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Wystan Hugh Auden was an English poet, who later became an American citizen. He is best known for love poems such as "Funeral Blues," poems on political and social themes such as "September 1, 1939" ...
Born: February 21, 1907, York, United Kingdom
Died: September 29, 1973, Vienna, Austria
Lived: 2 West Cottages, West End Lane, NW6
559 Finchley Road, NW3
38 Upper Park Road, NW3
77 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.72795, -73.98559)
46 Fitzroy Street, W1T
15 Loudoun Road, NW8
54 Bootham, York YO30, UK (53.96413, -1.08782)
43 Thurloe Square, SW7
25 Randolph Crescent, W9
George Washington Hotel, 23 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010
43 Chester Row, SW1W
February House, 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Education: University of Oxford
Gresham's School
Buried: Kirchstetten, Kirchstetten, Sankt Pölten-Land Bezirk, Lower Austria (Niederösterreich), Austria
Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA (memorial)
Christ Church Cathedral, St Aldate's, Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 1DP (memorial)
Find A Grave Memorial# 2969
Books: Poems, The Age of Anxiety, The Dyer's Hand, more
Influenced by: T. S. Eliot, Christopher Isherwood, John Donne, more
Married: June 15, 1935

Erika Mann was a German actress and writer, the eldest daughter of novelist Thomas Mann and Katia Mann. Her first noted affair was with actress Pamela Wedekind, whom she met in Berlin, and who was engaged to her brother Klaus Mann. She later became involved with actress Therese Giehse, and journalists Betty Knox and Annemarie Schwarzenbach, whom she served with as a war correspondent during World War II. On July 24, 1926, Erika Mann married German actor Gustaf Grundgens, but they divorced in 1929. In 1927, she and Klaus undertook a trip around the world, which they documented in their book Rundherum; Das Abenteuer einer Weltreise. She was involved as an actor in the lesbian film Mädchen in Uniform (1931, Leontine Sagan) but left the production before its completion. In 1935, she undertook a lavender marriage (marriage of convenience) to the homosexual English poet W.H. Auden, in order to obtain British citizenship. She and Auden never lived together, but remained friends and technically married until Erika's death. “Isherwood told me that Thomas Mann jokingly referred to him as the "family pimp" due to Isherwood having suggested the marriage in the first place.” Stathis Orphanos
Together from 1935 to 1969: 34 years.
Erika Julia Hedwig Mann (November 9, 1905 – August 27, 1969)
W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973)
Married: June 15, 1935



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Wystan Hugh Auden, who published as W.H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, born in England, later an American citizen, regarded by many critics as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. His work is noted for its stylistic and technical achievement, its engagement with moral and political issues, and its variety in tone, form and content. In 1939, at the Yorkville apartment on 81st St in NYC, two days after a League of American Writers reading, Auden met the poet Chester Kallman, who became his lover for the next two years (Auden described their relationship as a "marriage" that began with a cross-country "honeymoon" journey). In August 1941, Kallman ended their sexual relationship because he could not accept Auden's insistence on a mutual faithfulness, but he and Auden remained companions, sharing houses and apartments from 1953 until Auden's death. Kallman died less than two years after Auden, seemingly of a broken heart.
Together from 1939 to 1973: 34 years.
Chester Simon Kallman (January 7, 1921 – January 17, 1975)
W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973)
Anniversary: April 8, 1938



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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54 Bootham is situated in a Conservation Area. It was the birthplace in 1907 of the poet, W. H. Auden.
Address: 54 Bootham, York YO30, UK (53.96413, -1.08782)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 462897 (Grade II, 1954)
Place
A substantial three storey house of c. 1840. The symmetrical five-bay front built in white brick has the central bay and pilaster strips at each end projecting forward; brackets under the eaves cornice are set against a white plaster frieze which is matched by a deep white band under the second-floor windows. The front door is protected by an open porch and the window above is emphasised by a bold plaster surround. The back is built in red brick and has a central projection which on the upper floors contains alcoves leading off the half-landings of the staircase and giving access to what were water closets. The plan, apart from the projections at the back, is square with the common arrangement of four rooms disposed two on each side of the central hall. This central hall has the entrance hall divided from the stair-hall by Corinthian pilasters carrying enriched entablature, the doorways to principal rooms have enriched architraves and overdoors and the alcove off the half-landing is reached between fluted columns with foliated capitals, but the detail of these decorative features is all coarsely designed. The building was once used as a dormitory by Bootham School, later to become the home of the Buddhists in York, and since its purchase in 1986 is now used as offices by a firm of chartered accountants, and is the registered office of this Trust.
Life
Who: Wystan Hugh Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973)
W.H. Auden was an English poet, who later became an American citizen. He is best known for love poems such as "Funeral Blues," poems on political and social themes such as "September 1, 1939" and "The Shield of Achilles," poems on cultural and psychological themes such as The Age of Anxiety, and poems on religious themes such as "For the Time Being" and "Horae Canonicae." He was born in York, grew up in and near Birmingham in a professional middle-class family.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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W.H. Auden lived in 1930 at 43 Chester Row, SW1W staying with the Benensons whilst tutoring their son Peter.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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W.H. Auden (1907-73), writer and poet, lived with his brother John at 43 Thurloe Square, SW7 in the 1930s.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In 1932, W.H. Auden stayed at 46 Fitzroy Street, W1T with Robert Medley (educator and artist) and Rupert Doone (English dancer and choreographer). In Paris on Nov. 1925, Rupert Doone met and fell in love with Robert Medley. Medley and Doone lived together until Doone's death, because of multiple sclerosis. Medley and Doone invited Auden to write plays for the Group Theatre, and through Auden, Medley met Stephen Spender, Louis MacNeice, and others who became associated with the Group.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1933 W.H. Auden lodged at 25 Randolph Crescent, W9 with Stephen Spender, English poet and author. Spender's sexuality has been the subject of debate. Spender's seemingly changing attitudes have caused him to be labeled bisexual. Many of his friends in his earlier years were gay. Spender himself had many affairs with men in his earlier years, most notably with Tony Hyndman (who is called "Jimmy Younger" in his memoir “World Within World”). Following his affair with Muriel Gardiner he shifted his focus to heterosexuality, though his relationship with Hyndman complicated both this relationship and his short-lived marriage to Inez Pearn (1936–39). His marriage to Natasha Litvin in 1941 seems to have marked the end of his romantic relationships with men, although not the end of all homosexual activity, as his unexpurgated diaries reveal.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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From 1935 to 1936, 2 West Cottages, West End Lane, NW6. In 1936, W.H. Auden stayed here with Benjamin Britten. From 1936 to 1937, 559 Finchley Road, NW3. W.H. Auden stayed here with Benjamin Britten. From 1937 to 1938, 38 Upper Park Road, NW3. Britten Rents a room. In 1934 W.H. Auden, after a conflict with Basil Wright with whom he was lodging in Highgate, moved out of Wright’s flat and began to lodge with William Coldstream and his wife Nancy at their house at 38 Upper Park Road, Hampstead.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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February House was the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the XX century. Its residents included, among others, Carson McCullers, W. H. Auden, Paul Bowles, and the famed burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 – April 26, 1970). This ramshackle Brooklyn brownstone was host to an explosion of creativity, an extraordinary experiment in communal living, and a nonstop yearlong party fueled by the appetites of youth. Here these burgeoning talents composed many of their most famous, iconic literary works while experiencing together a crucial historical moment--America on the threshold of WWII.
Address: 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In 1940, George Davis, an editor recently fired from Harper's Bazaar, rented a dilapidated house in Brooklyn Heights in which he installed brilliant, volatile artists, who spent the next year working, fighting, and drinking. Carson McCullers sipped sherry while, down the hall, the burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee typed her mystery novel with three-inch fingernails, and, downstairs, Benjamin Britten and Paul Bowles fought over practice space. W. H. Auden was housemother, collecting rent, assigning chores, and declaring no politics at dinner. Like all bohemian utopias, February House (so named because of the residents' February birthdays) was unable to withstand the centrifugal force of its constituent egos. The artists dispersed—to return home, serve in the military, or follow wayward lovers—and the house was demolished to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The George Washington Hotel was a hotel and boarding house (23 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010) open in 1928. The building was occupied by many famous writers, musicians, and poets including W. H. Auden, who called it “the nicest hotel in town,” and Christopher Isherwood who lived there in the 1930s. Much of the space is currently under sublease to the School of Visual Arts except for apartments still occupied by original (non-student) tenants who pay stabilized rent, and who are still protected under NYC rent laws.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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8th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan that runs from Sixth Avenue to Third Avenue, and Avenue B to Avenue D; its addresses switch from West to East as it crosses Fifth Avenue. Between Third Avenue and Avenue A, it is named St. Mark’s Place, after the nearby St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery on 10th Street at Second Avenue.
Address: 77 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.72795, -73.98559)
Type: Private Property
Place
St. Mark’s Place is considered a main cultural street for the East Village. Vehicular traffic runs east along both one-way streets. St. Mark’s Place features a wide variety of retailers. Venerable institutions lining St. Mark’s Place include Gem Spa, Yaffa Café, the St. Mark’s Hotel, St. Mark’s Comics, and Trash and Vaudeville. There are several open front markets that sell sunglasses, clothing and jewelry. There are also a number of restaurants and bars, as well as several record stores. Wouter van Twiller, colonial governor of New Amsterdam, once owned a tobacco farm near 8th and Macdougal Streets. Such farms were located around the area until the 1830s. Nearby, a Native American trail crossed the island via the right-of-ways of Greenwich Avenue, Astor Place, and Stuyvesant Street. Under the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811, a city grid for much of Manhattan was defined. Eighth Street was to run from Sixth Avenue in the west to Third Avenue and the Bowery to the east. The area west of Sixth Avenue was already developed as Greenwich Village. Mercer, Greene, Wooster, Thompson Street, Sullivan Street, and Macdougal Streets, as well as Laurens Street (present-day LaGuardia Place), extended to Eighth Street until the 1820s, when the construction of Washington Square Park severed Laurens, Thompson, and Sullivan Streets south of 4th Street. After the Commissioners’ Plan was laid out, property along the street’s right of way quickly developed. By 1835, the New York University opened its first building, the Silver Center, along Eighth Street near the Washington Square Park. Row houses were also built on Eighth Street. The street ran between the Jefferson Market, built in 1832 at the west end, and the Tompkins Market, built in 1836, at the east end. These were factors in the street’s commercialization in later years. Eighth Street was supposed to extend to a market place at Avenue C, but since that idea never came to fruition. Capitalizing on the high-class status of Bond, Bleecker, Great Jones, and Lafayette Streets in NoHo, developer Thomas E. Davis developed the east end of the street and renamed it "St. Mark’s Place.” Davis built up St. Mark’s Place between Third and Second Avenues between 1831 and 1832. Although the original plan was for Federal homes, only three such houses remained in 2014.
Notable queer residents at St. Marks Place:
• No. 33: Home to poet Anne Waldman in the late 1960s/mid-1970s. In 1977, the storefront was occupied by Manic Panic, the first U.S. boutique to sell punk rock attire, which developed its own line of make-up and vibrant hair dyes; notable patrons have included performers David Bowie, Cyndi Lauper, Debbie Harry, and Joey Ramone.
• No. 51: In the early 1980s, this was home to 51X, a gallery that featured graffiti art, representing artists such as Keith Haring, and Jean-Michel Basquiat.
• No. 57: Club 57 was an important art and performance space in the late 1970s and early 1980s; notable people, such as Ann Magnuson, Keith Haring, Klaus Nomi, John Sex, Kenny Scharf, David Wojnarowicz, Wendy Wild, The Fleshtones, and Fab Five Freddy, performed or showed there.
• No. 75: The Holiday Cocktail Lounge has had a range of visitors including W.H. Auden, Allen Ginsberg and other Beat writers, Shelley Winters, and Frank Sinatra, whose agent lived in the neighborhood.
• No. 77: Home to W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 –September 29, 1973) for almost 20 years, from 1953 to 1972. Born in England, the poet Wystan Hugh Auden, arrived in New York City in 1939. After stints at the George Washington Hotel on East 23rd Street and in Brooklyn Heights, he and companion Chester Kallman settled into a second-floor apartment at this location. His living quarters were described as being so cold that the toilet no longer functioned and he had to use the toilet in the liquor store at the corner. Auden is regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the XX century. The building now houses a restaurant, La Palapa. The basement of this building was the location where the newspaper Novy Mir ("New World" or "New Peace"), a Russian-language Communist paper, was founded in 1916. It was edited by Nikolai Ivanovich Bukharin, and Leon Trotsky worked there; the paper stopped publishing after the Russian Revolution of October, 1917.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The San Remo Cafe was a bar at 93 MacDougal Street at the corner of Bleecker Street. It was a hangout for Bohemians and writers such as James Agee, W. H. Auden, Tennessee Williams, James Baldwin, William S. Burroughs, Gregory Corso, Miles Davis, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, Jack Kerouac, Jackson Pollock, William Styron, Dylan Thomas, Gore Vidal, Judith Malina and many others. It opened in 1925 closed in 1967. Jack Kerouac described the bar's crowd in his novel “The Subterraneans”: “Hip without being slick, intelligent without being corny, they are intellectual as hell and know all about Pound without being pretentious or saying too much about it. They are very quiet, they are very Christlike.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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In 1963, W.H. Auden stayed with Stephen Spender at this latter home at 15 Loudoun Road, NW8. This is the house where Spender died of a heart attack on July 16, 1995, aged 86. He was buried in the graveyard of St Mary on Paddington Green Church, W2.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Klaus Mann (1906-1949), homosexual son of Thomas Mann and brother to Erika Mann, who married in a lavender marriage W.H. Auden, is buried at Cimetière du Grand Jas de Cannes, Plot: Carré 16. His sister Erika Mann is buried at Kilchberg Village Cemetery (Kilchberg, Switzerland), while instead W.H. Auden is buried at Kirchstetten, Austria.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Paul Frederic Bowles was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator. He became associated with Tangier, Morocco, where he settled in 1947 and lived for 52 years to the end of his life.
Died: November 18, 1999, Tangier, Morocco
Education: University of Virginia
Lived: Rue Sidi Bouknadel (near Rue Riad Sultan), Tanger, Morocco (35.78906, -5.81259)
Taprobane Island, Weligama By Pass Rd, Sri Lanka (5.96775, 80.42573)
February House, 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Buried: Lakemont Cemetery, Lakemont, Yates County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 10542065
Spouse: Jane Bowles (m. 1938–1973)
Movies: The Sheltering Sky, Paul Bowles: The Complete Outsider, more
Married: February 21, 1938

Paul Bowles was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator. Jane Bowles was an American writer and playwright. Jane spent her life examining lesbian identity with an honest and sardonic wit. Jane's adventures in the lesbian and gay bars of Greenwich Village, and her open pursuit of women lovers, caused her mother and her family consternation. In 1937, she was introduced to Paul--himself a homosexual--and agreed to marry him. The two soon recognized that their marriage would succeed only as a platonic friendship; both continued their homosexual liaisons. After a brief sojourn in France, they were prominent among the literary figures of New York throughout the 1940s, with Paul working under Virgil Thomson as a music critic at the New York Herald Tribune. In 1947, Bowles settled in Tangier, Morocco. Except for winters spent in Sri Lanka (then known as Ceylon) during the early 1950s, Tangier was Paul Bowles’ home for the remaining 52 years of his life. Paul Bowles died in 1999 at the age of 88. His ashes are buried in Lakemont Cemetery in upstate New York.
Together from 1937 to 1973: 36 years.
Jane Sydney Auer Bowles (February 22, 1917 – May 4, 1973)
Paul Frederic Bowles (December 30, 1910 – November 18, 1999)
Married: February 21, 1938



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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February House was the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the XX century. Its residents included, among others, Carson McCullers, W. H. Auden, Paul Bowles, and the famed burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 – April 26, 1970). This ramshackle Brooklyn brownstone was host to an explosion of creativity, an extraordinary experiment in communal living, and a nonstop yearlong party fueled by the appetites of youth. Here these burgeoning talents composed many of their most famous, iconic literary works while experiencing together a crucial historical moment--America on the threshold of WWII.
Address: 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In 1940, George Davis, an editor recently fired from Harper's Bazaar, rented a dilapidated house in Brooklyn Heights in which he installed brilliant, volatile artists, who spent the next year working, fighting, and drinking. Carson McCullers sipped sherry while, down the hall, the burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee typed her mystery novel with three-inch fingernails, and, downstairs, Benjamin Britten and Paul Bowles fought over practice space. W. H. Auden was housemother, collecting rent, assigning chores, and declaring no politics at dinner. Like all bohemian utopias, February House (so named because of the residents' February birthdays) was unable to withstand the centrifugal force of its constituent egos. The artists dispersed—to return home, serve in the military, or follow wayward lovers—and the house was demolished to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1947 Paul Bowles settled in Tangier, Morocco, and his wife Jane Bowles followed in 1948. Except for winters spent in Sri Lanka (then known as Ceylon) during the early 1950s, Tangier was Bowles’ home for the remainder of his life. He came to symbolize American expatriates in the city.
Address: Rue Sidi Bouknadel (near Rue Riad Sultan), Tanger, Morocco (35.78906, -5.81259)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In Paris, Paul Bowles became part of Gertrude Stein’s literary and artistic circle. On her advice he made his first visit to Tangier with Aaron Copland in the summer of 1931. They took a house on the Mountain above Tangier Bay. Bowles later made Morocco his full-time home, and it inspired many of his short stories. From there he returned to Berlin, where he met British writers Stephen Spender and Christopher Isherwood. (Isherwood was reportedly so taken with him that he named character Sally Bowles in his novel after him.) The next year, Bowles returned to North Africa, traveling throughout other parts of Morocco, the Sahara, Algeria, and Tunisia. In 1947 Paul Bowles received a contract for a novel from Doubleday; with the advance, he moved permanently to Tangier. Jane joined him there the next year. Bowles commented: “I was a composer for as long as I’ve been a writer. I came here because I wanted to write a novel. I had a commission to do it. I was sick of writing music for other people — Joseph Losey, Orson Welles, a whole lot of other people, endless.” He set his second novel, “Let It Come Down” (1952), in North Africa, specifically Tangier. It explored the disintegration of an American (Nelson Dyar), who was unprepared for the encounter with an alien culture. The first American edition by Random House was published later that same month. While Bowles was concentrating on his career as a writer, he composed incidental music for nine plays presented by the American School of Tangier. The Bowles couple became fixtures of the American and European expatriate scene in Tangier. Visitors included Truman Capote, Tennessee Williams and Gore Vidal. The Beat writers Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs and Gregory Corso followed in the mid-1950s and early 1960s. In 1951, Bowles was introduced to the Master Musicians of Jajouka, having first heard the musicians when he and Brion Gysin attended a festival or moussem at Sidi Kacem. Bowles described his continued association with the Master Musicians of Jajouka and their hereditary leader Bachir Attar in his book, “Days: A Tangier Journal.” After the death of Jane Bowles on May 4, 1973 in Málaga, Spain, Bowles continued to live in Tangier. He wrote regularly and received many visitors to his modest apartment. Bowles died of heart failure on November 18, 1999 at the Italian Hospital in Tangier at the age of 88. He had been ill for some time with respiratory problems. His ashes were buried in Lakemont, New York, next to the graves of his parents and grandparents.
Life
Who: Paul Frederic Bowles (December 30, 1910 – November 18, 1999)
In 1938 Paul Bowles married Jane Auer, an author and playwright. It was an unconventional marriage: their intimate relationships were with people of their own sex, but they maintained close personal ties with each other. Bowles has frequently been featured in anthologies as a gay writer, but during his life, he always regarded such typecasting as both absurd and irrelevant. After a brief sojourn in France, the couple were prominent among the literary figures of New York throughout the 1940s. Paul Bowles also worked under Virgil Thomson as a music critic at the New York Herald Tribune. His light opera “The Wind Remains,” based on a poem by Federico García Lorca, was performed in 1943 with choreography by Merce Cunningham and conducted by Leonard Bernstein. His translation of Sartre’s play “Huis Clos” (No Exit), directed by John Huston, won a Drama Critic’s Award in 1943.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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House: In 1952, Paul Bowles bought the tiny island of Taprobane, off the coast of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka.) There he wrote much of his novel “The Spider’s House,” returning to Tangier in the warmer months. He returned to Sri Lanka most winters.
Place
Taprobane Island is a rocky private island with one villa, located just off the southern coast of Sri Lanka opposite the village of Weligama. The island was named after the old Greek word for Sri Lanka. The island was previously owned by (self-titled) Count Maurice Maria de Mauny Talvande who fell in love with Weligama Bay. It was he who had the villa built on this tiny island. The islet passed on to the American author and composer Paul Bowles and then the Sri Lankan born former UN Chief Prosecutor Sir Desmond Lorenz de Silva before it came to the ownership of the Australian businessman Geoffrey Dobbs. Notable people who stayed on Taprobane include Dutch author Peter ten Hoopen, who spent a month there in 1984 during civil unrest on the mainland, as well as Kylie Minogue, who composed a song about the island inspired by her stay titled "Taprobane (Extraordinary Day.”) It had inspired Jason Kouchak to compose "Dark Island" in his 1999 album Watercolours.
Life
Who: Maurice Talvande, Count de Mauny Talvande (March 21, 1866 – November 27, 1941)
Maurice attended St Mary's College at Hales Place in Canterbury, which was run by French Jesuit Priests, during the period 1883-1884. His brother Roger also attended St Mary's College and stayed on for a longer period from 1883-1888. Maurice, subsequently, went to Saint-Cyr Military College which was also influenced by the Jesuit Order. Despite the basic French environment that he was surrounded by, Maurice probably learned his English too while he was under their tutorship. His close friendship with George Byng, brother of Lady Mary, whom he first met at St Mary's College in Canterbury, may have given him the opportunity to meet Mary, in the first place, and then develop into a relationship that ended in marriage to her. After completing his education, it is reported that, he travelled widely in America for several years. He is reported to have sailed from Le Havre and arrived in New York, in the US, on November 19, 1894 on board the 9,000 ton SS La Touraine., being in transit to Boston, in a journey that lasted about seven days. Count Maurice Maria de Mauny Talvande married Lady Mary Elizabeth Agnes Bynge, daughter of the fourth Earl of Strafford, enry William John Byng, on June 24, 1898. The wedding was a great social occasion and attended by the Princess of Wales, Princess Christian and Prince and Princess Saxe-Weimer. His mother Mme de Mauny Talvande and brother Roger de Mauny Talvande also attended. His father, Felix Talvande, was not present. The bridegroom was 32 and the bride was 33 years old at the timeof their marriage. The newly wed De Mauny's settled down in 1898 at the famous Azay-le-Rideau castle, whose long and memorable history goes bact to the reign of Francois I in the XVI century. From Azay, Maurice and Mary moved to Cannes where their son Victor Alexander Christian henry George was born on April 19 1899. From here they moved briefly to San Remo and then returned to England. On their return from France in 1900 the de Mauny family moved to an old Queen Anne house called "Terrick House", near Ellesbrough in Buckimhamshire. A daughter, Alexandra Mary, was born here on July 19 1904. Maurice is reported to have written three books, "The Peace of Suffering 1914-1918", "Gardening in Ceylon", "The Gardens of Taprobane". Maurice was a great traveller. It is believed that he visited Ceylon for extended periods of a time a year or two after 1910. William Warren has suggested in "Tropical Asian Style", that de Mauny was first invited to Ceylon in 1912 by Sir Thomas Lipton, the tea magnate. Warren has conjectured that it was some “great personal disaster” that drove de Mauny to Ceylon. It is possible that both his diminishing financial status and also his many marital problems he was facing may have been the reasons for his move eastwards.de Mauny travelled several times between Hampshire and Ceylon soon after his bankruptcy problems. His skills as an expert gardener and furniture maker in Ceylon, and, later on Journalism, may have provided him with the necessary finances to supplekent his travel and living. There are accounts from people who knew him in Ceylon that he also used to receive remittances from overseas which probably could have beensent by his wife, Mary, from time to time for his upkeep and living. It is reported that he also ran a furniture factory and workshop in Colombo. A number of de Mauny furniture pieces have survived in the hands of private owners. They are now highly valued and cherished in Sri Lanka. He started the "Weligama Local Industrues" in 1925 which as he claimed gave employment to over 200 carpenters, carvers and inlayers. By 1930, the enterprise suffered at the hands of the Depression and had to be halted until better times. It was restarted in 1936. The craftsmanship was most admirable and the designs were very much French styles of that time. Ferguson's Ceylon Directory for 1920-21 shows that his address was “Ascot,” Albert Crescent, Cinnamon Gardens, Colombo 7, a very elite and high-society area of Colombo. His son, Victor, is also listed as living there. It was in September 1927 that he saw for the first time, and quite by chance, a place that was to become his final home. At the center of the arc of the Bay of Weligama, in the southern tip of Ceylon, “a red granite rock, covered with palms and jungle shrub, rising from the Indian Ocean - an emerald in a setting of pink corral” was where he finally chose to build andlive his eternal dream of peace and tranquility close to nature that he loved so much. He swam across the narrow straight and saw an admirable view as he reached the plateau of the rock. "There was nothing", he recalled some ten years later, "between me and the South Pole". Having located and identified his magical island, which was only a few acres in area, de Mauny then set upon the task of building it into his future home that he had been dreaming of for so many years. The foundation stone of the house was laid on February 1, 1927 and thus initiated the beginning of what was to become a famous and much visited site by many distinguished persons. The seeds of "The Gardens of Taprobane" had been planted. The island was named "Taprobane" based on the ancient name for Ceylon given by the Greeks and also because it suited its pear-shape outline more like a mini Ceylon itself. The local name, by tradition, for the sland was "Galduwa" meaning "Rock Islan" in Sinalese. It is conjectured that the island may have been a art of the mainland in ancient tmes as it is not shown in maps of the Portuguese Colonial era. The name Taprobane is also considered to have been originated from the sanskrit "Tamba Vanna" meaning "copper colored" as a reference to the many famous golden beaches of Ceylon. The house was built on a 135 feet square area with a broad terrace surrounding it. It was octagonal in shape spanninga surface of 25 by 25 yards. This gave the resident and eight faced view of the outsde world with the north side facing towards the mainland and the south facing Antarctica in the South Pole. The central hall was called the "Hall of Lotus" and was also octagonal in shape measuring 26 by 26 feet. A 30 foot high dome lined with eight panels of inlaid wood was located in the center of he hall. The panels were dyed with an opaque gold and blue color and bore designs of Lotus buds and flowers. The dome was supported by eight square pilars of Wedgewood-blue, 24 feet tall. On either side of these were two light columns, 12 feet tall, making sixteen in all, terracotta with gilded capitals. They supported a white stone traverse that connected the pillars in an arch that was 12 foot span. This was hung with curtains of soft blue silk with a deep brocaded border of art noveau design at the bottom colored black and gold on cream. The rooms converged on the hall through eight arches. A Sigiriya frescoe styled border ran along the stone white walls. The whole scheme was engulfed in a golden hue by light entering through Venetian blinds created out of amber colored glass. The furniture within was made by local craftsmen using some of the rarest woods of Ceylon. They were mainly of French style although here were any pieces that belonged to the Dutch designs too. A carpet of Maidenhair ferns and a light bronze creeper with clumps of Eucharist Lilies adorned the hall. From the north-east terrace here was a splendid view of the shoreline, the forest of coconut palms fringing the Bay of Weligama, and the copper colored sands clustered with boats on a pea-green sea. Through the entrances of iron gates, with their design of brass-headed peacocks with prussian blue eyes one could see he openness and vastness of the mighty Indian Ocean sprawling through time. The Count was residing at Weligama in 1931. His son, Victor Alexander, was then residing at "Boxmead", Turret Road (now renamed to Dharmapala Mawatha and running from Kollupitiya junction in Colombo 3 all the way down to Liptons Circus in Colombo 7, bounding one of the most prestigious residential areas of Colombo), Colombo 7. Victor was employed at the Rosehough Tea Company, first as an Assistant and then as an under-manager. It is also reported in the Fergusons Directory that he held the position of Second Lieutenant in the Royal Navy. he went on to become a Commander in the Royal Navy in WW II, wher he was awarded the DFC. He eventually went on to become the Chairman of Rosehough until he resigned in the early 1970's. Local records in Sri Lanka show that the island was actually purchased by de Mauny for a sum of Rs 250 in 1925 in the name of his son Victor Alexander. It remained in his ownership until it was sold by public auction, in 1942, for Rs 12,000. The Count encouraged people to visit is island. His historical visitors book was filled with names of Kings, Princes, Dukes, Duchesses, Aristocrats, Prime Ministers, and other famous personalities from across the blue marble. Count Maurice de Mauny Talvande died on November 27, 1941 while at the Chelvarayan Estate, Navatkuli, in the northern city of Jaffna in Ceylon. Hs remains were buried at St Mary's Burial Grounds in Jaffna. Maurice's son Victor passed away in 1978 and his daughter Alexandra died in 1989. They were both chidlless. De Mauny's island was a very famous destination for many notables from different nations. The island was sold by public auction in 1942 after having been neglected ad in a state of derelict for many years. In 1957 Paul Bowles wrote an article about finding and living on a tiny tropical island in the Indian Ocean – Taprobane – only one hundred yards off the coast of Weligama, near Galle, in southern Ceylon (now Sri Lanka.) He first became intrigued by Taprobane island in 1949 when he saw photographs of it during a stay at Wilton House, the magnificent ancestral home of his friend from Tangier, David Herbert. The Herbert family had stayed on the island in the mid-1930s. Bowles first visited Ceylon in 1950 and two years later, when Taprobane was put up for sale, he bought the island with some of the proceeds from his second book “The Delicate Prey and Other Stories.” Paul Bowles wrote the final chapters of “The Spider’s House” while living on Taprobane. Bowles sold the island n 1956 to the Irish writer Shaun Mandy. For several years, since 1964, the island was in the ownership of of the de Silva whose senior member was Desmond de Silva QC, the very distinguished British barristor. The island was then on a long lease to to the very successful Hong Kong business tycoon Geofrey Dobbs. It may be interesting to note that the wife of Desmond de Silva is Princess Katharina of Yugoslavia. The author Robin Maugham, who visited the Island as a young man, and in the mid-1970s, considered the unique beauty and harmony of the villa had become compromised after de Mauny's death by partitioning and the loss of his furniture and fittings, and that the area itself had been despoiled by the construction of a new road along the mainland beach. Since then, and particularly after the 2004 tsunami, significant development of the adjoining mainland village has occurred.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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At Lakemont Cemetery (Dundee, NY 14837) is buried Paul Bowles (1910–1999), American expatriate composer, author, and translator. He became associated with Tangier, Morocco, where he settled in 1947 and lived for 52 years to the end of his life.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Mary Edwards Walker was an American feminist, abolitionist, prohibitionist, alleged spy, prisoner of war and surgeon. As of 2016, she is the only woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor.
Born: November 26, 1832, Oswego
Died: February 21, 1919, Oswego, New York, United States
Education: Syracuse Medical College
Buried: Rural Cemetery, Oswego, Oswego County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 23089
Awards: Medal of Honor
Books: A Woman of Honor: Dr. Mary E. Walker and the Civil War, Hit: Essays on Women's Rights, Hit
Parents: Vesta Walker, Alva Walker

Born in 1832, Dr. Mary Edwards Walker (November 26, 1832 – February 21, 1919) is the second woman to become a physician in the US. She served as a doctor during the Civil War and is the only woman to receive the Medal of Honor. She preferred to dress in masculine clothes and often offered her home as sanctuary for others who chose to dress unconventionally. Her grave at Rural Cemetery (242 Cemetery Rd, Oswego, NY 13126) is identified as a property associated with the Women's Rights Movement in the NPS "Women's Rights National History Trail Feasibility Study" 2003.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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John Henry Newman CO was a Catholic cardinal and theologian who was an important figure in the religious history of England in the 19th century. He was known nationally by the mid-1830s.
Born: February 21, 1801, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
Died: August 11, 1890, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Oratory House, Birmingham B45 8, UK (52.38483, -2.00464)
Newman House, 52 Ham Street, Richmond, Greater London TW10 7HQ, UK (51.43782, -0.31251)
Buried: Rednal Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rednal, Metropolitan Borough of Birmingham, West Midlands, England
Buried alongside: Ambrose St. John
Find A Grave Memorial# 35439076
Parents: Jemina Fourdrinier, John Newman

John Henry Newman was an important figure in the religious history of England. The Reverend Father Ambrose St. John was an English Oratorian, convert to Catholicism. He is now best known as a lifelong friend of Cardinal Newman. Newman wrote after St John's death: "I have ever thought no bereavement was equal to that of a husband's or a wife's, but I feel it difficult to believe that any can be greater, or any one's sorrow greater, than mine." In accordance with his expressed wishes, Cardinal Newman was buried in the grave with Fr. St. John at Rednal Roman Catholic Cemetery, Rednal, England: "I wish, with all my heart, to be buried in Fr Ambrose St John's grave — and I give this as my last, my imperative will.” The pall over the coffin bore his cardinal's motto Cor ad cor loquitur ("Heart speaks to heart".) The two men have a joint memorial stone that is inscribed with the words he had chosen: Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem ("Out of shadows and phantasms into the truth"). In The Dream of Gerontius, Edward Elgar's piece on Newman's poem, the Guardian Angel is considered to be based on St. John. In preparation for his beatification and canonization, the Catholic Church wanted to transfer his body, but when the grave was opened in 2008, no remains were found due to his body being buried in a wooden coffin in very damp ground.
Together from (around) 1835 to 1875: 40 years.
The Reverend Father Ambrose St. John (1815 – May 24, 1875)
Cardinal John Henry Newman CO (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: Grey Court, Ham Street, Cardinal Newman (1801–1890), "In this house John Henry Newman, later Cardinal Newman spent some of his early years"
Address: 52 Ham Street, Richmond, Greater London TW10 7HQ, UK (51.43782, -0.31251)
Type: Student facility (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 205346 (Grade II, 1950)
Place
Built in late XVIII century
Grey Court School was built in the grounds of a Georgian house called Grey Court House. The school would take its name from the house. The house itself was renamed Newman House after Cardinal Newman who lived there as a child in the early part of the XIX Century. Three storeys, 5 windows. Brown brick with parapet above cornice. Slate roof. Central pedimented porch. Grey Court School is a coeducational secondary school with academy status, located in Ham, London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It is twinned with Alexander-von-Humboldt-Gymnasium in Konstanz, Germany. The school has received an "outstanding" rating in all areas from Ofsted. In September 2014, a new Sixth Form Centre opened for Grey Court’s founding sixth form students. The school occupies a large acreage in Ham, with playing fields and tennis courts. The school’s current head teacher is Maggie Bailey. The school was opened in 1956 to provide education for the children of the newly constructed Ham Estate.
Life
Who: John Henry Newman Cong. Orat. (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890)
Cardinal Newman was born in London in 1801. Three years later the family moved to Grey Court House, an XVIII century mansion that still stands in Ham Street, but has been re-named Newman House. The future cardinal only lived there for three years but it became engraved on his memory. Revisiting it 54 years later, he wrote: "I have been looking at the windows of our home at Ham near Richmond, where I lay aged five looking at the candles stuck in them in celebration of the victory of Trafalgar. I have never seen the house since September 1807 - I know more about it than any house I have been in since, and could pass an examination in it. It has ever been in my dreams." Built in 1742, the house was already a school before Newman died in 1890. Now it forms part of Grey Court, the school built in its grounds some 50 years ago.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The Birmingham Oratory is an English Catholic religious community of the Congregation of the Oratory of St. Philip Neri, located in the Edgbaston area of Birmingham. The community was founded in 1849 by the Blessed John Henry Newman, C.O., the first house of that congregation in England.
Address: Birmingham B45 8, UK (52.38483, -2.00464)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 217208 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
The living quarters of the Birmingham Oratory, called the Oratory House (1850–51), fronting Hagley Road, served as Cardinal Newman’s home from 1852 to 1890 (except for four years spent in Ireland). His personal papers are located here. The Birmingham Oratory was to play a major role in the life of J. R. R. Tolkien, the author of “The Lord of the Rings,” who was a parishioner there for about nine years during his childhood. J. R. R. Tolkien lived at Fern Cottage in Rednal at the age of 12, and his mother died there in 1904. He wandered widely around the Lickeys and later recalled: “When I think of my mother’s death ... worn out with persecution, poverty, and, largely consequent, disease, in the effort to hand on to us small boys the faith, and remember the tiny bedroom she shared with us in rented rooms in a postman’s cottage at Rednal, where she died alone, too ill for viaticum, I find it very hard and bitter, when my children stray away.” The body of Cardinal Newman was buried in the small Roman Catholic cemetery at Rednal, by the Oratory country house. Attempts to move his body to Birmingham Oratory, near Birmingham’s city centre, as he was being considered for canonisation, failed due to the absence of any mortal remains.
Life
Who: John Henry Newman Cong. Orat. (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890), aka Cardinal Newman and Blessed John Henry Newman and Ambrose St. John (June 29, 1815 – May 24, 1875)
In accordance with his express wishes, Cardinal John Henry Newman was buried in the grave of his lifelong friend Ambrose St. John (1815-1876.) The pall over the coffin bore the motto that Newman adopted for use as a cardinal, “Cor ad cor loquitur” (Heart speaks to heart), which William Barry, writing in the “Catholic Encyclopedia” (1913), traces to Francis de Sales and sees as revealing the secret of Newman’s "eloquence, unaffected, graceful, tender, and penetrating.” Ambrose St. John had become a Roman Catholic at around the same time as Newman, and the two men have a joint memorial stone inscribed with the motto Newman had chosen, “Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem” (Out of shadows and phantasms into the truth), which Barry traces to Plato’s allegory of the cave.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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John Ercel Fryer, M.D. was an American psychiatrist and gay rights activist best known for his anonymous speech at the 1972 American Psychiatric Association annual conference where he appeared in disguise and under the name Dr. Henry Anonymous.
Born: November 7, 1937, Winchester, Kentucky, United States
Died: February 21, 2003, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Transylvania University
Vanderbilt University,
Ohio State University
University of Pennsylvania
Buried: Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, USA, Plot: Garden LN, Section 134, Lot 133, Space 3
Find A Grave Memorial# 49661173
Employer: Temple University
Field: Psychiatry

Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum (733 acres) is a nonprofit garden cemetery and arboretum located at 4521 Spring Grove Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. It is the second largest cemetery in the United States. The cemetery dates from 1844, when members of the Cincinnati Horticultural Society formed a cemetery association. They took their inspiration from contemporary rural cemeteries such as Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, and Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Address: 4521 Spring Grove Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45232, USA (39.17433, -84.52501)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 513-681-7526
National Register of Historic Places: 76001440, 1976
Notable queer burials at Spring Grove Cemetery:
• Clara Chipman Newton (1848–1936), Plot: Garden LN, Section 57, Lot 49, Space 21.
• Grace W. Hazard (died in 1952), Plot: Garden LN, Section 14, Lot 305, Space 13.
• John E. Fryer, M.D. (1937–2003), American psychiatrist and gay rights activist best known for his anonymous speech at the 1972 American Psychiatric Association (APA) annual conference where he appeared in disguise and under the name Dr. Henry Anonymous. This event has been cited as a key factor in the decision to de-list homosexuality as a mental illness from the APA's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The APA's "John E. Fryer, M.D., Award" is named in his honor.
• Mary Louise McLaughlin (1847–1939), Plot: Garden LN Section 54, Lot 50 space 18.
Life
Who: Mary Louise McLaughlin (September 29, 1847 – January 19, 1939) and Clara Chipman Newton (October 26, 1848 – December 8, 1936)
Mary Louise McLaughlin was an American ceramic painter and studio potter from Cincinnati, Ohio, and the main local competitor of Maria Longworth Nichols Storer, who founded Rookwood Pottery. Like Storer, McLaughlin was one of the originators of the art pottery movement that swept the United States. In 1877 she worked out how to paint the porcelain under the glaze, and consequently became the first artist in the United States to implement the underglaze technique. Eventually other artists began utilizing this same technique, and in 1879 McLaughlin founded the Cincinnati Pottery Club along with Clara Chipman Newton and others. Mary Louise McLaughlin was born to a wealthy family of Cincinnati, her father being the owner of a successful dry goods company in the city. Her older brother was architect James W. McLaughlin. In spite of her independence, McLaughlin was always quick to admit that she had invaluable assistance from her companion and housekeeper of 47 years, Margaret "Maggie" Hickey. Hickey was an Irish immigrant who joined her sister in the United States and began work for McLaughlin around 1885. Maggie was about 20 years old at the time. While she lacked formal education, her natural intelligence was considerable. She was soon able to assist McLaughlin in every aspect of the porcelain process. By the winter of 1898-1899 she was doing all the casting of the ware, and by the fall of 1901 she was also managing all the firing. at the time of Hickey's death in 1932, she was still working for McLaughlin. In 1894, shortly after her brother George died, McLaughlin moved to 6 Oak Street near Gilbert Avenue, and by 1897 she was renting a house at 2558 Eden Avenue in Mount Auburn, not far from her brother James's home. It was at her Eden Avenue address that she decided to make porcelain. In 1912 McLaughlin moved from 2558 Eden Avenue in the suburb of Mount Auburn to her final address at 4011 Sherwood Avenue in Madisonville, another Cincinnati suburb. She designed the house, and it was built by her architect brother James. The simple plan, which placed all living needs on the ground floor, was ideal for the artist who was then 65 years old. On Mar. 4, 1923, Louise's brother, James McLaughlin, died at the age of 88 at his retirement home in New York City. His obituaries hailed him as one of Cincinnati's most important architects. Margaret Hickey died in 1932. In 1934 Miss Grace W. Hazard, then 65 years old, assumed Hickey's position. Hazard always affectionately referred to McLaughlin as "Ma." McLaughlin's will was contested for years by various members of the family and by Hazard, her last companion. Clara Chipman Newton was an American artist best known as a china painter. In 1879 she became one of the founding members and the secretary of the Cincinnati Pottery Club along with Mary Louise McLaughlin, who was to become a close friend.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Jane Bowles was an American writer and playwright.
Born: February 22, 1917, New York City, New York, United States
Died: May 4, 1973, Málaga, Spain
Lived: Rue Sidi Bouknadel (near Rue Riad Sultan), Tanger, Morocco (35.78906, -5.81259)
Buried: Cementerio de San Miguel, Málaga, Provincia de Málaga, Andalucia, Spain, Plot: Grave 453-F
Find A Grave Memorial# 13173300
Spouse: Paul Bowles (m. 1938–1973)
Married: February 21, 1938

Paul Bowles was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator. Jane Bowles was an American writer and playwright. Jane spent her life examining lesbian identity with an honest and sardonic wit. Jane's adventures in the lesbian and gay bars of Greenwich Village, and her open pursuit of women lovers, caused her mother and her family consternation. In 1937, she was introduced to Paul--himself a homosexual--and agreed to marry him. The two soon recognized that their marriage would succeed only as a platonic friendship; both continued their homosexual liaisons. After a brief sojourn in France, they were prominent among the literary figures of New York throughout the 1940s, with Paul working under Virgil Thomson as a music critic at the New York Herald Tribune. In 1947, Bowles settled in Tangier, Morocco. Except for winters spent in Sri Lanka (then known as Ceylon) during the early 1950s, Tangier was Paul Bowles’ home for the remaining 52 years of his life. Paul Bowles died in 1999 at the age of 88. His ashes are buried in Lakemont Cemetery in upstate New York.
Together from 1937 to 1973: 36 years.
Jane Sydney Auer Bowles (February 22, 1917 – May 4, 1973)
Paul Frederic Bowles (December 30, 1910 – November 18, 1999)
Married: February 21, 1938



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Jane Bowles was an American writer and playwright. Paul Bowles introduced Jane to Cherifa (Amina Bakalia), a countrywoman, working in the grain market near the bottom of the Grand Hotel Villa de France, who will become Jane's live-in partner. Later Jane will write: “I love Tangier. But like a dying person. When Tetum and Cherifa die I might leave. But we are all three of us the same age, more or less. Tetum older, Cherifa a bit younger. I’d like to buy them meat and fish and oil so that they will stay alive longer. I don’t know which one I like best, or how long I can go on this way, at the point of expectation, yet knowing at the same time that it is all hopeless. Does it matter? It is more coming home to them that I want than it is they themselves. But I do want them to belong to me, which is of course impossible . . .”
Together from 1948 to 1973: 25 years
Cherifa (died in the late ‘90s)
Jane Bowles (February 22, 1917 - May 4, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Jane Bowles (February 22, 1917 - May 4, 1973), who suffered from alcoholism, had a stroke in 1957 at age 40. Her health continued to decline, despite various treatments in England and the United States, until she had to be admitted to a clinic in Málaga, Spain, where she died in 1973. She is buried at Cementerio de San Miguel (29014 Málaga, Spain).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Harriet Goodhue Hosmer was a neoclassical sculptor, considered the most distinguished female sculptor in America during the 19th century. Among other technical innovations, she pioneered a process for turning limestone into marble.
Born: October 9, 1830, Watertown, Massachusetts, United States
Died: February 21, 1908, Watertown, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: Riverside Condominiums, Riverside Street, Watertown
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery
Find A Grave Memorial# 508
Period: Neoclassicism
Known for: Sculpture
Books: Harriet Hosmer letters and memories

Harriet Hosmer was an American sculptor. In November, 1852, with her father and her friend Charlotte Saunders Cushman, she went to Rome. While living in Rome, she was associated with Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thorvaldsen, Thackeray, George Eliot and George Sand; and she was frequently the guest of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning at Casa Guidi, in Florence. Novelist Henry James (brother of Alice James) unflatteringly referred to the group of women artists in Rome of which she was a part as "The White Marmorean Flock,“: lesbians Anne Whitney, Emma Stebbins, Edmonia Lewis and non-lesbians Louisa Lander, Margaret Foley, Florence Freeman, and Vinnie Ream. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton. Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie, and had one daughter, the Hon. Mary Florence ("Maisie"), born 1860 in London. She was a Patron of Arts after the death of her husband. Mount Hosmer, near Lansing, Iowa is named after Hosmer, the result a race to the top that she won as a youth.
Together from 1878 to 1903: 25 years.
Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (October 9, 1830 - February 21, 1908)
Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, Lady Ashburton (March 5, 1827 – February 2, 1903)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Town of Watertown is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. It is part of the Greater Boston area. The population was 31,915 at the 2010 census.
Address: Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA (42.37092, -71.18283)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Watertown Arsenal Historic District (Arsenal St.), 99000498, 1999
Place
Watertown is one of fourteen Massachusetts municipalities that have applied for, and been granted, city forms of government but wish to retain "The town of” in their official names. Watertown is made up of six neighborhoods: Bemis, Brigham (Brigham Historic District), Coolidge Square, East Watertown, Watertown Square and the West End. Archeological evidence suggests that Watertown was inhabited for thousands of years before the arrival of settlers from England. Two tribes of Massachusett people, the Pequossette and the Nonantum, had settlements on the banks of the river later called the Charles. The Pequossette built a fishing weir to trap herring at the site of the current Watertown Dam. The annual fish migration, as both alewife and blueback herring swim upstream from their adult home in the sea to spawn in the fresh water where they were hatched, still occurs every spring. Watertown, first known as Saltonstall Plantation, was one of the earliest of the Massachusetts Bay settlements. It was begun early in 1630 by a group of settlers led by Sir Richard Saltonstall and the Rev. George Phillips and officially incorporated that same year. The alternate spelling "Waterton" is seen in some early documents. The first buildings were upon land now included within the limits of Cambridge known as Gerry’s Landing. For its first quarter century Watertown ranked next to Boston in population and area. Since then its limits have been greatly reduced. Thrice portions have been added to Cambridge, and it has contributed territory to form the new towns of Weston (1712), Waltham (1738), Lincoln (1754) and Belmont (1859.) In 1632 the residents of Watertown protested against being compelled to pay a tax for the erection of a stockade fort at Cambridge; this was the first protest in America against taxation without representation and led to the establishment of representative government in the colony. As early as the close of the XVII century Watertown was the chief horse and cattle market in New England and was known for its fertile gardens and fine estates. Here about 1632 was erected the first grist mill in the colony, and in 1662 one of the first woolen mills in America was built here. Boston town meetings were held here during the siege of Boston, when many Boston families made their homes in the neighborhood. For several months early in the American Revolution the Committees of Safety and Correspondence made Watertown their headquarters and it was from here that General Joseph Warren set out for Bunker Hill. From 1832 to 1834 Theodore Parker conducted a private school here and his name is still preserved in the Parker School, though the building no longer operates as a public school. The Edmund Fowle House is a historic house and local history museum at 28 Marshall Street in Watertown, Massachusetts. Built in 1722, it is the second oldest surviving house in Watertown (after the Browne House, built c. 1698.) Watertown was the seat of Massachusetts government during the British occupation of Boston in the American Revolution. The committees of the 2nd and 3rd Provincial Congress met in this house from Apr. 22 to 19 July, 1775, and the Executive Committee met here from 19 July, 1775, to September 18, 1776. The house was built by Edmund Fowle (1747-1821) and originally located on Mount Auburn St., then called Mill St. In 1776 the Treaty of Watertown, the first treaty signed between the newly formed United States of America and a foreign power, the St. John’s and Mi’kmaq First Nations of Nova Scotia, was signed in this house. Sturgis and Brigham Architects (Charles Brigham and John Hubbard Sturgis) purchased the house in 1871, moved it to its present Marshall St. address and converted it into a two family residence. The Historical Society of Watertown purchased the house in 1922. The Historical Society was awarded $500,000 in 2004 and another $200,000 in 2006 by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the restoration of the Edmund Fowle House. The grand re-opening of the house took place in May, 2008. The Abraham Browne House (built circa 1694-1701) is a colonial house located at 562 Main Street. It is now a nonprofit museum operated by Historic New England and open to the public two afternoons per year. The house was originally a modest one-over-one dwelling, probably with a minor dependency to one side. It has grown by a series of enlargements but they occurred behind the original block, thus preserving the profile of the one-over-one elevation. (The exception, a XIX century addition, was removed before 1919.) The Browne House is one of fewer than a half-dozen houses in New England to retain this profile. By 1919 the house was nearly ruined when it was acquired by William Sumner Appleton, who in 1923 donated it to the nonprofit organization now known as Historic New England. It was then painstakingly restored in the first fully documented restoration in America. The Abraham Browne house was featured on PBS’s “This Old House” television program while they were in Watertown for a restoration project during their 20th anniversary season. The Watertown Arsenal operated continuously as a military munitions and research facility from 1816 until 1995, when the Army sold the property, by then known as the Army Materials Technology Laboratory, to the town of Watertown. The Arsenal is notable for being the site of a 1911 strike prompted by the management methods of operations research pioneer Frederick Winslow Taylor. Taylor’s method, which he dubbed "Scientific Management," broke tasks down into smaller components. Workers no longer completed whole items; instead, they were timed using stopwatches as they did small tasks repetitively, as Taylor attempted to find the balance of tasks that resulted in the maximum output from workers. The strike and its causes were controversial enough that they resulted in Congressional hearings in 1911; Congress passed a law in 1915 banning the method in government owned arsenals. Taylor’s methods spread widely, influencing such industrialists as Henry Ford, and the idea is one of the underlying inspirations of the factory (assembly) line industrial method. The Watertown Arsenal was the site of a major superfund clean-up in the 1990s, and has now become a center for shopping, dining and the arts, with the opening of several restaurants and a new theatre. The site includes the Arsenal Center for the Arts, a regional arts center that opened in 2005. The Arsenal is now owned by athenahealth. Arsenal Street features two shopping malls across the street from one another, with the Watertown Mall on one side, and The Arsenal Project of Watertown (formerly the Arsenal Mall) on the other. The Perkins School for the Blind, founded in 1829, has been located in Watertown since 1912. The Stanley Brothers built the first of their steam-powered cars, which came to be known as Stanley Steamers, in Watertown in 1897. In 1988, Watertown Square became the new location for the Armenian Library and Museum of America, said to host the largest collection of Armenian artifacts in North America. The Birthplace of Harriet Hosmer, Riverside Street, is currently the location of the Riverside Condominiums. Dr. Hiram Hosmer was born in 1798 in Walpole, NH. Helped his father on the farm and learned the trade of cabinet maker. He received his degree from Harvard in 1824. He married Sarah Watson Grant of Walpole, NH in 1827. Of his four children only the youngest, Harriet Hosmer survived. The John Hunt House is Anne Whitney’s birthplace. The house was built by James Barton in 1715. It was sold to John Hunt in 1745. Joseph Warren boarded (in the southwestern corner on the first floor) here during the session of the Provincial Congress in 1775. He left afterward to ride to Bunker Hill, 17 June, 1775. It was later owned by Nathaniel Whitney, Jr. and in it was born Anne Whitney, September 2, 1821. It was bought from Nathaniel Whitney, Jr. by Luke Robinson, who lived here the rest of his life. The house was demolished 8 May, 1935. It was later sold to Mr. F.E. Howard who moved it to Water Street and had tenants "of a lower class.”
Life
Who: Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895), Harriet Hosmer (1830-1908) and Anne Whitney (1821-1915)
Leverett Saltonstall travelled with Charles William Dabney, Jr., his Harvard classmate, after graduation and generally had a difficult time settling down; it was said that his mother forced him, against his will, to marry. He is buried at Harmony Grove Cemetery (30 Grove St, Salem, MA 01970). Both Harriet Hosmer, a neoclassical sculptor, considered the most distinguished female sculptor in America during the XIX century, and Anne Whitney, a sculptor and poet, where from Watertown. Nathaniel Hawthorne described in his novel “The Marble Faun,” the group of American women artists living in Rome, causing Henry James to dismiss them as "The White Marmorean Flock.” They were: Harriet Hosmer, Anne Whitney, Emma Stebbins, Edmonia Lewis, Louisa Lander, Margaret Foley, Florence Freeman, and Vinnie Ream. While living in Rome, Hosmer associated with a colony of artists and writers that included Nathaniel Hawthorne, Bertel Thorvaldsen, William Makepeace Thackeray, and the two female Georges, Eliot and Sand. When in Florence, she was frequently the guest of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning at Casa Guidi.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.
Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.
Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman, later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman.
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Charlotte Cushman (1816–1876), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Martha May Eliot (1891–1978), was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. She was a scion of the Eliot family, an influential American family that is regarded as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy and held sway over the American education system in the late XIX and early XX centuries. Her father, Christopher Rhodes Eliot, was a Unitarian minister, and her grandfather, William G. Eliot, was the first chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis. The poet, playwright, critic, and Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot was her first cousin. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner.
• Mary Katherine Keemle "Kate" Field (1838-1896), American journalist, lecturer, and actress, of eccentric talent. She was the daughter of actors Joseph M. Field and Eliza Riddle. Kate Field never married. In October 1860, while visiting his mother's home in Florence, she met the celebrated British novelist Anthony Trollope. She became one of his closest friends and was the subject of Trollope's high esteem. Trollope scholars have speculated on the nature of their warm friendship. Twenty-four of his letters to Kate survive, at the Boston Public Library; hers to Trollope do not.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848 - 1920) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851 - 1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, CI GBE DCVO GCStJ was an English heiress, socialite, relief worker and the last Vicereine of India as wife of Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma.
Born: November 28, 1901, Broadlands, Romsey, United Kingdom
Died: February 21, 1960, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
Lived: 2 Wilton Cres, Belgravia, London SW1X 8RN, UK (51.49981, -0.15615)
Classiebawn Castle, Cliffony, Co. Sligo, Ireland (54.4551, -8.46929)
Buried: at sea off the coast of Portsmouth (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 42981711
Spouse: Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (m. 1922–1960)
Grandchildren: India Hicks, more
Children: Patricia Knatchbull, 2nd Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Lady Pamela Hicks
Parents: Wilfrid Ashley, 1st Baron Mount Temple, Amalia Mary Maud Cassel

Nadejda Mikhailovna Mountbatten was the second daughter of Grand Duke Michael Mikhailovich of Russia and his morganatic wife Sophie, Countess von Merenberg. Nicknamed "Nada," she married Prince George of Battenberg, later the 2nd Marquess of Milford Haven, in London, England, on 15 November, 1916. Nada and her sister-in-law, Edwina Mountbatten, were extremely close friends and the two frequently went together on rather daring adventures, traveling rough in difficult and often dangerous parts of the world. Rumors surrounding the nature of their relationship abounded. Edwina Cynthia Annette Ashley was an English heiress, socialite, relief-worker, wife of Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, and last Vicereine of India. Publishers Weekly summarizes the Janet Morgan biography of Lady Mountbatten: "Edwina Ashley wed Lord Louis ('Dickie') Mountbatten in 1922 at the age of 20, then embarked on two decades of frivolity. Not satisfied having two well-behaved daughters and an 'enthusiastic boy' of a husband, she took refuge in lovers and sparked scandals".
Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, CI, GBE, DCVO, GCStJ (November 28, 1901 – February 21, 1960)
Nadejda Mikhailovna Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (March 28, 1896 – January 22, 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 2 Wilton Crescent, Louis, Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900–1979) and Edwina, Countess Mountbatten of Burma (1901–1960) , "Last Viceroy and Vicereine of India lived here"
Address: 2 Wilton Cres, Belgravia, London SW1X 8RN, UK (51.49981, -0.15615)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 207643 (Grade II, 1985)
Place
Wilton Crescent is a street in Belgravia, London. Wilton Crescent was created by Thomas Cundy II, the Grosvenor family estate surveyor, and was drawn up with the original 1821 Wyatt plan for Belgravia. It was named at the time of Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton, second son of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster on whose estate the road was built in 1825 by Seth Smith. In the XIX and XX century, it was home to many prominent British politicians, ambassadors and civil servants. Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma lived at 2 Wilton Crescent for many years. Today there is a blue plaque on the house marking this. Like much of Belgravia, Wilton Crescent is characterised by grand terraces with lavish white houses which are built in a crescent shape, many of them with stuccoed balconies, particularly on the southern part of the crescent. The houses to the north of the crescent are stone clad and five stories high and were refaced between 1908 and 1912. Most of the houses had originally been built in the stucco style, but such houses became stone clad during this renovation period. Other houses today have black iron balconies. Wilton Crescent lies east of Lowndes Square and Lowndes Street, to the northwest of Belgrave Square. It is accessed via Wilton Place which connects it to the main road in Knightsbridge. It is adjacent to Grosvenor Crescent to the east, which contains the Indonesian Embassy. Further to the east lies Buckingham Palace. The play “Major Barbara” is partly set at Lady Britomart’s house in Wilton Crescent. In 2007, Wilton Garden in the middle of the crescent won a bronze medal by the London Gardens Society. There are two diplomatic buildings in Wilton Crescent: the High Commission of Singapore at No. 9, and the Embassy of Luxembourg at No. 27 (formerly home to the Luxembourgish government-in-exile.)
Life
Who: Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC, FRS, born Prince Louis of Battenberg (June 25, 1900 – August 27, 1979) and Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, GBE, DCVO, GCStJ, CI (November 28, 1901 – February 21, 1960)
Lord Mountbatten was a British statesman and naval officer, an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, and second cousin once removed to Elizabeth II. Mountbatten was married on 18 July, 1922 to Edwina Cynthia Annette Ashley, daughter of Wilfred William Ashley, later 1st Baron Mount Temple, himself a grandson of the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury. She was the favourite granddaughter of the Edwardian magnate Sir Ernest Cassel and the principal heir to his fortune. There followed a glamorous honeymoon tour of European courts and America which included a visit to Niagara Falls (because "all honeymooners went there.”) Mountbatten admitted "Edwina and I spent all our married lives getting into other people’s beds." He maintained an affair for several years with Frenchwoman Yola Letellier, and a sexual interest in men has also been alleged. Edwina and Jawaharlal Nehru became intimate friends after Indian Independence. During the summers, she would frequent the prime minister’s house so she could lounge about on his veranda during the hot Delhi days. Personal correspondence between the two reveals a satisfying yet frustrating relationship. Edwina states in one of her letters. "Nothing that we did or felt would ever be allowed to come between you and your work or me and mine – because that would spoil everything." Lady Mountbatten died in her sleep at age 58 of unknown causes in 1960 in Jesselton (now Kota Kinabalu), British North Borneo (now Sabah) while on an inspection tour for the St John Ambulance Brigade. In accordance with her wishes, Lord Mountbatten buried her at sea off the coast of Portsmouth from HMS Wakeful on 25 February 1960; Nehru sent two Indian destroyers to accompany her body; Geoffrey Fisher, the Archbishop of Canterbury, officiated.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Classiebawn Castle is a country house built for Viscount Palmerston on what was formerly a 10,000 acre estate on the Mullaghmore peninsula near the village of Cliffoney, County Sligo, in the Republic of Ireland.
Address: Cliffony, Co. Sligo, Ireland (54.4551, -8.46929)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1875, Design by James Rawson Carroll (1830-1911)
Classiebawn Castle was designed in the Baronial style and is constructed from a yellow-brown sandstone brought by sea from County Donegal. It comprises a gabled range with a central tower topped by a conical roofed turret. The land, which once belonged to the O’Connor Sligo, was confiscated by the English Parliament to recompense the people concerned in putting down an Irish rebellion. Around 10,000 acres of land on which Classiebawn now stands was granted to Sir John Temple, Master of the Rolls in Ireland. The property passed down to the 3rd Viscount Palmerston, the statesman who served as both British Prime Minister and British Foreign Secretary. It was this Lord Palmerston who commissioned the building of the current Classiebawn Castle and the harbour at Mullaghmore. The house was not complete on his death in 1865, but was completed in 1874 by his stepson and successor, Rt. Hon. William Cowper-Temple, P.C., M.P. (later created 1st Baron Mount Temple.) The latter died childless in 1888 and the estate passed to his nephew, Hon. Evelyn Ashley, second surviving son of the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury. Evelyn Ashley spent some time there each year and on his death in 1907 was succeeded by his only son, Wilfred William Ashley (later created Baron Mount Temple in a new creation.) He also spent his summers at the castle with his daughters Edwina, the future Countess Mountbatten, and Mary, the future Lady Delamere. In 1916 the house was cleared and remained empty until 1950. It was inherited by Edwina, Lady Mountbatten (when she was still officially styled as Lady Louis Mountbatten), in 1939 who, with her husband Admiral of the Fleet 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, made a number of improvements, installing electricity and a mains water supply. After his wife’s death in 1960, Lord Mountbatten, the last Viceroy of India, spent his summers there until his death when his boat was blown up off the coast of Mullaghmore by the IRA in August 1979. The castle and surrounding lands are now owned by the estate of Hugh Tunney, a deceased businessman, who bought the castle and 3,000 acres of surrounding estate in 1991 after having leased it for many years.
Life
Who: Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC, FRS, born Prince Louis of Battenberg (June 25, 1900 – August 27, 1979) and Edwina Cynthia Annette Mountbatten, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, GBE, DCVO, GCStJ, CI (November 28, 1901 – February 21, 1960)
Lord Mountbatten usually holidayed at his summer home, Classiebawn Castle, in Mullaghmore, a small seaside village in County Sligo, Ireland. The village was only 12 miles (19 km) from the border with Northern Ireland and near an area known to be used as a cross-border refuge by IRA members. In 1978, the IRA had allegedly attempted to shoot Mountbatten as he was aboard his boat, but "choppy seas had prevented the sniper lining up his target.” Despite security advice and warnings from the Garda Síochána, on August 27, 1979, Mountbatten went lobster-potting and tuna fishing in his 30-foot (9.1 m) wooden boat, the Shadow V, which had been moored in the harbour at Mullaghmore. IRA member Thomas McMahon had slipped onto the unguarded boat that night and attached a radio-controlled bomb weighing 50 pounds (23 kg.) When Mountbatten was aboard, just a few hundred yards from the shore, the bomb was detonated. The boat was destroyed by the force of the blast, and Mountbatten’s legs were almost blown off. Mountbatten, then aged 79, was pulled alive from the water by nearby fishermen, but died from his injuries before being brought to the shore. Also aboard the boat were his eldest daughter Patricia (Lady Brabourne), her husband John (Lord Brabourne), their twin sons Nicholas and Timothy Knatchbull, John’s mother Doreen, (dowager) Lady Brabourne, and Paul Maxwell, a young crew member from County Fermanagh. Nicholas (aged 14) and Paul (aged 15) were killed by the blast and the others were seriously injured. Doreen, Lady Brabourne (aged 83) died from her injuries the following day. Thomas McMahon, who had been arrested two hours before the bomb detonated at a Garda checkpoint between Longford and Granard on suspicion of driving a stolen vehicle, was tried for the assassinations in the Republic of Ireland, and convicted by forensic evidence supplied by James O’Donovan that showed flecks of paint from the boat and traces of nitroglycerine on his clothes.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Find A Grave Memorial# 161934572

A gifted and versatile artist, Tee Corinne worked with photography, line drawing, paint, sculpture, ceramics and printing, and she published erotic fiction, poetry, and reviews. Favorite cover artist for lesbian publisher Naiad and author of the famous Cunt Coloring Book, Corinne's work is found on bookshelves across the lesbian nation. Showing real sex between real-life lovers, she was "interested in loving, beautiful, sexy images. . . I also want the images to be a turn on, create an adrenaline high, a rush of desire so intense that the act of looking is sexual." Stripped of the distancing effect of routine pornographic signifiers, Corinne's work becomes more challenging and takes more risks. In 1966, Corinne married the man she described as her 'best friend'. She came out in 1975 at which time she was in a relationship with Honey Lee Cottrell. Over the years, Corrine embarked upon relationships with Caroline Overman (early 1980s), Lee Lynch (mid 1980's) and Beverly Anne Brown. Corinne died at her home in Oregon, after a valiant struggle with liver cancer. Her longtime partner, Beverly, preceded her in death. In her honor, Moonforce Media established the Tee A. Corinne Prize for Lesbian Media Artists.
Together from 1989 to 2005: 16 years.
Beverly Anne Brown (died in 2005)
Tee Corinne (November 3, 1943 - August 27, 2006)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Buried: Hebrew Cemetery, Richmond, Richmond City, Virginia, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 6993415

In 1988, the NAACP claimed Dorothy Parker's remains and designed a memorial garden for them outside their Baltimore headquarters. The plaque reads: “Here lie the ashes of Dorothy Parker (1893–1967) humorist, writer, critic. Defender of human and civil rights. For her epitaph she suggested, “Excuse my dust.” This memorial garden is dedicated to her noble spirit which celebrated the oneness of humankind and to the bonds of everlasting friendship between black and Jewish people. Dedicated by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. October 28, 1988.”
Address: 4805 Mt Hope Dr, Baltimore, MD 21215, USA (39.34429, -76.70936)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
Phone: +1 410-580-5777
Life
Who: Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) and Alan K. Campbell (February 21, 1904 – June 14, 1963)
Dorothy Parker was an American poet, short story writer, critic, and satirist, best known for her wit, wisecracks and eye for XX-century urban foibles. From a conflicted and unhappy childhood, Parker rose to acclaim, both for her literary output in publications such as The New Yorker and as a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. Following the breakup of the circle, Parker traveled to Hollywood to pursue screenwriting. Her successes there, including two Academy Award nominations, were curtailed when her involvement in left-wing politics led to a place on the Hollywood blacklist. Dismissive of her own talents, she deplored her reputation as a "wisecracker." Nevertheless, her literary output and reputation for sharp wit have endured. Parker was born Dorothy Rothschild to Jacob Henry and Eliza Annie Rothschild (née Marston) at 732 Ocean Avenue in Long Branch, New Jersey, where her parents had a summer beach cottage. Dorothy's mother was of Scottish descent, and her father was of German Jewish descent. Parker wrote in her essay "My Hometown" that her parents got her back to their Manhattan apartment shortly after Labor Day so she could be called a true New Yorker. Her mother died in West End in July 1898, when Parker was a month shy of turning five. Her father remarried in 1900 to a woman named Eleanor Francis Lewis. Parker hated her father, whom she accused of physical abuse; and likewise despised her stepmother, whom she refused to call "mother", "stepmother", or even "Eleanor", instead referring to her as "the housekeeper". She grew up on the Upper West Side and attended a Roman Catholic elementary school at the Convent of the Blessed Sacrament on West 79th Street with sister Helen, despite having a Jewish father and Protestant stepmother. Mercedes de Acosta was a classmate. Parker later went to Miss Dana's School, a finishing school in Morristown, New Jersey. She graduated from Miss Dana's School in 1911, at the age of 18. Following her father's death in 1913, she played piano at a dancing school to earn a living while she worked on her verse. She sold her first poem to Vanity Fair magazine in 1914 and some months later was hired as an editorial assistant for another Condé Nast magazine, Vogue. She moved to Vanity Fair as a staff writer after two years at Vogue. In 1917, she met and married a Wall Street stockbroker, Edwin Pond Parker II (1893–1933), but they were separated by his army service in WWI. Her career took off while she was writing theatre criticism for Vanity Fair, which she began to do in 1918 as a stand-in for the vacationing P. G. Wodehouse. At the magazine, she met Robert Benchley, who became a close friend, and Robert E. Sherwood. The trio began lunching at the Algonquin Hotel on a near-daily basis and became founding members of the Algonquin Round Table. The Round Table numbered among its members the newspaper columnists Franklin Pierce Adams and Alexander Woollcott. When Harold Ross founded The New Yorker in 1925, Parker and Benchley were part of a "board of editors" established by Ross to allay concerns of his investors. She eventually separated from her husband, divorcing in 1928, and had a number of affairs. Her lovers included reporter-turned-playwright Charles MacArthur and the publisher Seward Collins. Her relationship with MacArthur resulted in a pregnancy, about which Parker is alleged to have remarked, "how like me, to put all my eggs into one bastard." She had an abortion, and fell into a depression that culminated in her first attempt at suicide. In 1934, she married Alan Campbell, an actor with aspirations to become a screenwriter. Like Parker, he was half-Jewish and half-Scottish. He was reputed to be bisexual—indeed, Parker claimed in public that he was "queer as a billy goat". The pair moved to Hollywood and signed ten-week contracts with Paramount Pictures, with Campbell (who was also expected to act) earning $250 per week and Parker earning $1,000 per week. They would eventually earn $2,000 and in some instances upwards of $5,000 per week as freelancers for various studios. She and Campbell worked on more than 15 films. With Robert Carson and Campbell, she wrote the script for the 1937 film “A Star is Born,” for which they were nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing—Screenplay. She received another Oscar nomination, with Frank Cavett, for 1947's “Smash-Up, the Story of a Woman,” starring Susan Hayward. Parker met S. J. Perelman at a party in 1932, and despite a rocky start (Perelman called it "a scarifying ordeal") - they remained friends for the next 35 years, even becoming neighbors when the Perelmans helped Parker and Campbell buy a run-down farm in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Her marriage to Campbell was tempestuous, with tensions exacerbated by Parker's increasing alcohol consumption and Campbell's long-term affair with a married woman while he was in Europe during WWII. They divorced in 1947, then remarried in 1950. Parker moved back to New York in 1952, living at the Volney residential hotel at 23 East 74th Street on the Upper East Side. She returned to Hollywood in 1961 and reconciled with Campbell. In the next two years, they worked together on a number of unproduced projects. Campbell died of an apparent suicide on June 14, 1963 in West Hollywood, California. While Parker insisted that he would never have intentionally killed himself, and reported his death as "accidental", he had been drinking all day; capsules of the barbiturate Seconal were found around his bed, and a plastic bag was draped over his neck and shoulders. The coroner's report listed the cause of death as "acute barbiturate poisoning due to an ingestion of overdose". His remains were returned to Richmond for burial at the Hebrew Cemetery (N 4th St & Hospital St, Richmond, VA 23219). Following Campbell's death, Parker returned to New York City and the Volney residential hotel. Parker died on June 7, 1967, of a heart attack at the age of 73. In her will, she bequeathed her estate to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Following King's death, her estate was passed on to the NAACP. Her executor, Lillian Hellman, bitterly but unsuccessfully contested this disposition. Her ashes remained unclaimed in various places, including her attorney Paul O'Dwyer's filing cabinet, for approximately 17 years.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC, styled Viscount Elmley until 1891, was a British Liberal politician.
Born: February 20, 1872, London, United Kingdom
Died: November 14, 1938, New York City, New York, United States
Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Walmer Castle, Walmer, Deal, Kent CT14 7LJ, UK (51.20058, 1.40201)
Madresfield Court, Madresfield, Malvern, Worcestershire WR13 5AJ, UK (52.12549, -2.2808)
Buried: St Mary, Madresfield Village, Madresfield, Worcestershire, WR13 5AA
Find A Grave Memorial# 83725459
Spouse: Lettice Grosvenor (m. 1902)
Party: Liberal Party
Succeeded by: Alfred Emmott, 1st Baron Emmott
Children: Lady Mary Lygon

Hugh Patrick Lygon was the second son of William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp, and is often believed to be the inspiration for Lord Sebastian Flyte in Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited. He was a friend of Waugh's at Oxford (A. L. Rowse believed the two to be lovers), where both were members of the Hypocrites' Club. He was educated at Eton and Pembroke College, Oxford. After leaving Oxford he worked in a bank in Paris before working in the City. Lygon died in Germany where he was on a motoring tour with his friend, the artist Henry Winch, son of Lady Newborough. Lygon was standing in the road to ask the way and fell backwards, hitting his head on a stone. He died later due to a fractured skull, having spent four days in a hospital in Rothenburg ob der Tauber. Evelyn Waugh was an English writer of novels, biographies, and travel books; and also was a prolific journalist and reviewer. His best-known works include the early satires Decline and Fall (1928) and A Handful of Dust (1934), the novel Brideshead Revisited (1945), and the Second World War trilogy Sword of Honour (1952–61). Hugh’s father, William Lygon, was outed as homosexual in 1931 and went into exile. Evelyn’s brother, Alec Waugh, like his father, had gone to school at Sherborne, however, in 1915, Alec was asked to leave, after a homosexual relationship came to light. He departed for military training and, while waiting for his commission to be confirmed, wrote a novel of school life, The Loom of Youth. The novel alluded to homosexual friendships in Sherborne and caused a public sensation.
Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh (October 28, 1903 – April 10, 1966)
Hugh Patrick Lygon (November 2, 1904 – August 19, 1936)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Walmer Castle is an artillery fort originally constructed by Henry VIII in Walmer, Kent, between 1539 and 1540.
Address: Walmer, Deal, Kent CT14 7LJ, UK (51.20058, 1.40201)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Place
Walmer Castle formed part of the King's Device programme to protect against invasion from France and the Holy Roman Empire, and defended the strategically important Downs anchorage off the English coast. Comprising a keep and four circular bastions, the moated stone castle covered 0.61 acres (0.25 ha) and had 39 firing positions on the upper levels for artillery. It cost the Crown a total of £27,092 to build the three castles of Walmer, Sandown, and Deal, which lay adjacent to one another along the coast and were connected by earthwork defences. The original invasion threat passed, but during the Second English Civil War of 1648–49, Walmer was seized by pro-Royalist insurgents and was only retaken by Parliamentary forces after several months' fighting. In the XVIII century, Walmer became the official residence of the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and was gradually modified from a military fortification into a private residence. Various Prime Ministers and prominent politicians were appointed as Lord Warden, including William Pitt, the Duke of Wellington and Lord Granville, who adapted parts of the Tudor castle as living spaces and constructed extensive gardens around the property. By 1904, the War Office agreed that Walmer had no remaining military utility and it passed to the Ministry of Works. Successive Lord Wardens continued to use the property but it was also opened to the public. Walmer was no longer considered a particularly comfortable or modern residence, however, and Lord Curzon blamed the poor condition of the castle for his wife's death in 1906. Lord Wardens since the Second World War have included Winston Churchill, Robert Menzies and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, but they have made only intermittent use of Walmer Castle. In the XXI century, Walmer Castle is run as a tourist attraction by English Heritage. The interior of the castle displays a range of historical objects and pictures associated with the property and its Lord Wardens, protected since the XIX century by special legislation. The grounds include the Queen Mother's Garden, designed by Penelope Hobhouse as a 95th birthday gift for Elizabeth in 1997.
Life
Who: William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC (February 20, 1872 – November 14, 1938)
William Lygon, the Earl Beauchamp, became the Lord Warden in 1913, building a Roman Catholic chapel at the castle and holding large parties there each summer. His children later commented that they found the castle was chilly and cramped. The Prime Minister, Asquith, was invited by Beauchamp to use the castle during the WWI as a weekend retreat, as it had good communication links with the front line in France. Asquith's wife, Margot, was not initially impressed by Walmer, noting in her diary that while it was "very distinguished" and had "great charm", it was "terribly exposed" with "cold... noisy corridors and small rooms"; she later came to like the castle and noted that she was sad to finally leave it. Lygon had sexual relations with men, which was illegal in England during this period. Rumours spread about the parties that he had held at Walmer Castle after the war, where, according to the historian Richard Davenport-Hines, he had "behaved indiscreetly with young men". The King was informed about his lifestyle and Lygon fled the country in 1931, resigning the appointment of Lord Warden the following year.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Madresfield Court, near the village centre, has been the ancestral home for several centuries of the Lygon family, whose eldest sons took the title of Earl Beauchamp from 1815 until 1979, when the last Earl died. Distinguished collections of furniture, art, and porcelain are housed at Madresfield, which was rated by Sir Simon Jenkins among the 50 best in his book on 1,000 historic houses. The house is managed by the Elmley Foundation, a British registered charity.
Address: Madresfield, Malvern, Worcestershire WR13 5AJ, UK (52.12549, -2.2808)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 153385 (Grade I, 1968)
Place
The original Great Hall, built in the XII century, stands at the core of this building. In 1593 Madresfield Court was rebuilt, replacing a XV century medieval building. It was again remodelled in the XIX century to resemble a moated Elizabethan house, with the result that it contains 136 rooms. The chapel was designed by the architect Philip Charles Hardwick and sumptuously decorated in the Arts and Crafts style by Birmingham Group artists including Henry Payne, William Bidlake and Charles March Gere. Madresfield was the home of the 7th Earl Beauchamp. Evelyn Waugh was a frequent guest to the house and is said by Chips Channon in his diary to have based the Flyte family in “Brideshead Revisited” on the Lygons. In Jan. 2006, documents revealed by the National Archives showed that emergency plans were made to evacuate Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret of the British Royal Family to Madresfield in the event of a successful German invasion following the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940. Five years later, Worcestershire County Council’s Historic, Environment and Archaeology Service showed that the 1940 plan was simply part of pre-existing 1938 invasion contingency plans. In the event of an invasion breaking out of a likely lodgement in Kent and threatening London, the whole UK government would move to Worcestershire with the Royal family residing at Madresfield. Before her death in 1989, Countess Beauchamp, the widow of William Lygon, 8th Earl Beauchamp, the last Earl Beauchamp, endowed the Elmley Foundation to ensure the Court’s many generations of tradition as a patron of the arts in Herefordshire and Worcestershire. Madresfield Court has never been sold or bought in all its long history, instead simply remaining in the hands of the Lygon family. Madresfield Court is currently the home of Rosalind, Lady Morrison, niece of the 8th and last Earl Beauchamp. A variety of apple, first cultivated at the house, and a variety of black table grape, are named Madresfield Court. The house can be visited by appointment only, between April and July each year.
Life
Who: William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG KCMG CB KStJ PC (February 20, 1872 – November 14, 1938) and Hugh Patrick Lyon (November 2, 1904 – April 19, 1936)
William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp, styled Viscount Elmley until 1891, was a British Liberal politician. He was Governor of New South Wales between 1899 and 1901, a member of the Liberal administrations of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman and H. H. Asquith between 1905 and 1915 and leader of the Liberal Party in the House of Lords between 1924 and 1931. When political enemies threatened to make public his homosexuality he resigned from office to go into exile. Lord Beauchamp is generally supposed to have been the model for Lord Marchmain in Evelyn Waugh’s novel, “Brideshead Revisited.” Although Beauchamp’s homosexuality was an open secret in parts of high society and one that his political opponents had refrained from using against him despite its illegality, Lady Beauchamp was oblivious to it and professed a confusion as to what homosexuality was when it was revealed. He had numerous affairs at Madresfield and Walmer Castle, with his partners ranging from servants to socialites, including local men. In 1930, while on a trip to Australia, it became common knowledge in London society that one of the men escorting him, Robert Bernays, a member of the Liberal Party, was a lover. It was reported to King George V and Queen Mary by his Tory brother-in-law, the Duke of Westminster, who hoped to ruin the Liberal Party through Beauchamp, as well as Beauchamp personally due his private dislike of Beauchamp. Homosexuality was a criminal offence at the time, and the King was horrified, rumoured to have said, "I thought men like that shot themselves.” The King had a personal interest in the case, as his sons Henry and George had visited Madresfield in the past. George was then in a relationship with Beauchamp’s daughter Mary, which was cut off by her father’s outing. After sufficient evidence had been gathered by the Duke, Beauchamp was made an offer to separate from his wife Lettice (without a divorce), retire on a pretence and then leave the country. Beauchamp refused, and, shortly afterwards, the Countess Beauchamp obtained a divorce. There was no public scandal, but Lord Beauchamp resigned all his offices except that of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and went into exile on the continent (fearing arrest if he did not), briefly contemplating suicide. On 26 July, 1902, Lord Beauchamp had married Lady Lettice Grosvenor, daughter of Victor Grosvenor, Earl Grosvenor, and Lady Sibell Lumley, and granddaughter of the 1st Duke of Westminster. They had three sons and four daughters: William Lygon, 8th Earl Beauchamp (1903–1979), the last Earl Beauchamp. His widow, Mona, née Else Schiewe, died 1989; Hon. Hugh Patrick Lygon (1904–1936), said to be the model for Sebastian in Brideshead Revisited; Lady Lettice Lygon (1906–1973) who married 1930 (div. 1958) Sir Richard Charles Geers Cotterell, 5th Bt. (1907–1978); Lady Sibell Lygon (1907–2005) who married Feb. 11, 1939 (bigamously) and 1949 (legally) Michael Rowley (d. 1952), stepson of her maternal uncle the 2nd Duke of Westminster; Lady Mary Lygon (1910–1982) who married 1937 (div) HH Prince Vsevolod Ivanovich of Russia; Lady Dorothy Lygon (1912–2001) who married 1985 (sep) Robert Heber-Percy (d. 1987) of Faringdon, Berkshire; Hon. Richard Edward Lygon (1916–1970) who married 1939 Patricia Janet Norman; their younger daughter Rosalind Lygon, now Lady Morrison (b. 1946), inherited Madresfield Court in 1979. Lady Beauchamp died in 1936, aged 59, estranged from all her children except her youngest child. Lord Beauchamp died of cancer in New York City, aged 66. He was succeeded in the earldom by his eldest son, William. Of the Earl’s seven children, all but the second son Hugh (who was homosexual) married, but only two left issue. Both father and son are buried at St Mary (Madresfield Village, Madresfield, Worcestershire, WR13 5AA).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Roy Marcus Cohn was an American attorney who became famous during Senator Joseph McCarthy's investigations into Communist activity in the United States during the Second Red Scare.
Born: February 20, 1927, The Bronx, New York City, New York, United States
Died: August 2, 1986, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
Education: Columbia University
Horace Mann School
Ethical Culture Fieldston School
Buried: Union Field Cemetery, Ridgewood, Queens County, New York, USA, Plot: Small private family mausoleum, GPS (lat/lon): 40.69271, -73.88904
Find A Grave Memorial# 21562
Political party: Democratic Party
Books: How to Stand Up for Your Rights and Win!, Roy Cohn Autobiography, McCarthy
Parents: Dora Marcus, Albert C. Cohn

Roy Cohn (1927-1986) was an American attorney who became famous during Senator Joseph McCarthy's investigations into Communist activity in the United States during the Second Red Scare. He is buried at Union Field Cemetery (82-11 Cypress Avenue, Ridgewood, NY 11385) in a small private family mausoleum.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen was a French novelist and poet. His life forms the basis of a fictionalised biography by Roger Peyrefitte.
Born: February 20, 1880, Paris, France
Died: November 5, 1923, Capri
Lived: Villa Lysis, Via Lo Capo, 80073 Capri, Italy (40.55916, 14.25972)
Buried: Protestant Cemetery, Capri, Città Metropolitana di Napoli, Campania, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 58117754
Books: Messes Noires- Lord Lyllian
People also search for: Nino Cesarini, R. P. Coppini, R. Nieri

Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen was a novelist and poet of the early 20th century; his fame is based on a mid-century fictionalized biography by Roger Peyrefitte. In 1903, a scandal involving Parisian students made him persona non grata in the salons of Paris and dashed his marriage plans, after which he took up residence in Capri with his longtime lover, Nino Cesarini. He became one of the many "characters" of the island in the interwar years, featuring in novels by Compton MacKenzie and others. His house was christened Villa Lysis (later sometimes referred to as Villa Fersen) in reference to Plato's Socratic dialogue Lysis discussing friendship (or, according to modern notions, homosexual love). Villa Fersen remains one of Capri's tourist attractions. Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen died in 1923 —allegedly by suicide achieved through drinking a cocktail of champagne and cocaine. His ashes are conserved in the non-Catholic cemetery of Capri. Cesarini returned to Rome.
Together from 1903 to 1923: 20 years.
Baron Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen (February 20, 1880 - November 5, 1923)
Nino Cesarini (September 29, 1889 – October 25, 1943)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Villa Lysis (initially, La Gloriette; today, Villa Fersen) is a villa on Capri built by industrialist and poet Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen. "Dedicated to the youth of love" (dédiée à la jeunesse d’amour), it was Fersen’s self-chosen exile from France after a sex scandal involving Parisian schoolboys and nude (or nearly nude) tableaux vivants.
Address: Via Lo Capo, 80073 Capri, Italy (40.55916, 14.25972)
Type: Museun (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 10.00-18.00
Phone: +39 0818386111
Place
Built in 1905
Fersen purchased the 12,000 square metres (130,000 sq ft) land in 1904 for 15,000 lire. The real designer of the Villa is unknown. A recent analysis of letters of Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen to his friend, the artist Edouard Chimot, shows that Chimot, who, since 1907, due to a trial following an accident in the building site, was said to be the designer, is not. The house was described in detail by Roger Peyrefitte in his novel “L’Exilé de Capri” (1959), a fictionalized account of Adelswärd-Fersen’s years on Capri together with his lover Nino Cesarini. Architecturally, the house is mainly Art Nouveau with Neoclassical elements; the style might be called "Neoclassical decadent." The well-known Latin inscription above the front steps (AMORI ET DOLORI SACRVM, "a shrine to love and sorrow") highlights Fersen’s Romantic view of himself. "Lysis" is a reference to the Socratic dialogue Lysis discussing friendship, and by our modern notion, homosexual love. In the atrium a marble stairway, with wrought iron balustrade, leads to the first floor where there are bedrooms with panoramic terraces, and a dining room. Fersen’s large room was on the upper floor, facing East, with three windows overlooking the Gulf of Naples and three towards Mount Tiberio. Nino also had a room on the upper floor. On the ground floor there is a lounge decorated with blue majolica and white ceramic, facing out over the Gulf of Naples. In the basement, there is a room for smoking opium, also known as the Chinese room. The large garden is connected to the villa by a flight of steps which leads to a portico with ionic columns. The ruins of Villa Jovis, one of Tiberius’ twelve villas on Capri, are a few hundred meters to the east-southeast of Villa Lysis.
Life
Who: Baron Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen (February 20, 1880 – November 5, 1923)
Jacques d’Adelswärd-Fersen became addicted to opium on a trip to Ceylon during construction of the house (Peyrefitte relates that a worker was killed during construction, and Fersen therefore decided to travel until the anger of the locals at him had subsided), and after WWI he started using cocaine. He eventually committed suicide in 1923 by ingesting an overdose of cocaine. His ashes are conserved in the non-Catholic cemetery of Capri. After Fersen’s death, the villa was left first to his sister, Germaine, but with the usufruct to Nino Cesarini. Cesarini sold the rights for 200 000 lire to Germaine and went to live in Rome. Germaine later gave the villa to her daughter, the Countess of Castelbianco. With the last of the maintenance work done in 1934, the house was essentially in ruins by the 1980s. In 1985, Villa Lysis passed into possession of the Italian state. The building was restored in the 1990s by the Lysis Funds Association (founded in 1986) and the Municipality of Capri. The Tuscan architect, Marcello Quiriconi, supervised the work. Since the restoration, Villa Lysis has been open to tourists. It is also available to rent for parties and dinners and cultural events have taken place there, such as an exhibition of photographs by Wilhelm von Gloeden in 2009. In Mar. 2010, the villa was put up for sale, listed as being 450 square metres (4,800 sq ft) with a 12,000 square metres (130,000 sq ft) garden.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Cimitero acattolico di Capri is a non-Catholic cemetery on the island of Capri. Established in 1878 by Englishman George Hayward, it contains 204 graves from a total of 21 different nations.
Address: Via Marina Grande, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.55153, 14.23452)
Type: Cimetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 081 838 6111
Place
Most of the people buried in the cemetery are of English,. German, Russian or American nationality. Aside from Protestants, also buried in the cemetery are people professing the Catholic religion (such as Anglicans, Jews, Orthodox). Notable interments include French Baron Jacques d'Adelsward-Fersen, Lucio Amelio, Günter Ammon, Gracie Fields, Norman Douglas and Jakob Johann von Uexküll. After WWII, the cemetery saw a period of great neglect, which ended in 1986 when the Municipality of Capri ensured the preservation and restoration of the cemetery graves.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero acattolico di Capri:
• Jacques d'Adelsward-Fersen (1880-1923), French novelist and poet. His life forms the basis of a fictionalised biography by Roger Peyrefitte.
• Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868-February 7, 1952), British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. His travel books such as his 1915 Old Calabria were also appreciated for the quality of their writing.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Elisar von Kupffer was a Baltic German artist, anthologist, poet, historian, translator, and playwright. He used the pseudonym 'Elisarion' for much of his writing. He studied at St. Petersburg and then Berlin.
Born: February 20, 1872, Tallinn, Estonia
Died: October 31, 1942, Minusio, Switzerland
Lived: Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion, Minusio (6648)
Buried: Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion, Minusio (6648)
Buried alongside: Eduard von Mayer
Find A Grave Memorial# 176225946

Around 1900, many neo-religious groups expressed their desire for a new beginning in mostly utopian architectural plans. Apart from serving as visualisations of a disengagement from institutionalised churches, these designs were also intended to turn new devotional rituals into a collective experience. Although many designs for temples emerged, only three were implemented and have survived until today: Rudolf Steiner’s Goetheanum in Dornach, the Bossard Art Centre near Jeesteburg – and the Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion in Minusio.
Address: Via Rinaldo Simen 3, 6648 Minusio, Switzerland (46.17375, 8.8105)
Type: Administrative Building (open to public)
Place
After the original plans to build a “sacred castle” to Clarism in Eisenach failed in 1925, the Sanctuarium was built in Minusio in 1926 and extended by a rotunda in 1939. The building’s façade features skilful references to temple designs of the day, and to Italian baptistery architecture of the Renaissance, but also to the palace architecture of Palermo. The visit to the Sanctuarium was planned as a pilgrimage with the railway station as the starting point. The cultic structure that determined the further progression first became apparent in the entrance area inside the building. This order primarily reflected aspects of the Claristic faith. In analogy to contemporary Percival productions, visitors were guided through a confined “tomb bridge” into the light-flooded last building where “Die Klarwelt der Seligen” (The Clear World of the Blissful) awaited them. In his will (1960), Eduard von Mayer left the Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion and all its contents to the Canton of Ticino and the property to the municipality of Minusio on condition that the gardens should be made accessible to the public. It was not until 1968, after the canton had initially rejected the donation that the community decided to accept this gift. The material that is necessary for a better understanding of the pictorial and philosophical oeuvre was to be kept in a cupboard on the ground floor. The paintings, the urns with Elisàr von Kupffer and Eduard von Mayer’s ashes, and family heirlooms were to remain in the building. Furthermore, the gardens were to be maintained. Today the men’s legacy is distributed across different places in the community. Most of the surviving paintings, fragments of the former library, and the literary remains can be found in a room of the former sacred building. The inventory in its entirety has yet to be undertaken. Thanks to Harald Szeemann, it was possible to save the monumental cyclorama “Die Klarwelt der Seligen (The Clear World of the Blissful)” from destruction. Two decades ago, it was installed at Monte Verità where it can be visited under provisional circumstances. The Centro Culturale Elisarion opened in 1981. The institution’s programme is dedicated to cultural projects in the community of Minusio.
Life
Who: Elisar von Kupffer (February 20, 1872 – October 31, 1942)
Elisar von Kupffer was a Baltic German artist, anthologist, poet, historian, translator, and playwright. He used the pseudonym 'Elisarion' for much of his writing. At the age of nineteen, Eilsàr was sent to the German St. Anna School in Saint Petersburg where he concluded his schooling. In the nearby village of Levashovo he met Eduard von Mayer who, like Agnes von Hoyningen-Huene, a girl of the same age, was to become an important friend, and later on, also his life partner. He studied at St. Petersburg and then Berlin. After travels in Italy from 1902 to 1915, he established himself as a fine-art painter and muralist in Locarno, Switzerland, with his partner the historian and philosopher Eduard von Mayer. From 1925 to 1929 they transformed their Minusio villa (at the Lake Maggiore) into an opulent collection of art, the 'Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion'. From 1981 this has been a Museum dedicated to von Kupffer's work. The couple were at the heart of a religious movement called the Klarismus (in English: 'Clarity'). In 1899/1900 Adolf Brand published von Kupffer's influential anthology of homoerotic literature, “Lieblingminne und Freundesliebe in der Weltliteratur” in Berlin. The anthology was reprinted in 1995. The anthology was researched and created, in part, as a protest against the imprisonment of Oscar Wilde in England. His work was also published and reviewed in the gay magazine Akademos published by Jacques d'Adelswärd-Fersen. He was also a photographer, making photographic studies of boys for use in the creation of his paintings, but more often his own rejuvenated form can be seen as a subject of his art works. Eduard von Mayer was born in Analowo near Saint Petersburg as the seventh child of Charlotte von Mayer and the physician Dr. Karl von Mayer, founder of the protestant hospital of Saint Petersburg. The von Mayer family was of German descent and belonged to the Ukrainian aristocracy. On 15 August 1891 — by this time he had already finished school — he became acquainted with Elisàr von Kupffer in the garden of his parents’ villa. Elisàr later described him as “completely wound up in his feelings, very hospitable, but unapproachable. It was this acquaintance that finally helped Eduard von Mayer to distance himself from his pietistic upbringing and to pursue his interests in theatre and fine arts. From 1897 onwards, the events in his life coincided almost completely with those in Elisàr von Kupffer’s life. Together they developed and corroborated in the theoretical writings on Clarism. In spite of — or in his opinion — because of his highly developed intellect, Eduard decided to defer to Elisarion’s work and to withdraw his authorship. “That which I came to understand and herewith affirm” he wrote “is the fruit of life from Elisarion’s tree.” Eduard von Mayer spent the years after Elisarion’s death in 1942 documenting and securing their communal achievements. During four years of work, he not only assessed the library of the Sanctuarium Artis Elisarion, but also created an inventory of the surviving letters, sketches, drawings, plans, and paintings which included 2400 items.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Douglas Cooper, who also published as Douglas Lord was a British art historian, art critic and art collector. He mainly collected Cubist works.
Born: February 20, 1911, London, United Kingdom
Died: April 1, 1984, London, United Kingdom
Education: Sorbonne
Lived: Château de Castille, Chemin du Château, 30210 Argilliers, France (43.97475, 4.49919)
Find A Grave Memorial# 176225732
People also search for: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Tomas Main Ridas, Georges Braque

After WWII, Douglas Cooper returned to England, but could not settle in his native country and moved to southern France, where in 1950 he bought the Château de Castille near Avignon.
Address: Chemin du Château, 30210 Argilliers, France (43.97475, 4.49919)
Type: Private Property
Place
The lordship of Argilliers became the Barony of Castile in 1748. In 1773 the barony was inherited by Gabriel-Joseph de Froment d’Argilliers (1747-1826). Baron de Castille redesigned the old castle of the XVII century in 1785. The baron was arrested in 1794. The castle was plundered. The old castle was a rectangular building flanked by round towers. The baron added columns. The castle was preceded by colonnades which probably the baron wanted to remind the St. Peter's Square of Bernini. The works lasted until 1815. The Baron died in 1826. Since then, some of the additions disappeared. After the death of Baron, indifference was to cause the ruin of the garden and its additions. The castle was bought in 1924 by Paul Grousset from Mr. Seguin, heir of the barons of Castile. The castle and the colonnade were registered with the additional inventory of historic monuments in 1927. The owner was concerned about the cost of maintenance. In 1929, the Minister of Education and Fine Arts was alerted that some of the additions were sold to an American. Paul Grousset wrote to the State that he wanted to sell part of the Castle’s elements and if the state did not buy them, he was to continue to sell the additions before their total ruin. The castle was bought in 1950 by Douglas Cooper to put in his collection of modern art. The collection disappeared in 1977. Several restoration campaigns were undertaken from 1962. The facade, roof, common, the "ancient in dining room" and the colonnade were classified Historical Monuments in November 4, 1983. Château de Castille near Avignon was a suitable place to show Douglas Cooper’s impressive art collection, which he continued to expand with newer artists like Klee and Miró. During the following years, art historians, collectors, dealers and artists flocked to his home which had become something like an epicenter of Cubism, very much to his pride. Léger and Picasso were regular guests at the castle; the latter even became a substantial part of its life. Cooper regarded Picasso as the only genius of the 20th century and he became a substantial promoter of the artist. Picasso tried several times to induce Cooper to sell his castle to him; however, he would not agree and finally in 1958 recommended to Picasso the acquisition of Château of Vauvenargues.
Life
Who: (Arthur William) Douglas Cooper (February 20, 1911 – April 1, 1984) aka Douglas Lord
Douglas Cooper was a British art historian, art critic and art collector. He mainly collected Cubist works. In 1950, he became acquainted with art historian John Richardson, sharing his life with him for the next 10 years. John Richardson moved to southern France (Provence) in 1952, as Cooper acquired Château de Castille in the vicinity of Avignon and transformed the run-down castle into a private museum of early Cubism. Cooper had been at home in the Paris art scene before WWII and had been active in the art business as well; by building his own collection, he also met many artists personally and introduced them to his friends. Richardson and Cooper became close friends of Picasso, Fernand Léger and Nicolas de Staël as well. At that time Richardson developed an interest in Picasso's portraits and contemplated creating a publication; more than 20 years later, these plans expanded into Richardson's four-part Picasso biography “A Life of Picasso.” In 1960, Richardson left Cooper and moved to New York City. Towards his life's end, Cooper was honoured by being appointed the first foreign patron of the Museo del Prado in Madrid, which made him very proud. In gratitude, he donated his best Gris to the Prado, Portrait of the Artist's Wife from 1916, and a cubist Still Life with Pigeons by Picasso. His only other donation went to the Kunstmuseum Basel; the Tate Gallery didn't receive anything. Cooper died on April 1, 1984 (Fools' Day), perhaps completely fitting, as he predicted. He left an incomplete catalogue raisonné of Paul Gauguin and his art collection to his adopted son William McCarty Cooper (having adopted him according to French law, in order that nobody else would inherit anything, in particular not his family). His written legacy is kept at the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews was a British stage actor. He also briefly appeared in films.
Born: February 20, 1895, London, United Kingdom
Died: 1976, Maidenhead, United Kingdom
Lived: 67 Egerton Gardens, Chelsea, SW3
37 St Mary's Mansions, St Mary's Terrace, W2
Redroofs, School Ln, Littlewick Green, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 3QY, UK (51.51071, -0.79085)
Find A Grave Memorial# 101146344
Movies: The Man from Colorado, The Burgomaster of Stilemonde, The Walking Dead

Bobbie Andrews was a British stage actor. Ivor Novello was a Welsh composer and actor who became one of the most popular British entertainers of the first half of the 20th century. Novello and Andrews were at the very hub of London's theatrical gay society, dubbed "the Ivor/Noël naughty set (after Ivor Novello and Noël Coward)" by Cecil Beaton in his diaries. Novello had his first stage success with Theodore & Co in 1916, a production by George Grossmith, Jr. and Edward Laurillard with a score composed by Novello and the young Jerome Kern. In the same year, Novello contributed to André Charlot's revue See-Saw. In 1917, he wrote for another Grossmith and Laurillard production, the operette Arlette. In the same year, he was introduced him to the actor Bobbie Andrews, who became Novello's life partner. Andrews introduced Novello to the young Noël Coward. Coward, six years Novello's junior, was deeply envious of Novello's effortless glamour. He wrote, "I just felt suddenly conscious of the long way I had to go before I could break into the magic atmosphere in which he moved and breathed with such nonchalance".
Together from 1916 to 1951: 35 years.
Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews (February 20, 1895 – 1976)
David Ivor Davies aka Ivor Novello (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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In the 1930s, Bobbie Andrews, partner of Ivor Novello, lived at 67 Egerton Gardens, Chelsea, SW3.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1956 Bobbie Andrews, Ivor Novello’s lifelong companion, lived at 37 St Mary's Mansions, St Mary's Terrace, W2.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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The British film company Gainsborough Pictures offered Ivor Novello a lucrative contract, which enabled him to buy a country house in Littlewick Green, near Maidenhead. He renamed the property Redroofs, and he entertained there famously and with little regard for convention.
Address: School Ln, Littlewick Green, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 3QY, UK (51.51071, -0.79085)
Type: Student Facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1628 822982
Place
The village of Littlewick Green is set just off the main Bath Road two miles west of Maidenhead and has a certain charm, with many of its cottages and houses set around a sizeable green with the school and parish church completing the picture. Also here is “Redroofs,” the former home of Ivor Novello, where many of his most famous works were composed. The village pub, the Cricketers, overlooks the green. The village hall was built in 1911 and has an unusual balcony facing the green where the cricket teams watch matches and keep the score on the scoreboard. The church was completed in 1893 and was built mainly to provide a burial ground and to make unnecessary the long walk to White Waltham in whose civil parish the village lies.
Life
Who: David Ivor Davies (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951) aka Ivor Novello and Robert Tobias "Bobbie" Andrews (February 20, 1895 – 1976)
Cecil Beaton, noting the frequent homosexual excesses at Redroofs, coined the phrase, "the Ivor/Noel naughty set.” Noel Coward had by now caught Novello up professionally, despite a joint disaster when Novello starred in Coward’s play “Sirocco” in 1927, which was a débâcle, and closed within a month of opening. In 1928 Novello starred in the silent adaptation of Coward’s much more successful “The Vortex,” and made his last silent film, “A South Sea Bubble.” During the late 1920s, Novello was the most popular male star in British films. Novello died on March 6, 1951. Bobbie Andrews died in 1976 at Redroofs. Novello’s memory is promoted by The Ivor Novello Appreciation Bureau, which holds annual events around Britain, including an annual pilgrimage to Redroofs each June. Redroofs was sold after Novello’s death and is now a theatre training school.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Marcel Moore, born Suzanne Alberte Malherbe, was a French illustrator, designer, and photographer. She, along with her romantic and creative partner Claude Cahun, was a surrealist writer and photographer.
Born: July 19, 1892, Nantes, France
Died: February 19, 1972, Jersey
Lived: St. Brelade’s Bay Hotel, La Route de la Baie, St Brelade, Jersey CI. JE3 8EF, UK (49.18539, -2.20132)
Buried: St Brelade, Rue de la Baie, at the western end of St Brelade's Bay, Jersey, Channel Islands, JE3 8EP
Buried alongside: Claude Cahun
Find A Grave Memorial# 100891884
Period: Surrealism

Claude Cahun was a French artist, photographer and writer. Their work was both political and personal, and often undermined traditional concepts of gender roles. Claude was the niece of an avant-garde writer Marcel Schwob and the great-niece of Orientalist David Léon Cahun. They began making photographic self-portraits as early as 1912, when they were 18 years old, and they continued taking images of themself through the 1930s. Around 1919, they changed their name to Claude Cahun, after having previously used the names Claude Courlis (after the curlew) and Daniel Douglas (after Lord Alfred Douglas). During the early 20s, they settled in Paris with their lifelong partner and stepsibling Suzanne Malherbe, whom they met at the lycée (high school). For the rest of their lives together, Cahun and Malherbe collaborated on various written works, sculptures, photomontages and collages. They befriended Henri Michaux, Pierre Morhange and Robert Desnos. Around 1922 Claude and Malherbe began holding artists' salons at their home. Among the regulars who would attend were artists Henri Michaux and André Breton and literary entrepreneurs Adrienne Monnier and Sylvia Beach. Claude and Suzanne are buried together at St Brelade's Church in the island of Jersey.
Together from 1909 to 1954: 45 years.
Lucy Renee Mathilde Schwob aka Claude Cahun (October 25, 1894 – December 8, 1954)
Suzanne Malherbe aka Marcel Moore (July 19, 1892 - February 19, 1972)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore had a long association with Jersey, having spent many childhood holidays in the Island. They usually stayed at St Brelade’s Bay Hotel and became friends with the owners, the Colley family
Address: La Route de la Baie, St Brelade, Jersey CI. JE3 8EF, UK (49.18539, -2.20132)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1534 746141
Place
In the late XIX century the St. Brelade’s Bay Hotel was hardly more than a pub owned by a local brewery. It was situated where the Cocktail Bar is now. Apart from the parish church, the only houses in the bay at that time were four farms, some fishermen’s cottages and the Martello Tower. Sarah Jennings, a publican by trade, became the license holder in 1877. Her daughter, Ellen, took over the tenancy in 1880 and in 1884 married Alan Harden an “ambitious commercial traveller.” Over the following years they had three daughters, Helen, May and Eve. Alan Harden was successful, he considerably enlarged the premises, doubling the bedroom capacity. The room rate at that time was seven shillings and sixpence for full board, with free use of a bathing machine; a lobster lunch was one shilling and sixpence. In 1917 Mr. Harden asked the brewery to sell him the freehold, but they refused. He immediately bought a plot of land right next door and built the granite building at the west end of the Hotel and threatened to open a rival establishment.In 1919 the brewery reluctantly sold the freehold to him and the next door property was turned into self contained flats. Alan Harden died in 1924 and the license was inherited by Helen Colley, his widowed eldest daughter. During her time in charge, the two buildings were joined together and considerable improvements were made to the interior including, amongst other things, “Electric light throughout.” Then, and earlier, a large proportion of the vegetables used in the Hotel were grown in what is now the gardens. Three “côtils” of Jersey Royals on the hillside at the back, tomatoes and cucumbers in the greenhouses, vegetables where the pool bar and tennis court are now, cherry and pear trees where the swimming pool is situated and an apple orchard on the car park. Helen Colley retired in 1933 and her only son Bob took over the reins; the Germans invaded Jersey on July the 1st 1940 and he escaped to England on one of the last steamers. His mother and his aunts remained on the island throughout the occupation. The Hotel was taken over by unwelcome visitors and was used as a “Soldatenheim” a place for rest and recreation away from the front line. Jersey was a prestigious part of Hitler’s “Atlantic Wall ” and amongst the numerous defensive/aggressive constructions built by slave labour on the island were the sea wall stretching the length of the bay and, beneath the terrace at the front of the Hotel an air-raid shelter, now used as a holding tank for rainwater that falls upon the Hotel. In May 1945 Bob Colley returned to Jersey, with his new wife, Audrey, and his stepson. The Hotel was in an appalling condition after the four years of the Occupation and it took some years to be up and running properly again. Tourism in Jersey started to boom in the late nineteen fifties and during this period the other hotels in the bay were built. Bob Colley made some massive changes to the premises, all the bedrooms were made en-suite, the swimming pool was built along with the pool bar and grill and a new floor was added. Bob Colley died in 1965 and for the next twenty five years the Hotel was run by his step son Digby, who returned his shares to the family in 1990. Robert and Mandy Colley then ran the hotel until 2009 the fifth generation of the family to run the hotel. In Nov. 2009, the hotel was sold to Jayne Best, daughter of Wigan Athletic Chairman Dave Whelan. In the following years the hotel underwent major refurbishments and expansion with the addition of the DW Health Club which opened in Jan. 2012. Under the guidance of Jayne the hotel re-established itself at the forefront of Jersey hotels and has become one of the leading hotels within the Channel Islands. In 2013 following Wigan’s historic FA Cup win, the Whelan family brought the trophy to the hotel where it was displayed within the Bay Restaurant and the Health Club for local and guests to view. During the FA Cups visit it also went to three schools in the local area of the hotel in order to promote the development through sport.
Life
Who: Lucy Renee Mathilde Schwob (October 25, 1894 – December 8, 1954) aka Claude Cahun and Suzanne Alberte Malherbe (July 19, 1892 – February 19, 1972) aka Marcel Moore
In 1937 Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore purchased La Rocquaise, a house just opposite the hotel, and moved there permanently in 1938. The garden, the house and the area around the bay were favourite settings for Cahun’s work. While living in Jersey they were generally known by their real names and gained a reputation for strange behaviour, such as taking their cat for a walk on a lead and wearing trousers. They remained here throughout the occupation, carrying out subversive resistance activities for which they were arrested and imprisoned. Claude Cahun was a French artist, photographer and writer. Her work was both political and personal, and often undermined traditional concepts of gender roles. Though Cahun’s writings suggested she identified as agender, most academic writings use feminine pronouns when discussing her and her work, as there is little documentation that gender neutral pronouns were used or preferred by the artist. In 1929 Cahun translated Havelock Ellis’ theories on the third gender. Around 1919, she changed her name to Claude Cahun, after having previously used the names Claude Courlis (after the curlew) and Daniel Douglas (after Lord Alfred Douglas.) During the early 20s, she settled in Paris with her lifelong partner and step-sibling Suzanne Malherbe. For the rest of their lives together, Cahun and Malherbe (who adopted the name "Marcel Moore") collaborated on various written works, sculptures, photomontages and collages. The two published articles and novels, notably in the periodical "Mercure de France,” and befriended Henri Michaux, Pierre Morhange and Robert Desnos. Around 1922 Claude and Malherbe began holding artists’ salons at their home. Among the regulars who would attend were artists Henri Michaux and André Breton and literary entrepreneurs Sylvia Beach and Adrienne Monnier. In 1937 Cahun and Malherbe settled in Jersey. Following the fall of France and the German occupation of Jersey and the other Channel Islands, they became active as resistance workers and propagandists. Fervently against war, the two worked extensively in producing anti-German fliers. Many were snippets from English-to-German translations of BBC reports on the Nazis’ crimes and insolence, which were pasted together to create rhythmic poems and harsh criticism. The couple then dressed up and attended many German military events in Jersey, strategically placing them in soldier’s pockets, on their chairs, etc. Also, they inconspicuously crumpled up and threw their fliers into cars and windows. In many ways, Cahun and Malherbe’s resistance efforts were not only political but artistic actions, using their creative talents to manipulate and undermine the authority which they despised. In many ways, Cahun’s life’s work was focused on undermining a certain authority, however her specific resistance fighting targeted a physically dangerous threat. In 1944 she was arrested and sentenced to death, but the sentences were never carried out. They were saved by the Liberation of Jersey in 1945, but their home and property had been confiscated and much of their art destroyed by the Germans. However, Cahun’s health never recovered from her treatment in jail, and she died in 1954. She is buried at St Brelade (Rue de la Baie, at the western end of St Brelade's Bay, Jersey, Channel Islands, JE3 8EP). Moore relocated to a smaller home, Carola in Beaumont. Moore committed suicide in 1972. She was buried with her partner Claude Cahun in St Brelade’s Church.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Jackie Curtis was an American actress, writer, singer and Warhol Superstar.
Born: February 19, 1947, New York City, New York, United States
Died: May 15, 1985, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: Louis N. Jaffe Art Theater Building, 181-189 Second Ave., NYC, NY
Buried: Rose Hills Memorial Park, Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New York, USA, Plot: Woodlawn, Plot 14, Gr. 292
Find A Grave Memorial# 7202853
Parents: Jenevive Uglialoro, John Holder, Sr.
Siblings: Timothy Holder

Built in 1925-26, Louis N. Jaffe Art Theater Building (181-189 Second Ave., NYC, NY) was a Yiddish theater through 1945. Between 1945 and 1953, the Mafia-controlled 181 Club, one of the most luxurious gay and lesbian clubs in the country, occupied the downstairs of the building. From 1953 through 1961, the Phoenix Theater occupied the building, featuring GLBT performers like Montgomery Clift and Roddy McDowell. The front offices were converted into apartments, which housed gay residents including Jackie Curtis (drag performer in Andy Warhol films), photographer Peter Hujar, and artist David Wojnarowicz.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Jackie Curtis (1947–1985) was an American actress, writer, singer and Warhol Superstar. She was born John Curtis Holder, Jr. in New York City. "Jackie Curtis is not a drag queen. Jackie is an artist. A pioneer without a frontier", Andy Warhol said of his associate. In the 1980s drug addiction had taken control of her life, eventually leading to her death by heroin overdose at the age of 38. She is buried at Rose Hills Memorial Park (101 Mill St, Putnam Valley, NY 10579).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Jay Bell is an American writer best known as the author of the Something Like series which includes Something Like Summer which is being adapted into a feature film by Blue Seraph Productions under the direction of J. T.
Born: February 19, 1977 (age 39), Merriam, Kansas, United States
Anniversary: March 1, 2000
Married: September 27, 2003

Jay Bell never gave much thought to Germany until he met a handsome foreign exchange student. At that moment, beer and pretzels became the most important thing in the world. After moving to Germany and getting married, Jay found himself desperate to communicate the feelings of alienation, adventure, and love that surrounded this decision, and has been putting pen to paper ever since. Something like Summer is one of Amazon's selections for Best Gay Books of 2011, a Lambda Literary Awards finalist, and soon to be a movie from the makers of Judas Kiss. Kamikaze Boys is a winner in the 25th annual Lambda Literary Awards for gay romance, and winner of two Goodreads M/M Romance Member's Choice awards. Jay’s husband, Andreas, designs all covers of Jay’s books.
Together since 2000: 15 years.
Andreas Bell (born June 11, 1974)
Jay Bell (born February 19, 1977)
Anniversary: March 1, 2000
Married: September 27, 2003
Andreas and I met at a bar—an environment neither one of us is particularly fond of. I was drawn in by his adorable speech impediment, which turned out to be a German accent. As soon as we realized there was chemistry, we made plans to meet again that weekend and went our separate ways. Our first real date was wonderful and took place on a surprisingly warm day for early March. I drove him out to a lake, we strolled around the woods talking, and we even stopped by a ranch to say “hi” to a horse. We spent the entire day together, and much of the evening. What I remember most was laughing a lot, and how intelligent and kind this person seemed to be. All these years later, and that first impression has proven correct. Andreas is an incredible man, and I love him with all of my heart. -Jay Bell



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Cù Huy Cận was a Vietnamese poet. He was a close friend of Xuân Diệu, another famous poet. His first collection of poems, Sacred Fire, was published in 1938. His son is Cù Huy Hà Vũ, legal scholar and dissident.
Born: May 31, 1919, Hương Sơn District, Vietnam
Died: February 19, 2005, Hanoi, Vietnam
Find A Grave Memorial# 161890036
Children: Cù Huy Hà Vũ

Ngô Xuân Diệu was a prominent Vietnamese poet. A colossal figure in modern Vietnamese literature, he wrote about 450 poems (largely in posthumous manuscripts) especially love poems, several short stories, and many notes, essays, and literary criticisms. Although well known for his love poems, he was married for only six months without consummating the marriage before divorcing from his wife and died a bachelor. Many people believe that he was homosexual along with his lifelong friend the famous poet Huy Cận, as shown through his many poems about love dedicated to (and apparently addressed to) various men. These poems include Tình trai (Man's Love, about the love affair between the French poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine) and Em đi (You leave, a heartfelt poem dedicated to a younger man with whom the poet shared a house for several years). For two years (1938-1940), Xuân Diệu was Huy Cận's roommate at the College of Agriculture in Hanoi, from which he received his engineering degree in agricultural science in 1943.
They met in 1938 and remained friends until Xuân Diệu’s death in 1985: 47 years.
Cù Huy Cận (May 31, 1919 - February 19, 2005)
Ngô Xuân Diệu (February 2, 1916 – December 18, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Francis Otto Matthiessen was an educator, scholar and literary critic influential in the fields of American literature and American studies.
Born: February 19, 1902, Pasadena, California, United States
Died: April 1, 1950, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Yale University
Harvard University
University of Oxford
Polytechnic School
Hackley School
Lived: Eliot House, Harvard University, 101 Dunster St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37024, -71.12097)
Hotel Manger, North Station
Cheney House, Old Ferry Ln, Kittery, ME 03904, USA (43.08426, -70.72264)
Buried: Springfield Cemetery, Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 7024168
Partner: Russell Cheney
People also search for: Henry James, Kenneth Ballard Murdock, K. B. Murdock, Herman Melville

Russell Cheney was an American painter. Cheney had a twenty-year love affair with English Literature Professor F.O. Matthiessen, an authority on American Literature, who taught at Yale and Harvard and who was also a Yale graduate, like Cheney, and became a member of Skull & Bones in 1923. Matthiessen was twenty years Russell's junior. Like Matthiessen's family, Cheney's was prominent in business, being among America's leading silk producers. In planning to spend his life with Cheney, Matthiessen went as far as asking his cohort in the Yale secret society Skull and Bones to approve of their partnership. Throughout his teaching career at Harvard, Matthiessen maintained a residence in either Cambridge or Boston. However, the couple often retreated to their shared cottage in Kittery, Maine. Their letters are collected into Rat & the Devil: Journal Letters of F.O. Matthiessen and Russell Cheney. Cheney’s nickname, Rat, and Matthiessen’s, Devil, came into use at Yale. Matthiessen’s contributions to the Harvard University community have been memorialized in several ways, including a recently endowed visiting professorship.
Together from 1925 to 1945: 20 years.
Francis Otto Matthiessen (February 19, 1902 - April 1, 1950)
Russell Cheney (October 16, 1881 - July 12, 1945)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Throughout his teaching career at Harvard, F.O. Matthiessen maintained a residence in either Cambridge or Boston. However, Matthiessen with his long-term companion Russell Cheney often retreated to their shared cottage in Kittery, Maine.
Address: Old Ferry Ln, Kittery, ME 03904, USA (43.08426, -70.72264)
Type: Private Property
Place
Russell Cheney was a Seacoast summer visitor, sharing a Kittery Point, Maine cottage with his partner, the well-know author F.O. Matthiessen from 1927 until Cheney’s death in 1945. They bought an old house there in 1930, and added a studio on the grounds. In 1928, Kittery newspaperman Horace Mitchell Jr. interviewed Cheney for the Portland Sunday Transcript. "I like Kittery Point," Cheney told him. "It’s a swell little town." Richard Hyde is the present owner of the Cheney house and studio on Old Ferry Lane in Kittery. He remembers being in charge of the artist’s many cats when he was a boy. Hyde was paid ten cents per night to keep a cat named Pretzel in the house and five cents for one named Baby. "If they got out -- there was a fine of twenty cents," Heard recalls.
Life
Who: Francis Otto Matthiessen (February 19, 1902 – April 1, 1950) and Russell Cheney (October 16, 1881 – July 12, 1945)
Russell Cheney was a painter. He graduated from Yale University in 1904, where he was a member of the Skull and Bones secret society. Cheney studied painting at the Art Students League of New York and was its acting president in 1909-10. He held his first New York exhibition in Babcock Galleries 1922. His portrait of Professor Candle hung in the Paris Salon in 1909 and his work has been represented in many museums including the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the San Francisco Museum of Art. Cheney illustrated F.O. Matthiessen’s book “Sarah Orne Jewett” (1929), on the writer of the same name. A catalogue of Cheney’s paintings was published in 1922. Cheney was a member of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, and San Francisco Art Society. He was the longtime partner and lover of author F. O. Matthiessen, who was also a Yale graduate and became a member of Skull & Bones in 1923. Matthiessen was twenty years Russell’s junior. Cheney had three brothers Knight Dexter Cheney, Philip Cheney, and Thomas Langdon Cheney, who were also members of Skull and Bones. In 1945, Cheney died of a heart attack in Kittery. His funeral was in Manchester, and he is buried in the Cheney Cemetery, off East Center Street. His remaining paintings were disposed off by his partner F.O. Mathiesson. A collection of them was displayed at the old Cheney Office Building on Hartford Road, and relatives could pick what they wanted to take home.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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F.O. Matthiessen was the first Senior Tutor at Eliot House, one of Harvard College’s undergraduate residential houses.
Address: 101 Dunster St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37024, -71.12097)
Type: Student facility (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 617-495-2275
Place
F.O. Matthiessen’s contribution to the critical celebration of XIX century American literature is considered formative and enduring. Along with several other scholars, he is regarded as a contributor to the creation of American studies as a recognized academic discipline. His stature and legacy as a member of the Harvard community has been memorialized in several ways by the university. More than sixty years after his death, his suite at Eliot House remains preserved as the F. O. Matthiessen Room, housing personal manuscripts and 1700 volumes of his library available for scholarly research by permission. Also, Eliot House hosts an annual Matthiessen Dinner with a guest speaker. In 2009 Harvard established an endowed chair in LGBT studies called the F. O. Matthiessen Visiting Professorship of Gender and Sexuality. Believing the post to be "the first professorship of its kind in the country," Harvard President Drew Faust called it “an important milestone.” It is funded by a $1.5 million gift from the members and supporters of the Harvard Gay & Lesbian Caucus. In the spring of 2013 Henry D. Abelove was the first scholar to hold the Matthiessen Chair. The second scholar appointed to the Chair for the spring of 2014 was Gayle Rubin. Several generations after Matthiessen’s passing, this visiting professorship reaffirms the university’s appreciation for his continuing legacy as a storied scholar and teacher. Notable former resident of the Eliot House include Leonard Bernstein. In 1951, roommates of A-12 included Paul Matisse, grandson of French impressionist Henri Matisse, Stephen Joyce, grandson of novelist James Joyce, and Sadruddin Aga Khan, lineal descendant of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. This caused master John Finley to brag to the New York Times, "where else would you find, in one room, the grandson of Matisse, the grandson of Joyce, and the great-great-great-great-grandson of God?"
Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Ned Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.
Life
Who: Francis Otto Matthiessen (February 19, 1902 – April 1, 1950)
F.O. Matthiessen was an educator, scholar and literary critic influential in the fields of American literature and American studies. His best known work, “American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman,” celebrated the achievements of several XIX century American authors and had a profound impact on a generation of scholars. Matthiessen was well known for his support of liberal causes and progressive politics. Matthiessen was known to his friends as “Matty.” As a gay man in the 1930s and 1940s, he chose to remain in the closet throughout his professional career, if not in his personal life – although traces of homoerotic concern are apparent in his writings. In 2009, a statement from Harvard University said that Matthiessen "stands out as an unusual example of a gay man who lived his sexuality as an “open secret” in the mid-XX century." He had a two decade long romantic relationship with the painter Russell Cheney, twenty years his senior. Like Matthiessen’s family, Cheney’s was prominent in business, being among America’s leading silk producers. In planning to spend his life with Cheney, Matthiessen went as far as asking his cohort in the Yale secret society Skull and Bones to approve of their partnership. With Cheney having encouraged Matthiessen’s interest in Whitman, it has been argued that “American Renaissance” was "the ultimate expression of Matthiessen’s love for Cheney and a secret celebration of the gay artist." Throughout his teaching career at Harvard, Matthiessen maintained a residence in either Cambridge or Boston. However, the couple often retreated to their shared cottage in Kittery, Maine. Russell Cheney died in July 1945. Matthiessen had been hospitalized once for a nervous breakdown in 1938-1939. He continued to be deeply affected by Russell Cheney’s death. Commentators have speculated on the impact of the escalating Red Scare on Matthiessen’s state of mind. Matthiessen’s personal story, academic contributions, political activism and early death had a lasting impact on a circle of scholars and writers. Their sense of loss and struggle to understand Matthiessen’s suicide can be found in two novels with central figures inspired by Matthiessen, May Sarton’s 1955 novel, “Faithful are the Wounds” and Mark Merlis’s 1994 novel “American Studies.” Matthiessen was buried at Springfield Cemetery in Springfield, Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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F.O. Matthiessen committed suicide by jumping off a 12th floor window of the Hotel Manger at North Station, in 1950. In a note left in the hotel room, Matthiessen wrote, "I am depressed over world conditions. I am a Christian and a Socialist. I am against any order which interferes with that objective." The Hotel Manger became the Hotel Madison in 1958 when purchased by the Boston & Maine Railroad. By the early 1970s, however, the Madison’s splendor had faded and its doors closed in 1976. The building was demolished in 1983.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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At Springfield Cemetery (171 Maple St, Springfield, MA 01105) is buried Francis Otto Matthiessen (1902-1950), educator, scholar and literary critic influential in the fields of American literature and American studies.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lived: 1817 Stark Ave, Columbus, GA 31906, USA (32.48004, -84.95821)
Buried: Parkhill Cemetery, Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia, USA, Plot: Magnolia Garden
Buried alongside: Glesca Marshall
Find A Grave Memorial# 92371316

Alla Nazimova was an American film and theater actress, a screenwriter, and film producer. Between the years of 1917 and 1922, Nazimova wielded considerable influence and power in Hollywood. Nazimova helped start the careers of both Rudolph Valentino's wives, Jean Acker and Natacha Rambova. Nazimova is confirmed to have been romantically involved with actress Eva Le Gallienne, director Dorothy Arzner, writer Mercedes de Acosta, and Oscar Wilde's niece, Dolly Wilde. Bridget Bate Tichenor (an intimate of George Platt Lynes, she married Jonathan Tichenor, brother of Platt Lynes’ lover George, who was killed during the WWII), a Magic Realist artist and Surrealist painter, was also rumored to be one of Nazimova's favored lovers. According to Tichenor, their intimate relationship angered Nazimova's longtime companion, Glesca Marshall. Nazimova lived with Glesca Marshall from 1929 until her death in 1945 at the Garden of Allah Hotel on Sunset Boulevard near the Sunset Strip in Hollywood. Glesca was also the longtime companion of Emily Woodruff, theatrical benefactor and main patron of the Springer Opera House in Columbus, Georgia. Glesca and Emily are both buried at Parkhill Cemetery, Columbus, Georgia, in the Magnolia Garden.
Together from 1929 to 1945: 16 years.
Alla Nazimova (June 3, 1879 – July 13, 1945)
Catherine Glesca Marshall (September 19, 1906 – August 21, 1987)
Emily Woodruff (February 19, 1913 – February 21, 1994)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Glesca Marshall was the longtime companion of Emily Woodruff, theatrical benefactor and main patron of the Springer Opera House in Columbus, Georgia. Emily was married to Hume Cronyn, though they never lived together and Emily insisted the marriage remain a secret.
Address: 1817 Stark Ave, Columbus, GA 31906, USA (32.48004, -84.95821)
Type: Private Property
Place
James Waldo Woodruff was a pioneer of river development in the Chattahoochee Valley and a leading businessman and financier in Columbus for more than half a century. J.W. Woodruff was known as “Mr. River” for most of his life. He is buried at Parkhill Cemetery near his daughter Emily and Emily’s long-time companion, Glesca Marshall. An engineer, and an intrepid visionary, Mr. Woodruff was probably the staunchest pioneer of the development of the Chattahoochee River for power and navigation. He devoted a great deal of his busy life to this favorite dream and he lived long enough to see dock construction here begin and his dream well on its way to coming true. It was only fitting, therefore, that the first dam to be constructed in the three rivers development plan should bear his name. The Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam was dedicated on Mar. 22, 1957. It was built at a cost of $46,380,000 and stands where the Flint and Chattahoochee rivers united to form the Apalachicola. Woodruff married the former Miss Ethel Illges Oct 7, 1908, the wedding being held at the Illges family home on Second Avenue. Their family home was at 1817 Stark Ave, Columbus.
Life
Who: Emily Woodruff (February 19, 1913 – February 21, 1994) and Glesca Marshall (September 19, 1906 – August 21, 1987)
Glesca Marshall was an actress and theatrical benefactor who was known primarily as the most enduring lover of Alla Nazimova, silent screen actress and a legend of her time. Glesca met Nazimova when both were cast in a production at the Civic Repertory Theater. Glesca later lived with Nazimova at the Garden of Allah Hotel on Sunset Boulevard near the Sunset Strip in Hollywood. In the silent film era, the hotel had been an estate that was Nazimova’s home. Glesca lived there in a villa on the grounds until Nazimova’s death in 1945. Glesca Marshall and Emily Woodruff are buried side by side at Parkhill Cemetery (4161 Macon Rd, Columbus, GA 31907), Plot: Magnolia Garden.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Elizabeth Carter was an English poet, classicist, writer and translator, and a member of the Bluestocking Circle around Elizabeth Montagu.
Born: December 16, 1717, Deal, United Kingdom
Died: February 19, 1806, London, United Kingdom
Lived: 20 Clarges Street, W1J
Buried: Grosvenor Chapel, Mayfair, City of Westminster, Greater London, England, Plot: unmarked
Find A Grave Memorial# 22149933

Elizabeth Carter was an English poet, classicist, writer and translator, and a member of the Bluestocking Circle. Catherine Talbot was an English author. February 1741 saw the beginning of her lifelong friendship with Elizabeth Carter. The two women carried on a lively and copious correspondence. During the whole period of her residence with Thomas Secker, a protégé of Talbot’s father, Catherine Talbot was Secker's almoner. In 1760, accompanied by Elizabeth Carter, she went to Bristol for her health. Secker died in 1768, leaving to Mrs. Talbot and her daughter £13,000 in the public funds. The women moved from Lambeth Palace to Lower Grosvenor Street. There Catherine died of cancer on January 9, 1770, aged 48. Several poems were written in her praise. At her daughter's death in 1770, Mrs. Talbot put her daughter's manuscripts into Elizabeth Carter's hand, leaving their publication to her discretion.
Together from 1741 to 1770: 29 years.
Elizabeth Carter (December 16, 1717 – February 19, 1806)
Catherine Talbot (May 1721 – January 9, 1770)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Elizabeth Carter was renowned during a long span of the later XVIII century as a scholar and translator from several languages and the most seriously learned among the Bluestockings. Her English version of Epictetus was still current into the XX century. She was also a poet and a delightful letter-writer. She died on February 19, 1806, at her regular winter lodgings in 20 Clarges Street, W1J.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In Grosvenor Chapel (24 S Audley Street, W1K), is buried Elizabeth Carter. A poet and translator, one of the most learned Englishwoman of her time, she studied astronomy and ancient history, learnt Latin, French, Hebrew, Italian and Spanish, played both the spinet and the flute. She was a friend of Samuel Johnson and many other eminent men, as well as being a close confidant of Elizabeth Montagu, Hannah More, Hester Chapone, and several other members of the Bluestocking circle. She had a special friendship with Catherine Talbot, of whom published a book of poems once she died from cancer in 1770.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Carson McCullers was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, and poet. Her first novel, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, explores the spiritual isolation of misfits and outcasts in a small town of the U.S. South.
Born: February 19, 1917, Columbus, Georgia, United States
Died: September 29, 1967, Nyack, New York, United States
Education: New York University
Columbia University
Columbus High School
Juilliard School
Lived: Carson McCullers House, 131 S Broadway, Nyack, NY 10960, USA (41.08598, -73.91912)
The Dakota Building
February House, 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
1519 Stark Ave, Columbus, GA 31906
423 13th St, Columbus, GA 31901
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Nyack, Rockland County, New York, USA, Plot: High Lawn section
Find A Grave Memorial# 696
Movies: Reflections in a Golden Eye, more
Spouse: Reeves McCullers (m. 1945–1953), Reeves McCullers (m. 1937–1941)

Carson McCullers (1917-1967) was born Lula Carson Smith in Columbus, Georgia in 1917. Her mother’s grandfather was a planter and Confederate war hero. Her father was a watchmaker and jeweler of French Huguenot descent. From the age of ten she took piano lessons; when she was fifteen her father gave her a typewriter to encourage her story writing. 1519 Stark Ave, Columbus, GA 31906, a modest white frame house, was her childhood home. Her actual birthplace was at 423 13th St, Columbus, GA 31901. Carson‘s mother lived in this house until her husband’s death in 1944. Plagued by illness throughout her life, Carson frequently returned to Columbus to recuperate under her mother’s care. Eventually, mother and daughter lived together in Nyack, NY, in a house bought with the money from the sale of the Stark Avenue house. The house is now open to the public by appointment; it also operates as an artists’ retreat, offering residencies to writers and musicians.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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February House was the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the XX century. Its residents included, among others, Carson McCullers, W. H. Auden, Paul Bowles, and the famed burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (January 8, 1911 – April 26, 1970). This ramshackle Brooklyn brownstone was host to an explosion of creativity, an extraordinary experiment in communal living, and a nonstop yearlong party fueled by the appetites of youth. Here these burgeoning talents composed many of their most famous, iconic literary works while experiencing together a crucial historical moment--America on the threshold of WWII.
Address: 7 Middagh St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA (40.7008, -73.99468)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
In 1940, George Davis, an editor recently fired from Harper's Bazaar, rented a dilapidated house in Brooklyn Heights in which he installed brilliant, volatile artists, who spent the next year working, fighting, and drinking. Carson McCullers sipped sherry while, down the hall, the burlesque star Gypsy Rose Lee typed her mystery novel with three-inch fingernails, and, downstairs, Benjamin Britten and Paul Bowles fought over practice space. W. H. Auden was housemother, collecting rent, assigning chores, and declaring no politics at dinner. Like all bohemian utopias, February House (so named because of the residents' February birthdays) was unable to withstand the centrifugal force of its constituent egos. The artists dispersed—to return home, serve in the military, or follow wayward lovers—and the house was demolished to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Charles Henri Ford died in 2002. He was survived by his elder sister, actress Ruth Ford, who died in 2009. Upon her death, Ruth Ford left the apartments she owned in the historic Dakota Building on the Upper West Side to Indra Tamang, Charles Henri Ford’s caretaker, along with a valuable Russian surrealist art collection, making him a millionaire.
Address: 1 W 72nd St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77652, -73.97614)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +1 212-362-1448
National Register of Historic Places: 72000869, 1972 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built between 1880 and 1884, Design by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh (1847-1918)
The Dakota (also known as Dakota Apartments) is a cooperative apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It is famous as the home of former Beatle John Lennon from 1973 to 1980, as well as the location of his murder. The Dakota is considered to be one of Manhattan’s most prestigious and exclusive cooperative residential buildings, with apartments generally selling for between $4 million and $30 million. Henry Janeway Hardenbergh was commissioned to create the design for Edward Clark, head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The firm also designed the Plaza Hotel. The Dakota was purportedly so named because at the time of construction, the Upper West Side was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote in relation to the inhabited area of Manhattan as the Dakota Territory was. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper interview with the Dakota’s long-time manager, quoted in Christopher Gray’s book “New York Streetscapes”: "Probably it was called “Dakota” because it was so far west and so far north.” According to Gray, it is more likely that the building was named the Dakota because of Clark’s fondness for the names of the new western states and territories. Beginning in 2013, the Dakota’s facade was being renovated. In the 1970s, the co-op board refused to admit playwright Mart Crowley, who wrote "The Boys in the Band," apparently because Crowley was an out gay man.
Notable queer residents at The Dakota Building:
• Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. Arthur Laurents (Bernstein’s collaborator in “West Side Story”) said that Bernstein was "a gay man who got married. He wasn’t conflicted about it at all. He was just gay."
• Bob Crewe (1930-2014), songwriter, record producer, artist. Crewe was portrayed as "overtly gay" in "Jersey Boys,” but his brother Dan told The New York Times he was discreet about his sexuality, particularly during the time he was working with the Four Seasons. "Whenever he met someone, he would go into what I always called his John Wayne mode, this extreme machoism."
• Charles Henri Ford (1908–2002), poet, novelist, filmmaker, photographer, and collage artist best known for his editorship of the Surrealist magazine View (1940–1947) in New York City, and as the partner of the artist Pavel Tchelitchew. Ford is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery (Brookhaven, MS 39601).
• Judy Garland (1922-1969), actress. Garland had a large fan base in the gay community and became a gay icon. Reasons given for her standing, especially among gay men, are admiration of her ability as a performer, the way her personal struggles mirrored those of gay men in America during the height of her fame and her value as a camp figure. In the 1960s, a reporter asked how she felt about having a large gay following. She replied, "I couldn’t care less. I sing to people."
• Judy Holliday (1921-1965), actress, comedian, and singer, she was a resident of the Dakota for many years. She inhabited apartment #77 until her death from breast cancer at age 43 on June 7, 1965. She is interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.
• William Inge (1913-1973), playwright and novelist, whose works typically feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. “The Last Pad” is one of three of Inge’s plays that either have openly gay characters or address homosexuality directly. “The Boy in the Basement,” a one-act play written in the early 1950s, but not published until 1962, is his only play that addresses homosexuality overtly, while Archie in “The Last Pad” and Pinky in “Where’s Daddy?” (1966) are gay characters. Inge himself was closeted. Inge is buried at Mt Hope Cemetery (Independence, KS 67301).
• Carson McCullers (1917-1967), novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, and poet. Among her friends were W. H. Auden, Benjamin Britten, Gypsy Rose Lee and the writer couple Paul Bowles and Jane Bowles. After WWII McCullers lived mostly in Paris. Her close friends during these years included Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams.
• Rudolf Nureyev (1938-1993), dancer. Depending on the source, Nureyev is described as either bisexual as he did have heterosexual relationships as a younger man, or gay. Nureyev met Erik Bruhn, the celebrated Danish dancer, after Nureyev defected to the West in 1961. Bruhn and Nureyev became a couple and the two remained together off and on, with a very volatile relationship for 25 years, until Bruhn’s death in 1986. Nureyev’s grave is at a Russian cemetery in Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois near Paris.
Who: Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) and Lorentz Severin Skougaard (March 10, 1887 – January 18, 1965)
Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) was an American heir and philanthropist. His father, Edward Cabot Clark (1811–1882) was an American businessman and lawyer, founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company, along with his business partner Isaac Merritt Singer. Together, they began investing in real estate in the 1870s. They built The Dakota. Determined to escape from his family Alfred Corning Clark went abroad and studied the piano in Milan. He confessed later to an intimate companion, that away from home he felt free “to worship at the shrine of friendship.” Among these friends, all male, was Lorentz Severin Skougaard, a young Norwegian tenor whom he met in Paris. It became an all-consuming relationship that lasted until Lorentz’s death nineteen years later. Although Alfred did the right thing by marrying and siring four sons, he did not give up the private half of his life. Summers he sent his family to the country— to a large farm he owned in Cooperstown, New York, his mother’s birthplace. While they enjoyed the fresh air, he continued his travels in Europe: France, Italy, and Norway, this time with Lorentz. And becoming bolder after his father’s death, he bought Lorentz a house in New York almost next door to the house where he lived with his wife and children. When Lorentz died he commissioned a marble memorial from George Grey Barnard, a handsome young indigent American sculptor he picked up in Paris. Brotherly Love is a highly erotic work showing two muscular athletic naked men with broad shoulders, triangular torsos, perfect buttocks, and powerful legs, groping toward each other: a perfect metaphor for Alfred and Lorentz and their love. After Alfred’s death Barnard, now rich, famous, and the toast of New York and Paris, thanks to his patron’s munificence, helped Alfred’s sons Sterling and Stephen Clark build their collections of art, now the glory of three museums: the Metropolitan and the Modern in New York, and the Sterling and Francine Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Carson McCullers House is a historic home located at South Nyack in Rockland County, New York.
Address: 131 S Broadway, Nyack, NY 10960, USA (41.08598, -73.91912)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 06000562, 2006
Place
It is a two-story Second Empire style residence constructed in 1880 and modified with subsequent interior and exterior modifications largely in the Colonial Revival spirit about 1910. It is a frame structure built originally as parsonage, three bays wide and four bays deep. It features a one-story verandah, a slate-covered mansard roof, and an interesting multi-story tower projection crowned by a bell-cast roof. It was home to noted author Carson McCullers from 1945 to 1967.
Life
Who: Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967)
After separating from Reeves McCullers, Carson McCullers moved to New York to live with George Davis, the editor of Harper’s Bazaar. She became a member of February House, an art commune in Brooklyn. Among her friends were W.H. Auden, Benjamin Britten, Gypsy Rose Lee and the writer couple Paul Bowles and Jane Bowles. After WWII McCullers lived mostly in Paris. Her close friends during these years included Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams. In 1945 Carson and Reeves McCullers remarried. Three years later while severely depressed she attempted suicide. In 1953 Reeves tried to convince her to commit suicide with him, but she fled and Reeves killed himself in their Paris hotel with an overdose of sleeping pills. Her bittersweet play, “The Square Root of Wonderful” (1957), drew upon these traumatic experiences. McCullers dictated her unfinished autobiography, “Illumination and Night Glare” (1999), during the final months of her life. McCullers suffered throughout her life from several illnesses and from alcoholism. She had rheumatic fever at the age of 15 and suffered from strokes that began in her youth. By the age of 31 her left side was entirely paralyzed. She lived the last twenty years of her life in Nyack, New York, where she died on September 29, 1967, at the age of 50 after a brain hemorrhage; she was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery (140 N Highland Ave, Nyack, NY 10960).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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André Paul Guillaume Gide was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1947 "for his comprehensive and artistically significant writings, in which human problems and conditions ...
Born: November 22, 1869, Paris, France
Died: February 19, 1951, Paris, France
Lived: 1021 Route du Château, 76280 Cuverville, France (49.6585, 0.27183)
Education: Lycée Henri-IV
Buried: Cimetière de Cuverville, Cuverville, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
Find A Grave Memorial# 9267056
Movies: Travels in the Congo, La Symphonie pastorale, The Counterfeiters
Influenced by: Oscar Wilde, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, more

XVIII century manor house built by Chevalier de Cuverville. The Rondeaux family acquired it around 1820. André Gide lived there.
Address: 1021 Route du Château, 76280 Cuverville, France (49.6585, 0.27183)
Type: Private Property
Place
Cuverville-en-Caux (pop. 233) nestles in the Lezarde valley a few miles inland from the Normandy coast and would be unknown to the world if André Gide, Nobel Laureate for literature, hadn't lived there. In 1996 the current owner of Cuverville's manor house, in which Gide lived and wrote for more than 50 years, decided that the place needed renovating. He contacted respected architect Jean-Claude Rochette, formerly France's inspector general of historic monuments, for advice on what needed doing. Rochette decided that the manor needed to be restored to the way it looked when it was built in 1735. As a result, off came the white shutters that Gide knew during the last century, builders chipped away at the pale yellow rendering to uncover wine-coloured bricks, six rectangular columns were revealed and the pediment above them was painted white. According to Emmanuel de Roux of Le Monde: “The renovation works have given the place the profile of a British manor house, chic and elegant, but one that the writer who stayed there until his death would not recognise at all.” Dominique Rouin inherited the house from Gide's widow Madeleine, and sold it to the current owner in 1963. At present the house is private and is not open to the public. In one of Gide's best novels, “La Porte Etroite” (Strait is the Gate, 1909), Cuverville features under the guise of the fictional village of Fougueusemare (a rather poor guise since there is a real-life village of Fougueusemare just up the road). The manor house itself receives a less-than-glowing description: “Standing in a garden which is neither very large nor very fine, and which has nothing special to distinguish it from a number of other Normandy gardens, the white two-storeyed building, resembles a great many country houses of the century before last. A score of large windows look east onto the front of the garden; as many more on to the back; there are none at the sides.” The house also figures in Gide's novel “The Immoralists” and in his “Journals.” It was at Cuverville that Gide received some of the great European literary figures, including the poet Paul Valéry, for tennis parties and literary discussions. Here he also worked with the co-founders of the Nouvelle Revue Française, one of Europe's most important literary journals.
Life
Who: André Paul Guillaume Gide (22 November 1869 – 19 February 1951)
André Gide was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1947 "for his comprehensive and artistically significant writings, in which human problems and conditions have been presented with a fearless love of truth and keen psychological insight". Gide's career ranged from its beginnings in the symbolist movement, to the advent of anticolonialism between the two World Wars. Gide was born in Paris on 22 November 1869, into a middle-class Protestant family. His father was a Paris University professor of law who died in 1880. His uncle was the political economist Charles Gide, who owned much of Cuverville. Gide was brought up in isolated conditions in Normandy and became a prolific writer at an early age, publishing his first novel, “The Notebooks of André Walter” (French: Les Cahiers d'André Walter), in 1891, at the age of twenty-one. In 1893 and 1894, Gide travelled in Northern Africa, and it was there that he came to accept his attraction to boys. He befriended Oscar Wilde in Paris, and in 1895 Gide and Wilde met in Algiers. Wilde had the impression that he had introduced Gide to homosexuality, but, in fact, Gide had already discovered this on his own. He defended homosexuality in the public edition of “Corydon” (1924) and received widespread condemnation. He later considered this his most important work. In 1916, Marc Allégret, only 15 years old, became his lover. Marc was the son of Elie Allégret, best man at Gide's wedding. Of Allégret's five children, Gide adopted Marc. The two fled to London, in retribution for which his wife burned all his correspondence – "the best part of myself," he later commented. In 1918, he met Dorothy Bussy, who was his friend for over thirty years and translated many of his works into English. In 1923, he sired a daughter, Catherine, by Elisabeth van Rysselberghe, a woman who was much younger than he. He had known her for a long time, as she was the daughter of his closest female friend, Maria Monnom, the wife of his friend the Belgian neo-impressionist painter Théo van Rysselberghe. This caused the only crisis in the long-standing relationship between Allégret and Gide and damaged the relation with van Rysselberghe. This was possibly Gide's only sexual liaison with a woman, and it was brief in the extreme. Catherine became his only descendant by blood. He liked to call Elisabeth "La Dame Blanche" ("The White Lady"). Elisabeth eventually left her husband to move to Paris and manage the practical aspects of Gide's life (they had adjoining apartments built for each on the rue Vavin). She worshiped him, but evidently they no longer had a sexual relationship. Allégret’s relationship with Gide ended in 1927, as Allégret found out that he preferred women after having experiences with women. They nevertheless remained close friends until Gide's death in 1951. Gide is buried at Cuverville, in the churchyard.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Ida Helmi Tuulikki Pietilä was a Finnish graphic artist and professor, born in Seattle, Washington, United States. Pietilä was one of the most influential people in Finnish graphic arts, and her work has been shown in numerous art exhibitions.
Born: February 18, 1917, Seattle, Washington, United States
Died: February 23, 2009, Helsinki, Finland
Education: Academy of Fine Arts, Helsinki
Konstfack
Lived: Klovharu Island, Pellinki, Finland (60.22053, 25.88207)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161889945
Movies: Haru, Island of the Solitary
Books: Gossip, markets, and gender

Tove Jansson was a Swedish-speaking Finnish novelist, painter, illustrator and comic strip author. For her contribution as a children's writer she received the Hans Christian Andersen Medal in 1966. Briefly engaged in the 1940s to Atos Wirtanen, she later met her future life partner Tuulikki Pietilä. Tuulikki Pietilä was a Finnish graphic artist and professor. The two women collaborated on many works and projects, including a model of the Moominhouse, in collaboration with Pentti Eistola. It is now exhibited at the Moomin museum in Tampere. Jansson is best known as the author of the Moomin books for children. The first such book, The Moomins and the Great Flood, appeared in 1945, though it was the next two books, Comet in Moominland and Finn Family Moomintroll, published in 1946 and 1948 respectively that brought her fame. Jansson's and Pietilä's travels and summers spent together on the Klovharu Island in Pellinki have been captured on several hours of film, shot by Pietilä. Several documentaries have been made of this footage, the latest being Haru, yksinäinen saari (Haru, the lonely island) (1998) and Tove ja Tooti Euroopassa (Tove and Tooti in Europe) (2004).
Together from (before) 1945 to 2001: 56 years.
Tove Marika Jansson (August 9, 1914 – June 27, 2001)
Tuulikki Pietilä (February 18, 1917 – February 23, 2009)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The small ascetic island of Klovharu lies off the coast of Porvoo in the Pellinki archipelago. This rocky islet in the Gulf of Finland was home to Tove Jansson and Tuulikki Pietilä for almost thirty years.
Address: Pellinki, Finland (60.22053, 25.88207)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1964
Although Tove Jansson had dreamed of her own lighthouse, the cottage she built on Klovharu was a small, low-rise structure. It was built quite high up, but slightly below the cliff top. The cottage boasts a surprising subterranean feature – a vast cellar, larger than the building above. “Our cellar is the largest cellar that’s ever been dug, at least in this area, the floor area measures 25 square metres and it’s two metres deep.” The island was (and still is) part of the Pellinki island community. Permission to build had, therefore, to be requested from the islanders. “But Pellinki, just like many other self-governing island communities, had its own patriarch who would give advice on delicate issues concerning the islands. This man cautioned us not to expect too much and, above all, not to have faith in legal papers, which would sooner or later become the bane of our lives – so, no rental agreement, just a friendly donation to the local fishing association. Take it easy, he said, put yourselves on the Söderbyhy yes-or-no list. If I write yes, then the others are sure to follow my example. We stuck the list on the shop’s veranda door, and got a string of nothing but yeses.” Tove and Tooti sent their ‘yes list’ to the rural municipality of Porvoo’s authorities, and then camped out in the rain on Klovharu, waiting for a building permit. One evening, a man came ashore and introduced himself as Brunström from Kråkö. Brunström, who had been fishing for salmon, had intended to sleep in his boat, but had decided to come ashore when he spotted lights on the island. “Brunström had heard about our yes-or-no list and told us that it would never go through, not even in Porvoo where they take a broader view on such things, that is, they take it easy. You’ll never get a building permit. The only thing you can do is to start building right now. The authorities will take ages to decide what they want, and that’s when you have to take the initiative. The law says that a building cannot be torn down if the logs are in place up to the roof ridge. “Believe me,” Brunström said. “I know about these things.”” Tove and Tooti believed him and started building immediately. Sven Brunström also brought Nisse Sjöblom into the construction project. Occasionally, other Pellinki neighbours brought fish soup to the workers. The only suitable place for a cottage was occupied by the Great Rock, which weighed an estimated fifty tons. Blasting the Great Rock out of the way was their first task. The explosions scattered rock debris across the island, which presented Tove with another way of letting off steam. Rolling rocks was a way of cooling off and freeing herself of the bothers brought about by writing and illustrating.
Life
Who: Tove Marika Jansson (August 9, 1914 – June 27, 2001) and Ida Helmi Tuulikki Pietilä (February 18, 1917 – February 23, 2009)
Tove Jansson was a Swedish-speaking Finnish novelist, painter, illustrator and comic strip author. For her contribution as a children's writer she received the Hans Christian Andersen Medal in 1966. Briefly engaged in the 1940s to Atos Wirtanen, she later during her studies met her future partner Tuulikki Pietilä. The two women collaborated on many works and projects, including a model of the Moominhouse, in collaboration with Pentti Eistola. This is now exhibited at the Moomin museum in Tampere. Although Jansson had a studio in Helsinki, she lived many summers on a small island called Klovharu, one of the Pellinki Islands near the town of Porvoo. Jansson's and Pietilä's travels and summers spent together on the Klovharu island in Pellinki have been captured on several hours of film, shot by Pietilä. Several documentaries have been made of this footage, the latest being “Haru, yksinäinen saari” (Haru, the lonely island) (1998) and “Tove ja Tooti Euroopassa” (Tove and Tooti in Europe) (2004). Tove Jansson is buried at Hietaniemi cemetery (Sanduddsgatan 20, 00100 Helsingfors).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Buried: Weybridge Hill Cemetery, Weybridge, Addison County, Vermont, USA
Buried alongside: Charity Bryant
Find A Grave Memorial# 112580393

“At age twenty-nine, still defiantly single, Charity Bryant visited friends in Weybridge, Vermont. There she met a pious and studious young woman named Sylvia Drake. The two soon became so inseparable that Charity decided to rent rooms in Weybridge. In 1809, they moved into their own home together, and over the years, came to be recognized, essentially, as a married couple. Revered by their community, Charity and Sylvia operated a tailor shop employing many local women, served as guiding lights within their church, and participated in raising their many nieces and nephews.” --Rachel Hope Cleves. “Tuesday- 3 [July]—31 years since I left my mother’s house and commenced serving in company with Dear Miss B. Sin mars all earthly bliss, and no common sinner have I been, but God has spared my life, given me every thing I would enjoy and now I have a space, if I improve it, to exercise true penitence. --Sylvia Drake’s Diary, 1838. Charity’s nephew, William Cullen Bryant, one of 19th Century America’s best-known writers and editors, described their relationship: “If I were permitted to draw the veil of private life, I would briefly give you the singular, and to me interesting, story of two maiden ladies who dwell in this valley. I would tell you how, in their youthful days, they took each other as companions for life, and how this union, no less sacred to them than the tie of marriage, has subsisted, in uninterrupted harmony, for more than forty years.” Charity and Sylvia are buried together at Weybridge Hill Cemetery, Addison County, Vermont.
Together from 1807 to 1851: 44 years
Charity Bryant (1777 – October 6, 1851)
Sylvia Drake (1784 – February 18, 1868)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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When Charity Bryant died in 1851, Sylvia Drake moved in with her brother, Asaph, in his big brick house next to what is now the Morgan Horse Farm. When she died, in 1868, they opened Charity’s grave in the cemetery at Weybridge Hill and the two were reunited for eternity.
Address: Weybridge, VT 05753, USA (44.04107, -73.21371)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Place
Within a year since their meeting, Sylvia and Charity decided to move to Weybridge, Vermont, where they could live near Drake’s older brother, Asaph. They built a house, now gone, on the corner of Rte. 23 and Drake Road, where they set themselves up in a successful tailoring business. Weybridge is a small, rural town in Vermont, population 833 as of the 2010 census. Located in Addison County, Weybridge is home to the University of Vermont Morgan Horse Farm and Monument Farms Dairy. Otter Creek weaves through the town on its way to Lake Champlain. Chartered in 1761 by a hardy crew from Connecticut, Weybridge continues its traditions of farming, water power and close community.
Life
Who: Sylvia Drake (1784–1868) and Charity Bryant (1777–October 5, 1851)
Sylvia Drake and Charity Bryant met in 1806 in Bridgewater, Massachusetts and quickly formed a passionate friendship. Charity was open about her feelings, imploring Sylvia, “Do not disappoint my hopes and blast my expectations, for…I long to see you, and enjoy your company and conversation.” Sylvia Drake, celebrated the thirty-first anniversary of her life partnership with Charity Bryant in her diary: “Tuesday- 3 (July)—31 years since I left my mother’s house and commenced serving in company with Dear Miss B. Sin mars all earthly bliss, and no common sinner have I been, but God has spared my life, given me every thing I would enjoy and now I have a space, if I improve it, to exercise true penitence. —Sylvia Drake’s Diary, 1838” Charity’s nephew, William Cullen Bryant, one of XIX Century America’s best-known writers and editors, came to Weybridge to stay with the pair in the July, 1843 and described their relationship: “If I were permitted to draw the veil of private life, I would briefly give you the singular, and to me interesting, story of two maiden ladies who dwell in this valley. I would tell you how, in their youthful days, they took each other as companions for life, and how this union, no less sacred to them than the tie of marriage, has subsisted, in uninterrupted harmony, for more than forty years… they have shared each other’s occupations and pleasures and works of charity while in health, and watched over each other in sickness… I could tell you how they slept on the same pillow and had a common purse, and adopted each other’s relations… one of them, more enterprising and spirited than the other, might be said to represent the male head of the family, and took upon herself their transactions with the world without, until at length her health failed, and she was tended by her gentle companion, as a fond wife tends her invalid husband… I would speak of the friendly relations which their neighbors, people of kind hearts and simple manners, seem to take pleasure in bestowing upon them; but I have already said more than I fear they will forgive me for if this should ever meet their eyes, and I must leave the subject.” Their relationship was no barrier to their full participation in their church. They were Christians and very religious in their attendance at Weybridge Congregational. They were both devout, often attending four religious meetings each week. Sylvia frequently wrote of the comfort she took from sermons like that of Apr. 24, 1836, on “Romans 10,17, For whosoever will call on the name of the Lord will be saved.” Friends often came over after church for religious discussions. Both women tended to be sickly, though it is not clear whether their ailments were cured or caused by the great array of “remedies” they kept trying. One week’s medicines included catnip, harrow, castor oil and opium bought over the counter. Charity’s health finally broke down completely. The Sheldon Museum now has a large cradle they had made, big enough to hold an adult, in which Sylvia would rock Charity to sleep when she was unwell.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Buried: Mound Cemetery, Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, USA
Buried alongside: Owen Hawley
Find A Grave Memorial# 94845191

Owen Hawley (1930-2006) was a professor at Marietta College. He lived with his partner, Ralph Schroeder (1920-1976). They are buried side by side at Mound Cemetery (Marietta, OH 45750), along with many Revolutionary War soldiers and the early political and religious leaders of Marietta.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Nancy Hamilton was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer.
Born: July 27, 1908, Sewickley, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: February 18, 1985, New York City, New York, United States
Find A Grave Memorial# 161841675
Genre: Jazz
Movies: Helen Keller in Her Story, This Is Our Island
Albums: Dreamsville, Detour Ahead
Awards: Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature

Katharine Cornell was a member of the “Sewing circles” in New York, and had relationships with Nancy Hamilton, Tallulah Bankhead, and Mercedes de Acosta, among others. Nancy Hamilton was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer. She worked in the New York theater from 1932-1954. She wrote sketches and lyrics for the revues New Faces of 1934 (1934), One for the Money (1939), Two for the Show (1940) and Three to Make Ready (1946). She is best known as the lyricist for the popular song, How High the Moon. Helen Keller: A Life was produced by Nancy Hamilton and narrated by Katharine Cornell (about Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller). Dear Liar was both Cornell’s and Guthrie McClintic’s last play. On October 29, 1961, McClintic passed away at his and Cornell’s Palisades home. Nearing 70, feeling a lack of connection to the current theater and without the partner who had helped her shape her career for 40 years, Cornell retired from the stage. Over the next 13 years, she split her time between her Manhattan apartment and her beloved Martha’s Vineyard house, where she lived with lifelong friend and companion, Nancy Hamilton. She and Hamilton were active members of the Vineyard Haven community until Cornell’s death on June 9, 1974. Cornell was buried in Tisbury on Martha's Vineyard.
Together from (around) 1930 to 1974: 44 years.
Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974)
Nancy Hamilton (July 27, 1908 - February 18, 1985)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect, and poet of the High Renaissance who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art.
Born: March 6, 1475, Caprese Michelangelo
Died: February 18, 1564, Rome
Buried: Basilica di Santa Croce, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 1896
Sculptures: David, Pietà, Dying Slave, Crucifix, Madonna of Bruges, more

Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564) was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect, and poet of the High Renaissance who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art. It is impossible to know for certain whether Michelangelo had physical relationships (Condivi ascribed to him a "monk-like chastity"), but the nature of his sexuality is made apparent in his poetry. The longest sequence displaying a great romantic friendship, was written to Tommaso dei Cavalieri (c. 1509–1587), who was 23 years old when Michelangelo met him in 1532, at the age of 57. Cavalieri remained devoted to Michelangelo until his death. In 1542 Michelangelo met Cecchino dei Bracci who died only a year later, inspiring Michelangelo to write forty-eight funeral epigrams. The openly homoerotic nature of the poetry was a source of discomfort to later generations and it was not until John Addington Symonds translated them into English in 1893 that the original genders were restored. Late in life, Michelangelo nurtured a great platonic love for the poet and noble widow Vittoria Colonna, whom he met in Rome in 1536 or 1538 and who was in her late forties at the time. Michelangelo died in Rome in 1564, at the age of 88 (three weeks before his 89th birthday). His body was taken from Rome for interment at the Basilica of Santa Croce (Piazza di Santa Croce, 16, 50122 Firenze, Italy), fulfilling the maestro's last request to be buried in his beloved Florence.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Mary Williams Dewson was a feminist and political activist. Head of the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee in 1932 after an active role in the New York Consumer's League.
Born: 1874, Quincy, Massachusetts, United States
Died: October 1962, Castine, Maine, United States
Education: Wellesley College
Lived: Moss Acre, Castine, ME, USA (44.38886, -68.79895)
171 West 12th Street
Buried: Castine Cemetery, Castine, Hancock County, Maine, USA
Buried alongside: Polly Porter
Find A Grave Memorial# 11094134

From the 1920s through the 1950s, the building at 171 West 12th Street was home to a number of lesbian couples, an extended network of friends and comrades-in-arms that included artist Nancy Cook and educator Marion Dickerman; activist Polly Porter and Democratic Party official Molly Dewson; and Grace Hutchins and her partner Anna Rochester, both leaders in the Communist Party. Many of these women, particularly Dickerman and Cook, were good friends with Eleanor Roosevelt, who had apartments of her own at 20 East 11th Street from 1933 to 1942 and at 29 Washington Square West from 1942 to 1949. Since her young adulthood, Roosevelt had been pan of a circle of women reformers, many of them in long-term relationships with other women. When Franklin D. Roosevelt became president, Eleanor became a fierce champion for women in government, and many of her friends got government positions during the New Deal. Molly Dewson served as director of the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee and as a member of the Social Security Board. Among President Roosevelt's other appointees were Frances Perkins, the secretary of labor from 1933 to 1945 and the first woman cabinet member, and Grace Abbot, who was chief of the Children's Bureau. From within the government, these women could press for action on the issues they had pursued for years, such as wages and hours' legislation, workers' compensation requirements, and child labor laws. Roosevelt herself had an intimate relationship with another woman. In 1932, an Associated Press reporter named Lorena Hickok was assigned to file stories on the new first lady. They quickly became fast friends. Hickok would eventually come to live in the White House. The nature of the Hickok-Roosevelt relationship has been hotly contested by biographers and historians, but their letters reveal a passionate intimacy—in 1933, for example, Hickok wrote to Roosevelt: “I've been trying today to bring back your face, to remember just how you look, most clearly I remember your eyes, with a kind of teasing smile in them, and the feeling of that soft spot just North-east of the corner of your mouth against my lips. Good night, dear one, I want to put my arms around you and kiss you at the corner of your mouth. And in a little more than a week now, I shall.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Moss Acre was built In 1895, on the Morse's Cove road, about two and one-half miles from the village, in what was formerly known as Hatch's woods, the largest and probably one of the finest houses in this vicinity of the time. It was owned by Mr. W. D. Porter, of Chicago. It had an extensive view up and down the Penobscot river. The grounds were very spacious, and were to be elaborately laid out.
Address: Castine, ME, USA (44.38886, -68.79895)
Type: Private Property
Life
Who: Mary ("Molly") Williams Dewson (February 18, 1874 - October 21, 1962) and Mary ("Polly") G. Porter (1884-1972)
Molly Dewson was born in Quincy, Massachusetts, to Edward Henry Dewson and Elizabeth Weld (Williams) Dewson. After earning her A.B. degree from Wellesley College (1897), Dewson was hired as secretary of the Domestic Reform Committee of the Women's Educational and Industrial Union in Boston. She left this position in 1900 to become the superintendent of parole at the Massachusetts State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster, where she remained until 1912. There she met Polly Porter. Porter, a student at the Boston School for Social Workers, began an internship under Dewson's supervision in 1909. When her internship ended, she withdrew from school, choosing to remain at the Industrial School as a volunteer. By 1910, Dewson and Mary G. Porter had come to think of their relationship as a "partnership"; it was to last for 52 years. After a brief stint running a small dairy farm with Porter, Dewson returned to reform work, a field that occupied her for the next two decades. She was particularly active in the woman's suffrage movement, and in the National Consumers' League's campaign to secure passage of minimum wage laws for women and children. During World War I Dewson and Porter spent 15 months with the American Red Cross's Bureau of Refugees in France. Between 1917 and 1938 the two women lived in New York City, spending summers at the Porter family's house in Castine, Maine. Dewson and Porter, Eleanor Roosevelt’s friends, had a co-op apartment in Greenwich Village, across the hall from two other of Roosevelt's favorites, Marion Dickerman and Nan Cook. From reports the whole building was filled with a few singles but mostly pairs of women. While Dewson was working in various reform movements, the independently wealthy Porter bred and raised Sheltie dogs at a kennel she owned in Connecticut. By the late 1920s, Dewson became convinced that needed reforms could best be accomplished from within organized political parties; she therefore initiated efforts to increase the number of women active in the Democratic Party. She organized women to work in Alfred E. Smith's presidential campaign (1928); and for Franklin D. Roosevelt's New York State gubernatorial race (1930), and his subsequent bids for the presidency. In 1933, thanks to the influence of Eleanor Roosevelt, her political ally and personal friend, she was appointed to head the Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee. She is credited with securing leadership positions for many women within the Democratic Party and the Roosevelt Administration. In 1937 she was appointed to the Social Security Board, but she resigned from the position the following year. Dewson and Porter spent the early years of their retirement in Castine, Georgetown (Connecticut), and New York, but eventually established permanent residence in Castine (1952), where Dewson died in 1962. They are both buried at Castine Cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Buried: Newton Cemetery, Newton, Sussex County, New Jersey, USA
Buried alongside: William August Liebherr
Find A Grave Memorial# 120800543

M. Allen Alexander died in 2000, aged 83, and is buried alongside his partner for over 40 years, William August “Bill” Liebherr, died in 2008, at Newton Cemetery (19 Lawnwood Ave, Newton, NJ 07860).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Charlotte Saunders Cushman was an American stage actress. Her voice was noted for its full contralto register, and she was able to play both male and female parts.
Born: July 23, 1816, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: February 18, 1876, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: Omni Parker House, 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 248
Books: Fifteen Years in the Senior Order of Shakers: A Narration of Facts, Concerning that Singular People

Charlotte Saunders Cushman was an American stage actress. In 1848, Cushman met journalist, writer and part-time actress Matilda Hays. After a short amount of time and some correspondence, they became involved in a lesbian affair. In 1854, Hays left Cushman for lesbian sculptor Harriet Hosmer, which launched a series of jealous interactions among the three women. Hays eventually returned to live with Cushman, but by late 1857, Cushman was secretly involved with lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins. Emma Stebbins was among the first notable American woman sculptors, her best-known work is the Angel of the Waters (1873), also known as Bethesda Fountain, located on the Bethesda Terrace in Central Park, New York. In 1857, Stebbins moved to Rome quickly becoming involved in the bohemian and feminist lesbian lifestyle in Europe, which was more tolerated there than it would have been back in New York. In 1869, Cushman was treated for breast cancer. Stebbins devoted all her time during that ordeal to nursing her lover, ignoring her work during the next years.
Together from 1857 to 1876: 19 years.
Charlotte Saunders Cushman (July 23, 1816 – February 18, 1876)
Emma Stebbins (September 1, 1815 – October 25, 1882)
Matilda Mary Hays (September 8, 1820 – July 3, 1897)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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With its close proximity to Boston’s Theater District, the Omni Parker House (60 School St, Boston, MA 02108) played an important role for thespians. Many of the XIX century’s finest actors made the Parker House a home away from home, including Charlotte Cushman, Sarah Bernhardt, Edwin Booth, and the latter’s handsome, matinee-idol brother, John Wilkes. Charlotte Cushman (1816-1876) died of pneumonia in her hotel room on the third floor in 1876, aged 59. During the XX century, that list expanded to include stars of stage, screen, and television—including Joan Crawford, Judy Garland, Ann Magret, and Marlow Thomas.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.
Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.
Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman, later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman.
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Charlotte Cushman (1816–1876), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Martha May Eliot (1891–1978), was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. She was a scion of the Eliot family, an influential American family that is regarded as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy and held sway over the American education system in the late XIX and early XX centuries. Her father, Christopher Rhodes Eliot, was a Unitarian minister, and her grandfather, William G. Eliot, was the first chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis. The poet, playwright, critic, and Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot was her first cousin. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner.
• Mary Katherine Keemle "Kate" Field (1838-1896), American journalist, lecturer, and actress, of eccentric talent. She was the daughter of actors Joseph M. Field and Eliza Riddle. Kate Field never married. In October 1860, while visiting his mother's home in Florence, she met the celebrated British novelist Anthony Trollope. She became one of his closest friends and was the subject of Trollope's high esteem. Trollope scholars have speculated on the nature of their warm friendship. Twenty-four of his letters to Kate survive, at the Boston Public Library; hers to Trollope do not.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848 - 1920) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851 - 1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Barbara Gittings was a prominent American activist for gay equality. She organized the New York chapter of the Daughters of Bilitis from 1958 to 1963, edited the national DOB magazine The Ladder from ...
Born: July 31, 1932, Vienna, Austria
Died: February 18, 2007, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, United States
Education: Northwestern University
Buried: Congressional Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, USA
Buried alongside: Kay Tobin Lahusen
Find A Grave Memorial# 18047727
Awards: GLAAD Media Barbara Gittings Award
Organizations: Daughters of Bilitis, American Library Association

Barbara Gittings and Kay Tobin, two of the original "gay pioneers,” met in 1961 at a picnic in Rhode Island. "We hit it off, we started courting. I flew to Boston to visit her and got off the plane with a big bunch of flowers in my hand. I couldn't resist. I did not care what the world thought. I dropped the flowers, grabbed her and kissed her." Gittings organized the New York chapter of the Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), edited the national DOB magazine The Ladder, and worked closely with Frank Kameny on the first picket lines that brought attention to the ban on employment of gay people by the US government. Gittings was most involved in the American Library Association to promote positive literature about homosexuality in libraries. She was a part of the movement to get the American Psychiatric Association to drop homosexuality as a mental illness. Kay Lahusen is considered the first openly gay photojournalist of the gay rights movement. Lahusen's photographs appeared on several of the covers of The Ladder while her partner was the editor. She helped with the founding of the original Gay Activists Alliance (GAA), contributed to a New York-based weekly newspaper named Gay Newsweekly, and co-authored The Gay Crusaders with Randy Wicker.
Together from 1961 to 2007: 46 years.
Barbara Gittings (July 31, 1932 – February 18, 2007)
Kay Tobin Lahusen (born January 5, 1930)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Congressional Cemetery or Washington Parish Burial Ground is a historic and active cemetery located at 1801 E Street, SE, in Washington, D.C., on the west bank of the Anacostia River.
Address: 1801 E St SE, Washington, DC 20003, USA (38.88128, -76.98056)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 202-543-0539
National Register of Historic Places: 69000292, 1969. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
It is the only American "cemetery of national memory" founded before the Civil War. Over 65,000 individuals are buried or memorialized at the cemetery, including many who helped form the nation and the city of Washington in the early XIX century. Though the cemetery is privately owned, the U.S. government owns 806 burial plots administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Congress, located about a mile and a half (2.4 km) to the northwest, has greatly influenced the history of the cemetery. The cemetery still sells plots, and is an active burial ground. From the Washington Metro, the cemetery lies three blocks east of the Potomac Avenue station and two blocks south of the Stadium-Armory station. Many members of the U.S. Congress who died while Congress was in session are interred at Congressional Cemetery. Other burials include early landowners and speculators, the builders and architects of early Washington, Native American diplomats, Washington mayors, and Civil War veterans. XIX century Washington, D.C. families unaffiliated with the federal government also have graves and tombs at the cemetery. In all, there are one Vice President, one Supreme Court justice, six Cabinet members, 19 Senators and 71 Representatives (including a former Speaker of the House) buried there, as well as veterans of every American war, and the first director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover. Peter Doyle, (June 3, 1843-April 19, 1907), a veteran of the Confederate Army, and the greatest love of poet Walt Whitman is buried here. They met in Washington, D.C. on the horse-drawn streetcar for which Doyle was the conductor who later recalled, “We were familiar at once – I put my hand on his knee – we understood. He did not get out at the end of the trip – in fact went all the way back with me.” Whitman wrote in one letter to him, “I will imagine you with my arm around my neck saying Good night, Walt - & me – Good night, Pete.”
Notable queer burials at Congressional Cemetery:
• Everett Lysle Boyer (1927-1998) & Forrest Leroy Snakenberg (1932-1986). Boyer's tombstone reads: Arise up my love, Tis the time of singing birds (Song of Solomon 2:12), Snakenberg's, same style of that of Everett, reads: So be truely glad there is wonderful joy ahead (Peter 1:6)
• Kenneth Dresser (1938-1995) and Charles Fowler (1931-1995) are buried together. Dresser designed the Electric Light Parade at Disneyland, the Electric Water Pageant at Epcot, and the Fantasy of Lights at Callaway Gardens, Georgia. Fowler was an arts educator and writer, director of National Cultural Resources, Inc, and a guest professor at several American universities.
• James Richard Duell (1947-1992) and Larry Martin Worrell (1954-1989). The tombstone reads: "Two most excellent adventures"
• John Frey (1929-1997) and Peter Morris (1929-2010), together 43 years, met while at college together. Frey was a Fulbright Scholar, professor of Romance Languages at George Washington University, and author of books on Victor Hugo and Emile Zola. Morris was an expert French cook, and on the Board of Directors of the gay Catholic organization Dignity for whom he coauthored a community cookbook.
• Barbara Gittings (1932-2007) helped convince the American Psychiatric Association to declassify homosexuality as a mental illness. She founded the New York chapter of the lesbian rights organization the Daughter of Bilitis. The tombstone reads: Gay Pioneers who spoke truth to power: Gay is good. Partners in life, Married in our hearts.
• Dan Hering (1925-2012) was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and served 20 years in the U.S. Army. He and his partner Joel were members of one of the earliest gay right groups, the Society for Individual Rights (SIR) formed in 1964. They were founding members of the earliest known gay boat club, San Francisco’s Barbary Coast Boating Club. Dan was also a member of Service Academy Gay & Lesbian Alumni (SAGLA) and Knights Out, the association of gay West Point graduates. His partner Joel Leenaars (born 1935) lives at 1533 Weybridge Cir, Naples, FL.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) was a WWII veteran and the father of the modern gay rights movement.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) was an American writer, philosopher, educator, and patron of the arts. Distinguished as the first African American Rhodes Scholar in 1907, Locke was the philosophical architect —the acknowledged "Dean"— of the Harlem Renaissance. Locke was gay, and may have encouraged and supported other gay African-Americans who were part of the Harlem Renaissance. However, he was not fully public in his orientation and referred to it as his point of "vulnerable/invulnerability", taken to mean an area of risk and strength in his view. Howard University officials initially considered having Locke's ashes buried in a niche at Locke Hall on the Howard campus, similar to the way that Langston Hughes' ashes were interred at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City in 1991. But Kurt Schmoke, the university's legal counsel, was concerned about setting a precedent that might lead to other burials at the university. After an investigation revealed no legal problems to the plan, university officials decided the remains should be buried off-site. At first, thought was given to burying Locke beside his mother, Mary Hawkins Locke. But Howard officials quickly discovered a problem: She had been interred at Columbian Harmony Cemetery in Washington, D.C., but that cemetery closed in 1959 and her remains transferred to National Harmony Memorial Park—which failed to keep track of them. (She was buried in a mass grave along with 37,000 other unclaimed remains from Columbian Harmony.) Howard University eventually decided to bury Alain Locke's remains at historic Congressional Cemetery, and African American Rhodes Scholars raised $8,000 to purchase a burial plot there. Locke was interred at Congressional Cemetery on September 13, 2014. His tombstone reads: 1885–1954, Herald of the Harlem Renaissance, Exponent of Cultural Pluralism. On the back of the headstone is a nine-pointed Bahá'í star (representing Locke's religious beliefs); a Zimbabwe Bird, emblem of the nation Locke adopted as a Rhodes Scholar; a lambda, symbol of the gay rights movement; and the logo of Phi Beta Sigma, the fraternity Locke joined. In the center of these four symbols is an Art Deco representation of an African woman's face set against the rays of the sun. This image is a simplified version of the bookplate that Harlem Renaissance painter Aaron Douglas designed for Locke. Below the bookplate image are the words "Teneo te, Africa" ("I hold you, my Africa").
• T. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich (1943-1988), was a gay civil rights and AIDS activist, his tombstone reads: "When I was in the military they gave me a medal for killing two men and a discharge for loving one."
• William Boyce Mueller (1942–1993) was the gay grandson of the founder of the Boy Scout of America. Mueller helped create the first organization to lobby today’s Scout oligarchs to end their ban on gay Scouts and Scout leaders, Forgotten Scouts.
• Frank Warren O’Reilly (1922-2001) was a WWII veteran with a Ph.D. in International Relations, and a music critic for The Washington Times, and founder of Miami’s Charles Ives Centennial Festival and the American Chopin Foundation which sponsors an annual national Chopin competition.
• Emanuel “Butch” Zeigler (1951-2009) was a onetime elementary school teacher, and co-owner of Capital Promoting Service whose clients include Heads of State and major corporations.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Audre Lorde was an African American writer, feminist, womanist, lesbian, and civil rights activist. As a poet, she is best known for technical mastery and emotional expression, particularly in her poems ...
Born: February 18, 1934, Harlem, New York City, New York, United States
Died: November 17, 1992, Christiansted, United States Virgin Islands
Education: Columbia University
Hunter College High School
Hunter College
National Autonomous University of Mexico
City College of New York
Lived: 207 St Pauls Ave, Staten Island, NY 10304, USA (40.63255, -74.07886)
Buried: St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 11341370
Spouse: Edwin Rollins (m. 1962–1970)
Parents: Linda Gertrude Belmar Lorde, Frederick Byron Lorde

Audre Lorde was a Caribbean-American writer and civil rights activist. In 1968 Lorde was writer-in-residence at Tougaloo College in Mississippi, where she met Frances Clayton, a professor of psychology, who was to be her romantic partner until 1989. From 1977 to 1978, Lorde had a brief affair with the sculptor and painter Mildred Thompson. They met in Nigeria in 1977 at the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. Their affair ran its course during the time that Thompson lived in Washington, D.C. and was teaching at Howard University. Lorde received the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement from Publishing Triangle in 1992. Publishing Triangle subsequently instituted the Audre Lorde Award to honor works of lesbian poetry in 2001. Lorde died in 1992, in St. Croix, where she had been living with Gloria I. Joseph. In her own words, Lorde was a "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, and poet." "What I leave behind has a life of its own. I have said this about poetry; I have said it about children. Well, in a sense I'm saying it about the very artifact of who I have been."
Together from 1968 to 1989: 21 years.
Audrey Geraldine “Audre” Lorde (February 18, 1934 - November 17, 1992)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Audre Lorde lived here with her partner Frances Clayton and Lorde's two children from 1972 to 1987. During these years, Lorde taught at Hunter College and John Jay College, and wrote several books of poetry and essays as well as “The Cancer Journals” (1980) and “Zami: A New Spelling of My Name” (1982).
Address: 207 St Pauls Ave, Staten Island, NY 10304, USA (40.63255, -74.07886)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: St. Paul’s Avenue-Stapleton Heights Historic District.
Place
This neo-Colonial-style house was designed by the prolific Stapleton architect OttoLoeffler and built in 1898 as the residence of Andrew Jackson, a harbor pilot, during the period when several previously-undeveloped tracts in the historic district were built up with Queen Anne, Shingle, and Colonial-style homes. The critically-acclaimed African-American novelist, poet, essayist, and feminist Audre Lorde resided here in the 1970s. She was professor of English at John Jay College and was appointed the New York State poet laureate in 1991. She published several books of proseand poetry, as well as articles in scholarly journals. The house is distinguished by it open porch featuring turned columns and closed pediment with sunburst and its gabled roofline.
Life
Who: Audrey Geraldine “Audre” Lorde (February 18, 1934 - November 17, 1992)
Audre Lorde was a Caribbean-American writer and civil rights activist. In 1968 Lorde was writer-in-residence at Tougaloo College in Mississippi, where she met Frances Clayton, a professor of psychology, who was to be her romantic partner until 1989. From 1977 to 1978, Lorde had a brief affair with the sculptor and painter Mildred Thompson. They met in Nigeria in 1977 at the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture. Their affair ran its course during the time that Thompson lived in Washington, D.C. and was teaching at Howard University. Lorde received the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement from Publishing Triangle in 1992. Publishing Triangle subsequently instituted the Audre Lorde Award to honor works of lesbian poetry in 2001. Lorde died in 1992, in St. Croix, where she had been living with Gloria I. Joseph. In her own words, Lorde was a "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, and poet." "What I leave behind has a life of its own. I have said this about poetry; I have said it about children. Well, in a sense I'm saying it about the very artifact of who I have been."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The Bagatelle, now a Mexican restaurant called El Cantinero (86 University Pl, New York, NY 10003), was a lesbian bar and hangout well into the 1950s. Saturday night was the big night when dykes slicked back their hair, and Sunday afternoon sessions were an added treat. There was a backroom for dancing, and a warning light that flashed on as a signal to stop when somebody dangerous came in up front. The black lesbian poet and activist Audre Lorde has also mentioned the Bagatelle on occasion. She described the "mommies and daddies" that dominated the bar's social structure and how difficult it was for black lesbians to exist within such a place.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Lived: 3574 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 (32.74269, -117.15871) - Alice Lee Residence
3560 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Katherine Teats Cottage
3578 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Alice Lee Cottage
Buried: Hillside Cemetery, Westport, Essex County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 20122751

Lee and Teats were companions who lived together from 1902 through 1943, when Lee died. Teats continued to live in their house until she died in 1952. The women were important in the early XX-century San Diego social scene, and entertained two US presidents in their home.
Addresses:
3574 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 (32.74269, -117.15871) - Alice Lee Residence
3560 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Katherine Teats Cottage
3578 7th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103 - Alice Lee Cottage
Place
Known as the Teats Cottage, the Prairie-style house was built in 1905 for Katherine Teats, the domestic partner of prominent San Diego socialite Alice Lee. Originally was part of a compound with three residences sharing a garden designed by noted botanist/landscape architect Kate Sessions. In May of 1906, Alice Lee granted the property of the Teats Cottage to her companion Katherine Teats. Misses Lee and Teats lived in the main house and used the other two for rentals. Miss Lee was close friends with both Mrs. Grover Clevelend and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, and often dined at the White House. President and Mrs. Roosevelt, Mrs. Cleveland, and other distinguished visitors were often guests at Miss Lee's Seventh Avenue home.
Life
Who: Alice Lee (May 27, 1854-February 18, 1943)
Alice Lee was born in Westport, NY, and throughout her life was surrounded by individuals passionate about the Progressive movement including Teddy Roosevelt, who was married to her second cousin; Florence Nightingale; Ralph Waldo Emerson; and the Bronson Alcott family. When Lee moved to San Diego in 1902 for health reasons she became friends with the Marston Family who were involved with the Progressive movement in San Diego. Alice Lee became very involved with different organizations in San Diego including the First Unitarian Church, the Wednesday Club, the Civic Committee of the Chamber of Commerce, and other local civic and cultural groups. She took leadership positions as President of the San Diego Museum, Honorary Director of the Women’s Civic Center, Director of the Natural History Museum, President of the Balboa Park Auditorium Association, and President of the Balboa Park Commission. Alice Lee founded the group “Open Forum”, which was a public forum to openly talk about social, political, and international issues. According to a newspaper article from the San Diego Union, by 1935 the group had become one of the “oldest continuous non-legislative forum of free public discussion in the United States” before being disbanded sometime in the 1970s. Lee was also a leader of the Progressive movement in San Diego organizing Progressive thinking women to get out and vote for Teddy Roosevelt in 1932. She was recognized by the Progressive Party by being chosen to represent California at the National Convention for the Progressive Party in Chicago. Lee was the leader of the “Save the Beaches” campaign in San Diego which resulted in the city acquiring miles of beach for public use. She was also instrumental in developing the public playground system. Alice Lee was praised as a Civic leader in several publications including the San Diego Union, the Ticonderoga Sentinel, the Boston Globe, and a book entitled “Women of the West: A Series of Biographical Sketches of Living Eminent Women in the Eleven Western States of the United States of America.” Lee lived in the home at 3574 Seventh Avenue from its year of construction in 1905 until her death in 1943. Alice Lee is buried at Hillside Cemetery (165 Ridgefield Road, Wilton, Connecticut), established in 1818.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Alice Lee is buried at Hillside Cemetery (165 Ridgefield Road, Wilton, Connecticut), same cemetery where is buried M. Emma Wolley.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Anniversary: February 17, 1994

Born: Sheffield, United Kingdom
People also search for: Terry Jastrow, Laurie Slade, Peter Rowe
Anniversary: February 17, 1994

Award-winning theatre Composer Matthew Bugg and Marketing Professional Tobias "Toby" Oliver have been together since 1994. They live in Sheffield with their beloved Dachshund, Georgie. Matthew grew up in Sheffield and began his theatre training at the age of four. He achieved the highest mark in the country at A Level Music, and won the Roland Gregory Prize and Barber Scholarship at the University of Birmingham. Before even graduating, Matthew landed his first professional theatre job at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester. Tobias grew up in London and read English with Drama at the University of Sheffield. He went on to study Text and Performance at RADA and King’s College London. After 20 years working in the arts and major events industries he became Marketing Director of Mr. Bugg Presents, a music theatre company his husband, composer Matthew Bugg, and he set up with producer Keith Arrowsmith. They have taken their critically acclaimed production, Miss Nightingale – the musical written by Matthew, on two hugely successful tours of the UK, including a run in London’s West End. They are now working on their second show, alongside a potential USA production and movie version of Miss Nightingale.
Together since 1994: 21 years.
Matthew Bugg (born Sept. 19, 1974) & Tobias Oliver (born July 13, 1972)
Anniversary: February 17, 1994
Matthew and I met on the dance floor of a nightclub in Sheffield that had a ‘lesbian and gay night’ once a week. I was studying at University and he was training in music and dance. There was an instant attraction. I loved the beauty, abandon and joy with which he danced. And once we started talking, we did not stop until the club closed. However, at the time I had a boyfriend in London and managed to muster up just enough self-control to resist when Matthew tried to kiss me. So our relationship was initially based on friendship. We became the very best of friends spending hours together talking, dancing and laughing. (Nothing has changed!) As my relationship in London ended, it became clear that Matthew and I were meant to be. We finally enjoyed our first kiss at the same club at a Valentine’s Day night and have been together ever since. Our early years were spent living apart, spending hours on the phone and travelling across the country to see one another at weekends as I returned to London to begin my career and Matthew went to University. So much has changed since we met, the club is long closed and the equal rights we campaigned for are gradually coming into law. In 2007, we celebrated our 13th anniversary with a Civil Partnership in front of our family and friends. In 2015, now British law has changed again, we plan to convert this into a marriage. So much has changed, changed for the better. The beautiful boy I fell in love with has grown into a handsome man - it has been wonderful growing up together, I look forward to growing old together. -Toby Oliver



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sybille Bedford, OBE was a German-born English writer. She was a writer of non-fiction and semi-autobiographical fiction books and a lesbian.
Born: March 16, 1911, Berlin, Germany
Died: February 17, 2006, London, United Kingdom
Lived: The Albany, Piccadilly, W1J
Buried: Mortlake Crematorium, Mortlake, London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, Greater London, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 62800459
Nominations: Man Booker Prize, Lambda Literary Award for Belles Lettres
People also search for: Aldous Huxley, Martha Gellhorn, Christian Spiel

Sybille Bedford was a German-born English writer. Many of her works are partly autobiographical. Julia Neuberger proclaimed her "the finest woman writer of the 20th century" while Bruce Chatwin saw her as "one of the most dazzling practitioners of modern English prose". Bedford spent the 1950s, 60s and 70s living in France, Italy, Britain and Portugal and during this period had a twenty-year relationship with the American female novelist Eda Lord. Maria Huxley, Aldous Huxley’s wife, is known to have said, to avoid Sybille’s deportation to Germany during WWII, "We need to get one of our bugger friends to marry you". Sybille entered a marriage of convenience with an English Army officer, Walter "Terry" Bedford, who had been an ex-boyfriend of a former manservant of W.H. Auden's. She followed the Huxleys to California and spent the rest of World War II in America. During the 1940s, she had a love affair with an American woman, Evelyn W. Gendel, who left her husband for Bedford and became a writer and editor herself. In 1979, she settled in Chelsea in London.
Together from 1956 to 1976: 20 years.
Sybille Bedford, OBE (born Freiin Sybille Aleid Elsa von Schoenebeck, March 16, 1911 – February 17, 2006)
Eda Lord (July 30, 1907 - October 1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, W1J built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy. In Oscar Wilde's play, “The Importance of Being Earnest” (1895), the character John (Jack) Worthing has a set at the Albany (number B4), where he lives while staying in London under the assumed name of Ernest. Notable queer residents: Sybille Bedford, writer, lived in Aldous Huxley's servant's room; Bruce Chatwin, writer; Aldous Huxley, writer; Matthew “The Monk” Lewis, from 1802 to 1818 (number K1); Compton Mackenzie, writer, from 1911 to 1912 (number E1); Sir Harold Nicolson, writer and politician from 1952 to 1965 (number C1); Terence Stamp, actor. George Cecil Ives had an apartment here which he shared with his live-in servant and lover, James Goddard (Kit) in 1894. The place was held in high esteem. Ives “refused to allow a third man to join him and Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde's intimate friend, for sex, --- because “it wouldn't do at the Albany”.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Sybille Bedford (1911-2006) was a German-born English writer. Sybille entered a marriage of convenience with an English Army officer, Walter "Terry" Bedford (an ex-boyfriend of a former man-servant of W.H Auden's), whom she described as a friend's "bugger butler", and obtained a British passport. Bedford spent the 1950s, '60s and '70s living in France, Italy, Britain and Portugal, and during this period had a twenty-year relationship with the American female novelist Eda Lord. In 1979 she settled in Chelsea in London. She is buried at Mortlake Cemetery (Kew Meadow Path, Townmead Rd, Richmond TW9 4EN).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Randy Shilts was a pioneering gay American journalist and author. He worked as a freelance reporter for both The Advocate and the San Francisco Chronicle, as well as for San Francisco Bay Area television stations.
Born: August 8, 1951, Davenport, Iowa, United States
Died: February 17, 1994, Guerneville, California, United States
Education: University of Oregon
Buried: Redwood Memorial Gardens, Guerneville, Sonoma County, California, USA
Buried alongside: Daniel R. Yoder
Find A Grave Memorial# 7739804
Movies: And the Band Played On
Awards: Stonewall Book Award, GLAAD Media Visibility Award, Lambda Literary Award for Gay Men's Studies
Siblings: Gary Shilts

Guerneville, 95446 is an historic logging town located in the Russian River Valley that became a resort destination in the late XIX century -- an economy that declined in the 1960s. Beginning in the late 1970s, gays and lesbians from San Francisco began visiting the area again for weekend recreation. Daniel R. Yoder (1952-1995) and Randy Shilts (1951-1994) are buried near each other at Redwood Memorial Gardens (Guerneville, CA 95446). Yoder’s tombstone reads: "No one could have a better Friend." Randy Shilts. Randy Shilts was a Journalist, author and AIDS activist. He is the author of "The Mayor of Castro Street: The Life and Times of Harvey Milk" (1982), "And the Band Played On: Politics, People and the AIDS Epidemic" (1987), and "Conduct Unbecoming: Lesbians and Gays in the U.S. Military" (1993). Shilts meticulously researched and courageously reported the real story behind AIDS, often running afoul of AIDS lobbying groups who accused him of being a traitor to the gay community. Diagnosed with HIV in 1987, Shilts succumbed to an AIDS related illness in 1994. 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Oskar Seidlin was an emigre from Nazi Germany first to Switzerland and then to the U.S. who taught German language and literature as a professor at Smith College, Middlebury College, Ohio State University, and Indiana University from 1939 to 1979.
Born: February 17, 1911, Chorzów, Poland
Died: December 11, 1984, Bloomington, Indiana, United States
Education: University of Basel
Buried: Walnut Grove Cemetery, Worthington, Franklin County, Ohio, USA, Plot: Lot 178, Section D, Space #2 east
Buried alongside: Dieter Cunz
Find A Grave Memorial# 36405847
Employer: Smith College
Books: Bete für mich, mein Lieber--, Essays in German and Comparative Literature, Der Theaterkritiker Otto Brahm
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship for Humanities, US & Canada

Richard Plant was a German-American writer. He is said to have written, in addition to the works published under his own name, several detective novels or Kriminalromane, with Dieter Cunz and Oskar Seidlin, under the collective pen name of Stefan Brockhoff. Upon the accession of the Nazis to power in Germany in 1933, and the enforcement of the Paragraph 175 against homosexuality, Plant was obliged to leave Germany for Switzerland in concert with his partner, Oskar Seidlin. In 1939, Seidlin obtained a lectureship (in 1941 elevated to assistant professorship) at Smith College for women in Northampton, Massachusetts. At Smith, he is said to have had a relationship with Newton Arvin. Seidlin also served on the Advisory Council of Princeton University for several terms. Plant is the author of The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War against Homosexuals, the first comprehensive book in English on the fate of the homosexuals in Nazi Germany. The horror of camp life is described through diaries, previously untranslated documents, and interviews with and letters from survivors, revealing how the anti-homosexual campaign was conducted.
Together from (before) 1933 to 1984: 51 years.
Oskar Seidlin (February 17, 1911 – December 11, 1984)
Richard Plant (July 22, 1910 – March 3, 1998)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?
tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

By the early 1900s, downtown Columbus residents and professors from The Ohio State University had built summer homes in Clintonville and the surrounding farmland was developed into housing developments shortly after the extension of the streetcar lines northward from Columbus. A business district developed in Beechwold, separated by nearly a mile of residences from the Clintonville district to the south. Both communities were entirely part of Columbus by the 1950s after it annexed most of Clinton Township.
Address: Walnut Grove Cemetery, 5561 Milton Ave, Columbus, OH 43085 (40.0759, -83.02371)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 614-885-5933
Place
Clintonville is a neighborhood in north-central Columbus, Ohio, with around 30,000 residents. Clintonville is an informal neighborhood. The southern border is loosely defined as Arcadia Avenue or the Glen Echo Ravine. To the east, either Interstate 71 or the adjacent railroad tracks are commonly accepted. The western boundary is assumed to be the Olentangy River. The northern border of Clintonville is the most ambiguous, with definitions anywhere in the 3 mi (4.8 km) stretch from Cooke Road to the southern border of Worthington. Worthington is a city in Franklin County, Ohio, and is a northern suburb of the larger Columbus. The population was 13,575 at the 2010 census. The city was founded in 1803 by the Scioto Company led by James Kilbourne, who was later elected to the United States House of Representatives, and named in honor of Thomas Worthington, who later became governor of Ohio.
Life
Who: Dieter Cunz (August 4, 1910 – February 17, 1969), Oskar Seidlin (February 17, 1911 – December 11, 1984) and Richard Plant (July 22, 1910 – March 3, 1998)
Dieter Cunz was an emigre from Nazi Germany first to Switzerland and then to the U.S. who taught German language and literature as a professor at the University of Maryland from 1939 to 1957 and at Ohio State University from 1957 until his death in 1969. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works. He studied at the University of Frankfurt. Here in the fall of 1931 he met two gay Jewish students of German literature, Richard Plaut and Oskar Koplowitz, and Koplowitz became his life partner. In 1938 Cunz, Koplowitz, and Plaut emigrated to the U.S., where within a year their paths diverged. While Plaut, who officially changed his name to Plant, remained in New York, Koplowitz, who changed his name to Seidlin, moved to Massachusetts in 1939 to take up a teaching position at Smith College. Cunz, who arrived in New York in August 1938, relocated to Maryland in October 1939. In 1957, Cunz accepted an offer to chair the German Department at Ohio State University following the departure of Bernhard Blume for Harvard University. Here he joined his partner Seidlin, who had been teaching at Ohio State since 1946, and the two built a house in the suburb Worthington. Cunz and Seidlin enjoyed summer vacations in the company of Richard Plant in Manomet, Massachusetts, and Mallnitz, Austria. Cunz was in declining health during his final years, suffering from high blood pressure and a heart valve defect. Even so, his death following a heart attack on February 17, 1969, at the age of 58, was unexpected and plunged Seidlin into a deep depression. In a signal honor, Ohio State University in 1973 named its new building for foreign languages and literatures after him (Dieter Cunz Hall, at 1841 Millikin Road, Columbus, Ohio). Oskar Seidlin taught German language and literature as a professor at Smith College, Middlebury College, Ohio State University, and Indiana University from 1939 to 1979. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works. In 1972, he found a new partner in the 35-year-old Hans Høgel, whom he visited regularly in Denmark and with whom he vacationed in the Great Smoky Mountains and the Caribbean. A heavy smoker, he suffered a heart attack in June, 1984 and was diagnosed with a malignant tumor at the beginning of October; he died nine weeks later. In accordance with his wishes, his mortal remains were interred alongside those of Dieter Cunz at the Walnut Grove Cemetery (5561 Milton Ave, Columbus, OH 4308). Richard Plant became a professor at the City University of New York, where he taught German language and literature from 1947 to 1973. He authored a number of fictional and non-fictional works as well as an opera scenario. He resided in Greenwich Village. Plant's companion during his final years was Michael Sasse. His papers are preserved in the Manuscripts and Archives Division of the New York Public Library.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20


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