Jan. 18th, 2017

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Adolf von Hildebrand was a German sculptor.
Born: October 6, 1847, Marburg, Germany
Died: January 18, 1921, Munich, Germany
Education: Academy of Fine Arts, Nuremberg
Academy of Fine Arts, Munich
Books: The problem of form in painting and sculpture
Children: Dietrich von Hildebrand
Lived: Maria-Theresia-Straße 23, 81675 München, Germany
Buried: Kirchhof Oberföhring, Oberfohring, Münchener Stadtkreis, Bavaria (Bayern), Germany

Hans von Marees was a German painter. He mainly painted country scenes in a realistic style. Marees' lifelong companion was art theorist and critic Konrad Fiedler, who, in his Kunstwissenschaft, created the theory of pure form, rejecting the concepts of Beauty and Art. However, Marees also had an 8 years love affair with sculptor Adolph von Hildebrand. In 1869, von Marees visited France, the Netherlands and Spain with Fiedler. He served in military in the Franco-Prussian War (1870–71) and then lived in Berlin and Dresden for a while. In 1873, he decorated the library walls of the newly built German Marine Zoological Institute in Naples, Italy with von Hildebrand. In 1877, von Hildebrand married Irene Schäuffelen. A painting by von Marees immortalized this event, with Irene in the middle of von Marees and von Hildebrand, with von Hildebrand reaching out to von Marees. Von Marees spent the last years of his life in Rome, supported by Fiedler. He died there in 1887, at the age of 49, and was buried in the Protestant Cemetery.
They met in 1866 and remained friends until Marees’ death in 1887: 21 years.
Hans von Marees (December 24, 1837 - June 5, 1887)
Konrad Fiedler (September 23, 1841 - June 3, 1895)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Adolf von Hildebrand (1847–1921) is one of the most important neoclassical sculptors. Its marble monuments, busts and sculptures inspired by antiquity are among the best artistic achievements of German idealism: the Wittelsbach fountain at the Lehnbachplatz, the Father-Rhine fountain at Ludwigsbrücke, the equestrian statue of the Prince Regent Luitpold and the Hubertusbrunnen at the end of the Nymphenburger canal. After studying at Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, Adolf von Hildebrand first traveled to Italy in 1867 and there met German philosophers and art theorists whose aesthetic theories greatly inspired him. Florentine Renaissance sculpture became his point of reference, and in 1872 he moved to Italy. Not until an 1884 exhibition in Berlin did his work come to the attention of a wider public in Germany. Seven years later, Hildebrand received his first large commission, for a fountain in Munich, whose completion brought him general recognition and numerous commissions. From then until the beginning of WWI, he divided his time between Florence and Munich. In 1898 Adolf von Hildebrand and his family moved in the newly built estate in Maria-Theresia-Straße 23. He died on October 18, 1921 aged 73 years in Munich and is buried in the cemetery of St. Lorenz at Oberföhring (Muspillistraße 14, 81925 München, Germany). His heirs, his son Dr. Dietrich von Hildebrand and one of his daughters Irene Georgii, sold the Hildebrandhaus to the author Elisabeth Braun in 1934.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Charles Bruce Chatwin was an English travel writer, novelist, and journalist. His first book, In Patagonia, established Chatwin as a travel writer, although he considered himself instead a storyteller, interested in bringing to light unusual tales.
Born: May 13, 1940, Sheffield, United Kingdom
Died: January 18, 1989, Nice, France
Spouse: Elizabeth Chanler (m. 1965–1989)
Movies: Cobra Verde, On the Black Hill, Utz
Parents: Margharita Chatwin, Charles Chatwin
Lived: Kalamitsi 240 22, Greece (36.88091, 22.24041)
The Albany, Piccadilly, W1J
Studied: Marlborough College
University of Edinburgh
Buried: Agios Nikolaos, Chora, Aghios Nikolaos, Regional unit of Messenia, Peloponnese, Greece

The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, W1J built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy. In Oscar Wilde's play, “The Importance of Being Earnest” (1895), the character John (Jack) Worthing has a set at the Albany (number B4), where he lives while staying in London under the assumed name of Ernest. Notable queer residents: Sybille Bedford, writer, lived in Aldous Huxley's servant's room; Bruce Chatwin, writer; Aldous Huxley, writer; Matthew “The Monk” Lewis, from 1802 to 1818 (number K1); Compton Mackenzie, writer, from 1911 to 1912 (number E1); Sir Harold Nicolson, writer and politician from 1952 to 1965 (number C1); Terence Stamp, actor. George Cecil Ives had an apartment here which he shared with his live-in servant and lover, James Goddard (Kit) in 1894. The place was held in high esteem. Ives “refused to allow a third man to join him and Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde's intimate friend, for sex, --- because “it wouldn't do at the Albany”.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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The village of Kalamitsi, just outside Kardamili was, in his later years, the principal home of Patrick Leigh Fermor and his wife Joan. Patrick was an English writer who was made an honorary citizen of the village for his participation in the Greek Resistance during World War II, especially in Crete. He died in hospital in 2011 the day after returning to his other home in Dumbleton in England. The ashes of his friend, the writer Bruce Chatwin, were scattered near a Byzantine chapel above the village in 1989.
Address: Kalamitsi 240 22, Greece (36.88091, 22.24041)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Place
The Stavros Niarchos Foundation has approved a grant to the Benaki Museum to fully cover the repair and restoration works as well as the cost of the necessary equipment for the Patrick and Joan Leigh Fermor House in Kardamyli. This unique property will soon start operating as a centre for hosting notable figures from the intellectual and artistic worlds as well as a centre for educational activities in collaboration with Institutions in Greece and abroad. The Fermor property is located in the Kalamitsi area on the outskirts of Kardamyli, in Messenia, and has a total area of about nine stremmata, a little over two acres. It is, by general consensus, one of the most beautiful properties in Greece. Its direct contact with the sea—narrow stone steps lead to a small pebble beach just below the estate—the low, discreet, stone buildings and the Mediterranean garden that goes down to the water, comprise an ideal environment for focus and the creative process. In short, a sojourn in this place is a great gift that Greece can offer to notable figures from the intellectual and artistic worlds.
Life
Who: Sir Patrick Michael Leigh Fermor, DSO, OBE (February 11, 1915 – June 10, 2011) and Charles Bruce Chatwin (May 13, 1940 – January 18, 1989)
Paddy Fermor was a British author, scholar and soldier who played a prominent role behind the lines in the Cretan resistance during the WWII. He was widely regarded as Britain's greatest living travel writer during his lifetime, based on books such as “A Time of Gifts” (1977). He influenced the whole generation of British writers such as Bruce Chatwin, Colin Thubron, Philip Marsden, Nicholas Crane, and Rory Stewart. A BBC journalist once described him as "a cross between Indiana Jones, James Bond and Graham Greene." After many years together, Leigh Fermor was married in 1968 to the Honourable Joan Elizabeth Rayner (née Eyres Monsell), daughter of Bolton Eyres-Monsell, 1st Viscount Monsell. She accompanied him on many of his travels until her death in Kardamyli in June 2003, aged 91. They had no children. They lived part of the year in their house in an olive grove near Kardamyli in the Mani Peninsula, southern Peloponnese, and part of the year in Gloucestershire. The house at Kardamyli was featured in the 2013 film “Before Midnight.” Bruce Chatwin (1940-1989) was an English travel writer, novelist, and journalist. His first book, “In Patagonia” (1977), established Chatwin as a travel writer, although he considered himself instead a storyteller, interested in bringing to light unusual tales. For “In Patagonia” Chatwin received the Hawthornden Prize and the E. M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Graham Greene, Patrick Leigh Fermor, and Paul Theroux praised the book. As a result of the success of In Patagonia, Chatwin's circle of friends expanded to include individuals such as Jacqueline Onassis, Susan Sontag, and Jasper Johns. Chatwin's ashes were scattered near a Byzantine chapel above Kardamyli in the Peloponnese. This was close to the home of one of his mentors, Patrick Leigh Fermor. Near here, Chatwin had spent several months in 1985 working on “The Songlines.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cary Grant was a British-American actor, known as one of classic Hollywood's definitive leading men.
Born: January 18, 1904, Horfield, Bristol, United Kingdom
Died: November 29, 1986, Davenport, Iowa, United States
Full name: Archibald Alexander Leach
Spouse: Barbara Harris (m. 1981–1986), more
Lived: The Savoy Hotel, Strand, WC2R
15 Hughenden Road, Bristol
Warwick New York Hotel, 65 W 54th St, New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76253, -73.97816)
75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
796 Via Miraleste, Palm Springs
928 Avenida Las Palmas, Palm Springs
Studied: Fairfield Grammar School
Bishop Road Primary School

Cary Grant (born Archibald Alexander Leach) was an English stage and Hollywood film actor who became an American citizen in 1942. Randolph Scott was an American film actor whose career spanned from 1928 to 1962. They met in 1932 when they were cast together in Hot Saturday. They lived together for many years in Los Angeles. Their home was featured in an issue of Architectural Digest that showed legendary Hollywood stars at home. After that, the house was dabbed “Bachelor Hall” (recently sold in 2006 for more or less 4 million dollars.) They both married but remained close ever afterward. Toward the end of their lives, Scott and Grant were often seen together, on one occasion holding hands late at night in the Polo Lounge, alone except for the waiters. Scott died little more than 3 months after Grant.
They met in 1932 and remained friends until Grant’s death in 1986: 54 years.
Cary Grant (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986)
Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Cary Grant, the star of films such as “North by Northwest” and “Bringing up Baby” was born at 15 Hughenden Road, Bristol, on January 18, 1904.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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The Savoy Hotel (Strand, WC2R) is a luxury hotel in central London. Built by the impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte with profits from his Gilbert and Sullivan opera productions, it opened on August 6, 1889. It was the first in the Savoy group of hotels and restaurants owned by Carte's family for over a century. The Savoy was the first luxury hotel in Britain, introducing electric lights throughout the building, electric lifts, bathrooms in most of the lavishly furnished rooms, constant hot and cold running water and many other innovations. Carte hired César Ritz as manager and Auguste Escoffier as chef de cuisine; they established an unprecedented standard of quality in hotel service, entertainment and elegant dining, attracting royalty and other rich and powerful guests and diners. Notable queer residents: Sarah Bernhardt in 1913, Marlon Brando in 1967, Dorothy Caruso in 1902, Noël Coward from 1941 to 1943, Sergei Diaghilev in 1919, Marlene Dietrich from 1924 to 1925, Cary Grant in 1966, Katharine Hepburn, Vaslav Nijinsky in 1911, Oscar Wilde.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Warwick New York Hotel is a luxury hotel located at 65 West 54th Street, near Sixth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City. It is owned by Warwick International Hotels.
Address: 65 W 54th St, New York, NY 10019, USA (40.76253, -73.97816)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 (212) 247-2700
Place
Built in 1926
William Randolph Hearst built the Warwick New York Hotel for $5 million. Long catering to the elite, Hearst built the 36-story residential tower to accommodate his Hollywood friends as well as his mistress, the actress Marion Davies, who had her own specially-designed floor in the building. The hotel’s restaurant, Murals on 54, features the 1937 murals of illustrator Dean Cornwell. The famed murals were fully restored following a 2004 renovation of the restaurant. The Warwick is also home to Randolph’s Bar & Lounge, whose rosebud leitmotif references Hearst’s purported nickname for Marion Davies.
Notable queer residents at Warwick Hotel:
• James Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955) was a frequent guest.
• Cary Grant (1904-1986) resided at the Warwick and lived in the hotel for 12 years.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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75½ Bedford St is a building in the Greenwich Village area of New York City that is only 9 feet 6 inches (2.9 meters) wide. It is considered to be the narrowest house in New York. Its past tenants have included Edna St. Vincent Millay, Ann McGovern, cartoonist William Steig and anthropologist Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 - November 15, 1978). It is sometimes referred to as the Millay House, indicated by a New York City Landmark plaque on the outside of the house.
Address: 75½ Bedford St, New York, NY 10014, USA (40.73138, -74.00499)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1873
The three-story house is located at 75½ Bedford St., off Seventh Ave. between Commerce and Moore Streets, in the West Greenwich Village section of Manhattan. On the inside, the house measures 8 ft. 7 in. wide; at its narrowest, it is only 2 ft. wide. There is a shared garden in the rear of the house. The archives of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation states that the house was constructed in 1873 during a smallpox epidemic, for Horatio Gomez, trustee of the Hettie Hendricks-Gomez Estate, on what was the former carriage entranceway for the adjacent property, which includes the 1799 house at 77 Bedford St., built by Joshua Isaacs, the oldest house in Greenwich Village. However, the house may have been constructed earlier, as the style that appears in a 1922 photograph at the New-York Historical Society is typical of the 1850’s Italianate architecture common in the area at the time. In 1923, the house was leased by a consortium of artists who used it for actors working at the Cherry Lane Theater. Cary Grant and John Barrymore stayed at the house while performing at the Cherry Lane during this time. Edna St. Vincent Millay, the Pulitzer Prize winning poet and her new husband, coffee importer Eugen Jan Boissevain, lived in the house from 1923 to 1924. They hired Ferdinand Savignano to renovate the house, who added a skylight, transformed the top floor into a studio for Millay and added a Dutch-inspired front gabled façade for her husband. Later occupants included cartoonist William Steig, and his sister-in-law, anthropologist Margaret Mead. The current owner is George Gund IV (son of sports entrepreneur George Gund III), who purchased the house for $3.25 million in June 2013. “A centrally placed spiral staircase dominates all three floors and bisects the space into two distinct living areas. The narrow steps call for expert sideways navigational skills. Under the stairwell on the first floor is a tiny utility closet, the only closed storage space in the house. All three floors have fireplaces.” The house has two bathrooms, and its galley kitchen comes with a microwave built into the base of the winding staircase that rises to the upper floors.
Life
Who: Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950)
Edna St. Vincent Millay was a poet and playwright. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism. She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work. The poet Richard Wilbur asserted, "She wrote some of the best sonnets of the century." Millay was openly bisexual. Counted among her close friends were the writers Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and the critic Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused. In January 1921, she went to Paris, where she met and befriended the sculptor Thelma Wood. In 1923 she married 43-year-old Eugen Jan Boissevain (1880–1949), the widower of the labor lawyer and war correspondent Inez Milholland, a political icon Millay had met during her time at Vassar. Boissevain died in 1949 of lung cancer, and Millay lived alone for the last year of her life.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cary Grant honeymooned at 796 Via Miraleste, Palm Springs, with his second wife, heiress Barbara Hutton; he later purchased the Kocher estate at 928 Avenida Las Palmas.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Chester Simon Kallman was an American poet, librettist, and translator, best known for his collaborations with W. H. Auden and Igor Stravinsky.
Born: January 7, 1921, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 18, 1975
Books: W.H. Auden and Chester Kallman: Libretti and Other Dramatic Writings by W.H. Auden, 1939-1973, more
Education: Brooklyn College
University of Michigan
Libretti: The Rake's Progress, Elegy for Young Lovers, The Bassarids, The Visitors, Love's Labour's Lost
Lived: 77 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.72795, -73.98559)

Wystan Hugh Auden, who published as W.H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, born in England, later an American citizen, regarded by many critics as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. His work is noted for its stylistic and technical achievement, its engagement with moral and political issues, and its variety in tone, form and content. In 1939, at the Yorkville apartment on 81st St in NYC, two days after a League of American Writers reading, Auden met the poet Chester Kallman, who became his lover for the next two years (Auden described their relationship as a "marriage" that began with a cross-country "honeymoon" journey). In August 1941, Kallman ended their sexual relationship because he could not accept Auden's insistence on a mutual faithfulness, but he and Auden remained companions, sharing houses and apartments from 1953 until Auden's death. Kallman died less than two years after Auden, seemingly of a broken heart.
Together from 1939 to 1973: 34 years.
Chester Simon Kallman (January 7, 1921 – January 17, 1975)
W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973)
Anniversary: April 8, 1938



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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8th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan that runs from Sixth Avenue to Third Avenue, and Avenue B to Avenue D; its addresses switch from West to East as it crosses Fifth Avenue. Between Third Avenue and Avenue A, it is named St. Mark’s Place, after the nearby St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery on 10th Street at Second Avenue.
Address: 77 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA (40.72795, -73.98559)
Type: Private Property
Place
St. Mark’s Place is considered a main cultural street for the East Village. Vehicular traffic runs east along both one-way streets. St. Mark’s Place features a wide variety of retailers. Venerable institutions lining St. Mark’s Place include Gem Spa, Yaffa Café, the St. Mark’s Hotel, St. Mark’s Comics, and Trash and Vaudeville. There are several open front markets that sell sunglasses, clothing and jewelry. There are also a number of restaurants and bars, as well as several record stores. Wouter van Twiller, colonial governor of New Amsterdam, once owned a tobacco farm near 8th and Macdougal Streets. Such farms were located around the area until the 1830s. Nearby, a Native American trail crossed the island via the right-of-ways of Greenwich Avenue, Astor Place, and Stuyvesant Street. Under the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811, a city grid for much of Manhattan was defined. Eighth Street was to run from Sixth Avenue in the west to Third Avenue and the Bowery to the east. The area west of Sixth Avenue was already developed as Greenwich Village. Mercer, Greene, Wooster, Thompson Street, Sullivan Street, and Macdougal Streets, as well as Laurens Street (present-day LaGuardia Place), extended to Eighth Street until the 1820s, when the construction of Washington Square Park severed Laurens, Thompson, and Sullivan Streets south of 4th Street. After the Commissioners’ Plan was laid out, property along the street’s right of way quickly developed. By 1835, the New York University opened its first building, the Silver Center, along Eighth Street near the Washington Square Park. Row houses were also built on Eighth Street. The street ran between the Jefferson Market, built in 1832 at the west end, and the Tompkins Market, built in 1836, at the east end. These were factors in the street’s commercialization in later years. Eighth Street was supposed to extend to a market place at Avenue C, but since that idea never came to fruition. Capitalizing on the high-class status of Bond, Bleecker, Great Jones, and Lafayette Streets in NoHo, developer Thomas E. Davis developed the east end of the street and renamed it "St. Mark’s Place.” Davis built up St. Mark’s Place between Third and Second Avenues between 1831 and 1832. Although the original plan was for Federal homes, only three such houses remained in 2014.
Notable queer residents at St. Marks Place:
• No. 33: Home to poet Anne Waldman in the late 1960s/mid-1970s. In 1977, the storefront was occupied by Manic Panic, the first U.S. boutique to sell punk rock attire, which developed its own line of make-up and vibrant hair dyes; notable patrons have included performers David Bowie, Cyndi Lauper, Debbie Harry, and Joey Ramone.
• No. 51: In the early 1980s, this was home to 51X, a gallery that featured graffiti art, representing artists such as Keith Haring, and Jean-Michel Basquiat.
• No. 57: Club 57 was an important art and performance space in the late 1970s and early 1980s; notable people, such as Ann Magnuson, Keith Haring, Klaus Nomi, John Sex, Kenny Scharf, David Wojnarowicz, Wendy Wild, The Fleshtones, and Fab Five Freddy, performed or showed there.
• No. 75: The Holiday Cocktail Lounge has had a range of visitors including W.H. Auden, Allen Ginsberg and other Beat writers, Shelley Winters, and Frank Sinatra, whose agent lived in the neighborhood.
• No. 77: Home to W.H. Auden (February 21, 1907 –September 29, 1973) for almost 20 years, from 1953 to 1972. Born in England, the poet Wystan Hugh Auden, arrived in New York City in 1939. After stints at the George Washington Hotel on East 23rd Street and in Brooklyn Heights, he and companion Chester Kallman settled into a second-floor apartment at this location. His living quarters were described as being so cold that the toilet no longer functioned and he had to use the toilet in the liquor store at the corner. Auden is regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the XX century. The building now houses a restaurant, La Palapa. The basement of this building was the location where the newspaper Novy Mir ("New World" or "New Peace"), a Russian-language Communist paper, was founded in 1916. It was edited by Nikolai Ivanovich Bukharin, and Leon Trotsky worked there; the paper stopped publishing after the Russian Revolution of October, 1917.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE was an English fashion, portrait and war photographer, diarist, painter, interior designer and an Academy Award–winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre.
Born: January 14, 1904, Hampstead, United Kingdom
Died: January 18, 1980, Broad Chalke, United Kingdom
Awards: Academy Award for Best Costume Design, more
Siblings: Nancy Beaton, Barbara Beaton, Reginald Beaton
Lived: Reddish House, South St, Broad Chalke, Salisbury SP5 5DH, UK (51.02717, -1.94577)
Ashcombe House, Cranborne Chase, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 5QG, UK (50.97478, -2.0967)
Studied: St John's College, Cambridge
Harrow School
St Cyprian's School
Buried: All Saints, South Street, Broadchalke, Wiltshire, SP5 5DH

Ashcombe House, also known as Ashcombe Park, is a Georgian manor house, set in 1,134 acres (4.59 km2) of land, on Cranborne Chase, in the parish of Berwick St John, near Salisbury, in Wiltshire. The house is about equidistant between the villages of Berwick St John and Tollard Royal.
Address: Salisbury, Wiltshire SP5 5QG, UK (50.97478, -2.0967)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 320267 (Grade II, 1985)
Place
There have been several buildings on the site. The first house was built in 1686 by a local squire, Robert Barber. Only some fifty years later, in 1740, the Barber family entirely demolished the 1686 house and rebuilt on the site. In 1750 Anne Wyndham inherited the house. The next year she married the Hon. James Everard Arundell, third son of the 6th Baron Arundell of Wardour. In 1754 the architect Francis Cartwright largely remodelled the interior of the house for the Arundells. In 1815 the Ashcombe Estate was purchased from Lady Arundell by Thomas Grove the younger of Ferne House for £8,700. Thomas Grove’s grandson Sir Walter demolished most of the 1740 house in around 1870. Sir Walter later sold Ashcombe House to the 13th Duke of Hamilton, who in turn sold Ashcombe to Mr R. W. Borley of Shaftesbury after WWI. The current Ashcombe House was originally part of the much larger mid-XVIII century structure, and is an L-shaped three-bay survival of the eastern wing. There is a five-bay orangery close to the house.
Life
Who: Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE (January 14, 1904 – January 18, 1980)
The photographer and designer Cecil Beaton first visited the house in 1930, taken there by the sculptor Stephen Tomlin together with the writer Edith Olivier. He was later to write of his first impression of the house, as he approached it through the arch of the gatehouse: “None of us uttered a word as we came under the vaulted ceiling and stood before a small, compact house of lilac-coloured brick. We inhaled sensuously the strange, haunting - and rather haunted - atmosphere of the place ... I was almost numbed by my first encounter with the house. It was as if I had been touched on the head by some magic wand.” That same year Mr Borley leased Ashcombe House to Beaton for £50 a year, a very small rent, on the condition that Beaton would make improvements to the house, which was all-but derelict. Beaton employed the Austrian architect Michael Rosenauer to make substantial alterations to the material of the house, including a passageway through the house to unite the front and the back, and elongating the windows. Plumbing and electricity were installed. The artist Rex Whistler designed the Palladian front door surround, with its pineapple made from Bath stone. Urns were positioned on the roof and the orangery was converted into Beaton’s studio. Beaton entertained lavishly at Ashcombe House, and his houseguests included many notable people of the time, including actors and artists such as Tallulah Bankhead, Diana Cooper, Ruth Ford and Lord Berners. Artists Whistler, Salvador Dalí, Christian Bérard and Augustus John and stage designer Oliver Messel painted murals in the house, and Dalí used it as the backdrop of one of his paintings. Little remains of the Beaton-era interior design, although in the "circus room,” which once contained a Whister-designed bed shaped like a carousel, one mural of a lady on a circus horse remains, painted during a hectic weekend party when all guests wielded paintbrushes. Beaton’s lease expired in 1945, and he was heartbroken to be forced to leave the house: his biographer Hugo Vickers has stated that Beaton never got over the loss of Ashcombe. Beaton detailed his life at the house in his book “Ashcombe: The Story of a Fifteen-Year Lease,” first published in 1949 by B. T. Batsford. The dustjacket of the first edition of the book featured a painting by Whistler, with the orangery on the left of the painting (on the back cover) and Ashcombe House itself to the right, on the front cover; this image has been reproduced on the cover of the 1999 publication of the book. In 1948 Beaton designed a fabric, which is still available, which he named "Ashcombe Stripe" after Ashcombe House. Right up until his death in 1980 Beaton owned a late XVIII century painting of the house, thought to have been painted around 1770. It is now held at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum in Salisbury, Wiltshire, bought from a sale of Beaton’s collections held by Christie’s auctioneers. Beaton’s landlord, Hugh Borley, R. W. Borley’s son, lived in the house from 1946 until his death in 1993. He grew increasingly eccentric and resented the fame which Beaton’s book had brought to the house, refusing all offers to sell it and chasing off sight-seers with dogs or threatening them with guns. Shortly before Borley’s death, the house was sold in a private sale, to David and Toni Parkes, who set about restoring the house. They were friends with the director of the Dovecote Press, which republished Beaton’s book on Ashcombe on its fiftieth anniversary in 1999, and so a special launch party was held at the house. When the house came up for sale in 2001, the first time it had been on the open market since just after WWI, there was a great deal of interest. Madonna and Guy Ritchie were the successful purchasers, after they were told by Hugo Vickers, Beaton’s biographer, of its being up for sale.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Society photographer and artist Sir Cecil Beaton bought Reddish house in 1947 and transformed the interior. Beaton added rooms on the eastern side, extended the parlour southwards, and introduced many new fittings. Greta Garbo was a frequent visitor. The upper floor had been equipped for illegal cock-fighting at the beginning of the XX century but Beaton used the cages as wardrobes to store the oscar-winning costumes from his set design of “My Fair Lady.” He remained at the house until his death in 1980 and is buried in the churchyard at All Saints (South Street, Broadchalke, Wiltshire, SP5 5DH).
Address: South St, Broad Chalke, Salisbury SP5 5DH, UK (51.02717, -1.94577)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 320692 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Reddish House, also known as Reddish Manor, in the village of Broad Chalke in Wiltshire, England, is an early XVIII-century manor house possibly built in its current form for Jeremiah Cray, a clothier. Whilst the history of the property can be traced to the early XVI century, the house as it currently stands appears to have been developed in the early XVIII century, when owned by a series of three absentee landlords all sharing the name Jeremiah Clay. The construction and design appear to show a melange of influences of the architectural styles favoured during the reigns of Charles II (1660–1685); William and Mary (1689–1702); and Queen Anne (1702–1714). In the XX century the house was inhabited by Norah Young until 1918, and by Major C.A. Wells until 1929 when it was purchased by R.W. Williamson to amalgamate the 100 acres into the neighbouring Knowle farm. In 1935 Claude Williamson sold the house and its 2.5 acre gardens to Dr. Lucius Wood and his wife Clare who lived there from 1935 until 1947, running his General Practice and dentistry. Their son, the artist Christopher Wood is buried in the village churchyard; his headstone was carved by Eric Gill. In 1980 Ursula Henderson bought the house from the estate of Cecil Beaton and lived there until 1987 when she moved to the neighbouring village of Bishopstone before her death in 1989. She was born Ursula von Pannwitz and was once styled Countess of Chichester from her first marriage to John Pelham, 8th Earl of Chichester who died on active service in 1944. The house was owned and extensively renovated by musicians Robert Fripp and Toyah Willcox from Dec. 1987 until July 1999.
Life
Who: John Christopher Wood (April 7, 1901 – August 21, 1930), aka Kit Wood
Christopher Wood was an English painter born in Knowsley, near Liverpool. At Liverpool University, Wood met Augustus John, who encouraged him to be a painter. The French collector Alphonse Kahn invited him to Paris in 1920. From 1921 he trained as a painter at the Academie Julian in Paris, where he met Picasso, Jean Cocteau, Georges Auric and Diaghilev. Wood was bisexual. In the early summer of 1921, Wood met Antonio de Gandarillas, a Chilean diplomat. Gandarillas, a married homosexual fourteen years older than Wood, lived a glamorous life partly financed by gambling. Their relationship lasted through Wood's life, surviving his affair with Jeanne Bourgoint. In 1927 his plans to elope and marry heiress Meraud Guinness were frustrated by her parents whereupon he required emotional support from Winifred Nicholson. (Meraud went on to marry Alvaro Guevara in 1929.) Wood also had a liaison with a Russian émigrée, Frosca Munster, whom he met in 1928. By 1930, addicted to opium and painting frenetically in preparation for his Wertheim exhibition in London, he suffered paranoia and began carrying a revolver. On August 21 he travelled to meet his mother and sister for lunch at 'The County Hotel' in Salisbury and to show them a selection of his latest paintings. After saying goodbye he jumped under a train at Salisbury railway station, although in deference to his mother's wishes it was reported as an accident.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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David Daniel Kaminsky, better known by his screen name Danny Kaye, was an American actor, singer, dancer, comedian, and musician. His performances featured physical comedy, idiosyncratic pantomimes, and rapid-fire novelty songs.
Born: January 18, 1911, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: March 3, 1987, Los Angeles, California, United States
Height: 1.8 m
TV shows: The Danny Kaye Show, Live from Lincoln Center
Studied: Thomas Jefferson High School
Buried: Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, Westchester County, New York, USA

Bertram Ross and John Wallowitch are buried together at Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, New York, Actors Fund Lot.
Address: 273 Lakeview Ave, Valhalla, NY 10595, USA (41.08328, -73.78491)
Type: Cemetery (open to publich)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00, Saturday and Sunday 9.00-16.00
Phone: +1 914-949-0347
Place
Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester County, New York, was founded in 1889, when many New York City cemeteries were becoming full, and rural cemeteries were being created near the railroads that served the city. Initially 250 acres (1.0 km2), it was expanded to 600 acres (2.4 km²) in 1905, but reduced to 461 acres (1.9 km²) in 1912, when a portion was sold to the neighboring Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Several baseball players are buried in this cemetery. Also many entertainment figures of the early XX century, including the Russian-born Sergei Rachmaninoff, were buried here. The cemetery has a special section for members of the Actors’ Fund of America and the National Vaudeville Association, some of whom died in abject poverty. Sharon Gardens is a 76-acre (31 ha) section of Kensico Cemetery, which was created in 1953 for Jewish burials.
Notable queer burials at Kensico Cemetery:
• Robert De Niro, Sr. (1922-1993), artist, father of actor Robert De Niro. De Niro Sr. lived openly as a gay man in his last years.
• Danny Kaye (1913–1987), comedic actor. Rumored to have been Laurence Olivier’s lover.
• Bertram Ross (November 14, 1920 – April 20, 2003), dancer best known for his work with the Martha Graham Dance Company, with which he performed for two decades. After leaving Graham’s company, Ross taught, choreographed and formed his own dance company. In later life, he toured in a cabaret duo with his real life partner, the composer and pianist John Wallowitch.
• John Wallowitch (February 11, 1926 – August 15, 2007), songwriter and cabaret performer. He wrote over 2,000 songs. For over 50 years he played and sang a catalogue of original songs at nightspots around New York City. His brother was photographer Edward Wallowitch, an associate of Andy Warhol.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Gladys Alberta Bentley was an American blues singer, pianist and entertainer during the Harlem Renaissance.
Born: August 12, 1907, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: January 18, 1960, Los Angeles, California, United States
Genre: Blues
Record label: Suncoast Music
Albums: Ground Hog Blues
Buried: Lincoln Memorial Park, Carson, Los Angeles County, California, USA

Gladys Bentley (1907-1960), one of the most flamboyant blues entertainers of the XX century, began performing in New York City as a singer and male impersonator. Bentley was known for being open about her lesbianism, and incorporated it into her stage show. In the years prior to her death, she adamantly tried to recant her lesbianism and married a man several years her junior. Bentley became an active member of the "Temple of Love In Christ" Church and was on her way to becoming an ordained minister at the time of her death from pneumonia at the age of 52. She is buried at Lincoln Memorial Park (Carson, CA 90746).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Lived: Mottistone Manor, Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Buried: Little Cloisters, Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England (memorial)

Mottistone Manor is a National Trust property in the village of Mottistone on the Isle of Wight. It has popular gardens and is a listed building. It was first mentioned in documents related to the Domesday Book.
Address: Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1983 741020
Place
The oldest parts of the manor, the south-east wing, date from the XV or early XVI century. The north-west wing was added or remodelled by Thomas Cheke in 1567, and additions to the south-east wing were made in the early XVII century. The whole house was remodelled in the 1920s by the architects Seely and Paget, Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963) of the firm being a great-grandson of Charles Seely (1803–1887), who had bought the house and estate in 1861. Though not open to the public, the manor has hosted gatherings for the Seely family. The great-great granddaughter of General J. E. B. Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, the theatre and opera director Sophie Hunter, held her wedding reception here with Benedict Cumberbatch on February 14, 2015.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963)
'The Shack' is a small caravan in the grounds of Mottistone Manor in which the Hon. John Seeley and Paul Paget spent weekends. Seeley later inherited the title Lord Mottistone. The pair were founders of an architectural practice that flourished from the 1920s to the 1960s as Seeley & Paget. The firm is best known for their church architecture and the business partners were also life partners. Entertaining lavishly at Mottistone Manor the pair retreated at night to The Shack where they slept in bunks at either end of their tiny space - while guests relaxed in the more comfortable rooms of the Manor. This sleeping arrangement enabled them to avoid accusations of a sexual relationship when necessary. The interior of the The Shack was designed by the architects in chrome and plywood in the Modern movement style - while the outside is more rustic. Though small inside, there were luxuries such as heated chromed steel pipes formed into a ladder up to the bunk beds so they went to bed with warm feet. The Manor is in private ownership but the National Trust now admits visitors to The Shack as part of visits to the Mottistone estate and gardens. John Seely and Paul Paget also designed Eltham Palace, which hosted “The Queens of Eltham Palace” event for LGBT History Month 2012.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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There are three original gardens within Westminster Abbey: the Garth, the Little Cloister and College Garden. St Catherine's Garden lies in the area of the ruined monastery and was more recently created. Each Garden had a separate function: the Garth with its square of turf, bounded by Cloisters, gave the monks somewhere to rest their eyes and minds as they walked around it. Metaphysically speaking, green was symbolic of rebirth, and therefore appropriate for spiritual refreshment.
Address: Westminster, London SW1P 3PJ, UK (51.49828, -0.12756)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Place
The Little Cloister Garden with its fountain and borders of scented plants was an area set aside for recuperation after illness. There would have probably been seats in this garden, and may have well been turf-topped ones, which were common in medieval times. The College Garden was the Infirmarer's Garden, used for the purposes of growing medicinal herbs and foods for the general well-being of the occupants of the Abbey. It is very unusual (possibly unique in England) for an Abbey or Monastery to still have its infirmarer's garden attached and kept as a garden. The Infirmary Garden originally contained an orchard (hence the name of the nearby Abbey Orchard Street). Though the orchard would have grown apples, pears, plums, figs, mulberries, nuts, medlars and vines, it did not exist merely to provide food. It was also an area of beauty, neatly laid out with plentiful paths and containing roses and lilies. This area was also known as the Cemetery Orchard for the monks were buried there. Symbolically, life and death were dovetailed in this garden. Vegetables such as broad beans, leeks, onions, garlic, coleworts (kale) and root vegetables were grown in a separate plot. There were also fishponds, beehives, and an area for growing medicinal herbs. The value of herbs to medieval people cannot be overestimated. Their bland vegetable and starch diet needed herbal flavouring to make it palatable. Herbs had enormous symbolic meaning, many being named after the Virgin Mary such as 'Lady's Bedstraw', Galium verum. Illnesses were treated by diet, blood-letting, and the application of herbs - surgery was only attempted in cases of direst need. The Gardens were tended by a Head Gardener and two undergardeners. They were monks and expected to attend matins and compline, though they were asked to leave their muddy boots and capes outside. In addition to providing the Abbey with food, the Gardener also gave away fruit from the orchard to local people on 25th July every year, St James' Day. Up to 1300, England had a Mediterranean climate, ideal for fruit growing, and especially vines and wine making. After this the weather became cool and damp. The Gardener had one day off a year, called his 'O' Day. He could choose when he wanted to take it, and the other monks gave money for him to spend on his special day. College Garden has been in cultivation for over 900 years. The oldest surviving feature that can be seen today is the stone precinct wall, built in 1376, at the far end and on the east side. The XVIII century Westminster School dormitory on the west side was designed by the Earl of Burlington. Four rather decayed statues of saints in the garden came originally from an altarpiece of 1686 and were carved by Arnold Quellin. The tall plane trees were planted in 1850. In 1993 a bronze sculpture of the Crucifixion by Enzo Plazzotta was presented and is at the south end of the garden. Nearby is a single water jet fountain installed in 2002.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Lord Mottistone (May 1, 1899 – January 18, 1963) and Paul Edward Paget (January 24, 1901 – August 13, 1985)
John Seely, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. They also re-built the Deanery which had been blitzed in 1941. In a niche in the wall of one of these clergy houses overlooking St Catherine's chapel garden is a fibreglass statue of St Catherine by Edwin Russell which forms a memorial to Lord Mottistone. The Latin on the plaque below, which is flanked by two seahorses, can be translated: "John Mottistone. This is a sign of love and sadness. P.E.P. 1966 A.C.D." The initials are those of his partner Paul Edward Paget and the Dean of Westminster at that time, Alan Campbell Don. The statue was unveiled on 25 November 1966. He was a son of John Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, politician, and his wife Emily. After education at Harrow School and Cambridge he served in WWI. A brother was killed at Arras in 1917. During WWII he served in the Auxiliary Air Force and at the Ministry of Works. In 1947 he succeeded to his father's title. He was Surveyor to the Fabric at St Paul's Cathedral, architect to St George's chapel, Windsor Castle and a Lay Canon and architect at Portsmouth cathedral. Among the other buildings Seely & Paget restored after war damage were Lambeth Palace, Eton College and many London churches. He died on January 18, 1963 and was succeeded in the title by his brother Arthur. The statue is in a private garden but can be seen through the door of St Catherine's chapel when the Little Cloister is open to the public Tuesdays-Thursdays. The gardens of his residence on the Isle of Wight, in Mottistone village, are open to the public.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Leonor Fini was an Argentine surrealist painter, designer, illustrator, and author, known for her depictions of powerful women.
Born: August 30, 1907, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Died: January 18, 1996, Paris, France
Spouse: Federico Veneziani (m. ?–1941)
Parents: Malvina Braun
Period: Surrealism
Artwork: Self Portrait with Scorpion, La toilette inutile, more

Leonor Fini was an Argentine surrealist painter. Fini married only once, for a brief period, to Fedrico Veneziani. They were divorced after she met the Italian Count, Stanislao Lepri, who abandoned his diplomatic career shortly after meeting Fini and lived with her thereafter. She met the Polish writer Konstanty Jeleński, known as Kot, in Paris right after the war. She was delighted to discover that he was the illegitimate half-brother of Sforzino Sforza, who had been one of her most favorite lovers. Kot joined Fini and Lepri in their Paris apartment in 1952 and the three remained inseparable until their deaths. She later employed an assistant to join the household, which he described as "a little bit of prison and a lot of theatre". One of his jobs was to look after her beloved Persian cats. Over the years, she acquired 17 of them; they shared her bed and, at mealtimes, were allowed to roam the dining-table selecting tasty morsels - and woe betide the guest who complained.
Together from 1952 to 1980: 28 years.
Konstanty Jeleński (January 2, 1922 - May 4, 1987)
Leonor Fini (August 30, 1907 – January 18, 1996)
Count Stanislao Lepri (1905 - 1980)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Buried: Langesund Cemetery, Langesund, Bamble commune, Telemark fylke, Norway

Charles Henri Ford died in 2002. He was survived by his elder sister, actress Ruth Ford, who died in 2009. Upon her death, Ruth Ford left the apartments she owned in the historic Dakota Building on the Upper West Side to Indra Tamang, Charles Henri Ford’s caretaker, along with a valuable Russian surrealist art collection, making him a millionaire.
Address: 1 W 72nd St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77652, -73.97614)
Type: Private Property
Phone: +1 212-362-1448
National Register of Historic Places: 72000869, 1972 Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
Built between 1880 and 1884, Design by Henry Janeway Hardenbergh (1847-1918)
The Dakota (also known as Dakota Apartments) is a cooperative apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It is famous as the home of former Beatle John Lennon from 1973 to 1980, as well as the location of his murder. The Dakota is considered to be one of Manhattan’s most prestigious and exclusive cooperative residential buildings, with apartments generally selling for between $4 million and $30 million. Henry Janeway Hardenbergh was commissioned to create the design for Edward Clark, head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The firm also designed the Plaza Hotel. The Dakota was purportedly so named because at the time of construction, the Upper West Side was sparsely inhabited and considered as remote in relation to the inhabited area of Manhattan as the Dakota Territory was. However, the earliest recorded appearance of this account is in a 1933 newspaper interview with the Dakota’s long-time manager, quoted in Christopher Gray’s book “New York Streetscapes”: "Probably it was called “Dakota” because it was so far west and so far north.” According to Gray, it is more likely that the building was named the Dakota because of Clark’s fondness for the names of the new western states and territories. Beginning in 2013, the Dakota’s facade was being renovated. In the 1970s, the co-op board refused to admit playwright Mart Crowley, who wrote "The Boys in the Band," apparently because Crowley was an out gay man.
Notable queer residents at The Dakota Building:
• Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), composer, conductor, author, music lecturer, and pianist. Arthur Laurents (Bernstein’s collaborator in “West Side Story”) said that Bernstein was "a gay man who got married. He wasn’t conflicted about it at all. He was just gay."
• Bob Crewe (1930-2014), songwriter, record producer, artist. Crewe was portrayed as "overtly gay" in "Jersey Boys,” but his brother Dan told The New York Times he was discreet about his sexuality, particularly during the time he was working with the Four Seasons. "Whenever he met someone, he would go into what I always called his John Wayne mode, this extreme machoism."
• Charles Henri Ford (1908–2002), poet, novelist, filmmaker, photographer, and collage artist best known for his editorship of the Surrealist magazine View (1940–1947) in New York City, and as the partner of the artist Pavel Tchelitchew. Ford is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery (Brookhaven, MS 39601).
• Judy Garland (1922-1969), actress. Garland had a large fan base in the gay community and became a gay icon. Reasons given for her standing, especially among gay men, are admiration of her ability as a performer, the way her personal struggles mirrored those of gay men in America during the height of her fame and her value as a camp figure. In the 1960s, a reporter asked how she felt about having a large gay following. She replied, "I couldn’t care less. I sing to people."
• Judy Holliday (1921-1965), actress, comedian, and singer, she was a resident of the Dakota for many years. She inhabited apartment #77 until her death from breast cancer at age 43 on June 7, 1965. She is interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.
• William Inge (1913-1973), playwright and novelist, whose works typically feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. “The Last Pad” is one of three of Inge’s plays that either have openly gay characters or address homosexuality directly. “The Boy in the Basement,” a one-act play written in the early 1950s, but not published until 1962, is his only play that addresses homosexuality overtly, while Archie in “The Last Pad” and Pinky in “Where’s Daddy?” (1966) are gay characters. Inge himself was closeted. Inge is buried at Mt Hope Cemetery (Independence, KS 67301).
• Carson McCullers (1917-1967), novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, and poet. Among her friends were W. H. Auden, Benjamin Britten, Gypsy Rose Lee and the writer couple Paul Bowles and Jane Bowles. After WWII McCullers lived mostly in Paris. Her close friends during these years included Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams.
• Rudolf Nureyev (1938-1993), dancer. Depending on the source, Nureyev is described as either bisexual as he did have heterosexual relationships as a younger man, or gay. Nureyev met Erik Bruhn, the celebrated Danish dancer, after Nureyev defected to the West in 1961. Bruhn and Nureyev became a couple and the two remained together off and on, with a very volatile relationship for 25 years, until Bruhn’s death in 1986. Nureyev’s grave is at a Russian cemetery in Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois near Paris.
Who: Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) and Lorentz Severin Skougaard (March 10, 1887 – January 18, 1965)
Alfred Corning Clark (November 14, 1844 – April 8, 1896) was an American heir and philanthropist. His father, Edward Cabot Clark (1811–1882) was an American businessman and lawyer, founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company, along with his business partner Isaac Merritt Singer. Together, they began investing in real estate in the 1870s. They built The Dakota. Determined to escape from his family Alfred Corning Clark went abroad and studied the piano in Milan. He confessed later to an intimate companion, that away from home he felt free “to worship at the shrine of friendship.” Among these friends, all male, was Lorentz Severin Skougaard, a young Norwegian tenor whom he met in Paris. It became an all-consuming relationship that lasted until Lorentz’s death nineteen years later. Although Alfred did the right thing by marrying and siring four sons, he did not give up the private half of his life. Summers he sent his family to the country— to a large farm he owned in Cooperstown, New York, his mother’s birthplace. While they enjoyed the fresh air, he continued his travels in Europe: France, Italy, and Norway, this time with Lorentz. And becoming bolder after his father’s death, he bought Lorentz a house in New York almost next door to the house where he lived with his wife and children. When Lorentz died he commissioned a marble memorial from George Grey Barnard, a handsome young indigent American sculptor he picked up in Paris. Brotherly Love is a highly erotic work showing two muscular athletic naked men with broad shoulders, triangular torsos, perfect buttocks, and powerful legs, groping toward each other: a perfect metaphor for Alfred and Lorentz and their love. After Alfred’s death Barnard, now rich, famous, and the toast of New York and Paris, thanks to his patron’s munificence, helped Alfred’s sons Sterling and Stephen Clark build their collections of art, now the glory of three museums: the Metropolitan and the Modern in New York, and the Sterling and Francine Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Lived: Galeana #441, Chapala Centro, 45900 Chapala, Jal., Mexico (20.28815, -103.19097)
Inn of the Turquoise Bear, Santa Fe, 342 E Buena Vista St, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA (35.67725, -105.93776)
Buried: Hunt Bynner Gravesite, Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, USA, Plot: Buried with the ashes of his long time companion Witter Bynner beneath the carved stone weeping dog at the house where he lived on Atalaya Hill in Santa Fe, now used as the president's home for St. John's College
Buried alongside: Witter Bynner

Witter “Hal” Bynner was an American poet, writer and scholar, known for his long residence in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at what was later the Inn of the Turquoise Bear. He moved there in 1922 and he and his partner, Robert Hunt, entertained artists and literary figures such as D.H. Lawrence, Georgia O'Keeffe, Carl Sandburg, Ansel Adams, Willa Cather, Igor Stravinsky, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden, Aldous Huxley, Christopher Isherwood, Martha Graham, and Thornton Wilder. He became a friend of D.H. Lawrence, and traveled with him and Frieda Weekley in Mexico; he much later, in 1951, wrote on Lawrence, while he and his partner are portrayed in Lawrence's The Plumed Serpent. In 1972, the Witter Bynner Foundation for Poetry was founded through a bequest from Bynner. It makes grants to perpetuate the art of poetry, primarily by supporting individual poets, translations, and audience development. Since 1997, it has funded the Witter Bynner Fellowship, the recipient of which is selected by the U.S. Poet Laureate. Bynner was buried with the ashes of his longtime companion Robert Hunt beneath a carved stone weeping dog at the house where he lived on Atalaya Hill in Santa Fe, now used as the president's home for St. John's College.
Together from 1922 to 1952: 30 years.
Harold Witter Bynner aka Emanuel Morgan (August 10, 1881 – June 1, 1968)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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“Here we are, in our own house—a long house with no upstairs—shut in by trees on two sides.—We live on a wide verandah, flowers round—it is fairly hot—I spend the day in trousers and shirt, barefoot—have a Mexican woman, Isabel, to look after us—very nice. Just outside the gate the big Lake of Chapala—40 miles long, 20 miles wide. We can’t see the lake, because the trees shut us in. But we walk out in a wrap to bathe.—There are camions—Ford omnibuses—to Guadalajara—2 hours. Chapala village is small with a market place with trees and Indians in big hats. Also three hotels, because this is a tiny holiday place for Guadalajara. I hope you’ll get down, I’m sure you’d like painting here.—It may be that even yet I’ll have my little hacienda and grow bananas and oranges.” – (letter dated May 3, 1923, to Kai Gotzsche and Knud Merrild, quoted in Knud Merrild’s book, “A Poet and Two Painters: A Memoir of D.H. Lawrence.”)
Address: Calle Zaragoza 307, Chapala Centro, 45900 Chapala, Jal., Mexico (20.28815, -103.19097)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +52 376 765 3653
Place
“Lawrence went to Guadalajara and found a house with a patio on the Lake of Chapala. There, Lawrence began to write his “Plumed Serpent.” He sat by the lake under a pepper tree writing it. The lake was curious with its white water. My enthusiasm for bathing in it faded considerably when one morning a huge snake rose yards high, it seemed to me, only a few feet away. At the end of the patio, we had the family that Lawrence describes in the “Plumed Serpent,” and all the life of Chapala. I tried my one attempt at civilizing those Mexican children, but when they asked me one day, “Do you have lice too, Niña,” I had enough and gave up in a rage. At night I was frightened of bandits and we had one of the sons of the cook sleeping outside our bedroom door with a loaded revolver, but he snored so fiercely that I wasn’t sure whether the fear of bandits wasn’t preferable. We quite sank into the patio life. Bynner and Spud came every afternoon, and I remember Bynner saying to me one day, while he was mixing a cocktail: “If you and Lawrence quarrel, why don’t you hit first?” I took the advice and the next time Lawrence was cross, I rose to the occasion and got out of my Mexican indifference and flew at him.” – (Frieda Lawrence, “Not I, But the Wind…”, (1934)) The house the Lawrences rented was at Zaragoza #4 (since renumbered Zaragoza #307) and became the basis for the description of Kate’s living quarters in “The Plumed Serpent.” The Lawrences lived in the house from the start of May 1923 to about July 9, that year. Interestingly, the house subsequently had several additional links to famous writers and artists. Immediately after the Lawrences departed, the next renters were American artists Everett Gee Jackson and Lowell Houser, who lived there for 18 months. They did not realize the identity of the previous tenant – “an English writer” – until the following year. Their time in Chapala is described, with great wit and charm, in Jackson’s “Burros and Paintbrushes” (1985.) Jackson visited Mexico many times and made several return visits to Chapala, including one in 1968 when he, his wife and young grandson, “rented the charming old Witter Bynner house right in the center of the village of Chapala. It had become the property of Peter Hurd, the artist…” In 1923, Bynner and Johnson stayed at the Hotel Arzapalo. In 1930, Bynner bought a home in Chapala (not the one rented by Lawrence) and was a frequent winter visitor for many years. Over the years, the house on Zaragoza that Lawrence and Frieda had occupied was extensively remodeled and expanded. The first major renovation was undertaken in about 1940 by famed Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Another large-scale renovation took place after the house was acquired in 1954 by American artist and architect Roy MacNicol. In the late 1970s, Canadian poet Al Purdy, a great admirer of Lawrence (to the point of having a bust of Lawrence on the hall table of his home in Ontario), wrote a hand-signed and numbered book, The D.H. Lawrence House at Chapala, published by The Paget Press in 1980, as a limited edition of 44 copies. The book includes a photograph, taken by Purdy’s wife Eurithe, of the plumed serpent tile work above the door of the Lawrence house. The town of Chapala today would be totally unrecognizable to Lawrence, but the home where he spent a productive summer writing the first draft of “The Plumed Serpent” eventually became the Quinta Quetzalcoatl, an exclusive boutique hotel.
Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930) aka D.H. Lawrence
D. H. Lawrence, together with his wife Frieda, and friends Witter Bynner and Willard (“Spud”) Johnson, visited Mexico in March 1923, initially staying in Mexico City. By the end of April, Lawrence was becoming restless and actively looking for somewhere where he could write. The traveling party had an open invitation to visit Guadalajara, the home of Idella Purnell, a former student of Bynner’s at the Univeristy of California, Berkeley. After reading about Chapala in Terry’s “Guide to Mexico,” Lawrence decided to catch the train to Guadalajara and then explore the lakeside village of Chapala for himself. Lawrence liked what he saw and, within hours of arriving in Chapala, he sent an urgent telegram back to Mexico City pronouncing Chapala “paradise” and urging the others to join him there immediately. Lawrence and his wife Frieda soon established their home for the summer in Chapala, on Calle Zaragoza. In a letter back to two Danish friends in Taos, Lawrence described both the house and the village. Life was not without its incidents and travails. Frieda, especially, was unconvinced about the charms of Chapala. Instead Witter Bynner and Robert Hunt made frequent visits to a second home in Chapala, Mexico. Their home (on the square at Galeana #441, the street name was later changed to Francisco I. Madero) was purchased from Mexican architect Luis Barragán in 1940 and was on the town’s plaza, a short distance from the lake. Hunt restored the house and, in 1943, added an extensive, rooftop terrace, which had clear views of Lake Chapala and near-by mountains. It became Bynner and Hunt’s winter home. Bynner spent much of the 1940s and early 1950s there, until he began to lose his eyesight. He returned to the USA, received treatment, and traveled to Europe with Hunt, who by the late 1950s and early 1960s took increasing responsibility for the ailing poet. Upon Bynner’s death, John Liggett Meigs and Peter Hurd, together, purchased Bynner’s house in Chapala. Along with the house, Bynner had included its content in the transfer of ownership. John described there being only four buildings on the block where the house was, and said that the house had two floors, the rooftop terrace that Hunt had added, and a “tower” overlooking Lake Chapala. The other buildings on the block included a “wonderful cantina,” which became a supermarket; another two-story house, next door, with a high wall between that house and Bynner’s house’s courtyard; and a two-story hotel on the corner. However, after John and Hurd bought Bynner’s house, they discovered that the owners of the hotel had sold the airspace over the hotel, and, one time, when John arrived, he discovered a twenty foot by forty foot “President Brandy” advertisement sign on top of the hotel, blocking his view of the lake. John said that was when he and Hurd decided to sell the place.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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The Inn of the Turquoise Bear occupies the home of Witter Bynner, who for almost 50 years was a prominent citizen of Santa Fe, actively participating in the cultural, artistic, and political life of the city.
Address: 342 E Buena Vista St, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA (35.67725, -105.93776)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 505-983-0798
Place
Noted as a poet, translator and essayist, Witter Bynner was a staunch advocate of human rights, especially of Native Americans, women, and other minorities. Bynner created his rambling adobe villa, constructed in Spanish-Pueblo Revival style, from a core of rooms that date to the early XIX century. It is now considered one of Santa Fe’s most important historical estates. With its signature portico, towering pine trees, magnificent rock terraces, and lush gardens filled with lilacs, wild roses, and other flowers, the Inn offers guests a bucolic retreat close to the center of Santa Fe. Bynner and Robert Hunt, his companion of almost 40 years, were famous – or infamous – for the riotous parties they hosted in this estate, referred to by Ansel Adams as “Bynner’s bashes.” Their home was regarded as the center for the gathering of the creative and fun loving elite of Santa Fe and visitors from New York and around the world. The celebrity guest list of Bynner included D.H. Lawrence (who spent his first night in an American home in this villa), Willa Cather, Ansel Adams, Igor Stravinsky, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden, Stephen Spender, Aldous Huxley, Clara Bow, Errol Flynn, Rita Hayworth, Lynn Riggs, Christopher Isherwood, Carl Van Vechten, Martha Graham, Robert Oppenheimer, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mary Austin, Willard Nash, Thornton Wilder, J.B. Priestly – and many others. Upon Witter’s death, he willed the estate to St. John’s College in Santa Fe who used the estate as a residence hall for a number of years. In September, 2014 the estate was once again filled with “Johnnies” celebrating their 35th reunion at “Witter Bynner” a place they once called home. In 1996, Ralph Bolton & Robert Frost, purchased the estate and created a wonderful Santa Fe bed and breakfast. The estate has not been altered in any significant way retaining its authentic Northern New Mexico charm. One can still see scant reminders of the Chinese decoration that Witter used to distinguish it. In April, 2014 Dan Clark & David Solem acquired the Inn. Their goals – as innkeepers and as stewards of the estate and land that Bynner loved – are to rekindle the comfort, creativity and hospitality for which this home was renowned in the past, to protect, restore and extend the legacy of its famous creator, and to provide guests with a unique, restorative experience that captures the essence of Santa Fe’s past and present.
Life
Who: Harold Witter Bynner (August 10, 1881 – June 1, 1968) aka Emanuel Morgan
Witter Bynner was a poet, writer and scholar, known for his long residence in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and association with other literary figures there. In June 1922 Bynner moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. Mabel Dodge Luhan introduced them to D.H. Lawrence and his wife Frieda, and Bynner and his former student Walter Willard “Spud” Johnson (and lover) joined the Lawrences on a trip through Mexico in 1923. The trip led to several Lawrence essays and his novel “The Plumed Serpent,” including characters based on Bynner and Johnson. Bynner ‘s related writings include three poems about Lawrence, and “Journey with Genius,” a memoir published in 1951. Mabel Dodge Luhan was not pleased about their trip, and she is said to have taken revenge on Bynner by hiring Johnson to be her own secretary. Bynner in turn wrote a play, “Cake,” satirizing her lifestyle. In 1930 Robert "Bob" Hunt arrived, originally for a visit while recuperating from an illness, but he stayed on as Bynner’s lifelong companion. They also made frequent visits to a second home in Chapala, Mexico. The home was purchased from Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Bynner spent much of the 1940s and early 1950s there, until he began to lose his eyesight. He returned to the U.S., received treatment, and traveled to Europe with Hunt, who by the late 1950s and early 1960s took increasing responsibility for the ailing poet. Hunt died of a heart attack in January 1964. On January 18, 1965, Bynner had a severe stroke. He never recovered, and required constant care until he died on June 1, 1968. Witter Bynner and Robert Hunt’s ashes were buried beneath a carved stone weeping dog at the house where they lived on Atalaya Hill in Santa Fe.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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