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Lived: Hotel Continental, Bagni di Lucca
Casa Bernardini, Bagno alla Villa
Casa Burlamacchi, Bagni di Lucca
Buried: English Cemetery, Bagni di Lucca, Provincia di Lucca, Toscana, Italy
Buried alongside: Rose Cleveland

Rose Cleveland was the sister of Pres. Grover Cleveland, who was unmarried during his first two years in office. Rose lived with him in the White House at that time and took over the hostess duties of the First Lady. She later became the principal of the Collegiate Institute of Lafayette, Indiana, a writer and lecturer, and the editor of the Chicago-based magazine Literary Life. At age 44, she started a passionate correspondence with a wealthy widow, Evangeline Simpson, with explicitly erotic correspondence. Things cooled off when 36 yo Evangeline married an Episcopal bishop from Minnesota, Henry Benjamin Whipple, 74 yo. By 1910, after his death, the two women rekindled their relationship and eventually moved to Bagni di Lucca, Italy, to live together. They shared the house with the English illustrator and artist Nelly Erichsen. Rose died at home during the 1918 flu pandemic, within one week of Nelly. They were buried in the English Cemetery at Bagni di Lucca. Before Evangeline’s death in 1930, she directed her executors to bury her next to Rose. “Ah, how I love you, it paralyzes me—it makes me heavy with emotion…. I tremble at the thought of you—all my whole being leans out to you…. I dare not think of your arms.” --Rose to Evangeline. “Oh, darling, come to me this night—my Clevy, my Viking, my Everything—Come! —Evangeline to Rose
Together from 1890 to 1918: 28 years.
Evangeline Marrs Simpson Whipple (January 15, 1862 - September 1, 1930)
Rose Elizabeth Cleveland (June 13, 1846 - November 22, 1918)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Bagni di Lucca (formerly Bagno a Corsena) is a comune of Tuscany, Italy, in the Province of Lucca with a population of about 6,500. Bagni di Lucca with its thermal baths reached its greatest fame during the XIX century, especially during the French occupation.
Address: Cimitero Inglese, Via Letizia, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00566, 10.58808)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Address: Via Bagno alla Villa, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00971, 10.5879)
Type: Private Property
Address: Villa San Francesco, Via S. Francesco, 6, 55022 Bagni di Lucca LU, Italy (44.00832, 10.58725)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +39 333 765 8629
Place
The town became the summer residence of the court of Napoleon and his sister, Elisa Baciocchi. A casino was built, where gambling was part of social nightlife, as well as a large hall for dances. At the Congress of Vienna (1814), the Duchy of Lucca was assigned to Maria-Louisa of Bourbon as ruler of Parma. It continued as a popular summer resort, particularly for the English, who built a Protestant church there. The church now has been converted to the Bagni di Lucca Biblioteca (library) and holds archives and records that date back to centuries ago. In 1847 Lucca with Bagni di Lucca was ceded to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, under the domain of the Grand Duke Leopold II of Lorraine. His rule started a period of decline for the springs and casino as a destination, since he was used to a secluded life. In 1853 the casino was closed. It was reopened after 1861, when Lucca became part of the unified Kingdom of Italy. In the 1940s, during the German invasion of Italy, Bagni di Lucca, along with many other towns located in the Apennines, was occupied, as they were along the Gothic Line. Several houses and mansions in the area were used as residences for German soldiers and some residents born after 1940 in this region have German ancestry. The English cemetery is a sacred place which is located in Bagni di Lucca, about 300 meters from the Church of England, on the other side of the river Lima. In 1842 Carlo Ludovico di Borbone granted to the British colony of Bagni di Lucca the faculty to establish a Protestant cemetery. They chose a place called "al Prato Santo (the Holy Meadow)" and, although the works were finished in 1844, the first burial happened immediately after the purchase. The graveyard was in operation until 1953 and there are 137 people who rest there. In 1982, with the exhaustion of a legacy for maintenance, the holy site was purchased by the town of Bagni di Lucca. The cemetery is currently managed by the Fondazione Michel de Montaigne and Istituto Storico Lucchese and is accessible to visitors every day (except Sunday) from 10.00 to 18.00. Among the people buried here, often in tombs made by famous sculptors such as Benjamin Gibson, Joseph Norfini and Emilio Duccini, are the novelist Ouida, Henry and Elizabeth Stisted and Irish entomologist Alexander Henry Haliday.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Inglese di Bagni di Lucca:
• Rose Elizabeth Cleveland (June 13, 1846 – November 22, 1918), was the First Lady of the United States from 1885 to 1886, during the first of her brother U.S. President Grover Cleveland’s two administrations.
• Nelly Erichsen (1862-1918) was an English illustrator and painter. From 1912 until Nov. 1918, Erichsen was living in the quiet Tuscan spa town of Bagni di Lucca with two companions - Evangeline Whipple and Rose Cleveland. Whipple was the widow of the American Episcopal Bishop Henry Whipple, known for his evangelical work among the native Indian population. Whipple and Cleveland had first met in the winter of 1889–1890, and resumed their relationship in 1901 (after the death of Henry Whipple), moving from the USA to Italy in 1910. In 1918 tragedy struck, when both Rose Cleveland and Nelly Erichsen were carried off by the 1918 flu pandemic which decimated the post-war World. Evangeline Whipple died in London in 1930, but she was laid to rest in Bagni di Lucca next to the tombs of the two friends who had preceded her.
• Ouida (1839-1908) was the pseudonym of the English novelist Maria Louise Ramé (although she preferred to be known as Marie Louise de la Ramée.)
• Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928), known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. He is now best known as the former owner of the Warren Cup in the British Museum. At Oxford Edward Perry Warren met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907. Beginning in 1888, Warren made England his primary home. He and Marshall lived together at Lewes House (with Marshall’s wife, Mary), a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach’s “Adam and Eve,” now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. Ned Warren, John Marshall and Mary are all buried together in Bagni di Lucca.
• Evangeline Marrs Whipple (1860-1930), widow for the second time (she first married the wealthy businessman Michael Hodge Simpson and then bishop Henry Benjamin Whipple), visited Bagni di Lucca in 1910, lodging at Hotel Continental and then taking residence at Casa Bernardini at Bagno alla Villa. This is the house she shared with Rose Cleveland and Nelly Ericksen. Rose and Nelly died in 1918. In 1928 Evangeline wrote “A Famous Corner of Tuscany” about Bagni di Lucca. Around this time she bought Casa Burlamacchi, completing restoring the “Casa Piccola” (Little House, now Villa San Francesco), in front of the garden at the back of the “Casa Grande” (Big House.)



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Baron Adolph de Meyer was a photographer famed for his photographic portraits in the early 20th century, many of which depicted celebrities such as Mary Pickford, Rita Lydig, Luisa Casati, Billie Burke, ...
Born: September 1, 1868, Paris, France
Died: January 6, 1946, Los Angeles, California, United States
Spouse: Olga de Meyer
Lived: 1 Cadogan Gardens, SW3
Married: July 25, 1899

Olga de Meyer was a British-born artists' model, socialite, patron of the arts, writer, and fashion figure of the early 20th century. She was best known as the wife of photographer Adolph de Meyer and was rumored to be the natural daughter of King Edward VII. Adolph de Meyer was a celebrated artist dubbed by Cecil Beaton "the Debussy of photography." Theirs was a marriage of convenience, as the groom was homosexual and the bride was bisexual. Violet Trefusis characterized the de Meyers—who counted Olga among her lovers and whose mother, Alice Keppel, was Edward VII's best-known mistress—as "Pederaste and Médisante" because, as Trefusis observed, "He looked so queer and she had such a vicious tongue." Among her affairs was one with Winnaretta Singer, Singer sewing machine heiress and arts patron, in the years 1901-05. Olga de Meyer was muse and model to many artists, among them Jacques-Émile Blanche, James McNeill Whistler, James Jebusa Shannon, Giovanni Boldini, Walter Sickert, John Singer Sargent, and Paul César Helleu.
Together from 1899 to 1931: 32 years.
Baron Adolph de Meyer (September 1, 1868 - January 6, 1946)
Olga, the Baroness de Meyer (August 8, 1871 – 1930/1931)
Married: July 25, 1899



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Baron Adolph de Meyer was a photographer famed for his elegant photographic portraits in the early 20th century, many of which depicted celebrities such as Mary Pickford, Rita Lydig, Luisa Casati, Billie Burke, Irene Castle, John Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Ruth St. Denis, King George V of the United Kingdom, and Queen Mary. He was also the first official fashion photographer for the American magazine Vogue, appointed to that position in 1913. He married (a lavender marriage) Donna Olga Caracciolo, an Italian noblewoman; she was a goddaughter (and possible illegitimate daughter) of Edward VII. The couple reportedly met in 1897, at the home of a member of the Sassoon banking family, and Olga de Meyer would be the subject of many of her husband's photographs. After the death of his wife, Baron de Meyer became romantically involved with a young German, Ernest Frohlich, whom he hired as his chauffeur and later adopted as his son. The latter went by the name Baron Ernest Frohlich de Meyer. From 1898 to 1913, de Meyer lived in fashionable Cadogan Gardens, London, and between 1903 and 1907 his work was published in Alfred Stieglitz's quarterly Camera Work. In 1912, he photographed Vaslav Nijinsky in Paris.
Together from 1932 to 1946: 14 years.
Baron Adolph de Meyer (September 1, 1868 - January 6, 1946)
Ernest Frohlich (born 1914)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cadogan Square is a residential square in Knightsbridge, west London, that was named after Earl Cadogan. Whilst it is mainly a residential area, some of the properties are used for diplomatic and educational purposes. The square is known for being one of the most expensive residential streets in the United Kingdom, with an average house price of around £5.75 million in 2013.
Address: Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RJ, UK
Type: Private Property
Place
The square was built between 1877 and 1888. The west side has the greatest variety of houses, all variations on the same Flemish-influenced theme. Numbers 54-58 were designed by William Young in 1877 for Lord Cadogan, and the architect J. J. Stevenson was largely responsible for the south side, built in 1879-85. The east side was built in 1879 by G. T. Robinson. Number 61 is an early example of high-class mansion flats, and number 61A was once a studio-house for a Mr F. W. Lawson. Cadogan Square is one of the most desirable residential addresses in London and is one of the most expensive in the United Kingdom. It is formed of a garden (restricted to residents) surrounded by red-brick houses, the majority of which have been converted into flats or apartments. The square is south of Pont Street, east of Lennox Gardens, and west of Sloane Street. An independent preparatory school for boys, Sussex House School, at number 68, was founded in 1953. The school is sited in a house by architect Norman Shaw. Apartments or flats tend to be available on short leases and are sold for several million pounds. There are three or so houses on the square that have not been converted into flats, and these may be valued at over £25 million each. The freeholder of most of the properties is Earl Cadogan, a multi-billionaire whose family has owned the land for several hundred years. Numbers 4 (by G.E Street), 52, 62 and 62b, 68 and 72 are all Grade II listed buildings. Writer Arnold Bennet lived at number 75 during the 1920s. On July 25, 1899, at Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, Cadogan Square, in London, Adolph de Meyer married Donna Olga Caracciolo, an Italian noblewoman who had been divorced earlier that year from Nobile Marino Brancaccio; she was a goddaughter of Edward VII.
Notable queer residents at Cadogan Gardens:
• From 1898 to 1913 Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) lived in fashionable 1 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 and between 1903 and 1907 his work was published in Alfred Stieglitz’s quarterly Camera Work.
• Sir Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999) lived from 1991 to 1999 and died at 2 Cadogan Gardens, SW3.
• Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972), US born one-time lover of Oscar Wilde’s niece, Dolly Wilde, and origin of the character Valerie Seymour in “The Well of Loneliness,” lived at 97 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 in the 1920s.
• Edward Sackville-West (1901-1965) was born at 105 Cadogan Gardens, SW3 the elder child and only son of Major-General Charles John Sackville-West, who later became the fourth Baron Sackville, and his first wife, Maud Cecilia, née Bell (1873–1920.)
• In 1907 at the Homburg spa in Germany, Radclyffe Hall met Mabel Batten (1856-1916), a well-known amateur singer of lieder. Batten (nicknamed "Ladye") was 51 to Hall's 27, and was married with an adult daughter and grandchildren. They fell in love, and after Batten's husband died they set up residence together at 59 Cadogan Square, SW1X. Batten gave Hall the nickname John, which she used the rest of her life. In 1915 Hall fell in love with Mabel Batten's cousin Una Troubridge (1887–1963), a sculptor who was the wife of Vice-Admiral Ernest Troubridge, and the mother of a young daughter. Batten died the following year, and in 1917 Radclyffe Hall and Una Troubridge began living together at 22 Cadogan Court, Draycott Avenue, SW3, a move Radclyffe originally planned to do with Mabel Batten. The relationship would last until Hall's death.
• On April 5, 1895, Oscar Wilde was arrested in room 118 of the upscale Edwardian Cadogan Hotel (now Belmond Cadogan Hotel, 75 Sloane Street, SW1X) on a charge of "gross indecency" stemming from his homosexual relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas. Friends had urged Wilde to flee the country once word of his impending arrest leaked out, but Wilde was resolute, saying, "I shall stay and do my sentence, whatever it is." The poet-dramatist was sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor, a cruel punishment that was to signal the beginning of the end for Wilde's brightly shining star. The arrest was immortalized by English poet laureate, John Betjeman, in his poem "The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at the Cadogan Hotel."
Life
Who: Baron Adolph de Meyer (September 1, 1868 – January 6, 1946) and Olga, the Baroness de Meyer (August 8, 1871 – 1930/1931)
Baron Adolph de Meyer was a photographer famed for his elegant photographic portraits in the early XX century, many of which depicted celebrities such as Mary Pickford, Rita Lydig, Luisa Casati, Billie Burke, Irene Castle, John Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Ruth St. Denis, King George V of the United Kingdom, and Queen Mary. He was also the first official fashion photographer for the American magazine Vogue, appointed to that position in 1913. In 1899 he married Donna Olga Caracciolo. The couple reportedly met in 1897, at the home of a member of the Sassoon banking family, and Olga would be the subject of many of her husband’s photographs. The de Meyers’ marriage was one of marriage of convenience rather than romantic love, since the groom was homosexual and the bride was bisexual or lesbian. As Baron de Meyer wrote in an unpublished autobiographical novel, before they wed, he explained to Olga "the real meaning of love shorn of any kind of sensuality.” He continued by observing, "Marriage based too much on love and unrestrained passion has rarely a chance to be lasting, whilst perfect understanding and companionship, on the contrary, generally make the most durable union." The de Meyers were characterised by Violet Trefusis—who counted Olga among her lovers and whose mother, Alice Keppel, was Edward VII’s best known mistress—as "Pederaste and Médisante" because, as Trefusis observed, "He looked so queer and she had such a vicious tongue." Among Olga’s affairs was one with Winnaretta, Princess Edmond de Polignac, the Singer sewing machine heiress and arts patron, in the years 1901–05. Cecil Beaton dubbed Adolph de Maeye "the Debussy of photography.” In 1912 he photographed Nijinsky in Paris. After the death of his wife in 1930/31, Baron de Meyer became romantically involved with a young German, Ernest Frohlich (born circa 1914), whom he hired as his chauffeur and later adopted as his son. The latter went by the name Baron Ernest Frohlich de Meyer.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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