church.

Address: 17 Church Street, Warwick CV34 4RB, UK (52.28226, -1.588)
Phone: +44 1926 403940
Website: http://www.stmaryswarwick.org.uk/
English Heritage Building ID: 307351 (Grade I, 1953)





Place
The Collegiate Church of St Mary is a Church of England parish church in the town of Warwick. It is in the centre of the town just east of the market place. It is a member of the Greater Churches Group. The church has the status of collegiate church as it had a college of secular canons. In governance and religious observance it was similar to a cathedral (although not the seat of a bishop and without diocesan responsibilities.) There is a Bishop of Warwick, but this is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Diocese of Coventry. The church foundations date back nearly nine hundred years, being created by Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick, in 1123. In addition to founding the church, de Beaumont established the College of Dean and Canons at the church. The only surviving part of the Norman church which de Beaumont had built is the crypt. The chancel vestries and chapter house of the church were extensively rebuilt in the XIV century by a later Earl of Warwick, Thomas de Beauchamp (later pronounced Beecham), in the Perpendicular Gothic style. His descendants built the Chapel of Our Lady, commonly known as the Beauchamp Chapel. It contains the effigial monuments of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick, and Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester. Buried in the chancel of the church is William Parr, 1st Marquess of Northampton, the brother of Queen consort Catherine Parr. The chamber of the Chapter House is filled almost to the ceiling by the monument built by Sir Fulke Greville, Lord Brooke. The tombe’s inscription reads: “Folk Grevill / Servant to Queene Elizabeth / Conceller to King James / Frend to Sir Philip Sidney / Trophaeum Peccati.” A letter written by Fulke Greville to his friend and assistant Sir John Coke in 1615, shows that Greville was outraged that his famous friend, the great Sir Philip Sidney, was “in pawls church wher he lyes open.” Following the first state funeral for a commoner, held in St Paul’s and attended by the Queen, Sidney’s body had been buried into a hole in the wall and marked with a small wooden plaque. Within a short time the plaque fell off. The letter makes clear that Greville had “long promised” that his “brother” Philip would be reburied in a magnificent tomb and that Greville would be buried with him. Greville describes the tomb he would build as a “sepulchre” with himself lying below with Sidney lying above him, like bunk-beds. Greville never built the tomb for Sidney and himself in St Paul’s but he did build a magnificent monument with a black marble sarcophagus in St Mary’s Church, Warwick, which bears the name “Sir Philip Sidney” and Fulke Greville is buried in the crypt directly beneath it.

Nottingham Castle (NG1 6EL)

House: Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham. It is located in a commanding position on a natural promontory known as "Castle Rock", with cliffs 130 feet (40 m) high to the south and west. In the Middle Ages it was a major royal fortress and occasional royal residence. In decline by the XV century, it was largely demolished in 1649. The Duke of Newcastle later built a mansion on the site, which was burnt down by rioters in 1831 and left as a ruin. It was later rebuilt to house an art gallery and museum, which remain in use to this day. Little of the original castle survives, but sufficient portions remain to give an impression of the layout of the site.

Address: Lenton Rd, Nottingham NG1 6EL, UK (52.94935, -1.15446)
Phone: +44 115 876 1400
Website: www.nottinghamcastle.org.uk



Place
Edward III used the castle as a residence and held Parliaments. In 1346 King David II of Scotland was held prisoner. In 1365 Edward III improved the castle with a new tower on the west side of the Middle Bailey and a new prison under the High Tower. In 1376 Peter de la Mare, speaker of the House of Commons was confined in Nottingham Castle for having “taken unwarrantable liberties with the name of Alice Perrers, mistress of the king.” In 1387 the state council was held in the castle. Richard II held the Lord Mayor of London with Aldermen and Sheriffs in the castle in 1392, and held another state council to humble Londoners. The last visit recorded by Richard II was in 1397 when another council was held here. From 1403 until 1437 it was the main residence of Henry IV's queen, Joan. After the residence of Joan maintenance was reduced. Only upon the Wars of the Roses did Nottingham Castle begin to be used again as a military stronghold. Edward IV proclaimed himself king in Nottingham, and in 1476 he ordered the construction of a new tower and Royal Apartments. This was described by John Leland in 1540 as: “the most beautifulest part and gallant building for lodging... a right sumptuus piece of stone work.” During the reign of King Henry VII the castle remained a royal fortress. Henry VIII ordered new tapestries for the castle before he visited Nottingham in August in 1511. By 1536 Henry had the castle reinforced and its garrison increased from a few dozen men to a few hundred. In 1538 the Constable, the Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, reported on the need for maintenance. A survey in 1525 stated that there was much “dekay and ruyne of said castell” and “part of the roof of the Great Hall is fallen down. Also the new building there is in dekay of timber, lead and glass.”

Life
Who: William Neville (died October 10, 1391)
The guided walk in Nottingham called the Gay Robin Hood tour examines the alleged homosexual origins of the man and has been researched by Nottingham historian Tony Scupham-Bilton. Scupham-Bilton believes Robin's origin dates back 700 years. It revolves around the relationship of two real life characters - Sir William Neville, the constable of Nottingham castle, and Sir John Clanvowe, a poet. According to the historian the two were as good as hitched, even though Sir William had a wife, Elizabeth. "The two men were soldiers who'd fought in the One Hundred Years War. They formed a close friendship. It's commonly accepted now that they were a gay couple." As a writer, Sir John Clanvowe was always looking for inspiration. "One of the ideas he had when King Richard II visited was to write a brand new ballad," says Scupham-Bilton. The result was “The Jest of Robin Hood.” According to Tony Scupham-Bilton all the stories created in the ballad became the basis of every film, book and television series around the character. "It was the gay connection that Sir John Clanvowe had with the constable of Nottingham that formed all the background to Robin Hood." Sir William Neville and Sir John Clanvowe died on pilgrimage near Constantinople. Neville died two days later of Clanvowe. Their tombstone survives in the Archaeological Museum of Constantinople.
Source: Was Robin Hood gay?, BBC Nottingham website, London Road, Nottingham, NG2 4UU



School: Nottingham High School (Waverley Mount, Nottingham NG7 4ED) is an independent fee-paying day school for boys and girls in Nottingham, comprising the Infant and Junior School (for ages 4–11) and Senior School (for ages 11–18). Located on Waverley Mount, the school's main building is close to local amenities and public transport. The main building is in the style of Gothic Revival architecture. In 1513, the school was founded as the "Free School" by Dame Agnes Mellers, after the death of her husband, Richard, partly in his memory, but also as an act of atonement for his several wrongdoings against the people of Nottingham. In order to do this she enlisted the help of Sir Thomas Lovell, who was both the Governor of Nottingham Castle and Secretary to the Treasury. As a result of their combined efforts, King Henry VIII sealed the school’s foundation deed on the November 22, of that year. D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930) attended Beauvale Board School (now renamed Greasley Beauvale D. H. Lawrence Primary School in his honour) from 1891 until 1898, becoming the first local pupil to win a County Council scholarship to Nottingham High School in nearby Nottingham. He left in 1901, working for three months as a junior clerk at Haywood's surgical appliances factory, but a severe bout of pneumonia ended this career. In the years 1902 to 1906 Lawrence served as a pupil teacher at the British School, Eastwood. He went on to become a full-time student and received a teaching certificate from University of Nottingham, in 1908. During these early years he was working on his first poems, some short stories, and a draft of a novel, “Laetitia,” which was eventually to become “The White Peacock.” At the end of 1907 he won a short story competition in the Nottingham Guardian, the first time that he had gained any wider recognition for his literary talents. The University of Nottingham (Nottingham NG7 2RD) is a public research university based in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire. It was founded as University College Nottingham in 1881 and was granted a Royal Charter in 1948.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
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Queer Places, Vol. 2.2 (Color Edition): Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1535453332 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1535453338
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2017-07-01 11:10 pm

West Midlands - Day 3

Mason Croft (CV37 6HB)

House: Mason Croft, now the home of The Shakespeare Institute, takes its name from the family who lived in the building for more than 150 years.

Address: Church Street, Stratford-Upon-Avon, Warwickshire CV37 6HB, UK (52.18972, -1.7093)
Phone: +44 121 414 9500
Website: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/edacs/departments/shakespeare/index.aspx
English Heritage Building ID: 366202 (Grade II, 1951)



Place
In 1900 the famous novelist Marie Corelli was living at Avon Croft in Stratford when she became aware that Mason Croft was available for rent. Although it was somewhat dilapidated, the house appealed to her sense of romance. She and her lifelong companion, Bertha Vyver, made it their permanent home. An elegant XVIII century town house of two storeys, with a simple symmetrical line of three windows on either side of the oak front door and seven on the first floor. The rear of the building, however, is gloriously different, with its seemingly haphazardly-placed pointed gables, conservatory and extensive gardens. The site was originally occupied by two houses: one a large freehold property owned by the Bartlett family since 1610 or earlier; the other a tenement belonging to the manor of Rowington (near Warwick), but associated with the Bartletts since 1632. In 1698 Ann Bartlett married the lawyer Nathaniel Mason and in 1710 they began to create a bigger, more modern dwelling. Their first additions were to the rear of the house, building a kitchen wing and chambers above, along with a “portal” and a tiny gable. Ann Mason died in 1717 and two years later Nathaniel married Elizabeth Rowney, a wealthy heiress from Halford. The joint income from Nathaniel’s business and Elizabeth’s leasing of property meant that substantial rebuilding of the family home could now take place. A new phase of building, beginning in or around 1724, created a more symmetrical house, with a butler’s pantry behind, “a place for coals,” a study, rear staircase and cellars. Above were bedrooms and, at the top, new attics. In 1727 Nathaniel bought the adjoining house, and in 1728 he had a plan for an expanded dwelling drawn up. In 1735, his son Thomas Mason bought an additional strip of land to the south of the house, and the following year he acquired two cottages on the northern boundary where the “great gates” to the rear were still sited. This impressive stone gateway was moved to its present site on the south side. The kitchen wing was extended, and to commemorate his improvements he fixed a new rainwater head, inscribed “1735 TM,” onto the rear of the building. Thomas Mason rebuilt the study wing in 1745. The paddock, acquired the previous year, was encircled with a brick wall, with “handsome gates, pillars and stone balls handsomely erected and finished.” The house remained in the family until the death of the last of the line, Thomas Mason, at the age of 90 in 1867. The property was bequeathed to Thomas Mason’s cousins John Paget and William Harcourt Clare, who sold it on to a Stratford ironmonger, Henry Newton. In 1869 the property was acquired by one William Daniels, who sold it five years later to Dr John Day Collis. Dr Collis was founder and headmaster of Trinity College, next door to Mason Croft, and he used the newly-acquired building for teaching purposes. In 1901 Marie Corelli was able to buy the property, and set about fashioning it to suit her taste. The interior decoration was renewed and she converted what had been the dining room of Trinity College into a music room. She also made a significant addition to the street frontage, adding a low wooden fence along the front of the house and a portico over the stone entrance steps. Striped blinds also appeared, a swathe of Virginia creeper, and window boxes packed with flowers according to the season. At the back of the house Corelli built a large conservatory called the “Winter Garden,” filling it with wicker furniture and palm trees. Marie Corelli died in Stratford and is buried there in the Evesham Road cemetery (Evesham Rd, Stratford-upon-Avon CV37 9AA). The marble angel that Bertha Vyver had ordered from Italy is set up to watch over her tomb with one outstretched arm pointing the way to heaven. Bertha died in 1941 and is buried next to Marie. Some rooms at Mason Croft remain substantially as she left them. The sitting room retains its oak display cabinets over the fireplace, and the latter its copper hood with recurring motif of waves and a single heart. The massive fireplace in the music room still bears the intertwined initials M.C. and B.V., encircled by laurel leaves, and with the legend “Amor Vincit” (love conquers.) In 1951 the building was bought by the University of Birmingham, and the paddock was reclaimed from the Fire Station. Mason Croft has now been the home of the University’s Shakespeare Institute for 60 years. Much of the building is still as it was in Corelli’s day. The most obvious addition to the grounds is the Shakespeare Library, a purpose-built research library designed by alumnus V.H. (“Johnnie”) Johnson, which was officially opened in 1996.



Life
Who: Marie Corelli (May 1, 1855 – April 21, 1924) and Bertha Vyver (died November 20, 1941)
Marie Corelli was a British novelist. She enjoyed a period of great literary success from the publication of her first novel in 1886 until WWI. Corelli’s novels sold more copies than the combined sales of popular contemporaries, including Arthur Conan Doyle, H. G. Wells, and Rudyard Kipling, although critics often derided her work as “the favourite of the common multitude.” For over forty years, Corelli lived with her companion, Bertha Vyver (died in 1941); when she died she left everything to her friend. Although she didn’t self-identify as a lesbian, biographers and critics have noted the erotic descriptions of female beauty that appear regularly in Corelli’s novels, while admitting they are expressed by men. Descriptions of the deep love between the two women by their contemporaries have added to the speculation that their relationship may have been romantic. Following Corelli’s death, Sidney Walton reminisced in the Yorkshire Evening News: “One of the great friendships of modern times knit together the hearts and minds of Miss Marie Corelli and Miss Bertha Vyver... Her own heart was the hearth of her comrade, and thought and love of “Marie” thrilled through Miss Vyver’s veins... In loneliness of soul, Miss Vyver mourns the loss of one who was nearer and tenderer to her than a sister... Over the fireplace in the fine, old spacious lounge at Mason Croft the initials M. C. and B. V. were carven into one symbol. And it was the symbol of life.” Corelli is generally accepted to have been the inspiration for at least two of E.F. Benson’s characters in his Lucia series of six novels and a short story. The main character, Emmeline "Lucia" Lucas, is a vain and snobbish woman of the upper middle class with an obsessive desire to be the leading light of her community, to associate with the nobility, to see her name reported in the social columns, and a comical pretension to education and musical talent, neither of which she possesses. She also pretends to be able to speak Italian, something Corelli was known to have done. The character of Miss Susan Leg is an author of highly successful but pulpish romance novels who writes under the name of Rudolph da Vinci and first appears in Benson’s work a few years after Marie Corelli’s death in 1924.
Source: Idol of Suburbia: Marie Corelli and Late-Victorian Literary Culture, By Annette Federico

Hall's Croft (CV37 6BG)

House: Hall's Croft, Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, was owned by William Shakespeare's daughter, Susanna Hall, and her husband Dr John Hall whom she married in 1607.

Address: 7 Old Town, Stratford-Upon-Avon, Warwickshire CV37 6BG, UK (52.18856, -1.70864)
Phone: +44 1789 338533
Website: www.shakespeare.org.uk
English Heritage Building ID: 366336 (Grade I, 1951)

Place
The building now contains a collection of XVI- and XVII-century paintings and furniture. There is also an exhibition about Doctor John Hall and the obscure medical practices of the period. The property includes a dramatic walled garden which contains a variety of plant life that John Hall may have used in his treatments. John and Susanna Hall later moved to New Place, which William Shakespeare left to his daughter after his death.



Life
Who: Marie Corelli (May 1, 1855 – April 21, 1924) and Bertha Vyver (died November 20, 1941)
After the death of Marie Corelli’s mother, in either 1876 or 1877 Bertha Vyver, a childhood friend, moved into Fern Dell Cottage, at Box Hill, near Mickelham, from her mothers home in Belsize Park, London. Bertha Vyver's mother, the Contess Van de Vyver died in May 1890. Marie and Bertha took a break and spent ten days in Stratford-upon-Avon, staying at the Falcon Hotel opposite the site of William Shakespeare's home. They signed the visitors book at Shakespeare's birthplace on 20th May, went boating on the river, and visited the Flowers family at their house on the banks of the river Avon. In 1899 Bertha suggested to live in Stratford-upon-Avon, and Marie wrote to Mrs Croker, the owner of Halls Croft, to ask for a furnished let for four months. Marie and Bertha moved there in mid-May. Sarah Bernhardt arrived in July to play at the Memorial Theatre in a production of “Hamlet,” and stayed at Halls Croft. Marie entered into the social life of the town; she was frequently asked to be the guest of honour at public functions, opens bazaars, and gave public speeches. Marie and Bertha decided to stay in Stratford, and offered to buy Halls Croft but Mrs Croker wished to return home. In September they moved to The Dower House, then called Avon Croft, a few doors down the street, and stayed through 1900 while they looked for a suitable property. Marie nearly purchased Alveston Leys, a house with lovely gardens on the banks of the Avon, but worrying it might be damp, she decided to lease Mason Croft in Church Street for 18 months with an option to buy. The house was a little dilapidated, and needs renovation work before it was ready for the two ladies to move in 1901.
Source: Memoirs of Marie Corelli. B Vyver, Alston Rivers 1930

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-06-30 07:42 pm

West Midlands - Day 2

Oratory House & Cardinal Newmans grave (B16 8UE)



Church: The Birmingham Oratory is an English Catholic religious community of the Congregation of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri, located in the Edgbaston area of Birmingham. The community was founded in 1849 by the Blessed John Henry Newman, C.O., the first house of that congregation in England.

Address: Hagley Road, Birmingham B16 8UE, UK (52.38483, -2.00464)
English Heritage Building ID: 217208 (Grade II, 1952)

Place
The living quarters of the Birmingham Oratory, called the Oratory House (1850–51), fronting Hagley Road, served as Cardinal Newman’s home from 1852 to 1890 (except for four years spent in Ireland). His personal papers are located here. The Birmingham Oratory was to play a major role in the life of J. R. R. Tolkien, the author of “The Lord of the Rings,” who was a parishioner there for about nine years during his childhood. J. R. R. Tolkien lived at Fern Cottage in Rednal at the age of 12, and his mother died there in 1904. He wandered widely around the Lickeys and later recalled: “When I think of my mother’s death ... worn out with persecution, poverty, and, largely consequent, disease, in the effort to hand on to us small boys the faith, and remember the tiny bedroom she shared with us in rented rooms in a postman’s cottage at Rednal, where she died alone, too ill for viaticum, I find it very hard and bitter, when my children stray away.” The body of Cardinal Newman was buried in the small Roman Catholic cemetery at Rednal, by the Oratory country house. Attempts to move his body to Birmingham Oratory, near Birmingham’s city centre, as he was being considered for canonisation, failed due to the absence of any mortal remains.



Life
Who: John Henry Newman Cong. Orat. (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890), aka Cardinal Newman and Blessed John Henry Newman and Ambrose St. John (June 29, 1815 – May 24, 1875)
In accordance with his express wishes, Cardinal John Henry Newman was buried in the grave of his lifelong friend Ambrose St. John (1815-1876.) The pall over the coffin bore the motto that Newman adopted for use as a cardinal, “Cor ad cor loquitur” (Heart speaks to heart), which William Barry, writing in the “Catholic Encyclopedia” (1913), traces to Francis de Sales and sees as revealing the secret of Newman’s "eloquence, unaffected, graceful, tender, and penetrating.” Ambrose St. John had become a Roman Catholic at around the same time as Newman, and the two men have a joint memorial stone inscribed with the motto Newman had chosen, “Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem” (Out of shadows and phantasms into the truth), which Barry traces to Plato’s allegory of the cave.
Source: Newman's Unquiet Grave: The Reluctant Saint, By John Cornwell

Housman’s & The Clock House, Bournheath (B61 9HY)

House: Housman’s was the home of A.E. Housman, the poet, during childhood. Very simple but attractive XVIII century, 2 storey brick farmhouse with roof of old tiles. Sashes in cased frames.
Address: Valley Road, Bournheath, Worcestershire B61 9HY, UK (52.35841, -2.07569)
English Heritage Building ID: 155679 (Grade II, 1972)



Place
Housman’s is a private home, originally The Valley House, an early Georgian farmhouse, part of the Clock House estate. Here in 1859, A.E. Housman was born, just before the family moved to Perry Hall. The Clock House once stood where there are now several modern houses, behind a long brick wall. Originally XVII century, it was at different times home to three generations of Housmans. A.E. Housmans lived there in his teens and with his brothers and sisters enjoyed the large garden (now private), country life and long walks. The high ground a few hundreds yards from the Clock House was known to the Housman childrens as Mount Pisgah. It commands extensive views including Bredon Hill, the Malverns, the Abberley Hills and to the west the Shropshire Clees which were to Housmans the “blue remembered hills” behind which the sun set. He romanticised about the land beyond them and it became the setting for “A Shropshire Lad.” It also overlooks Bromsgrove and the spire of St. Johns is a marker for where Housmans enjoyed his early years at Perry Hall and to where he walked daily to school.



Life
Who: Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936), aka A. E. Housman
A. E. Housman was a classical scholar and poet, best known to the general public for his cycle of poems “A Shropshire Lad.” Lyrical and almost epigrammatic in form, the poems wistfully evoke the dooms and disappointments of youth in the countryside. Their beauty, simplicity and distinctive imagery appealed strongly to late Victorian and Edwardian taste, and to many early XX century English composers (beginning with Arthur Somervell) both before and after WWI. Through their song-settings, the poems became closely associated with that era, and with Shropshire itself. The eldest of seven children, Housman was born at Valley House in Fockbury, a hamlet on the outskirts of Bromsgrove in Worcestershire, to Sarah Jane (née Williams, married 1June 7, 1858 in Woodchester, Gloucester) and Edward Housman (whose family came from Lancaster), and was baptised on 24 April 1859 at Christ Church, in Catshill. “I was born in a house called The Little Valley (to distinguish it from The Valley Farm on the other side of the road) about two miles north west of Bromsgrove in Worcestershire, in the parish of Catshill, near the hamlet of Bourneheath.” Naiditch demonstrates from census results that A.E. Housman is mistaken, and that he was born at the Valley House, near the Clock House, in Fockbury. “The one (house) I liked best (Fockbury House, known as The Clock House), and lived from 1873 to 1877, has been utterly ruined.”
Source: Alfred Edward Housman: recollections, by Katharine Elizabeth Symons

Perry Hall, Bromsgrove (B61 7JZ)

School: The former home of Old Bromsgrovian A.E. Housman, the only mixed boarding house, the only exclusively Sixth Form boarding house and the only house in Bromsgrove town itself; Housman Hall houses one hundred girl and boy boarders aged between sixteen and eighteen.

Address: Kidderminster Road, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire B61 7JZ, UK (52.33594, -2.07239)
Website: http://www.bromsgrove-school.co.uk/housman-hall.aspx
English Heritage Building ID: 155719 (Grade II, 1952)



Place
The house is possibly of XVII century origin but present building is of XVIII century red brick - work with sandstone plinth and two semi-circular arched doorways having (probably XVII century) studded boarded doors with strap hinges. 2 storeys, 3 windows left hand portion has XIX century Gothic headed lights in painted woodwork, and hipped roof of old tiles. Right hand lower portion is of similar brick- work but has square headed casements and gabled end facing the road. Part old tiles and part machine tiles. Now a residential hall belonging to Bromsgrove School, it was built in 1828 as a house for John Adam’s, a distant relative of A.E. Housman. The poet’s father, Edward, set up office there as a solicitor and it was the family home where Housman lived until he was 18. With his brothers and sisters Housman enjoyed its extensive gardens and had a perfect childhood. But the idyll was shattered when his mother died on his birthday in 1871 and in increasing financial difficulties, Edward moved his family to the Clock House. For most of the XX century Perry Hall was an hotel.



Life
Who: Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936), aka A. E. Housman
“From 1860 to 1873, and again from 1877 to 1882, I lived at Perry Hall in Bromsgrove, at the foot of the church hill.” A.E. Housman was educated at Bromsgrove School (Worcester Rd, Bromsgrove B61 7DU), where he revealed his academic promise and won prizes for his poems. A.E. Housman’s poem "Oh who is that young sinner with the handcuffs on his wrists?,” written after the trial of Oscar Wilde, addressed more general injustice towards homosexuals. In the poem the prisoner is suffering "for the colour of his hair,” a natural quality that, in a coded reference to homosexuality, is reviled as "nameless and abominable" (recalling the legal phrase peccatum illud horribile, inter Christianos non-nominandum, "the sin so horrible, not to be named amongst Christians.”) Despite acclaim as both a scholar and poet in his lifetime, Housman lived as a recluse, rejecting honours and avoiding the public eye. He travelled frequently to France where he enjoyed reading “books which were banned in Britain as pornographic.” A fellow described him as being “descendend from a long line of maiden aunts.” He died in 1936 in Cambridge and is buried as St. Laurence’s Church (Ludlow, Shropshire SY8).
Source: Perry Hall Hotel, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire. A Short History of the Hotel and Its Association with A.E. Housman

Ragley Hall, Alcester (B49 5NJ)

House: The country estate of George Seymour (1871-1940), Earl of Yarmouth and 7th Marquess of Hertford. Seymour inherited Ragley Hall in 1912 but never lived there, preferring the high life in London. Ragley Hall is a mid XVIII century park landscaped by Lancelot Brown, with late XIX century formal gardens and pleasure grounds laid out by Robert Marnock.

Address: Arrow, Warwickshire B49 5NJ, UK (52.198, -1.89599)
Phone: +44 1789 762090
Website: www.ragley.co.uk
English Heritage Building ID: 305020 (Grade I, 1967)



Place
Ragley Hall is located south of Alcester, Warwickshire, eight miles (13 km) west of Stratford-upon-Avon. It is the ancestral seat of the Marquess of Hertford and is one of the stately homes of England. The house, which was designed by Dr Robert Hooke, was built for the Edward Conway, 1st Earl of Conway and completed in 1680. The Great Hall is thought to have been decorated by James Wyatt in 1780. Financial instability of the Seymour family left the house threatened with demolition more than once. In 1912, following the death of Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford, the estate's trustees recommended that the house be demolished. However, during World War I and World War II, the house found use as a military hospital. Hugh Seymour, 8th Marquess of Hertford, who inherited Ragley Hall from his uncle in 1940, fought to save it after the war. It was refurbished between 1956 and 1958, when it became one of the first stately homes opened to the public. In 1983, the painter Graham Rust completed a huge mural including pets, friends and family members which is known as "The Temptation" and is exhibited on the Southern staircase. Ragley was the site of the Jerwood Sculpture Park, opened in July 2004. The Park included works that won the Jerwood Sculpture Prizes, and the work of Dame Elisabeth Frink, among others. However the site was closed in April 2012.



Life
Who: George Francis Alexander Seymour, 7th Marquess of Hertford (October 20, 1871 – February 16, 1940)
George Seymour, 7th Marquess of Hertford, was the son of Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford. Seymour became a Lieutenant in the Warwickshire regiment before joining the Black Watch. He became Earl of Yarmouth in 1884 and the 7th Marquess of Hertford in 1901. In 1895 he arrived at the sugar district of Mackay, Queensland, Australia, taking up a small mixed farm. Despite his senior rank and status, the local population showed him little respect, scandalised by his behaviour. The local paper called him a ‘skirt dancer’ and local memory is of him performing dances in a sequined outfit with butterfly wings and of hosting male-only parties on his isolated property. Seymour seems to have returned to England for Queen Victoria's Jubilee then travelled to the US, where he married Alice C. Thaw of Pittsburgh on 2April 7, 1903; their childless marriage was annulled in 1908 on the grounds of non-consummation. Alice Cornelia Thaw (January 2, 1880 – May 8, 1955) was an American philanthropist, born to William Thaw, Sr. and Mary Sibbet Copley. She was the younger sister of Harry Kendall Thaw. Lord Hertford filed for bankruptcy in 1910 and inherited Ragley Hall and its large Warwickshire estate in 1912, but never lived there, preferring the high life in London. Lord Hertford died in 1940, aged 68 and childless, and his titles passed to his nephew, Hugh Seymour.
Source: Robert Aldrich and Garry Wotherspoon. Who's Who in Gay and Lesbian History Vol.1: From Antiquity to the Mid-Twentieth Century: From Antiquity to the Mid-twentieth Century Vol 1 (p. 403). Taylor and Francis. Kindle Edition.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Queer Places, Vol. 2.2 (Color Edition): Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1535453338
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2017-06-29 09:47 pm

West Midlands - Day 1

Cathedral & Bishop’s Palace, Lichfield (WS13 7LD)





Church: Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires.

Address: 19A The Close, Lichfield, Staffordshire WS13 7LD, UK (52.68548, -1.83032)
Hours: Monday through Saturday 8.30-18.15, Sunday 7.30-18.30
Phone: +44 1543 306100
Website: http://www.lichfield-cathedral.org/
English Heritage Building ID: 382775 (Grade II, 1952)



Place
Anna Seward lived at the Bishop’s Palace all her life, caring for her father during the last ten years of his life, after he had suffered a stroke. When he died in 1790, he left her financially independent with an income of ₤400 per annum. She spent the rest of her life at the Palace, till her death in 1809. The Diocese of Lichfield covers all of Staffordshire, much of Shropshire and part of the Black Country and West Midlands. The present bishop is the Right Reverend Jonathan Gledhill, the 98th Lord Bishop of Lichfield. There is a plaque to Anna Seward (spelled “Anne,” which is the spelling she used in her will) in Lichfield Cathedral. “Anne Seward died March 25th, 1809, aged 66. By her order this monument is erected: To the memory of her Father, the Rev. Thomas Seward, M.A. Canon Residentiary of this Cathedral, who died March 4th, 1790, aged 81: of her Mother, Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of the Rev. John Hunter, who died July 31st, 1780, aged 66: and of her sister, Sarah, their younger daughter, who died June 13th, 1763, aged 20.



On a lower marble plaque, from a poem written for the occasion by Sir Walter Scott, Anna Seward’s friend and literary executor:
Amid these aisles, where once his precepts shew’d
The heavenward pathway, which in life he trod,
This simple tablet marks a Father’s bier,
And those he lov’d in life, in death are near;
For him, for them, a Daughter bade it rise,
Memorial of domestic Charities,
Still would you know – why o’er the marble spread,
In female grace the willow drops her head?
Why on her branches, silent and unstrung,
The minstrel harp is emblematic hung?
What Poet’s voice lies smother’d here in dust,
Till wak’d to join the chorus of the just?
Lo! One brief line an answer sad supplies,
Honour’d, belov’d, and mourn’d, here Seward lies;
Her worth, her warmth of heart, our sorrows say,
Go seek her Genius in her living lay.”
A full-length figure of a bare-brested woman draped in classical robes sits upon a low stool, carrying a scroll in her right hand and with her head in her left hand in a gesture of grief and despair. Her left elbow rests on the coffin containing the body of the deceased person for whom she is grieving. Behind her is a willow tree, often associated with weeping and sorrow, and from it hangs a harp, the traditional attribute of a poet. The monument originally stood in the aisle of the north transept, but was moved to its present position during Sir Gilbert Scott’s XIX century restoration of the cathedral.



Life
Who: Anna Seward (December 12, 1742 – March 25, 1809)
Anna Seward was a XVIII century English Romantic poet, often called the Swan of Lichfield. Seward was the eldest of two surviving daughters of Thomas Seward (1708–1790), prebendary of Lichfield and Salisbury, and author, and his wife Elizabeth. In 1749 her father was appointed to a position as Canon-Residentiary at Lichfield Cathedral and the family moved to that city, where her father educated her entirely at home. They lived in the Bishop’s Palace in the Cathedral Close. When a family friend, Mrs. Edward Sneyd, died in 1756, the Sewards took in one of her daughters, Honora Sneyd (1751-1780), who became an “adopted” foster sister to Anna. Honora was nine years younger than Anna. Anna Seward describes how she and her sister first met Honora, on returning from a walk, in her poem “The Anniversary” (1769.) Sarah (known as “Sally”) died suddenly at the age of nineteen of typhus (1764.) Sarah was said to be of admirable character, but less talented than her sister. Anna consoled herself with her affection for Honora Sneyd, as she describes in “Visions,” written a few days after her sister’s death. In the poem she expresses the hope that Honora (“this transplanted flower”) will replace her sister (whom she refers to as “Alinda”) in her and her parents affections. She was devastated and outraged by Honora’s marriage to Richard Lowell Edgeworth in 1773 and literally went into mourning. Even after Honora’s death in 1780, Honora remained an important figure in Seward’s interior life. Honora Sneyd Edgeworth (1751-1780) is buried at St Andrew (by the lake, near Weston Hall, Weston-under-Lizard, Staffordshire, ST19 9PD).
Source: Anna Seward: A Constructed Life : a Critical Biography, By Teresa Barnard

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-29 02:45 pm

Jeanine Deckers aka "Sœur Sourire" (October 17, 1933 — March 29, 1985)

Jeanne Deckers, aka Jeannine Deckers, better known as Sœur Sourire, was a Belgian singer-songwriter and initially a member of the Dominican Order in Belgium as Sister Luc-Gabrielle.
Born: October 17, 1933, Laeken
Died: March 29, 1985, Wavre, Belgium
Education: Catholic University of Leuven
Buried: Cheremont Cemetery, Wavre, Arrondissement de Nivelles, Walloon Brabant, Belgium
Buried alongside: Annie Pécher
Find A Grave Memorial# 11350
Albums: Best of Sœur Sourire, Dominique, Chants d'enfants, more
Parents: Lucien Deckers, Gabrielle Deckers

Jeanine Deckers, better known as Sœur Sourire, was a Belgian singer-songwriter and initially a member of the Dominican Order in Belgium as Sister Luc Gabrielle. She acquired world fame in 1963 with the release of the French-language song Dominique. In 1963, she was sent by her order to take theology courses at the University
of Louvain. She reconnected with a friend from her youth, Annie Pécher, with whom she slowly developed a very close relationship. Pulled between two worlds and increasingly in disagreement with the Catholic Church, she left the convent in 1966. She still considered herself a nun, praying several times daily, and maintaining a simple and chaste lifestyle. In the late 1970s, the Belgian government claimed that she owed $63,000 in back taxes. As her former congregation refused to take any responsibility for the debt, Deckers ran into heavy financial problems. Citing their financial difficulties in a note, she and her companion, Annie Pécher, committed suicide by an overdose of barbiturates and alcohol in 1985. In their suicide note, Decker and Pécher stated they had not given up their faith and wished to be buried together after a church funeral.

Together from 1963 to 1985: 22 years.
Annie Pécher (1944 – 1985)
Jeanine Deckers aka Sœur Sourire (October 17, 1933 — March 29, 1985)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Cemetery: Jeanine Deckers (1933-1985), better known as Sœur Sourire, was a Belgian singer-songwriter and initially a member of the Dominican Order in Belgium as Sister Luc Gabrielle. She acquired world fame in 1963 with the release of the French-language song “Dominique.” In 1963, she was sent by her order to take theology courses at the University of Louvain (Grand-Place 23, 1348 Ottignies-Louvain-la-Neuve) where she reconnected with a friend from her youth, Annie Pécher, with whom she slowly developed a very close relationship. Pulled between two worlds and increasingly in disagreement with the Catholic Church, she left the convent in 1966. Citing their financial difficulties in a note, she and her companion, Annie Pécher, committed suicide by an overdose of barbiturates and alcohol in 1985. In their suicide note, Decker and Pécher stated they had not given up their faith and wished to be buried together after a church funeral. They are interred together at Cheremont Cemetery (Avenue de Chèremont, 1300 Wavre).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-29 02:43 pm

Jan Holmgren (April 25, 1939 - March 29, 1993)

Buried: The Evergreens Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA
Buried Alongside: Yves François Lubin aka Assotto Saint
Find A Grave Memorial# 161933698

Assotto Saint (born Yves François Lubin) was a poet, dancer with the Martha Graham Company, and playwright. Jan Holmgren was a composer for theatrical works of Saint and his companion of 13 years. Saint was known for his acting up and acting out: at fellow black gay poet Donald W. Woods's funeral, Saint openly confronted the family for their hypocritical elision of Woods's gayness; outraged, especially since Woods had fought to end the repressive forms of silence that equal death for gay individuals and AIDS victims, Saint stood up and "testified" on his brother's behalf. In the preface to the anthology The Road before Us: 100 Gay Black Poets, Saint had requested that, in protest of the indifference of American society to those dying of AIDS, that the American flag be burned at his funeral and its ashes scattered on his grave. The Road before Us was a 1992 Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry. Here to Dare was nominee in 1993 for Gay Anthology, Wishing for Wings was a nominee in 1995 for Gay Poetry, Spells of a Voodoo Doll was a 1997 nominee for Gay Biography/Autobiography.

Together from 1980 to 1993: 13 years.
Assotto Saint (October 2, 1957 - June 29, 1994)
Jan Holmgren (April 25, 1939 - March 29, 1993)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Cemetery: At Cemetery of the Evergreens (1629 Bushwick Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11207) is buried Ella Wesner (1841-1917), the most celebrated male impersonator of the Gilded Age Vaudeville circuit. At the time of her death she was living at 431 Claremont Pkwy, Bronx, NY 10457. In the same cemetery are buried together Jan Holmgren (1939-1993) and Assotto Saint (1957-1994). When Assotto Saint delivered to the Names Project his quilt panel, he also enclosed a copy of Holmgren's funeral program and a moving note he had penned by hand, an intimate death notice of his partner and himself. "I made this quilt for my 13-year life-partner, Jan Urban Holmgren. He was my Jan & my man. Born in Alno, Sweden, on April 25, 1939, he died in my arms on March 29, 1993. We both found out in late 1987 that we were HIV-positive. Jan came down with full-blown AIDS in early 199o. I came down with full-blown AIDS in late 1991. Yes, it is a strange phenomenon when both life-partners in a relationship are fatally ill. Because of my disbelief in God & a spiritual after-life, it gives me great pleasure to know that at least we will be physically reunited in the same grave at The Evergreen Cemetery in Brooklyn, NY."

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-29 02:39 pm

Helen Arthur (March 29, 1879 – December 9, 1939)

Helen Arthur was a theatre manager, known for managing the Neighborhood Playhouse for thirteen seasons. Arthur was the manager of several notable actors, including Ruth Draper.
Born: March 29, 1879, Lancaster, Wisconsin, United States
Died: December 9, 1939, New York City, New York, United States
Find A Grave Memorial# 161717445
Partner: Agnes Morgan

School: Northwestern University (NU, 633 Clark St, Evanston, IL 60208) is a private research university based in Evanston, Illinois, with campuses in Chicago, Illinois; and Doha, Qatar. Composed of twelve schools and colleges, Northwestern offers 124 undergraduate degrees and 145 graduate and professional degrees. In 1930, construction began on the Charles Deering Library at Northwestern University (Charles Deering died in 1927). Funding was provided primarily through donations made by the Deering, McCormick, and Danielson families. Dedicated in 1933, it served as Northwestern's primary library until 1970, when an adjacent library was constructed. The Deering Library now houses certain special collections of the Northwestern University Library, along with art, music, government information, maps, and the University Archives. Deering's son Roger (1884–1936) also was an art patron and benefactor to Northwestern. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Barbara Gittings (1932–2007); Charles Deering (1852-1927); Helen Arthur (1879–1939); J. Michael Bailey (born 1957), James Deering (1859–1925); Ned Rorem (born 1923); Rich Gordon (born 1948).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: New York University (NYU), 10003, is a private, nonsectarian American research university. Founded in 1831, NYU is one of the largest private non-profit institutions of American higher education. University rankings compiled by U.S. News and World Report, Times Higher Education and the Academic Ranking of World Universities all rank NYU among the top 34 universities in the world. NYU is organized into more than 20 schools, colleges, and institutes, located in six centers throughout Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn. NYU's main campus is located at Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan with institutes and centers on the Upper East Side, academic buildings and dorms down on Wall Street, and the Brooklyn campus located at MetroTech Center in Downtown Brooklyn. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Helen Arthur (1879–1939), John Ashbery (born 1927), Howard Austen (1929-2003), Sara Josephine Baker (1873–1945), Rita Mae Brown (born 1944), Countee Cullen (1903-1946), Thomas M. Disch (1940-2008), Fred Ebb (1928–2004), Perry Ellis (1940–1986), Edward Field (born 1924), Lillian Hellman (1905-1984), Bo Huston (1959–1993), Arthur Laurents (1917-2011), William Alexander Levy (1909-1997), Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960), Carson McCullers (1917-1967), Ismail Merchant (1936-2005), Richard Thomas Nolan (born 1937), Robert Spitzer (1932–2015), Harold Norse (1916–2009), Larry Rivers (1923-2002), Douglas Sadownick (born 1959).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Theatre: Helen Arthur was a theatre manager, known for managing the Neighborhood Playhouse for thirteen seasons (1915-1927). Arthur was the manager of several notable actors, including Ruth Draper.

Address: 340 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75658, -73.96529)

Place
The Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre is a full-time professional conservatory for actors located at 340 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, and is known as the home of the Meisner technique. Neighborhood Playhouse had originally been founded as an off-Broadway theatre by philanthropists Alice Lewisohn and Irene Lewisohn in 1915, but closed in 1927. The following year, it re-opened as the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre with the addition of Rita Wallach Morgenthau. Sanford Meisner joined the faculty in 1935 from the Group Theatre. Meisner used his study of Russian theatre and acting innovator, Konstantin Stanislavski's System to develop his own technique, as an alternative to Lee Strasberg's Method acting. In 1955, Farley Granger (1925-2011) moved to New York and began studying with Bob Fosse, Gloria Vanderbilt, James Kirkwood and Tom Tryon in a class taught by Sandy Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse.

Life
Who: Helen Jean Arthur (March 29, 1879 – December 9, 1939) and Agnes Morgan (October 31, 1879 - May 25, 1976)
Helen Arthur was born in Lancaster, Wisconsin to Lemuel John Arthur (a lawyer) and Mary Emma Ziegler Arthur. She attended Evanston Township High School, followed by a year at Northwestern University (1897-1898), and received a Bachelor of Law degree from New York University in 1901. She was the first woman to try a criminal case in New York State. During her time in law practice she co-authored the handbook "Domestic Employment: A Handbook" which sought to explain applicable laws to an area which was subject to abuse. Helen Arthur's legal work brought her into contact with Lillian Wald of the Henry Street Settlement. Arthur was in residence at the Settlement during 1906, and was one of two people known to have had romantic relationships with Wald. The two vacationed together during August-September 1906. While practicing law Arthur began writing theatre reviews for a small publication. She soon gave up her law practice and became the agent for actress Grace George. She performed secretarial work for the theatrical managers, the Shubert brothers Lee and Jacob J. Shubert. A 1915 notice in Variety announced her leaving the Shuberts brothers "after seven or eight years." The notice also mentioned that Arthur, an "occasional authoress," had written a skit based on the Shuberts featuring characters Jake and Lee and that Arthur had taken the "Jake" part. By 1915, Alice Lewisohn (later Alice Crowley) and her sister Irene Lewisohn were in need of legal help for their nascent theatrical project, the Neighborhood Playhouse. Alice called upon Arthur to assist her, becoming part of the staff, despite Sarah Cowell Le Moyne's (the head teacher) distaste for "all feminists who invade the profession of men." A 1916 article in Variety described Arthur as publicity director. Arthur was responsible for introducing Agnes Morgan (by that time her partner) to Lewisohn, who went on to become one of the Playhouse's most significant directors. In her memoir of the Playhouse, Lewisohn (now Crowley) described Arthur as "lithe, shirt-waisted, and stiff-colored Helen Arthur, dapper, bright-eyed, keen; and her friend the quiet, serious, watchful Agnes Morgan." A Playhouse performer described her as "quite a pixie, bright as a whistle, and a little devilish too." Of the relationship between Arthur and Agnes Morgan, another Playhouse performer said they "were a lesbian couple; just everyone knew." Helen Arthur also engaged in pursuits outside of the Playhouse. In 1916 she was the manager for actress Doris Keane. In 1918 Arthur managed the Over There Theatre League in which a number of actors sailed for France and England to perform for the troops stationed there. She was director of the Casino Theatre in Newport, Rhode Island from 1935-1939 during its summer seasons. The plays she produced there included “At Marian's” (with Laurette Taylor), “Night in the House” and two plays written by Morgan, “If Love Were All” and “Grandpa” (written under the pseudonym Cutler Hatch). In 1936 she and Morgan joined the Popular Price Unit of the Federal Theatre Project where they presented “American Holiday,” “Thirteenth Chair” and “Class of '29.” In 1938-1939 she was appointed executive director of the Ann Arbor Dramatic Season for 1938. After the Neighborhood Playhouse closed in 1927, Helen Arthur and Agnes Morgan formed their own company, Actor-Managers, Inc. Arthur continued to manage notable actresses including Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Florence Roberts as well as the singer Marion Kirby and dancer Angna Enters. She managed Ruth Draper for ten years, from 1929 until her death in 1939. Helen Arthur died of cerebral thrombosis at the Neurological Institute of New York. Her obituary stated that she had homes in New York City and Pleasantville, New York. Agnes Morgan was a director, playwright, actress and theatrical producer. She is most known for her association with the Neighborhood Playhouse where she was a director and functioned in numerous other roles. Morgan was born in Le Roy, New York to Frank H. Morgan, an editor, and Sarah L. Cutler Morgan, a teacher. Lewisohn described Morgan as "quiet, serious, watchful." In speaking the Lewisohn sister, founders of the Playhouse joining with Morgan and Helen Arthur, Lewisohn added "...never had five people cast in such different molds joined forces with more congeniality." In speaking of two comedies, “Great Catherine: Whom Glory Still Adores” by Shaw and “The Queen's Enemies” by Lord Dunsany, Crowley recalled that "the spirited quality in both productions was largely due to Agnes Morgan's skillful direction. Perhaps Great Catherine was paving the way to her gift in handling burlesque, which was later to create an infectious vogue on Grand Street and Broadway through the [Grand Street Follies].” Crowley described Morgan as an essential part of the Playhouse: “Agnes Morgan's apprentices were the stage crew, a neighborhood corps of assistant property boys, scene shifters, and painters But her technical facility was such that she was everywhere in the theatre, combining a collection of functions the mere mention of which would drive any "self-respecting" member of the theatre union of today into a decline. Skilled as an actor, she played an occasional role; she developed the technical side of lighting, and had an instinctive gift for direction, as for the function of stage manager. As an amateur she responded to any production need while pursuing her professional career as playwright.” Grand St. Follies: Neighborhood Playhouse had an in-house burlesque. While searching for an experimental play (promised to subscribers), Lewisohn suggested that the in-house burlesque be open to the subscribers. It had been the inspiration and creation of Agnes Morgan and Helen Arthur. The following season, staff were concerned as to whether they could equal the success of the first Grand Street Follies. "...it was clear that her genius for brilliant satire had flowered overnight. Morgan directed thirty-one out of forty-four dramas mounted at the Neighborhood Playhouse between 1915 and its closing in 1927, as well as dance and festival shows. After the Playhouse closed she formed her own company, originally sharing the name of the annual Grand Street Follies and later called Actor-Managers, Inc. which existed until 1939. She directed eight plays on Broadway between 1927 and 1935 as well as three plays for the Federal Theatre Project. In 1931 she wrote the play “If Love Were All” under the pseudonym Cutler Hatch and staged it as well. In 1940 Morgan became associate director of the Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey, a position she held until 1972. Morgan died in 1976 in San Bernardino, California.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-29 02:36 pm

Edward Burra (March 29, 1905 - October 22, 1976)

Edward John Burra was an English painter, draughtsman, and printmaker, best known for his depictions of the urban underworld, black culture and the Harlem scene of the 1930s.
Born: March 29, 1905, London, United Kingdom
Died: October 22, 1976, Hastings, United Kingdom
Education: Royal College of Art,
Chelsea College of Arts
Buried: Rye Cemetery, Rye, Rother District, East Sussex, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 15089223
Artwork: The Snack Bar, Dancing Skeletons, The Common Stair, more

School: Chelsea College of Arts (16 John Islip St, Westminster, London SW1P 4JU) is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London based in London, and is a leading British art and design institution with an international reputation. The School of Art merged with the Hammersmith School of Art, founded by Francis Hawke, to form the Chelsea School of Art in 1908. The newly formed school was taken over by the London County Council and a new building erected at Lime Grove, which opened with an extended curriculum. A trade school for girls was erected on the same site in 1914. The school acquired premises at Great Titchfield Street, and was jointly accommodated with Quintin Hogg's Polytechnic in Regent Street (a forerunner of the University of Westminster). The campus at Manresa Road introduced painting and graphic design in 1963, with both disciplines being particularly successful. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Barbara Ker-Seymer (1905-1993), Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), Edward Burra (1905-1976), William Chappell (1907-1994).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: The Royal College of Art or RCA (Kensington Gore, Kensington, London SW7 2EU) is a public research university in London. It offers postgraduate degrees in art and design to students from over 60 countries; it is the only entirely postgraduate art and design university in the world. In the 2016 QS World University Rankings by Subject, the RCA was placed first in the Art and Design subject area. The RCA was founded in Somerset House in 1837 as the Government School of Design or Metropolitan School of Design. In 1853 it was expanded and moved to Marlborough House, and then, in 1853 or 1857, to South Kensington, on the same site as the South Kensington Museum. It was renamed the Normal Training School of Art in 1857 and the National Art Training School in 1863. During the later XIX century it was primarily a teacher training college. In 1896 or 1897 the school received the name Royal College of Art, and the emphasis of teaching there shifted to the practice of art and design. The Darwin Building in Kensington Gore dates from the 1960s (English Heritage Building ID: 487894 (Grade II, 2001)). It was designed by a team of RCA staff members, H. T. Cadbury-Brown, Hugh Casson and Robert Goodden. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Edward Burra (1905-1976), Ossie Clark (1942–1996), Una Vincenzo, Lady Troubridge (1887–1963).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Early-Mid XIX century. Two storeys and attic. Three windows. Three pedimented dormers. Stuccoed, ground floor rusticated. Pilasters flank the front. Stringcourse. Wide eaves cornice. Hipped slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Venetian shutters to windows. Wide porch with coupled Doric columns.

Address: A268, Rye Foreign, East Sussex TN31 7UL, UK (50.97103, 0.72161)
English Heritage Building ID: 412891 (Grade II, 1961)

Place
Springfield Court is a substantial mansion house originally constructed in the XIX Century and has Italian architectural influences. The property has white painted rendered elevations with green shutters under a pitched Mansard lead and slate roof. Springfield Court is situated in the sought after Domesday village of Playden which lies exactly 1 mile to the north of Rye. Playden derives its name from the Saxon word of “Plaidena” which means “deer pasture” and to this day still retains its original charm. The property has a very private setting and is reputed to be the quintessential house of Playden. The historic Cinque Port town of Rye dates back to pre-Norman times. Originally the area was part of the Manor of Rameslie which in 1014 was promised to the Abbey of Fécamp in Normandy by Elthelred the Unready and during the reign of King Henry III the area was returned to the English Crown. Following this the area underwent a period of fortification with the construction of four gates and a town wall in 1380 under King Edward II. During the late XIII Century the Plantagenet Kings gave Rye the Charter of the Cinque Port which meant that it provided safe harbour for ships. Springfield Court is approached through electronic wrought iron gates via a sweeping gravel driveway which leads to a carriage turning area in front of the main house. Springfield Court has been fully restored to its original splendour with the highest degree of attention to detail and fixtures and fittings being used. Throughout the main reception rooms are impressive marble fireplaces, polished oak floors and internal window shutters. The property retains all of its period charm including ornate moulded cornicing, plasterwork ceilings and original paint colours being used wherever possible throughout the property. The interior combines Georgian grandeur and modern living. The library has the original wooden shelving from No 11 Downing Street and then The Treasury and there is air conditioning across all floors which can be controlled remotely by computer. The property has a commanding position over its gardens, grounds and as such many of the reception rooms and bedrooms have superb views. To the rear there is an impressive raised decking area which again has magnificent views over the formal western gardens and to the valley beyond. To the south of the main house there is a self contained cottage annexe which provides excellent additional accommodation and has two separate access points. From the gravel driveway, there is a fine central plastered and pillared portico with flagstone steps leading to the front door.
Life
Who: Edward John Burra (March 29, 1905 – October 22, 1976) and William Chappell (September 27, 1907 – January 1, 1994)
Edward Burra was an English painter, draughtsman, and printmaker, best known for his depictions of the urban underworld, black culture and the Harlem scene of the 1930s. Burra was born at his grandmother's house in Elvaston Place, London to Henry Curteis Burra, J.P. and Ermentrude Anne (née Robinson Luxford). His father was a barrister and later Chairman of East Sussex County Council. Edward attended preparatory school at Northaw Place in Potters Bar but in 1917 suffered from pneumonia and had to be withdrawn from school and home-educated. Burra took art classes with a Miss Bradley in Rye in 1921, then studied at Chelsea School of Art until 1923, and from 1923–5 at the Royal College of Art under drawing tutors Randolph Schwabe and Raymond Coxon. A fellow student at the Chelsea School of Art was William Chappell (ballet dancer, choreographer, theatre producer and director), who became a close and lifelong friend. Burra visited Paris with William Chappell in October 1925. In September–October 1927, Burra and Chappell travelled to the south of France. In May 1928 Burra visited Toulon with Chappell, Irene Hodgkins, Barbara Ker-Seymer, Brian Howard and Anthony Powell. From October to December 1928, he stayed in Paris with Chappell, Fedorovitch, Frederick Ashton, Cedric Morris, Arthur Lett-Haines, Arthur Mahoney and John Banting. In May 1929, he visited Paris with Chappell, Ashton, Fedorovitch, Mahoney and Birgit Batholin. Ashton's ballet A Day in a Southern Port (Rio Grande) opened at the Savoy, London in November 1931 with sets and costumes by Burra. In 1940, Burra suffered terribly from rheumatism and gout. He spent much of the War years at his home, Springfield, near Rye as travel is difficult. In 1953 the Burra family left Springfield for Chapel House in the middle of Rye which had been built for them. In 1969 Burra moved from Chapel House to 2 Springfield Cottages, a gardener’s cottage next to his former home, Springfield at Playden, near Rye. After breaking his hip in 1974, his health declined sharply and he died in Hastings in 1976. He is buried at Rye Cemetery (Rye Hill, Rye, East Sussex, TN31 7NH). William Chappell was a British dancer, ballet designer and director. He is most noted for his designs for more than 40 ballets or revues, including many of the early works of Sir Frederick Ashton and Dame Ninette de Valois. Chappell was born in Wolverhampton, the son of theatrical manager Archie Chappell and his wife Edith Eva Clara Black (née Edith Blair-Staples). After his parents separated, Chapell and his mother moved to Balham, London, where she pursued a career as a fashion journalist. Edith's daughter by her first marriage, romantic novelist Hermina Black, Chappell's half-sister, was living nearby in Wandsworth. Chappell studied at the Chelsea School of Art where aged 14 he met fellow students Edward Burra and Barbara Ker-Seymer forging a lifelong friendship. He did not take up dancing seriously until he was 17 when he studied under Marie Rambert, whom he met through his friend Frederick Ashton. For two years Chappell and Ashton toured Europe with Ida Rubenstein's company under the direction of Massine and Nijinska. He retired to his home in Rye and died there after a long illness in 1994.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-29 02:32 pm

Dora Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)

Dora de Houghton Carrington, known generally as Carrington, was a British painter and decorative artist, remembered in part for her association with members of the Bloomsbury Group, especially the writer Lytton Strachey.
Born: March 29, 1893, Hereford, United Kingdom
Died: March 11, 1932, Newbury, United Kingdom
Education: Slade School of Fine Art
Bedford High School, Bedfordshire
Lived: The Mill, Tidmarsh, Reading, West Berkshire RG8, UK (51.46833, -1.08754)
Ham Spray House, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 3QZ, UK (51.3681, -1.50219)
Buried: under the laurels in the garden of the Ham Spray House, Wiltshire, England (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 2859
Artwork: Farm at Watendlath, Spanish Landscape with Mountains, more
Siblings: Noël Carrington

Giles Lytton Strachey was a British writer and critic. Dora Carrington was a British painter and decorative artist, remembered in part for her association with members
of the Bloomsbury Group, especially Lytton Strachey. Though Strachey spoke openly about his homosexuality with his Bloomsbury friends (he had a relationship with John Maynard Keynes, who also was part of the Bloomsbury group), it was not widely publicized until the late 1960s, in a biography by Michael Holroyd. In 1921, Carrington agreed to marry Ralph Partridge, not for love but to secure the 3-way relationship. Strachey himself had been much more sexually interested in Partridge, as well as in various other young men, including a secret sadomasochistic relationship with Roger Senhouse (later the head of publisher Secker & Warburg). Dora Carrington committed suicide out of grief in 1932, shortly after Lytton Strachey’s death. Ralph married Frances Marshall on March 2, 1933. They lived happily at Ham Spray until Ralph’s death in 1960.

Together from 1917 to 1932: 15 years.
Dora de Houghton Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)
Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 –January 21, 1932)
Ralph Partridge (1894 – November 30, 1960)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Bedford High School for Girls (Bromham Rd, Bedford MK40 2BS) was an independent school for pupils aged 7 to 18 in Bedford. It was one of a number of schools run by the Harpur Trust. The school was opened on May 8, 1882. It was built on the site of former Harpur Trust cottage almshouses. There were 43 girls on that first day. The school was located on its original site in Harpur ward, near the centre of Bedford, until its closure in 2012. In September 2010 the junior department of the school merged with the junior department of Dame Alice Harpur School. From September 2011 to September 2012 the senior schools also merged, the new school is known as Bedford Girls' School. The daughter of a Liverpool merchant, Dora Carrington (1893–1932) was born in Hereford, and attended the all-girls' Bedford High School which emphasized art. Her parents also paid for her to receive extra lessons in drawing.

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School: The UCL Slade School of Fine Art (informally The Slade, University College London, Gower St, Kings Cross, London WC1E 6BT) is the art school of University College London (UCL) and is based in London. It is world-renowned and is consistently ranked as the UK's top art and design educational institution. The school is organised as a department of UCL's Faculty of Arts and Humanities. The school traces its roots back to 1868 when lawyer and philanthropist Felix Slade (1788–1868) bequeathed funds to establish three Chairs in Fine Art, to be based at Oxford University, Cambridge University and University College London, where six studentships were endowed. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Dora Carrington (1893-1932), Ralph Chubb (1892-1960), Dorothy Brett (1883-1977), Duncan Grant (1885-1978), Eileen Gray (1878–1976), Derek Jarman (1942-1994), Mary Josephine Bedford (1861–1955), Robert Medley (1905-1994), Oliver Messel (1904-1978), William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1881–1941); Roger Rees (born 1944), Alix Strachey (1892–1973), Henry Scott Tuke (1858–1929), William Dobell (1899-1970).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: Once home to the Bloomsbury group, The Mill at Tidmarsh in Berkshire is still an inspiring abode. The Mill was last on the market in 2010 for £1.995.000.

Address: Sulham Hill, Tidmarsh, West Berkshire RG8 8ER, UK (51.46833, -1.08754)
English Heritage Building ID: 400899 (Grade II, 1984)

Place
"Sounds too good to be alright!" wrote Dora Carrington to Lytton Strachey on the morning of October 19, 1917. She was poring over the particulars of The Mill at Tidmarsh in Berkshire. There was electric light and "bath H & C.” It was romantic and lovely, and the rent was £52 a year for a three-year lease. Carrington first set up house with Lytton Strachey in November 1917, when they moved together to Tidmarsh Mill House, near Pangbourne, Berkshire. Carrington met Ralph Partridge, an Oxford friend of her younger brother Noel, in 1918. Strachey fell in love with Partridge and eventually, in 1921, Carrington agreed to marry him, not for love but to hold the menage a trois together with Lytton Strachey. Strachey paid for the wedding, and also accompanied the couple on their honeymoon in Venice.

Life
Who: Dora de Houghton Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)
Dora Carrington moved into the mill with Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) just as he was publishing “Eminent Victorians,” the book that made him famous. The pair were already prominent in the Bloomsbury circle, which included Clive and Vanessa Bell (1879-1961), whose highly decorated house, Charleston in Sussex, is open to the public. Lytton and Carrington were frequently seen at Lady Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938)’s parties at Garsington Manor. He was a spidery, bearded intellectual, widely known to be homosexual, she a Slade-trained artist with a pageboy haircut and no first name. Their decision to live together raised eyebrows inside and outside their group.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Love and literary retreat, a Wiltshire farmhouse was a bliss for a Bloomsbury threesome. Ham Spray House was last on the market in 2008 for £2.750.000.

Address: Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 3QZ, UK (51.3681, -1.50219)

Place
In 1924, Lytton Strachey and Ralph Partridge, members of the Bloomsbury group, bought Ham Spray House, and several of that group and other writers and artists spent time there from then until Ralph died in 1960, including Dora Carrington and Frances Partridge. Ham Spray, which cost Partridge and Strachey £2,300, suited their communal living and working arrangements. Surrounded by fields, and with a local shop selling Wellington boots, it was "a perfect English country house.” "We believed there was no view more beautiful, more inexhaustible in England, and no house more lovable than Ham Spray," wrote Frances in her diary. The rooms are of Georgian proportions, with high ceilings and cornices and pretty fireplaces. Carrington’s paintings hung on every wall, alongside works by Duncan Grant, Vanessa Bell and Augustus John. While Lytton Strachey wrote in his upstairs study, looking out across Ham Hill and Inkpen Beacon, Carrington painted in a studio above the former granary. In the evenings, they gathered in the music room, where there was a piano, gramophone and ping-pong table. In Strachey’s former study – now a bedroom - there are surviving works by Carrington, including a mural of an owl and a self-portrait of her riding across the Downs, painted on a tile. On a door in the corner of the room is a trompe d’oeil of a bookshelf, featuring titles such as “Deception” by Jane Austen and “The Empty Room” by Virginia Woolf.

Life
Who: Ralph Partridge (1894 – November 30, 1960)
Dora Carrington was in love with Lytton Strachey, who loved Ralph Partridge, an ex-army officer; Carrington loved Strachey, but married Partridge to stabilise their triangular relationship. In 1924, they set up home together at the XIX-century farmhouse outside the village of Ham, in Wiltshire, along with Ralph’s lover (and later wife) Frances Marshall (1900-2004.) Strachey died of stomach cancer at Ham Spray in January 1932. Carrington, who saw no purpose in a life without Strachey, committed suicide two months after his death by shooting herself with a gun borrowed from her friend, Hon. Bryan Guinness (later 2nd Baron Moyne.) Her body was cremated and the ashes buried under the laurels in the garden of Ham Spray House. Strachey's modest little brass plaque is in the family church at Chew Magna, Somerset. The Partridges had a son, Burgo, and continued to live at the house for almost 30 years, entertaining a roll-call of artists and writers, among them E.M. Forster and Patrick Leigh Fermor. Frances sold the house a year after Ralph’s death in 1961, insisting that it did not become a shrine to the Bloomsbury Group.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-29 02:28 pm

Denton Welch (March 29, 1915 - December 30, 1948)

Maurice Denton Welch was an English writer and painter, admired for his vivid prose and precise descriptions.
Born: March 29, 1915, Shanghai, China
Died: December 30, 1948, Sevenoaks, United Kingdom
Education: Repton School
Lived: 34 Croom's Hill, Greenwich
Middle Orchard, Long Mill Lane, Crouch, Sevenoaks, Kent, TN15 8QB
33 The Little Boltons, Earls Court, SW10
Find A Grave Memorial# 161889966

Denton Welch started at the Goldsmith School of Art in New Cross in 1933, where he studied for 3 years; among his teachers was the printmaker and graphic designer Edward Bawden. He moved into a house near Greenwich Park where the landlady was Evelyn Sinclair, who became a close lifelong friend. Eric Oliver was introduced to Welch in November 1943 at a time when Oliver, a conscientious objector, was working on the land and Welch was living as a semi-invalid, following a road accident when he was 20, near Hadlow, in Kent. The intensity of Welch's emotions was not returned, for on his own admission Oliver was incapable of love ("You must never take me seriously," he wrote in the only letter of his to Welch which survives), but, once they had sorted out the imbalance in their relationship, Oliver moved in with him, and as Welch's physical condition deteriorated Oliver nursed him with practical expertise. When Welch died on December 30, 1948, in Oliver's arms, the manuscript of his third and finest novel, A Voice Through a Cloud, lay by the bed, and Oliver was instrumental in John Lehmann’s publishing it in 1950, with a foreword signed by Oliver but probably written by Lehmann.

Together from 1943 to 1948: 5 years.
Maurice Denton Welch (March 29, 1915 - December 30, 1948)
Eric Oliver (October 6, 1914 - April 1, 1995)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Repton School (The Lodge, Repton, Derby DE65 6FH) is a co-educational independent school for day and boarding pupils in Repton, Derbyshire. The school has around 660 pupils aged between 13 and 18, of whom 451 are boarders. Repton School taught only boys for its first 400 years; Repton started accepting girls in the sixth form early in the 1970s, and within 20 years became completely coeducational. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986), novelist and screenwriter; Basil Rathbone (1892-1967), actor most known for playing Sherlock Holmes in the Sherlock Holmes (1939 film series); Denton Welch (1915-1948), painter and poet.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Denton Welch (1915-1948) started at the Goldsmith School of Art in New Cross in 1933, where he studied for three years. At first he lived in a house where his brother Bill was also rooming, and then he moved into 34 Crooms Hill, London SE10 8ER, a house near Greenwich Park where the landlady was Evelyn Sinclair, who became a close, lifelong friend. The house belonged to Miss Sinclair’s brother, Braxton. It had an interesting combination of architectural styles; there was a lovely view across the park; the road was absolutely quiet.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Denton Welch (1915-1948), Chinese born (Shanghai) English writer and artist, stayed at 33 The Little Boltons, Kensington, London SW10 9LL, in 1931 with his cousin, when he ran away from school. He recorded his childhood in China in his fictionalised autobiography of his early years, “Maiden Voyage” (1943). With the help and patronage of Edith Sitwell and John Lehmann this became a small but lasting success and made for him a distinct and individual reputation.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: On June 7, 1935, Denton Welch (1915-1948) was traveling by bicycle to go visit his aunt when he was hit by a car. His spine was fractured, and for a few months he was paralyzed from the chest down. He was able to learn to walk again, but with difficulty. For the rest of his life he had kidney and bladder infections, which would cause frequent and severe headaches. After the accident, Welch first spent time at National Hospital, and then in the Southcourt Nursing Home in Broadstairs, Kent. When he left the nursing home July 1936, Welch rented an apartment with Evelyn Sinclair in Tonbridge in order that he could be close to his doctor, John Easton. Sinclair remained with Welch as his housekeeper at his different residences until May 1946, two months after Welch and his partner Eric Oliver moved to Middle Orchard (Long Mill Lane, Crouch, Sevenoaks, Kent, TN15 8QB), the country house of Noël and Bernard Adeney at Crouch, near Borough Green, Kent. However, Sinclair returned to Middle Orchard in July 1948 to assist Welch until his death. He died December 30, 1948, at Middle Orchard Cottage in Crouch, Kent.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-29 02:24 pm

Cecil Arthur Lewis (March 29, 1898 - January 27, 1997)

Cecil Arthur Lewis MC was a British fighter pilot who flew in World War I. He went on to co-found the British Broadcasting Company and enjoy a long career as a writer, notably of the aviation classic Sagittarius Rising.
Born: March 29, 1898, Birkenhead, United Kingdom
Died: January 27, 1997, London, United Kingdom
Lived: Arolo, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 176217775
Books: Sagittarius Rising, Farewell to wings, Gemini to Joburg, Turn Right for Corfu, A way to be
Movies: Pygmalion, Carmen, The Indiscretions of Eve
Awards: Academy Award for Best Writing Adapted Screenplay
Battles and wars: World War I, World War II

National Park: Charles Ricketts died on 7 October 1931. He was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were to be scattered to the four winds in Richmond Park. His friends found out that the shoe box they were given contained a seemingly endless quantity of ashes, so they decided in the end that Cecil Lewis would take the remaining ashes to be scattered in Arolo near the Lago Maggiore. The Arolo land had been a present from Ricketts to Lewis. Lewis himself hollowed out a niche of the cliff, placed Ricketts's head in bronze by F.R. Wells facing the mountains, and a plaque was attached underneath it, “duly inscribed,” as Lewis wrote. The inscription is probably his, but the carving itself may have been a local job.

Address: 22010 Moltrasio CO, Italy (45.85111, 9.08944)

Life
Who: Cecil Arthur Lewis MC (March 29, 1898 – January 27, 1997)
Cecil Lewis was a British fighter pilot who flew in WWI. He went on to co-found the British Broadcasting Company and enjoy a long career as a writer, notably of the aviation classic “Sagittarius Rising” (some scenes from which were represented in the film “Aces High”). While at the BBC in the 1920s he was taken under the wing of the artist Charles Ricketts, who awakened his creative heart, giving him a love of art and language. When Lewis discovered a villa in Italy Ricketts gave him pounds 300 to buy it. Between the wars Cecil Lewis created a beautiful retreat out of a rocky wilderness overlooking Lake Maggiore in northern Italy, which he said was always "waiting to restore me to sanity and peace". He edited the letters and journals of Charles Ricketts, “Self-Portrait” (1939), which were, like his 1928 translation from the French of Paul Raynal's “The Unknown Factor,” later adapted for television. He wrote and produced plays for stage, television and screen, including the adaptation of two Shaw plays for the cinema - his “Pygmalion” (1938) won him an Academy Award. In 1991 he wrote and presented on Radio 3 “Between Ourselves,” a dramatised portrait of Ricketts, whom he had so greatly admired in younger days, with Sir John Gielgud in the principal part. A few months later, by now 1993, Lewis published “Sagittarius Surviving,” a further flying autobiography. In the same year he wrote an introduction to Antoine de St Exupery's “Wind, Sand and Stars,” and two years later his autobiographical “All My Yesterdays” appeared. He was the last surviving British flying ace of WWI. George Bernard Shaw wrote of Lewis: "This prince of pilots has had a charmed life in every sense of the word. He is a thinker, a master of words and a bit of a poet."

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1532906692
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2017-03-29 02:19 pm

Arthur Everett Austin, Jr. (December 18, 1900 – March 29, 1957)

Arthur Everett "Chick" Austin, Jr. was the innovative and pacesetting director of the Wadsworth Atheneum from 1927 through 1944.
Born: December 18, 1900, Massachusetts, United States
Died: March 29, 1957, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Education: Harvard University
Phillips Academy
Noble and Greenough School
Lived: A. Everett Austin House, 130 Scarborough St, Hartford, CT 06105, USA (41.78006, -72.70928)
Buried: Cemetery on the Hill, Windham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 145228268

School: Phillips Academy Andover (also known as Phillips Academy, Andover, or PA, 180 Main St, Andover, MA 01810) is a co-educational university-preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9–12, along with a post-graduate (PG) year. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957); Daniel Pinkham (1923–2006), George Tooker (1920-2011), John Horne Burns (1916–1953), William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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School: The Noble and Greenough School, commonly known as Nobles (10 Campus Dr, Dedham, MA 02026), is a coeducational, nonsectarian day and five-day boarding school for students in grades seven through twelve. It is located near Boston on a 187-acre (0.76 km2) campus that borders the Charles River in Dedham, Massachusetts. The current enrollment of 603 students includes a balance of boys and girls. After graduation, all members of the senior class go on to accredited four-year colleges and universities. Nobles was founded in 1866 by George Washington Copp Noble, in Boston, Massachusetts, as an all-boys preparatory school for Harvard University. It became known as Noble & Greenough in 1892. During WWI, the school merged with Boston-based Volkman School, which had faced a drastically declining student population due to the headmaster's German origins. There is a monument to the Volkman School on the Nobles campus. In 1922, the school moved from Boston to its current location in Dedham. The Dedham property was previously the Nickerson family estate. The grounds were designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. It discontinued its lower school at this time, though the lower school still operates today as the Dexter School. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Arthur Everett Austin, Jr. (1900-1957), director of the Wadsworth Atheneum; John F. Kennedy (1917–1963).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Marshall Kirk (1957-2005) was valedictorian of his high school class and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980, majoring in psychology, and writing his honors thesis on the testing of gifted children. In 1987 Kirk partnered with Hunter Madsen (writing under the pen-name "Erastes Pill") to write an essay, "The Overhauling of Straight America." The pair developed their argument in the 1989 book "After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ’90s." The book outlined a public relations strategy for the LGBT movement.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Agnes Morgan (1879-1976) attended Radcliffe College and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1901 and her Master of Arts in 1903. In 1904 she attended George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop at Harvard University.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Harry Elkins Widener (1885-1912) was the son of George and Eleanor Widener. He lived in Elkins Park, PA. Harry studied at Hill School, a private establishment in Pottstown, PA; graduating in 1903 he left to study at Harvard (graduated 1907). Harry was a noted collector of rare books, included in his collection was a Shakespeare Folio and a Gutenberg Bible. Harry developed his bibliophilic interests while in college, when he did research among early books with coloured plates illustrating costumes for a Hasty Pudding Theatrical. In the spring of 1912, he went to England to buy books (including the second edition of Bacon's Essais, 1598) and it was while returning from this visit that he lost his life along with many of the books purchased. Harry boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg with his father and mother, George Widener's valet Edwin Keeping and Mrs Widener's maid Emily Geiger. The Widener's occupied cabins C-80-82. On the night of April 14th Harry and his parents threw a party in honour of Captain Smith which was attended by some of the most wealthy passengers on board the Titanic. Later that night Harry helped his mother into boat 4 and then stood back to await his fate, at one point he was joined by William Ernest Carter who advised him to try for a boat but Harry "I'll think I'll stick to the big ship, Billy, and take a chance." A story, never confirmed by Mrs Widener, romanticizes the death of her son. He was about to step into a lifeboat that would have saved his life when he remembered a newly acquired and unique copy of Bacon's Essais and ran back to get it. After his death the librarians turned to Mrs Widener for a donation in memory of her bibliophile son. His mother gave $2,000,000 for the construction of the building that would also house her son's collection and in 1915 the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library was dedicated. Horace Trumbauer (hon. A.M. 1915) of Philadelphia designed the library building. Harvard still pays for fresh flowers to be placed under a portrait of Widener in the chapel.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: The A. Everett Austin House was the home of Wadsworth Atheneum director Arthur Everett "Chick" Austin, Jr. Chick Austin built the house in 1930 after seeing the Palladian Villas of the Veneto on his honeymoon. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1994, for its distinctive architectural style and for its association with Austin, the Atheneum's director 1927-44.

Address: 130 Scarborough St, Hartford, CT 06105, USA (41.78006, -72.70928)
National Register of Historic Places: 94001189, 1994

The house is a neo-Palladian homage to Vincenzo Scamozzi's Villa Ferreti, built in 1596 in Dolo, Republic of Venice. The house, only one room deep, is long and narrow, 86 feet in length by 18 feet in depth. In the front elevation, the central three-bay pedimented pavilion is flanked by four-bay wings. The bays are defined by shallow, two-story Ionic pilasters. The walls of the pavilion and wings are in the same plane, since the pavilion does not project. The planar effect is emphasized by the wall sheathing, which is flush boarding, tongue-in-groove. The twelve flat pilasters rise with entasis from bases of double torus moldings to stylized Ionic capitals. Two string courses, one at first-floor ceiling height, the other below second-floor window sills, establish a horizontal orientation to balance the strong upward thrust of the pilasters. Four stone steps lead up to the double front door in the central bay of the pavilion. Above the door, a balustrade is suggested by half-round, vase-shaped balusters applied to the spandrel under the tall, double round-arched window. First- and second-floor windows in the flanking bays of the pavilion are blind. Windows in the wings are double casements, four panes high at the first floor, three at the second; two are blind at each floor. The pavilion pilasters support a plain architrave and pulvinated frieze. The pediment above is without embellishment in its tympanum, and is wider than the cross gable behind it. The entablature continues under the eaves of the cross-gable roof. After Austin's departure from Hartford in 1946, Helen Goodwin Austin remained in residence. In 1985, she and her two children, David and Sarah Austin, donated the house to the Wadsworth Atheneum, which provides guided visits of the property. It is among the homes featured in Bob Vila's Guide to Historic Homes: In Search of Palladio, a six-hour A&E Network study of the work and influence of the Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio. The house was restored in 2000.

Life
Who: Arthur Everett "Chick" Austin, Jr. (December 18, 1900 – March 29, 1957)
Arthur Everett Austin, Jr. was the innovative and pacesetting director of the Wadsworth Atheneum from 1927 through 1944. Austin's visionary gift included persistence in the introduction of then-modern theater and modern design and especially contemporaneous art. Salvador Dalí, Alexander Calder, and Gertrude Stein benefited from his advocacy. Austin was appointed director of the Wadsworth Atheneum at the age of 26, and simultaneously joined the staff of Trinity College, Hartford, where he founded the fine arts department and taught throughout his tenure while director of the Wadsworth. In 1929, Austin married Helen Goodwin in Paris. The Goodwins were among the founders of Hartford, and related to and closely allied with the family of Hartford-born J. Pierpont Morgan, one of the Wadsworth Atheneum's great benefactors. Eventually they both realized that Chick’s affairs with Tommy Hughes, Jim Hellyar and others were becoming public knowledge and that they were headed for public scandal. Helen agreed that it would be wise if Chick left Hartford. When in 1947 he was offered the directorship of the Ringling Museum in Sarasota, which held the largest collection of baroque paintings in the country, he accepted, and took off for Florida with Jim. He and Helen remained friends, confidants, and married for the next ten years. But when he became ill with cancer he returned to Hartford and died with Helen and his two grown children, but not Jim, at his bedside. He is buried at Cemetery On the Hill (Range Rd, Windham, NH 03087).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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ISBN-10: 1544066589
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2017-03-28 02:18 pm

Katharine Lee Bates (August 12, 1859 – March 28, 1929)

Katharine Lee Bates was an American songwriter. She is remembered as the author of the words to the anthem "America the Beautiful". She popularized "Mrs. Santa Claus" through her poem Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride.
Born: August 12, 1859, Falmouth, Massachusetts, United States
Died: March 28, 1929, Wellesley, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Wellesley College
Wellesley High School
Lived: 16 Main St, Falmouth, MA 02540, USA (41.55466, -70.61968)
Buried: Oak Grove Cemetery, Falmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 1579
Genre: Praise & worship
People also search for: Samuel A. Ward, Margaret Evans Price, more

Katharine Lee Bates was an American songwriter. She is remembered as the author
of the words to the anthem America the Beautiful. She popularized "Mrs. Santa Claus" through her poem Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride (1889). In 1887, while teaching at Wellesley, Bates met fellow teacher Katharine Coman. Bates lived in Wellesley with Coman, who was a history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department. The pair lived together for twenty-five years until Coman's death in 1915. In 1922, Bates published Yellow Clover: A Book
of Remembrance, a collection of poems written "to or about my Friend" Katharine Coman, some of which had been published in Coman's lifetime. Some describe the couple as intimate lesbian partners, citing as an example Bates' 1891 letter to Coman: "It was never very possible to leave Wellesley [for good], because so many love-anchors held me there, and it seemed least of all possible when I had just found the long-desired way to your dearest heart...Of course I want to come to you, very much as I want to come to Heaven." Others contest the use of the term lesbian to describe such a "Boston marriage".

Together from 1887 to 1915: 28 years.
Katharine Ellis Coman (November 23, 1857 - January 11, 1915)
Katharine Lee Bates (August 12, 1859 – March 28, 1929)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Private, women-focused school founded in 1870 and known for its humanities programs.

Address: 106 Central St, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA (42.29357, -71.30592)
Phone: +1 781-283-1000
Website: http://www.wellesley.edu/

Place
Vida Dutton Scudder taught English literature from 1887 at Wellesley College, where she became an associate professor in 1892 and full professor in 1910. Wellesley College is a private women’s liberal-arts college in the town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, west of Boston. Founded in 1870, Wellesley is a member of the original Seven Sisters Colleges. Wellesley is the highest ranking women’s college in the U.S., and one of the top liberal arts colleges, ranking 4th by U.S. News & World Report. The school is also the highest endowed women’s college. For the 2014–15 year admissions cycle, Wellesley admitted 29% of its applicants. The college is known for allowing its students to cross-register at MIT, Babson, Brandeis, and Olin College. It is also a member of a number of exchange programs with other small colleges, including opportunities for students to study a year at Amherst, Bowdoin, Connecticut College, Dartmouth, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Trinity, Vassar, Wesleyan, and Wheaton. Wellesley was founded by Pauline and Henry Fowle Durant, believers in educational opportunity for women. Wellesley was founded with the intention to prepare women for "great conflicts, for vast reforms in social life." Its charter was signed on March 17, 1870, by Massachusetts Governor William Claflin. The original name of the college was the Wellesley Female Seminary; its renaming to Wellesley College was approved by the Massachusetts legislature on March 7, 1873. Wellesley first opened its doors to students on September 8, 1875. The original architecture of the college consisted of one very large building, College Hall, which was approximately 150 metres (490 ft) in length and five stories in height. The architect was Hammatt Billings. From its completion in 1875 until its destruction by fire in 1914, it was both an academic building and residential building. A group of residence halls, known as the Tower Court complex, are located on top of the hill where the old College Hall once stood.

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Wellesley:
• Katharine Anthony (1877-1965), biographer best known for “The Lambs” (1945), a controversial study of the British writers Charles and Mary Lamb. She taught at Wellesley College in 1907.
• Katharine Lee Bates (1859-1929), full professor of English literature. Bates lived in Wellesley with Katharine Coman at 70 Curve St, Wellesley, MA 02482, historic home built in 1907 by Bates, while she was a professor at Wellesley College. Bates was born in Falmouth, Massachusetts, the daughter of Congregational pastor William Bates and his wife, Cornelia Frances Lee. She graduated from Wellesley High School in 1874 and from Wellesley College with a B.A. in 1880. Wellesley High School (50 Rice St, Wellesley Hills, MA 02481) is a public high school in the affluent town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, educating students on grades 9 through 12. In 2016 it was ranked the 21st best high school in Massachusetts and the 467th best public high school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, earning a Gold Medal. The old school building was originally built as a public works project in 1938 during the Great Depression, designed by Perry Shaw and Hepburn and built by M. Spinelli and Sons Co., Inc. The building has been modified with several additions throughout its existence, most recently with a new fitness center. The 1938 building was replaced in 2012 with a brand new state of the art building in the former parking lot.
• Katharine Coman (1857-1915), history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department.
• Florence Converse (1871-1967)
• Mary “Molly” Dewson (1874–1962), graduated as a social worker in 1897. She was senior class president and her classmates believed she might one day be elected president of the United States.
• Marion Dickerman (1890-1983), suffragist, educator, vice-principal of the Todhunter School and an intimate of Eleanor Roosevelt.
• Grace Frick (1903-1979), literary scholar and Marguerite Yourcenar’s intimate companion.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) attended the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics, which later developed as the Department of Hygiene of Wellesley College. After graduating, she and her father moved to Washington, D.C. to be with his brother Francis and family. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller.
• Lilian Wyckoff Johnson (1864-1956), after an early education in private schools, in 1878 was sent to Dayton, Ohio to take refuge during a yellow fever outbreak; while there, she attended the Cooper Academy. Her parents then sent the 15 year old Lilian and her sister to Wellesley College in 1879, with the first two years being spent in preparatory school. However, Lilian had to return home upon the death of her mother in 1883, and was unable to complete her studies.
• Esther Lape (1881-1981), a graduate of Wellesley College, taught English at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, the University of Arizona, and Barnard College in New York City. Her life-partner was the scholar and lawyer, Elizabeth Fisher Read, who was Eleanor Roosevelt's personal attorney and financial advisor.
• Jeannette Augustus Marks (1875-1964), English and Theater professor at Mount Holyoke until her retirement in 1941 and Mary Emma Woolley’s companion.
• Julia Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954).
• Charlotte Anita Whitney (1867–1955), American women's rights activist, political activist, suffragist, and early Communist Labor Party of America and Communist Party USA organizer in California.
• Mary Emma Woolley (1863–1947), educator, peace activist and women’s suffrage supporter. She was the first female student to attend Brown University and served as the 11th President of Mount Holyoke College from 1900-1937.

Life
Who: (Julia) Vida Dutton Scudder (December 15, 1861 – October 9, 1954)
Vida Dutton Scudder was an educator, writer, and welfare activist in the social gospel movement. In 1885 she and Clara French (1863-1888) were the first American women admitted to the graduate program at Oxford, where she was influenced by York Powell and John Ruskin. While in England she was also influenced by Leo Tolstoi and by George Bernard Shaw and Fabian Socialism. Scudder and French returned to Boston in 1886. French died in 1888 (from typhoid fever, buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Syracuse, NY), and from 1919 until her death, Scudder lived with Florence Converse (1871-1967.) Converse graduated from Wellesley College in 1893 and was a member of the editorial staff of the The Churchman from 1900 to 1908, when she joined the staff of the Atlantic Monthly. In Wellesley they resided at 45 Leighton Rd, Wellesley, MA 02482. A 6000 square foot single family home with 5 bedrooms built in 1912, it was last sold in 1987 for $460,000. Scudder retired from Wellesley in 1927 and received the title of professor emeritus. She became the first dean of the Summer School of Christian Ethics in 1930 at Wellesley. In 1931 she lectured weekly at the New School for Social Research in New York. She published an autobiography, “On Journey,” in London in 1937, and a collection of essays, “The Privilege of Age,” in New York in 1939. Vida Dutton Scudder died at Wellesley, Massachusetts, on October 10, 1954. Florence Converse and Vida Dutton Scudder are buried side by side at Newton Cemetery (791 Walnut St, Newton Centre, MA 02459).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: The historic home of Katharine Lee Bates, just off the village green has been lovingly restored and sparkles at the entrance to Falmouth’s downtown area.

Address: 16 Main St, Falmouth, MA 02540, USA (41.55466, -70.61968)

Place
Built in 1810
The birthplace of Katharine Lee Bates, author of "America the Beautiful," sold for $1,200,000 in 2013. Period detailing and colors bring this home to life and evoke a feeling of a bygone era with the comforts of a modern home. Step into the gracious foyer with turned staircase, original wood floors and elegant sitting rooms with fireplaces. To the rear of the first floor there is a spacious dining room with fireplace, office/bedroom and a reconstructed ell which houses the masterfully designed efficient kitchen and mud room. The second floor offers three additional bedrooms and access to a private roof top deck. Both the basement and attic rooms have been reconditioned to expose original stone, brick and timber components in excellent condition and mechanicals have all been updated. Katharine Lee Bates was born in this house in 1859, the daughter of the minister of the First Congregational Church. Her father died shortly after her birth, leaving the family in dire financial straits. Although the family moved from Falmouth when Katharine was 12, she always remembered the town fondly as “a friendly little village that practiced a neighborly socialism without having heard the term.” When she was in her sixties, she included “When Lincoln Died” in her “America the Beautiful” collection. It describes Falmouth as she remembered it as a five-year-old when the little whaling village learned of Lincoln’s assassination.

Life
Who: Katharine Lee Bates (August 12, 1859 – March 28, 1929)
Katharine Lee Bates was a songwriter. She is remembered as the author of the words to the anthem "America the Beautiful.” She popularized "Mrs. Santa Claus" through her poem “Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride” (1889.) She graduated from Wellesley High School in 1874 and from Wellesley College with a B.A. in 1880. She returned to Wellesley as an instructor, then an associate professor 1891–93 when she was awarded an M.A. and became full professor of English literature. She studied at Oxford University during 1890–91. While teaching at Wellesley, she was elected a member of the newly formed Pi Gamma Mu honor society for the social sciences because of her interest in history and politics. Bates lived in Wellesley with Katharine Coman (1857-1915), who was a history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department. The pair lived together for twenty-five years until Coman’s death from breast cancer in 1915. In 1922, Bates published “Yellow Clover: A Book of Remembrance,” a collection of poems written "to or about my Friend" Katharine Coman, some of which had been published in Coman’s lifetime. Some describe the couple as intimate lesbian partners, citing as an example Bates’ 1891 letter to Coman: "It was never very possible to leave Wellesley [for good], because so many love-anchors held me there, and it seemed least of all possible when I had just found the long-desired way to your dearest heart... Of course I want to come to you, very much as I want to come to Heaven." Others contest the use of the term lesbian to describe such a "Boston marriage.” Bates died in Wellesley, Massachusetts, on September 28, 1929, and is buried at Oak Grove Cemetery (Falmouth, MA 02540).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-28 02:15 pm

Jane Rule (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007)

Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction.
Born: March 28, 1931, Plainfield, New Jersey, United States
Died: November 27, 2007, Galiano Island, Canada
Education: Mills College
Buried: Galiano Island Cemetery, Galiano Island, Capital Regional District, British Columbia, Canada
Buried alongside: Helen Sonthoff
Find A Grave Memorial# 23188687
Movies: Desert Hearts
Parents: Arthur Richards Rule, Carlotta Jane

Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction. Rule studied at Mills College in California. She graduated in 1952, moved to England for a short while and entered in a relationship with critic John Hulcoop. She taught at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she met Helen Sonthoff and fell in love with her. Rule moved with Hulcoop to work at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver in 1956, but Sonthoff visited her and they began to live together until Sonthoff's death in 2000. Rule died in 2007 at her home on Galiano Island due to complications from liver cancer, refusing any treatment that would take her from the island, opting instead for the care and support that could be provided by her niece, her partner, her many Galiano friends and neighbors. The ashes of Jane Vance Rule were interred in the Galiano Island Cemetery next to those of her beloved Helen. In 1964, Rule published Desert of the Heart: the novel featured two women who fall in love with each other; Donna Deitch (1985) later made it into a movie, which quickly became a lesbian classic.

Together from 1954 to 2000: 46 years.
Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff (September 11, 1916 - January 3, 2000)
Jane Vance Rule (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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School: Mills College (5000 MacArthur Blvd, Oakland, CA 94613) is a liberal arts and sciences college located in the San Francisco Bay Area. Mills was founded as the Young Ladies Seminary in 1852 in Benicia, California. The school was relocated to Oakland, California, in 1871, and became the first women's college west of the Rockies. Designed in 1869 by S. C. Bugbee & Son, Mills Hall became the College's new home when it moved from Benicia to Oakland in 1871 (National Register of Historic Places: 71000132, 1971). Mills Hall is "a long, four-story building with a high central observatory. The mansarded structure, which provided homes for faculty and students as well as classrooms and dining halls, long was considered the most beautiful educational building in the state". Notable queer alumni and faculty: Jane Rule (1931–2007); John Cage (1912–1992).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Cemetery: Jane Rule died at the age of 76 on November 28, 2007 at her home on Galiano Island due to complications from liver cancer, refusing any treatment that would take her from the island, opting instead for the care and support that could be provided by her niece, her partner, her many Galiano friends and neighbours. The ashes of Jane Vance Rule were interred in the Galiano Island Cemetery next to those of her beloved Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff.

Address: Galiano Island, BC V0N 1P0, Canada (48.92364, -123.44147)

Place
Unobviously located near the Mt. Galiano trailhead at the island’s south end, the atmospheric graveyard is set in a pretty waterfront wood overlooking Georgeson Bay, where seals lollop about in the shallows of Collinson Reef. It’s a serene location, where the silence is broken only by unobtrusive wind chimes, rustling branches or the occasional seal bark. The graves here differ greatly, from simple burial mounds marked by humble homemade tributes to the more traditional and decorative, many bearing personal effects laid down by family and friends. Like any cemetery it offers an intimate, moving and fascinating look into the past of the community it serves, so should be considered a must-see.

Life
Who: Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007) and Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff (September 11, 1916 – January 3, 2000)
Jane Rule was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction. Rule studied at Mills College in California. She graduated in 1952, moved to England for a short while and entered in a relationship with critic John Hulcoop. She taught at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she met Helen Sonthoff and fell in love with her. Rule moved with Hulcoop to work at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1956, but Sonthoff visited her and they began to live together. Rule and Sonthoff lived together until Sonthoff’s death in 2000. Rule surprised some in the gay community by declaring herself against gay marriage, writing, "To be forced back into the heterosexual cage of coupledom is not a step forward but a step back into state-imposed definitions of relationship. With all that we have learned, we should be helping our heterosexual brothers and sisters out of their state-defined prisons, not volunteering to join them there."

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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2017-03-28 02:00 pm

Dirk Bogarde (March 28, 1921 - May 8, 1999)

Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde, known as Dirk Bogarde, was an English actor and writer. Initially a matinée idol in films such as Doctor in the House for the Rank Organisation, he later acted in art-house films.
Born: March 28, 1921, West Hampstead, London, United Kingdom
Died: May 8, 1999, Chelsea, London, United Kingdom
Education: Chelsea College of Arts
University College School
Lived: Cobblestone House, Hascombe, Godalming GU8 4BT, UK (51.14153, -0.54976)
Le Haut Clermont, Chemin Du Haut Clermont, 06740 Châteauneuf-Grasse (43.6696, 6.96981)
2 Cadogan Gardens, SW3
44 Chester Square, SW1W
Buried: at his former estate, Le Haut Clermont, Châteauneuf de Grasse (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 19424
Books: A Postillion Struck by Lightning, UC An Orderly Man, more
Albums: Lyrics For Lovers
Siblings: Gareth Van Den Bogaerde, Elizabeth Goodings

Sir Dirk Bogarde was an English actor and novelist. Anthony Forwood was an English actor. Initially a matinee idol, Bogarde later acted in art-house films like Death in Venice. Forwood married, and later divorced, actress Glynis Johns. Their only child was actor Gareth Forwood (1945–2007). Forwood lived with Dirk Bogarde in Amersham, England; then in France until shortly before Forwood's death in London in 1988. The actor John Fraser said that "Dirk's life with Forwood had been so respectable, their love for each other so profound and so enduring, it would have been a glorious day for the pursuit of understanding and the promotion of tolerance if he had screwed up the courage ... to make one dignified allusion to his true nature. Self-love is no substitute for self-respect.” Bogarde suffered a minor stroke in November 1987, at a time when Forwood was dying of liver cancer and Parkinson's disease. Bogarde was most vocal, towards the end of his life, on the issue of voluntary euthanasia, of which he became a staunch proponent after witnessing the protracted death of his lifelong partner in 1988. Bogarde died in London on May 8, 1999, age 78.

Together from 1940 to 1988: 48 years.
Ernest Lytton aka Anthony Forwood (October 3, 1915 – May 18, 1988)
Dirk Bogarde (March 28, 1921 - May 8, 1999)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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ISBN-10: 1500563323
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University College School, generally known as UCS Hampstead (11 Holly Hill, London NW3 6QN), is an independent day school in Hampstead, northwest London. The school was founded in 1830 by University College London and inherited many of that institution's progressive and secular views. According to the Good Schools Guide, the school "Achieves impressive exam results with a relaxed atmosphere". UCS aims to combine the highest standards of academic achievement and pastoral care with outstanding facilities for all-round education with a distinctive liberal ethos. University College School moved to its current location in Hampstead in 1907. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), Frederic Leighton (1830–1896), Stephen Spender (1909–1995), Thom Gunn (1929-2004).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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School: Chelsea College of Arts (16 John Islip St, Westminster, London SW1P 4JU) is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London based in London, and is a leading British art and design institution with an international reputation. The School of Art merged with the Hammersmith School of Art, founded by Francis Hawke, to form the Chelsea School of Art in 1908. The newly formed school was taken over by the London County Council and a new building erected at Lime Grove, which opened with an extended curriculum. A trade school for girls was erected on the same site in 1914. The school acquired premises at Great Titchfield Street, and was jointly accommodated with Quintin Hogg's Polytechnic in Regent Street (a forerunner of the University of Westminster). The campus at Manresa Road introduced painting and graphic design in 1963, with both disciplines being particularly successful. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Barbara Ker-Seymer (1905-1993), Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), Edward Burra (1905-1976), William Chappell (1907-1994).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: Dirk Bogarde purchased the large farmhouse Cobblestone House (formerly Nore House) at Hascombe, near Godalming in 1962. He lived there with his partner and manager, Anthony Forwood, until 1971.

Address: Bramley, Surrey GU8 4BT, UK (51.14153, -0.54976)
English Heritage Building ID: 291246 (Grade II, 1960)

Place
Built in XVII century with XIX and XX century additions to right.
Timber framed, clad in whitewashed and rendered brick below, tile hung above, some in diamond pattern, with sandstone rubble and brick extensions to right, all under plain tiled roofs, some hipped and half-hipped. Two storeys with end stack to left and offset square end stack to right; square ridge stack to right of centre dated 1750 on top. Four leaded casements to first floor and three larger leaded casements to ground floor. Panelled door to right of centre. Wings at right angles to rear. Dormered extensions to right, once a barn converted in circa 1900 of no especial architectural interest, although it was formerly the home of Brian Howard. Dirk Bogarde entertained several of his Hollywood co-stars at Nore. Among them was Ingrid Bergman, who came to stay for six weeks in 1965 while she was playing “A Month in the Country,” the first production at the newly opened Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford. He wrote of her in his autobiography that she “was constantly amused by my evening walk down to the vegetable gardens to pick the mint for supper”. Screen legend Judy Garland also came to Nore, in 1963, to show Bogarde a script of her semi-autobiographical film “I Could Go On Singing.” After filming “Death in Venice” in 1971, Bogarde moved to West Sussex and then France; Nore estate was sold and subsequently divided up. Bogarde describes leaving Cobblestone House in his biography “Snakes and Ladders” (1978): “…The removal vans trundled slowly down the long drive in a flurry of sleet and snow-showers, leaving the house empty, bare and strangely silent after the long racketing week of packing and crating-up of one’s life.”…

Life
Who: Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde (March 28, 1921 – May 8, 1999) aka Dirk Bogarde
Of all Dirk Bogarde's houses in the fifties and sixties, Nore was the finest. Reached by a long private drive through woodland, and much more secluded than Drummers Yard had been, it was officially described as “a large, three-bay continuous jetty house of two storeys and attics”, a yeoman's house, dating in large part from the late XVI century. It stood in about ten acres, with breathtaking views across the Surrey countryside towards the South Downs. It had ten bedrooms, eight bathrooms and six reception rooms, two cottages, a separate studio, a tennis court, a garage block and four pools, “two for water-lilies, one for ducks and one for humans”. There was also a contractual right to a free daily supply of 500 gallons of water. Above all, there were extensive gardens. In the twenties and early thirties Nore had been home to the parents of Brian Howard, the American-born, Eton-educated poet, wit, aesthete, homosexual, “charismatic failure” and “the oddest aircraftman since T. E. Shaw”. He was dark and handsome, had a Machiavellian streak and was “quasi-sadistic mentally, quasi-masochistic physically”; he also had “pity and compassion for all human suffering, he loved the beauties of nature, literature and the arts”, and according to Evelyn Waugh was “mad, bad and dangerous to know”. A great platonic love of his was Daphne Fielding, and although she never saw him at Nore, when she went to stay with Dirk and Tony (Anthony Forwood), she “was conscious of Brian all the time, and his own very particular atmosphere seemed to dominate even Dirk's.” Which was indeed saying something. Howard's parents had rented Nore from Robert Godwin-Austen, a descendant of the topographer who “discovered” the Himalayan peak now known as K2, and whose travels yielded a miniature temple, with a “lion-dog” at each of the four corners, which Dirk found, buried in brambles, and with “a rather curious, and very detailed, phallic symbol standing erect in the very center! So I am not absolutely certain that it was only spirits who went there to worship.”

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: Sir Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999) was a matinee idol in over 60 films such as “Doctor in the House” (1954). After he lost his appetite for theatre and film he turned to writing and wrote seven candid volumes of autobiography and five novels. In 1947 at the start of his film career he signed a major deal with Rank paying him 35 a week retainer until he started work for them. The chap whose flat he was staying in returned after his tour folded early, so he had to move out. Dirk went to Willett's in Sloane Square and came out with the key to 44 Chester Square, SW1W 9EA, then a shabby 5 storey furnished georgian townhouse for 10 a week. The garden had 2 huge lime trees and a bomb crater. His friend Nannette Baildon from his RAF days in Calcutta came to live here and look after him. Dirk began to throw some wilder and wilder parties culminating in a massive New Year's Eve party for 1949/50 resulting in a massive row with Nannette. She moved out a year later, after 3 years and took the Bogarde’s cat with her.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: Cadogan Square is a residential square in Knightsbridge, west London, that was named after Earl Cadogan. Whilst it is mainly a residential area, some of the properties are used for diplomatic and educational purposes. The square is known for being one of the most expensive residential streets in the United Kingdom, with an average house price of around £5.75 million in 2013.

Address: Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RJ, UK

Place
The square was built between 1877 and 1888. The west side has the greatest variety of houses, all variations on the same Flemish-influenced theme. Numbers 54-58 were designed by William Young in 1877 for Lord Cadogan, and the architect J. J. Stevenson was largely responsible for the south side, built in 1879-85. The east side was built in 1879 by G. T. Robinson. Number 61 is an early example of high-class mansion flats, and number 61A was once a studio-house for a Mr F. W. Lawson. Cadogan Square is one of the most desirable residential addresses in London and is one of the most expensive in the United Kingdom. It is formed of a garden (restricted to residents) surrounded by red-brick houses, the majority of which have been converted into flats or apartments. The square is south of Pont Street, east of Lennox Gardens, and west of Sloane Street. An independent preparatory school for boys, Sussex House School, at number 68, was founded in 1953. The school is sited in a house by architect Norman Shaw. Apartments or flats tend to be available on short leases and are sold for several million pounds. There are three or so houses on the square that have not been converted into flats, and these may be valued at over £25 million each. The freeholder of most of the properties is Earl Cadogan, a multi-billionaire whose family has owned the land for several hundred years. Numbers 4 (by G.E Street), 52, 62 and 62b, 68 and 72 are all Grade II listed buildings. Writer Arnold Bennet lived at number 75 during the 1920s. On 2July 5, 1899, at Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, Cadogan Square, in London, Adolph de Meyer married Donna Olga Caracciolo, an Italian noblewoman who had been divorced earlier that year from Nobile Marino Brancaccio; she was a goddaughter of Edward VII.

Notable queer residents at Cadogan Gardens:
• Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972), US born one-time lover of Oscar Wilde’s niece, Dolly Wilde, and origin of the character Valerie Seymour in “The Well of Loneliness,” lived at 97 Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RE, in the 1920s.
• Edward Sackville-West (1901-1965) was born at 105 Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RF, the elder child and only son of Major-General Charles John Sackville-West, who later became the fourth Baron Sackville, and his first wife, Maud Cecilia, née Bell (1873–1920.)
• From 1898 to 1913 Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) lived in fashionable 1 Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RJ, and between 1903 and 1907 his work was published in Alfred Stieglitz’s quarterly Camera Work.
• Sir Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999) lived from 1991 to 1999 and died at 2 Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RS.
• In 1907 at the Homburg spa in Germany, Radclyffe Hall (1880-1943) met Mabel Batten (1856-1916), a well-known amateur singer of lieder. Batten (nicknamed "Ladye") was 51 to Hall's 27, and was married with an adult daughter and grandchildren. They fell in love, and after Batten's husband died they set up residence together at 59 Cadogan Square, Chelsea, London SW1X 0HZ. Batten gave Hall the nickname John, which she used the rest of her life. In 1915 Hall fell in love with Mabel Batten's cousin Una Troubridge (1887–1963), a sculptor who was the wife of Vice-Admiral Ernest Troubridge, and the mother of a young daughter. Batten died the following year, and in 1917 Radclyffe Hall and Una Troubridge began living together at 22 Cadogan Court, Draycott Ave, Chelsea, London SW3 3AA, a move Radclyffe originally planned to do with Mabel Batten. The relationship would last until Hall's death.
• On April 5, 1895, Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was arrested in room 118 of the upscale Edwardian Cadogan Hotel (now Belmond Cadogan Hotel, 75 Sloane St, London SW1X 9SG) on a charge of "gross indecency" stemming from his homosexual relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas. Friends had urged Wilde to flee the country once word of his impending arrest leaked out, but Wilde was resolute, saying, "I shall stay and do my sentence, whatever it is." The poet-dramatist was sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor, a cruel punishment that was to signal the beginning of the end for Wilde's brightly shining star. The arrest was immortalized by English poet laureate, John Betjeman, in his poem "The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at the Cadogan Hotel."

Life
Who: Baron Adolph de Meyer (September 1, 1868 – January 6, 1946) and Olga, the Baroness de Meyer (August 8, 1871 – 1930/1931)
Baron Adolph de Meyer was a photographer famed for his elegant photographic portraits in the early XX century, many of which depicted celebrities such as Mary Pickford, Rita Lydig, Luisa Casati, Billie Burke, Irene Castle, John Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Ruth St. Denis, King George V of the United Kingdom, and Queen Mary. He was also the first official fashion photographer for the American magazine Vogue, appointed to that position in 1913. In 1899 he married Donna Olga Caracciolo. The couple reportedly met in 1897, at the home of a member of the Sassoon banking family, and Olga would be the subject of many of her husband’s photographs. The de Meyers’ marriage was one of marriage of convenience rather than romantic love, since the groom was homosexual and the bride was bisexual or lesbian. As Baron de Meyer wrote in an unpublished autobiographical novel, before they wed, he explained to Olga "the real meaning of love shorn of any kind of sensuality.” He continued by observing, "Marriage based too much on love and unrestrained passion has rarely a chance to be lasting, whilst perfect understanding and companionship, on the contrary, generally make the most durable union." The de Meyers were characterised by Violet Trefusis—who counted Olga among her lovers and whose mother, Alice Keppel, was Edward VII’s best known mistress—as "Pederaste and Médisante" because, as Trefusis observed, "He looked so queer and she had such a vicious tongue." Among Olga’s affairs was one with Winnaretta, Princess Edmond de Polignac, the Singer sewing machine heiress and arts patron, in the years 1901–05. Cecil Beaton dubbed Adolph de Maeye "the Debussy of photography.” In 1912 he photographed Nijinsky in Paris. After the death of his wife in 1930/31, Baron de Meyer became romantically involved with a young German, Ernest Frohlich (born circa 1914), whom he hired as his chauffeur and later adopted as his son. The latter went by the name Baron Ernest Frohlich de Meyer.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: After 18 years as Rank’s biggest in-house star, feeling that he was not fully appreciated as an actor, Dirk Bogarde first kicked against the traces by playing a homosexual in the watershed film “Victim,” before upping sticks and removing himself and his lifelong companion, Anthony Forwood, to Europe. They eventually bought Le Haut Clermont, a former farmhouse, in Chateauneuf de Grasse and Dirk spent his happiest years there before Forwood’s last illness dictated a return to England. To the new owners Dirk wrote: ‘Please don’t send me any more photographs. Every time I see Clermont it breaks my heart.’

Address: Chemin Du Haut Clermont, 06740 Châteauneuf-Grasse (43.6696, 6.96981)

Place
Châteauneuf-Grasse (also known as Châteauneuf de Grasse or simply Châteauneuf) is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. Châteauneuf is situated on the French Riviera, just over 4 km from Grasse and 21 km (13 mi) from Cannes and borders the villages of Plascassier and Opio. Châteauneuf extends across 895 hectares and has a population of just over 3,000 inhabitants. It is divided into two districts: Pré-du-Lac, where most of the commerce is found, and Le Vignal.

Life
Who: Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde (March 28, 1921 – May 8, 1999), aka Dirk Bogarde, and Ernest Lytton Forwood (October 3, 1915 – May 18, 1988), aka Anthony Forwood
Dirk Bogarde was an English actor and writer. Initially a matinée idol in films such as “Doctor in the House” (1954) for the Rank Organisation, he later acted in art-house films. In a second career, he wrote seven best-selling volumes of memoirs, six novels and a volume of collected journalism, mainly from articles in The Daily Telegraph. Bogarde was a lifelong bachelor. For many years he shared his homes, first in Amersham, Buckinghamshire, then in France, with his manager Anthony Forwood, who was the former husband of actress Glynis Johns and the father of their only child, actor Gareth Forwood. Bogarde repeatedly denied that their relationship was anything but platonic. Such denials were understandable, mainly because male homosexual acts were criminal during most of his career, and could lead to prosecution and imprisonment. Rank Studio contracts included morality clauses, which provided for termination of the contract in the event of 'immoral' conduct on the part of the actor. This would have included same-sex relationships, thus potentially putting the actor's career in jeopardy. It is possible that Bogarde's refusal to enter into a marriage of convenience was a major reason for his failure to become a star in Hollywood, together with the critical and commercial failure of “Song Without End.” His friend Helena Bonham Carter believed Bogarde would not have been able to come out during later life, since this might have demonstrated that he had been forced to camouflage his sexual orientation during his film career. The actor John Fraser, however, said that "Dirk's life with Forwood had been so respectable, their love for each other so profound and so enduring, it would have been a glorious day for the pursuit of understanding and the promotion of tolerance if he had screwed up the courage..." Bogarde suffered a minor stroke in November 1987, at a time when his partner, Anthony Forwood, was dying of liver cancer and Parkinson's disease. In September 1996, he underwent angioplasty to unblock arteries leading to his heart and suffered a massive stroke following the operation. Bogarde was paralysed on one side of his body, which affected his speech and left him in a wheelchair. He managed, however, to complete a final volume of his autobiography, which covered the stroke and its effects as well as an edition of his collected journalism, mainly for the Daily Telegraph. He spent some time the day before he died with his friend Lauren Bacall. Bogarde died at home in London from a heart attack on May 8, 1999, age 78. His ashes were scattered at his former estate in Grasse, Southern France.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906692
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2017-03-27 08:19 pm

Michael Schofield (June 24, 1919 – March 27, 2014)

Michael George Schofield was a pioneer of social research into homosexuality in the 1950s and 1960s, and a campaigner for the Homosexual Law Reform Society at a time before the Sexual Offences Act 1967 ...
Born: June 24, 1919, Leeds, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 2014
Lived: Belsize Park
Find A Grave Memorial# 173560440
Books: The Sexual Behaviour of Young People, more

Michael George Schofield (June 24, 1919 –March 27, 2014) was a pioneer of social research into homosexuality in the 1950s and 1960s, and a campaigner for the Homosexual Law Reform Society at a time before the Sexual Offences Act 1967 partially decriminalised homosexual activity in the UK. He played a prominent role in the law reform lobbies of the 1960s and 1970s. He is the author of many books including “Sociological Aspects of Homosexuality” (1965) and “The Sexual Behaviour of Young People” (1965). Schofield retired in 1985 from public life and lived with his partner (whom he met in 1952), Anthony Skyrme, in Belsize Park until his death in 2014.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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2017-03-27 08:18 pm

Lester Welch Webb (July 29, 1919 - March 27, 1985)

Buried: Lewes Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Lewes, Sussex County, Delaware, USA
Buried alongside: Joseph V. Hayward
Find A Grave Memorial# 89367928

Cemetery: From the few info you can find, Joseph V. Hayward (1918-1965) and Lester Welch Webb (1919-1985) were not relatives, nevertheless they are buried together at Lewes Presbyterian Church Cemetery (133 Kings Hwy, Lewes, DE 19958) with twin tombstone even if Lester died 20 years after Joseph.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
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2017-03-27 08:13 pm

Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John 'Pop' Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker.
Born: March 27, 1902, Scotland, United Kingdom
Died: 1971, Cetona
Lived: Villa Tuoro, Via Tuoro, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)
Villa Kenwin, 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Riant Chateau, Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161096858
Spouse: Bryher (m. 1927–1947)
Movies: Borderline, Dreams That Money Can Buy

Bryher was the pen name of the novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. In 1921, she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. The same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D. 's lover (H.D. was Bryher’s lover as well). In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin (Kenneth + Winifred). They formally adopted H.D.'s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson's child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, even if she continued to provide for him. Bryher and H.D. no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until H.D.’s death in 1961. Bryher, H.D., and Macpherson formed the film magazine Close Up, and the POOL Group. Only one POOL film, Borderline (1930), starring H.D. and Paul Roberson, survives in its entirety.

Together from 1927 to 1947: 20 years.
Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro", which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Coucy Lyons. Bryher, Macpherson’s wife, supported her husband and his friend on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the aging Douglas. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas's death in 1952, writing an epitaph for Douglas, from which the Latin inscription, on Douglas's gravestone, is derived (Omnes Eodem Cogimur = "We are all driven to the same end" (i.e., death)). Douglas’s last words apparently were: "Get those fucking nuns away from me." Macpherson was Douglas’s heir, and upon his death, everything went to Islay Lyons.

They met in 1931 and remained friends until Douglas’s death in 1952: 21 years.
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 – June 14, 1971)
Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868 - February 7, 1952)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Islay Lyons was a notable Welsh photographer, novelist and linguist. During the WWII, he served in North Africa and then he was sent to the Far East to learn Japanese in 3 months. He did this with amongst others, Richard Mason, who was a lifelong friend and cousin by marriage. The character ‘Peter’ in Mason’s book The Wind Cannot Read portrays Lyons. Lyons had been the last lover of the filmmaker, Kenneth Macpherson, both of them living in the ‘Villa Tuoro’ on Capri. Norman Douglas was was their constant companion, there, during the last years of Douglas’s life. Both Macpherson and Lyons were at Norman Douglas’s bedside when he died. Douglas’s estate went to Macpherson, and at Macpherson’s death, to Islay Lyons. Another lover of Macpherson was New York cabaret singer, Jimmie Daniels. Macpherson’s wife, Bryher, financed Daniels and Macpherson’s life in New York. Before Kenneth Macpherson, in Daniels’s life there was the famed architect, Philip Johnson. They met around 1934 when Jimmie was first starting to get some real recognition as an entertainer.

Together from 1947 to 1971: 24 years.
Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Jimmie Daniels (1908 - June 29, 1984)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: In September 1931, Kenneth Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build on plans drawn up several years earlier by Alexander Ferenczy.

Address: 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)

Place
The home, which overlooked Lake Geneva, came to be known as Kenwin, derived from the names of its commissioners, Kenneth and Winifred, and would double as a film studio and home, not only for themselves, but also for an assortment of dogs, cats, and monkeys. Bryher gave her address, at the time, as Villa Kenwin, Chemin de Vallon, 1814 Burier-La-Tour, Vaud, Switzerland. During the war years, Bryher would use Kenwin as a staging post for the evacuation of refugees from Nazi Germany. Abandoned after the death of Bryher who will live there until 1983, it was bought in 1987 by the architect Giovanni Pezzoli who undertook a complete renovation. It is registered as a Swiss cultural object of national importance. In 1996, a documentary film entitled "Kenwin" and telling the story of the villa Kenwin was directed by Véronique Goël on the basis of archive footage.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. Her father was the shipowner and financier John Ellerman, who at the time of his death in 1933, was the richest Englishman who had ever lived. He lived with her mother Hannah Glover, but did not marry her until 1908. During the 1920s, Bryher was an unconventional figure in Paris. Among her circle of friends were Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach and Berenice Abbott. Her wealth enabled her to give financial support to struggling writers, including Joyce and Edith Sitwell. She also helped with finance for Sylvia Beach’s bookshop Shakespeare and Company and certain publishing ventures, and started a film company Pool Group. She also helped provide funds to purchase a flat in Paris for the destitute Dada artist and writer Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. In 1918 she met and became involved in a lesbian relationship with poet Hilda Doolittle “H.D.” The relationship was an open one, with both taking other partners. In 1921 she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. That same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D.’s lover. In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin. They formally adopted H.D.’s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson’s child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, she and Doolittle no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until Doolittle’s death in 1961.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Riant Chateau, Territet (1820)

House: Since 1921, H.D. had been a close friend of Bryher. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle.

Address: Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)

Place
Built in 1913, Design by Michel Polak (1885-1948)
The Riant Chateau was built for Belgian businessman Lucien Kaisin. This complex was built for a cosmopolitan clientele and was considered very advanced for its time. It had the most modern elevators and central heating of its time, and was furnished with luxurious fittings. In its heyday, it was the meeting place for avant-garde of the cinema; it was frequently visited by such notables as Eisenstein, Room and Pabst and housed the headquarters of the publishers of the magazine Pool. The redevelopment program has ensured that the spirit of the building has been retained, while all essential services have been replaced and modern technology added. The interior of the building reflects the extravagance and luxury of the Belle Époque, with high ceilings, elaborate cornices, inlaid mirrors, stained glass, heavy oak doors, and antique oak parquet floors. Bordering the Riant Chateau is Rose Park, a beautiful park which extends to the Anglican church. At present an underground parking space is being built beneath Rose Park which is being re-landscaped and replanted with more trees for added privacy. On the other side of the garden lies the Anglican church, and beyond that the terminus of the Mont Pelerin funicular. Rose Park was a favorite haunt of the Austrian Empress Sissi, whose statue serves as a reminder to today’s visitors.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971), Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983) and Hilda "H.D." Doolittle (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)
It was in 1927, from their base in Territet, that Kenneth Macpherson, Bryher and HD launched themselves as the Pool Group. Pool would veer away from the West’s commercial model of film production, and produce material which would promote cinematography as an “art form.” Their model would be based on the work coming out of Germany, particularly G W Pabst, and coming out of Russia, particularly Sergei Eisenstein. Their subject matter would be human behaviour, and its many facets, and their task would be representing this behaviour on screen, influenced by the work of Freud. Also at Territet, Macpherson founded the influential film journal, Close Up, dedicated to "independent cinema and cinema from around the world.” The first issue of Close Up, describing itself on the front cover as an "international magazine devoted to film art,” appeared in July 1927. Macpherson was editor, with Bryher as assistant editor, and Doolittle making regular contributions. Macpherson, who was particularly influenced by the Russian film-maker Sergei Eisenstein and whom he first met in 1929, "dictated the tone and direction of the publication, contributing articles that defined the role of the director and defended the integrity of cinema and its right to be considered as art.” Close Up published many of the first translations of Eisenstein’s ideas. Macpherson continued as the main editor until the magazine’s demise in 1933. Bryher is buried at Cimetière Saint-Martin (Boulevard Saint-Martin, 1800 Vevey).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Villa Tuoro is forever linked to the figure of Scots writer Norman Douglas, who lived here from the post-war period up until the time of his death in 1952. During those years, the house was the property of his great friend Kenneth McPherson. McPherson went on living there until 1957 together with Islay Bowe-Lyons, a cousin of the Queen Mother of England.

Address: Via Tuoro, 80076 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)

Place
Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro,” which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons. Today Villa Tuoro is the residence of Semiramis Zola and her husband John Lee, who bought it directly from Kenneth McPherson. Bowe-Lyons personally attended to the landscaping of the garden. On the ground floor, in the room where Douglas used to work, his writing desk and books are still in place. The windows here all look onto the garden, while as one mounts the stairs to the main floor, a panorama appears that stretches from Marina Piccola to the Certosa, and from Monte Solaro all the way to Ischia.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John “Pop” Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker. His 1930 film, “Borderline,” is now vey much part of the curriculum in the study of modern cinematography today. In his work with the Pool Group (1927–1933), which he co-founded with Bryher and HD, Macpherson also established the influential film journal, Close Up. Macpherson’s story began in 1927, when he married English writer, Annie Winifred Ellerman, (known as Bryher in the literary world), the daughter of a British shipping magnate. Bryher’s inherited fortune would help to finance Macpherson’s projects. Although Bryher’s and Macpherson’s marriage lasted for twenty years, for much of the marriage, both Macpherson and Bryher had extra-marital affairs. Bryher was lesbian but Macpherson was distinctly bi-sexual. A sexual partner, common to both Bryher and Macpherson, was the American poet, Hilda Doolittle (known in literary circles as "HD.”) Doolittle had been a close friend of Bryher’s since 1921. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle, who brought along her 9-year-old daughter, Perdita. (Perdita’s father was Cecil Gray, the Scottish music critic and composer.) In 1928, Doolittle had a sexual relationship with Macpherson, becoming pregnant by him. The pregnancy would be aborted later that year. In the same year, Macpherson and Bryher formally adopted Perdita, registering her name as Frances Perdita Macpherson. In September 1931, Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build. After spending a few months in New York in 1935, Macpherson eventually based himself there to focus on writing, photography and his art collection. In 1947, Macpherson returned from America, spending much of his time in Switzerland and Italy. Bryher supported her husband and his friend, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons, on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the ageing Norman Douglas, the Scottish novelist. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas’s death in 1952, writing an epitaph for his gravestone, “Omnes Eodem Cogimur,” “Where we all must gather.” Macpherson then moved to Rome, and then, in 1965, he “retired” to Tuscany and then Thailand. Macpherson died in Cetona on June 14, 1971, leaving everything, including his inheritance from Douglas, to De Courcy Lyons. Lyons died on 1November 7, 1993, in Chiang-Mai (Mueang Chiang Mai District, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand). Following Lyons’s death, his heir, Manop Charoensuk, arranged for publication of a volume of Lyons’s photographs.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-27 08:10 pm

James VI and I of England (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625)

James VI and I was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death.
Born: June 19, 1566, Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 1625, De Vere Theobalds Estate
Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA
Buried alongside: George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Find A Grave Memorial# 1974
Spouse: Anne of Denmark (m. 1589–1619)
Children: Charles I of England, more
Parents: Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, Mary, Queen of Scots

Church: In the chapel of St John the Baptist in Westminster Abbey there is the tomb of Mary Kendall (died March 13, 1709/1710) dating from 1710 with an inscription recording: "That close Union and Friendship, In which she lived, with the Lady Catharine Jones (died April 23, 1740); And in testimony of which she desir’d That even their Ashes, after Death, Might not be divided.”

Address: 20 Dean’s Yard, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK (51.49929, -0.1273)
Hours: Monday and Tuesday 9.30-15.30, Wednesday 9.30-18.00, Thursday and Friday 9.30-15.30, Saturday 9.30-13.30
Phone: +44 20 7222 5152
Website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/

Place
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church. According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the VII century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III. Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held there. There have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey since 1100. Two were of reigning monarchs (Henry I and Richard II), although, before 1919, there had been none for some 500 years.

Notable queer burials at Westminster Abbey:
• Anne, Queen of Great Britain (1665-1714). Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, became close to the young Princess Anne in about 1675, and the friendship grew stronger as the two grew older. Correspondence between the Duchess and the Queen reveals that the two women enjoyed a royally passionate romance. They called each other pet names: Sarah was “Mrs. Freeman” and Anne was “Mrs. Morley.” When Anne came to the throne in 1702, she named Sarah “Lady of the Bedchamber.” Anne and Sarah were virtually inseparable; no king’s mistress had ever wielded the power granted to the Duchess. Over time, Sarah became overconfident in her position and developed an arrogant attitude toward Anne, even going to far as to insult the queen in public. A cousin of Sarah’s, Abigail Hill, caught the Queen’s eye during Sarah’s frequent absences from Court, and eventually replaced her in Anne’s affections. After her final break with Anne in 1711, Sarah and her husband were dismissed from the court. Sarah enjoyed a "long and devoted" relationship with her husband of more than 40 years, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. The money she inherited from the Marlborough trust left her one of the richest women in Europe.
• Sir Frederick Ashton (1904–1988), ballet dancer and choreographer, Memorial in Poet’s Corner (buried St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Yaxley)
• W. H. Auden (1907-1973), poet and essayist. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey in 1974, adjoining the grave of John Masefield. Another memorial is at Christ College Cathedral, Oxford, where he graduated (buried Kirchstetten, Austria) (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for Boys which was an inspiration for the Scout Movement, founder and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association and founder of the Girl Guides. In the south aisle of the nave of Westminster Abbey, against the screen of St George’s chapel, there is a memorial stone to Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, by W.Soukop. Both are buried in Kenya and each had a memorial service held at the Abbey (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), Prime Minister, memorial. A memorial to Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, was unveiled in the nave of Westminster Abbey in 1997. Designed by Donald Buttress and cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was a dramatist in the English Renaissance theatre, most famous for his collaborations with John Fletcher (1579–1625.) According to a mid-century anecdote related by John Aubrey, they lived in the same house on the Bankside in Southwark, "sharing everything in the closest intimacy." About 1613 Beaumont married Ursula Isley, daughter and co-heiress of Henry Isley of Sundridge in Kent, by whom he had two daughters, one posthumous. Francis Beaumont and his brother Sir John Beaumont are both buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, at the entrance to St Benedict's chapel near Chaucer's monument. Fletcher died in 1625 and is buried inside the Southwark Cathedral, London Bridge, London SE1 9DA. On 1November 6, 1996 the cathedral became a focus of controversy when it hosted a twentieth-anniversary service for the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement. In 1997 openly gay cleric, Jeffrey John became Canon Chancellor and Theologian of the Cathedral (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. Behn’s close association with royalty, especially her friendship with the King’s mistress, Nell Gwyn, and her long-standing liaison with John Hoyle (died 1692), whose affairs with other men were notorious, made Behn a prime subject for court and theater gossip. Just as Behn was notorious for presenting sensational subjects on stage despite societal taboos, she achieved a reputation for unusually explicit accounts of erotic and sexual episodes in her poems. Many of these celebrated gay male and lesbian relationships. She was buried in the east cloister of Westminster Abbey, near the steps up into the church. The inscription on her tombstone, written by John Hoyle, reads: "Here lies a Proof that Wit can never be Defence enough against Mortality." John Hoyle was stabbed to death on May 1692 and is buried in the vault of the Inner Temple church, Temple, London EC4Y 7BB) (Location in the Abbey: Cloisters; East Cloister).
• William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709) and King William III of England (1650-1702), are buried next to Queen Mary II. King William III is buried in great simplicity in the South Aisle of the Chapel of Henry VI, and his companion William Bentinck is buried in a vault nearby. Several members of the Bentinck family are buried in the Ormond vault at the eastern end of Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey. None have monuments but their names and dates of death were added to the vaultstone in the late XIX century (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915) died at 4:46 pm on April 23, 1915 in a French hospital ship moored in a bay off the island of Skyros in the Aegean on his way to the landing at Gallipoli. As the expeditionary force had orders to depart immediately, he was buried at 11 pm in an olive grove on Skyros, Greece. His grave remains there today. On 11 November 1985, Brooke was among 16 WWI poets commemorated on a slate monument unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976), musician and composer. In the north choir (or Musicians) aisle in Westminster Abbey there is a memorial stone. Britten refused a formal burial since he wanted to be buried beside his partner Peter Pears (Location in the Abbey: North Quire Aisle).
• Robert Browning (1812-1889), poet, is buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. He was born on 7 May 1812 in London, a son of Robert Browning (1782-1866) and Sarah (Wiedemann). He married Elizabeth Barrett, a famous poet in her own right, in September 1846 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• George, 6th Baron Byron (1788-1824). The memorial stone in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey was given by the Poetry Society and unveiled on May 8, 1969 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), composer and playwright. A memorial was unveiled in 1984 in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. The black marble stone was cut by Ralph Beyer. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend" (Location in the Abbey: South Quire Aisle).
• Major-General Sir Herbert Edwardes (1819–1868) was an administrator, soldier, and statesman active in the Punjab, India. He is buried in Highgate Cemetery. A memorial by sculptor William Theed junior, is on the wall of the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. He is also commemorated by a stained glass window in the chapel of King’s College London. Brigadier-General John Nicholson (1822–1857) was a Victorian era military officer known for his role in British India. Nicholson never married, the most significant people in his life being his brother Punjab administrators Sir Henry Lawrence and Herbert Edwardes. At Bannu, Nicholson used to ride one hundred and twenty miles every weekend to spend a few hours with Edwardes, and lived in his beloved friend’s house for some time when Edwardes’ wife Emma was in England. At his deathbed he dictated a message to Edwardes saying, "Tell him that, if at this moment a good fairy were to grant me a wish, my wish would be to have him here next to my mother." The love between him and Edwardes made them, as Edwardes’ wife latter described it "more than brothers in the tenderness of their whole lives.” In the retaking of Delhi, India, Nicholson led 2,000 men (mostly British, Pathan, and Punjabi troops) through the Kashmiri Gate in Delhi. Mortally wounded he died at the hour of British victory and is buried at New Delhi (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Eliot (1819-1880) was not buried in Westminster Abbey because of her denial of the Christian faith and her "irregular" though monogamous life with Lewes. She was buried in Highgate Cemetery (East), Highgate, London, in the area reserved for religious dissenters and agnostics, beside the love of her life, George Henry Lewes. On 2June 1, 1980 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. Stone by John Skelton (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771)’s biographer William Mason erected a memorial to him, designed by John Bacon the Elder, in the east aisle of Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey in 1778. (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner)
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), Poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in 1975 in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. By sculptor David Peace (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936), poet, has a memorial panel in the window above Chaucer's monument in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner). he has a memorial also at St Laurence (College Street, Ludlow, Shropshire, SY8 1AN).
• Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon (1661-1723), was the only son of Henry and his first wife Theodosia, daughter of Lord Capel. As Viscount Cornbury was governor of New York from 1702 to 1708. He had a very bad reputation and "his character and conduct were equally abhorred in both hemispheres". He secretly married Catherine O'Brien in 1688 and died in obscurity and debt. His only surviving son Edward as Lord Clifton took his seat in the House of Lords but died unmarried of a fever after a drinking bout. His daughter Theodosia married John Bligh, later Earl of Darnley, and both were buried in the vault (Location in the Abbey: North ambulatory)
• Henry James (1843-1916), American born novelist. On June 17, 1976 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets’ Corner Westminster Abbey by his great grand-nephew. Cut by Will Carter (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• James Kendall, politician and governor of Barbados, is buried in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. James’s niece Mary Kendall was buried in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Abbey and has a monument there with a kneeling alabaster figure of herself. The inscription, written by the Dean of Westminster Francis Atterbury, reads: "Mrs Mary Kendall daughter of Thomas Kendall Esqr. and of Mrs Mary Hallet, his wife, of Killigarth in Cornwall, was born at Westminster Nov.8 1677 and dy’d at Epsome March 4 1709/10, having reach’d the full term of her blessed Saviour’s life; and study’d to imitate his spotless example. She had great virtues, and as great a desire of concealing them: was of a severe life, but of an easy conversation; courteous to all, yet strictly sincere; humble, without meanness; beneficient, without ostentation; devout, without superstition. These admirable qualitys, in which she was equall’d by few of her sex, surpass’d by none, render’d her every way worthy of that close uion and friendship in which she liv’d with the Lady Catherine Jones; and in testimony of which she desir’d that even their ashes, after death, might not be divided: and, therefore, order’d her selfe here to be interr’d where, she knew, that excellent Lady design’d one day to rest, near the grave of her belov’d and religious mother, Elizabeth, Countess of Ranelagh. This monument was erected by Capt. Charles Kendall." Her name was inscribed on the vault stone in front of the monument in the late XIX century. Mary’s father Thomas Kendall, son of a merchant, died in 1684 and Mary lived with the Earl of Ranelagh’s family while James was in the West Indies. Lady Catherine Jones (d.1740) was the Earl’s daughter. Charles was Mary’s cousin and was in the Royal Navy. Her estates were left to her cousin Canon Nicholas Kendall. The coats of arms show those for Kendall and also "or, a chief gules overall on a bend engrailed sable three bezants" for Hallet.
• Herbert, 1st Earl Kitchener (1850-1916), Sirdar of the Egyptian army (Commander in Chief), is remembered on the altar in the south aisle of the Lady Chapel (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel)
• D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930), novelist and poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey on 1November 6, 1985. By David Parsley (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• In July 2002, a memorial window to Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) – a gift of the Marlowe Society – was unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey. Controversially, a question mark was added to the generally accepted date of death. On 2October 5, 2011 a letter from Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells was published by The Times newspaper, in which they called on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence.” In 2012, they renewed this call in their e-book Shakespeare Bites Back, adding that it "denies history,” and again the following year in their book Shakespeare Beyond Doubt. (Buried St Nicholas Churchyard, Deptford)
• Just inside the west door of Westminster Abbey there is a memorial brass, by Christopher Ironside, to Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900-1979) and his wife, Countess Mountbatten of Burma. He was Admiral of the Fleet (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• It has been said that the greatest love of Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727)’s life was with a fellow mathematician, Fatio de Duillier. They collaborated for several years, and when they broke up over an argument in 1693, Newton suffered symptoms of a nervous breakdown. Fatio assisted John Conduitt (Newton’s nephew) in planning the design, and writing the inscription for Newton’s monument in Westminster Abbey. His large monument is by William Kent and J.M.Rysbrack. Newton has also a Memorial at Trinity College, Cambridge. Fatio died in 1753 and was buried at the church of St. Nicholas, Worcester (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• After being ill for the last twenty-two years of his life, Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) died of renal failure on 11 July 1989 at his home near Steyning, West Sussex. His cremation was held three days later. The ashes of the greatest actor of his generation, are buried in the south transept of Westminster Abbey. His stone was cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: South Transept).
• Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. The inscription on the stone is taken from Owen’s "Preface" to his poems; "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." (Buried Ors Communal Cemetery, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)
• Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902). A small tablet was unveiled in Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey in 1953 (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Seigfried Sassoon (1886-1967), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. (Buried St Andrew Churchyard, Mells, Somerset)
• Henry John Alexander Seely (1899-1963), 2nd Lord Mottistone, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. A statue by Edwin Russell remembers him (Location in the Abbey: St Catherine's Chapel Garden; Little Cloister).
• Robert Stewart (1769-1822), Viscount Castlereagh and 2nd Marquis of Londonderry, politician, was buried in the centre of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. His statue is by sculptor John Evan Thomas (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628) and King James I of England (1566-1625) are buried in the Henry VII Chapel. King James I’s tomb was lost and not rediscovered until 1869. On His Majesty’s left is the magnificent tomb of his lover George Villiers. On his right is the tomb (with huge bronze figures representing Hope, Truth, Charity and Faith) of Ludovic Stuart, Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1574-1624), son of one of his earliest lovers, Esme Stuart.
• On 14 February 1995 a small stained glass memorial was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey for Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wilde (1854-1900), playwright and aesthete (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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