Jan. 20th, 2017

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Barbara Stanwyck was an American actress. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a ...
Born: July 16, 1907, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 20, 1990, Santa Monica, California, United States
Education: Erasmus Hall High School
Lived: 1055 Loma Vista Drive
Buried: Lone Pine, California (ashes)
Height: 1.65 m
Children: Anthony Dion Fay
Spouse: Robert Taylor (m. 1939–1952), Frank Fay (m. 1928–1935)

Barbara Stanwyck was an American actress. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a favorite of directors including Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang and Frank Capra. She was often cast as a tough woman in a man’s world, always in command and control, whether playing a reporter (Meet John Doe), a criminal manipulator (Double Indemnity, The Lady Eve), or a husbandless rancher (The Big Valley). She played a lesbian in Walk on the Wild Side, and it was not much of a stretch. For nearly thirty years, Stanwyck had an intimate relationship with her publicist Helen Ferguson, former actress. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, and Robert Taylor, among others. Ferguson represented actress Loretta Young for more than nineteen years.
They met in 1947 and remained friends until Ferguson’s death in 1977: 30 years.
Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990)
Helen Ferguson (July 23, 1901 - March 14, 1977)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Barbara Stanwyck's career spanned fifty years, from the Golden Age of Movies through her time in television. She was nominated for four Academy Awards, was given an hon-orary Oscar in 1982, and notably portrayed the matriarch in TV's “The Big Valley.” For many years, she and film star Robert Taylor were lovers. After his death in 1969, the actress began to see his spirit in her Beverly Hills home, at 1055 Loma Vista Drive, off Sunset Boulevard, and visitations continued right up until her own death in 1990. Upon her death at age 82, her will demanded her ashes be spread in Lone Pine, California.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Isa or Isabella Jane Blagden was an English-language novelist and poet born in the East Indies or India, who spent much of her life among the English community in Florence.
Born: 1817
Buried: Cimitero Accatolico, Florence, Città Metropolitana di Firenze, Toscana, Italy, Plot: B11C/ B42/ 1194

The English Cemetery in Florence, Italy is at Piazzale Donatello. Its names, 'Cimitero Inglese' and 'Cimitero Protestante' are somewhat misleading, as the cemetery holds bodies of Orthodox Christians as well as those of many Reformed Churches; but the majority of those buried here were of the Anglophone British and American communities of Florence.
Address: Piazzale Donatello, 38, 50132 Firenze, Italy (43.77716, 11.26858)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +39 055 582608
Place
Before 1827 non-Catholics and non-Jews who died in Florence could be buried in Livorno only. In 1827 the Swiss Evangelical Reformed Church bought land outside the medieval wall and gate of Porta a' Pinti at Florence from Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany for an international and ecumenical cemetery, Russian and Greek Orthodox burials joining the Protestant ones. Carlo Reishammer, a young architectural student, landscaped the cemetery, then Giuseppe Poggi shaped it as its present oval when Florence became capital of Italy. He surrounded it with studios for artists, including that of Michele Gordigiani (who painted the portraits of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, now in the National Portrait Gallery, London). Many famous people are buried in the graveyard like Elizabeth Barrett Browning (in a tomb designed by Frederic, Lord Leighton); her son Pen Browning is buried at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori. Florence has always been a place were queer people from all over the world came due to its acceptance, wherelse in other countries was impossible to live. We cannot say if the following were really all queer couples, or maybe just special friends, the fact is that some of them chose to be buried near to each other.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Acattolico:
• Emilia Sophia Macpherson Abadam Adams (1776-1831) was the grandmother of both Alice Abadam, the suffragette, and Vernon Lee (aka Violet Page), the writer.
• Charles Bankhead, M.D. (1768-1859), George IV's Physician Extraordinary, he was the physician in attendance at Castlereagh's suicide.
• Isa or Isabella Jane Blagden (1816 or 1817–1873) was an English-language novelist and poet born in the East Indies or India, who spent much of her life among the English community in Florence. Some of the surviving letters to Blagden from Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning are demonstrably affectionate. (Unfortunately Blagden's letters to them have not survived.) "Isa, perfect in companionship, as in other things," Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote of her. In one letter to Isa in the summer of 1859, she wrote: "My ever dearest, kindest Isa, I can't let another day go without writing just a word to say that I am alive enough to love you." In another from Paris a year earlier, Elizabeth Barrett Browning states that they had arrived "having lost nothing – neither a carpet-bag nor a bit of our true love for you."
• Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), died in her husband's arms. Robert Browning said that she died "smilingly, happily, and with a face like a girl's.... Her last word was... ''Beautiful". "On Monday July 1 the shops in the area around Casa Guidi were closed, while Elizabeth was mourned with unusual demonstrations." The nature of her illness is still unclear. Some modern scientists speculate her illness may have been hypokalemic periodic paralysis, a genetic disorder that causes weakness and many of the other symptoms she described.
• George Frederic Waihinger (1800-1867), German, was the beloved head waiter/butler to the Prince Demidoff of San Donato. Count Anatoly or Anatoli (called Anatole) Nikolaievich Demidov, 1st Prince of San Donato (1813–1870), was a Russian industrialist, diplomat and arts patron of the Demidov family.
• William Edgeworth (1832-1833), a one-year-old child unlisted in the Peerage though his two siblings Antonio Eroles and Francis Ysidro are. His mother is the Spanish Mariquita Eroles' sister, Rosa Florentina Eroles Edgeworth. His aunt is Maria Edgeworth, the great Irish novelist. He is buried in same plot with David (1807-1833) and Mary Reid (1833-1833), first husband and daughter of Mariquita Eroles, and Rev. Robert John Tennant (1809-1842), second husband of Mariquita. Mariquita Dorotea Francesca Tennant, née Eroles (1811–1860), is known as a social reformer. She is commemorated for helping the impoverished women of Windsor.
• Mary Farhill (1784-1854), small, clever, generous and eccentric, she was ennobled in Fiesole's Order of St Stephen. Farhill was found drowned in her bath at 70 years old. Though in Florence they thought she had no family when she died at the Villa il Palmerino, her brother Edward Farhill carefully arranged her burial in both English and Italian in a grand tomb. The Morning Post noted she willed her villa to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, Maria Antonia. In the 1870s it came into the possession of the Earl of Belcarres and Crawford, Lord Lindsay. Dumas and Queen Victoria were guests under its roof. It later became Vernon Lee's residence.
• Harriet Theodosia Fisher, nee Garrow (1811-1848), half-sister of Theodosia Trollope, is buried with their maid, Elizabeth Shinner (1811-1852).
• James Lorimer "Lorrie" Graham, Jr (1831-1876), American Maecenas, married, gay, founded Graham's Magazine, had wealth, was shipwrecked and injured, appointed American Consul in Florence by President Grant, occupied the Palazzo di Valfonda, Claire Claremont (Mary Shelley's stepsister, who bore Lord Byron the child Allegra), lodging with him, and he collected autographs, books, paintings which he willed to the Century Association, New York, which sold them at auction.
• Hadrian Marryat (1845-1873). His maternal grandfather was General Lord Robert Edward Henry Somerset of Badminton House and his grandmother, Lady Louisa Augusta Courtenay, daughter of William Courtenay, 8th Earl of Devon, of Powderham Castle. The three Marryat children were painted in 1851-2 in Rome by the young Frederick Leighton.
• Clara Anastasia Novello (1818-1908), was an acclaimed soprano, the fourth daughter of Vincent Novello, a musician and music publisher, and his wife, Mary Sabilla Hehl. In 1843 she married Count Gigliucci, and retired in 1861. Clara Novello Davies (1861-1943), a well-known Welsh singer, teacher and conductor was named after Clara Novello. She married David Davies, a solicitor's clerk with the same surname as her own- Their son, David Ivor Davies, became better known as Ivor Novello, the actor, composer, dramatist and director.
• Eugene Polyakov (1943-1996), a Russian-trained balletmaster who was Rudolf Nureyev's chief assistant when Nureyev was director of the Paris Opera Ballet in the 1980's. Polyakov was born in Moscow and trained at the Bolshoi Ballet before leaving Russia for Venice in 1976. He formed his own troupe, Viva la Danza, there in 1977 and was the dance director of the Teatro Comunale in Florence from 1978 to 1983, when Nureyev appointed him balletmaster. Polyakov worked again in Florence from 1992 to 1995, when he returned to the Paris Opera Ballet. He died in Paris, but asked to be buried in Florence.
• Elena Raffalovich Comparetti (1842-1918) was an educator , intellectual and froebeliana Russian. She was the third daughter of Leo Raffalovich (1813-1879), wealthy jew landowner, and Rosette (Rosa) Mondel Loevensohn (1807-1895). The family moved to Paris. The older sister Maria Raffalovich, married to their uncle Hermann, is the mother of Marc André Raffalovich and great friend of Claude Bernard.
• William Reader of Banghurst House, Hampshire (1787-1846). His original tombstone identifies Henry Austin as his faithful servant; Austin died in Florence on July 5, 1859, age 40,
• The tomb of Mary Anne Salisbury (1798-1848) was placed by the Catholic wife of the last descendant of Michelangelo Buonarotti, Rosina, beneath a great yew tree at the entrance of the English Cemetery. It was tradition to have two yew trees, poisonous to cattle but essential for the English long bow of Agincourt in English graveyards, which also symbolize the Jachin and Boaz columns of the Jerusalem Temple. Only one yew tree remains and a falling branch from it destroyed this tomb, now replaced by the Rotary Club, 23/4/2012. The busts of Count Cosimo Buonarroti and Rosina which grace the Michelangelo museum at the Casa Buonarroti were sculpted by Aristodemo Costoli.
• James Bansfield’s tomb and that of King William IV's son's wife, Lady Georgina Hacking Hamilton Sewell, lie on either side of the king's natural son, Sir William Henry Sewell, each being apparently equal to Sir William. “Known as a servant above a servant a brother beloved. James died January 11, 1862. He was for 20 years the faithful and devoted servant of General Sir W.H. Sewell, K.C.B. by whose widow this tomb was raised.”
• Eleanore Emilie Contessa Stenbock-Fermor (1815-1859) was the daughter of Count Magnus Stenbock-Fermor, Russian Colonel. Her Oxford-educated PreRaphaelite poet nephew was Eric Stenbock.
• Theodosia Trollope, born Theodosia Garrow (1816–1865) was an English poet, translator, and writer known also for her marriage into the Trollope family. She married and bought a villa in Florence, Italy with her husband, Thomas Adolphus Trollope. Her hospitality made her home the centre of British society in the city. Her writings in support of the Italian nationalists are credited with changing public opinions.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Jamie Pedersen is an American lawyer and politician from the state of Washington who has served as a member of the Washington State Legislature since January 2007. He currently represents the 43rd District in the Washington State Senate.
Born: September 9, 1968 (age 48), Puyallup, Washington, United States
Education: Yale Law School
Puyallup High School
Yale University
Spouse: Eric Pedersen (m. 2004)
Party: Democratic Party
Residence: Seattle, Washington, United States
Succeeded by: Brady Walkinshaw
Anniversary: September 27
Married: July 3, 2004

Jamie Pedersen is an American lawyer and politician from the state of Washington who has served as a member of the Washington State Legislature since Jan. 2007. He currently represents the 43rd District in the Washington State Senate. Pedersen is married to Eric Cochran Pedersen, a high-school assistant principal whom he met while attending Central Lutheran Church on Capitol Hill in Seattle. They married at the same church on July 3, 2004. They registered as domestic partners on July 23, 2007, the day that the law went into effect. Their oldest son, Trygve, was born a month later on August 27. He was joined by his brothers Leif, Erik, and Anders on July 12, 2009. Pedersen graduated summa cum laude in American Studies from Yale and received his law degree from Yale Law School. Pedersen joined Preston Gates & Ellis in 1995, working on corporate mergers. His pro bono work during this time focused on gay rights issues and he was Lambda Legal's lead attorney on the state's same-sex marriage case – Andersen v. King County. In 2012 Pedersen publicly endorsed Washington Referendum 74, which legalized the same-sex marriage.
Together since 2004: 11 years.
Eric Cochran Pedersen
Jamie Pedersen (born September 9, 1968)
Anniversary: September 27
Married: July 3, 2004



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Raymond Roussel was a French poet, novelist, playwright, musician, and chess enthusiast. Through his novels, poems, and plays he exerted a profound influence on certain groups within 20th century French ...
Born: January 20, 1877, Paris, France
Died: July 14, 1933, Palermo
Education: Conservatoire de Paris
Lived: 25 Boulevard Malesherbes, Paris
47 Rue Pierre Charron, Paris
25 Boulevard Richard Wallace, Neuilly
Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes, Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 89

Raymond Roussel (January 20, 1877 – July 14, 1933) was a French poet, novelist, playwright, musician, and chess enthusiast. Through his novels, poems, and plays he exerted a profound influence on certain groups within XX century French literature, including the Surrealists, Oulipo, and the authors of the nouveau roman. He began to be rediscovered in the late 1950s, by the Oulipo and Alain Robbe-Grillet. His most direct influence in the English speaking world was on the New York School of poets; John Ashbery, Harry Mathews, James Schuyler, and Kenneth Koch briefly edited a magazine called Locus Solus after his novel. French theorist Michel Foucault's only book-length work of literary criticism is on Roussel. Roussel was born in Paris on January 20, 1877, to affluent parents: his father, Eugène, was a stockbrocker; his mother, Marguerite, was the daughter of a wealthy Paris businessman. They lived at 25 Boulevard Malesherbes, near the Madeleine Church, and were thus neighbors of the family of Marcel Proust, who lived at number 9 Boulevard Malesherbes. The Roussels also knew the painter Madeleine Lemaire, the principal model for Proust’s Mme. Verdurin, who painted a portrait of Raymond as a child. Later in life, Roussel became acquainted with Robert de Montesquiou, Proust’s Baron de Charlus, who wrote one of the first substantial critical essays on Roussel’s work. In the 1880s, the Roussels moved from the Boulevard Malesherbes to a splendid mansion just off the Champs-Elysées; they also spent time at a villa in the Bois de Boulogne at Neuilly and later summered in another villa overlooking the Atlantic at Biarritz.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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After the death of his mother in 1911, Raymond Roussel (1877–1933) inherited the house at 25 Boulevard Richard Wallace, Neuilly, and lived there in almost total isolation. His habits was to write during the mornings and to consume a single meal comprising breakfast, lunch, and dinner from early to late afternoon; these solitary repasts often included 27 courses. He was then free to spend the evening at the theatre, where, with the long-suffering Mme. Dufrène, his fake mistress, he often attended the same spectacle night after night, always sitting in the same seat if possible.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Jean Börlin (1893-1930) was a Swedish dancer and choreographer born in Härnösand. He worked with Michel Fokine, who was his teacher in Stockholm. Jean Borlin was a principal dancer of the Royal Swedish Ballet when Rolf de Mare brought him to Paris in in 1920 as first dancer and choreographer of the Ballets Suedois at the Theatre de Champs-Elysees. According to Paul Colin, de Mare “was very rich” and he had brought the Swedish Ballet to Paris “especially to show his young lover, Jean Borlin.” The Stockholm press derided de Mare's sexual orientation. In contrast, open-minded Paris welcomed the Ballets Suedois. One wonders what might have happened if de Mare had not disbanded the company in 1925, reportedly because its recent performances had disappointed him. But he had a new lover. Borlin's last years were melancholy. By 1925, he was exhausted: he had choreographed all 23 ballets in his company's repertory and danced in each of its 900 performances -- a grueling schedule that led him to alcohol and drugs. In 1930, he opened a school in New York but died of heart failure shortly thereafter. He was only 37. He was buried at his own wish in the cemetery of Pére Lachaise in Paris in January l931. A stricken de Mare founded Les Archives Internationales de Danse, in his memory.
• Jean Jacques Régis de Cambacérès (1753-1824) 1st Duke of Parma, later 1st Duke of Cambacérès, was a French lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire, best remembered as the author of the Napoleonic Code, which still forms the basis of French civil law and inspired civil law in many countries. The common belief that Cambacérès is responsible for decriminalizing homosexuality in France is in error. Cambacérès was not responsible for ending the legal prosecution of homosexuals. He did play a key role in drafting the Code Napoléon, but this was a civil law code. He had nothing to do with the Penal Code of 1810, which covered sexual crimes. Before the French Revolution, sodomy had been a capital crime under royal legislation. The penalty was burning at the stake. Very few men, however, were ever actually prosecuted and executed for consensual sodomy (no more than five in the entire XVIII century). Sodomites arrested by the police were more usually released with a warning or held in prison for (at most) a few weeks or months. The National Constituent Assembly abolished the law against sodomy when it revised French criminal law in 1791 and got rid of a variety of offenses inspired by religion, including blasphemy. Cambacérès was a homosexual, his sexual orientation was well-known, and he does not seem to have made any effort to conceal it. He remained unmarried, and kept to the company of other bachelors. Napoleon is recorded as making a number of jokes on the subject. Robert Badinter once mentioned in a speech to the French National Assembly, during debates on reforming the homosexual age of consent, that Cambacérès was known in the gardens of the Palais-Royal as "tante Turlurette".
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Loie Fuller (1862–1928) was an American dancer who was a pioneer of both modern dance and theatrical lighting techniques. Fuller supported other pioneering performers, such as fellow United States-born dancer Isadora Duncan. Fuller helped Duncan ignite her European career in 1902 by sponsoring independent concerts in Vienna and Budapest. She was cremated and her ashes are interred in the columbarium at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Her sister, Mollie Fuller, had a long career as an actress and vaudeville performer.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Eileen Gray (1878–1976) was an Irish furniture designer and architect and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture. Gray was bisexual. She mixed in the lesbian circles of the time, being associated with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller, the singer Damia and Natalie Barney. Gray's intermittent relationship with Damia (or Marie-Louise Damien) ended in 1938, after which they never saw each other again, although both lived into their nineties in the same city. Damia died at La Celle-Saint-Cloud, a western suburb of Paris, and was interred in the Cimetière de Pantin (163 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 93500 Aubervilliers, France). Today, she is considered to be the third greatest singer of chansons réalistes, after Edith Piaf and Barbara.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Marie Laurencin (1883-1956) was a French painter and printmaker. She became an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde as a member of the Cubists associated with the Section d'Or. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire, and has often been identified as his muse. In addition, Laurencin had important connections to the salon of the American expatriate and famed lesbian writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She had heterosexual and lesbian affairs. During WWI, Laurencin left France for exile in Spain with her German-born husband, Baron Otto von Waëtjen, since through her marriage she had automatically lost her French citizenship. The couple subsequently lived together briefly in Düsseldorf. After they divorced in 1920, she returned to Paris, where she achieved financial success as an artist until the economic depression of the 1930s. During the 1930s she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She lived in Paris until her death.
• Mary Elizabeth Clarke Mohl (1793–1883) was a British writer who was known as a salon hostess in Paris. She was known by her nickname of "Clarkey". She was admired for her independence and conversation. She eventually married the orientalist Julius von Mohl. She was an ardent Francophile, a feminist, and a close friend of Florence Nightingale. She wrote about her interest in the history of women's rights. She was buried with her husband, Julius von Mohl, at Père Lachaise Cemetery (56th division).
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) was a French composer and pianist. The biographer Richard D. E. Burton comments that, in the late 1920s, Poulenc might have seemed to be in an enviable position: professionally successful and independently well-off, having inherited a substantial fortune from his father. He bought a large country house, Le Grande Coteau (Chemin Francis Poulenc, 37210 Noizay, France), 140 miles (230 km) south-west of Paris, where he retreated to compose in peaceful surroundings. Yet he was troubled, struggling to come to terms with his sexuality, which was predominantly gay. His first serious affair was with the painter Richard Chanlaire, to whom he sent a copy of the Concert champêtre score inscribed, "You have changed my life, you are the sunshine of my thirty years, a reason for living and working". Nevertheless, while this affair was in progress Poulenc proposed marriage to his friend Raymonde Linossier. As she was not only well aware of his homosexuality but was also romantically attached elsewhere, she refused him, and their relationship became strained. He suffered the first of many periods of depression, which affected his ability to compose, and he was devastated in January 1930, when Linossier died suddenly at the age of 32. On her death he wrote, "All my youth departs with her, all that part of my life that belonged only to her. I sob ... I am now twenty years older". His affair with Chanlaire petered out in 1931, though they remained lifelong friends. On 30 January 1963, at his flat opposite the Jardin du Luxembourg, Poulenc suffered a fatal heart attack. His funeral was at the nearby church of Saint-Sulpice. In compliance with his wishes, none of his music was performed; Marcel Dupré played works by Bach on the grand organ of the church. Poulenc was buried at Père Lachaise Cemetery, alongside his family.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Raymond Radiguet (1903–1923) was a French novelist and poet whose two novels were noted for their explicit themes, and unique style and tone. In early 1923, Radiguet published his first and most famous novel, “Le Diable au corps” (The Devil in the Flesh). The story of a young married woman who has an affair with a sixteen-year-old boy while her husband is away fighting at the front provoked scandal in a country that had just been through WWI. Though Radiguet denied it, it was established later that the story was in large part autobiographical. He associated himself with the Modernist set, befriending Picasso, Max Jacob, Jean Hugo, Juan Gris and especially Jean Cocteau, who became his mentor. Radiguet also had several well-documented relationships with women. An anecdote told by Ernest Hemingway has an enraged Cocteau charging Radiguet (known in the Parisian literary circles as "Monsieur Bébé" – Mister Baby) with decadence for his tryst with a model: "Bébé est vicieuse. Il aime les femmes." ("Baby is depraved. He likes women.") Radiguet, Hemingway implies, employed his sexuality to advance his career, being a writer "who knew how to make his career not only with his pen but with his pencil." Aldous Huxley is quoted as declaring that Radiguet had attained the literary control that others required a long career to reach. On December 12, 1923, Radiguet died at age 20 in Paris of typhoid fever, which he contracted after a trip he took with Cocteau. Cocteau, in an interview with The Paris Review stated that Radiguet had told him three days prior to his death that, "In three days, I am going to be shot by the soldiers of God." In reaction to this death Francis Poulenc wrote, "For two days I was unable to do anything, I was so stunned". In her 1932 memoir, “Laughing Torso,” British artist Nina Hamnett describes Radiguet's funeral: "The church was crowded with people. In the pew in front of us was the negro band from the Boeuf sur le Toit. Picasso was there, Brâncuși and so many celebrated people that I cannot remember their names. Radiguet's death was a terrible shock to everyone. Coco Chanel, the celebrated dressmaker, arranged the funeral. It was most wonderfully done. Cocteau was too ill to come." ... "Cocteau was terribly upset and could not see anyone for weeks afterwards.”
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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