Feb. 26th, 2017

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José Benjamín Quintero was a Panamanian theatre director, producer and pedagogue best known for his interpretations of the works of Eugene O'Neill.
Born: October 15, 1924, Panama City, Panama
Died: February 26, 1999, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Education: University of Southern California
Find A Grave Memorial# 161890803
Movies: The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, A Moon for the Misbegotten
Books: If You Don't Dance They Beat You
Parents: Consuelo Palmerola, Carlos Rivera Quintero

José Benjamín Quintero was a Panamanian theatre director, producer and pedagogue best known for his interpretations of the works of Eugene O'Neill. He directed over seventy productions by a great number of writers, including Truman Capote, Jean Cocteau, Thornton Wilder, Jean Genet and Brendan Behan. He also directed plays by Tennessee Williams, including the 1952 production of Summer and Smoke, which made Geraldine Page a star. In 1961, he directed Vivien Leigh and Warren Beatty in The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone which brought Lotte Lenya an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actress. Quintero battled alcoholism and with the help of his life partner, Nicholas Tsacrios, a former advertising executive, was able to defeat his addiction in the 1970s. He was diagnosed with throat cancer in 1987 that necessitated the removal of his larynx, which ultimately led to his death in New York City in 1999. He remained active until nearly the end of his life. At his memorial, Liv Ullmann recalled ''He said to me, 'I am not ready to die yet, though, if I die, I have had a rich life.'” The Jose Quintero Theatre on West 42nd Street in Manhattan was named in his honor.
Together from (around) 1950 to 1999: 49 years.
José Benjamín Quintero (October 15, 1924 – February 26, 1999)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Louise DeKoven Bowen was an American philanthropist, civic leader, social reformer, and suffragist. Born in Chicago, Illinois, her parents were Helen Hadduck and John deKoven, a banker. In 1875, she graduated from Dearborn Seminary.
Born: February 26, 1859
Died: November 9, 1953
Lived: Baymeath, Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Buried: Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 112064288
Books: Growing Up with a City

Bar Harbor is a town on Mount Desert Island in Hancock County, Maine. As of the 2010 census, its population is 5,235.
Address: Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Hancock County, Maine, USA (44.38761, -68.20391)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: West Street Historic District (West St. between Billings Ave. and Eden St.), 80000226, 1980, & Harbor Lane--Eden Street Historic District (Portions of Harbor Ln. and Eden St.), 09000550, 2009
Place
Louise DeKoven Bowen, Mrs. J.T. Bowen of Chicago, friend and patroness of Jane Addams, built his summer home, Baymeath, at Bar Harbor in 1896. Baymeath was a southern colonial house four miles from Bar Harbor Village. It was situated on a hillside from which a series of terraces led down to the bay. One of these, formerly a tennis court, was a formal garden enclosed by vine-covered stone walls on two sides and high fences with actinidia on the other two. Beyond the house, another lattice-enclosed garden stood with a rose bed. Climbing roses covered all the fences. Another rose arbor led into the woods where lupine, day lilies, and wild roses grew. From all these gardens, a wide view of Frenchman’s Bay added contrast to the color of the northern flowers. The house was razed in 1979. Near Baymeath, on Lookout Point in Hull’s Cove, was a cottage called Yule Craig, designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston for the son of Senator Yulee of Florida. In 1904, the house was purchased by Mrs. Bowen’s friend, Jane Addams. A half mile path connected Baymeath and Yule Craig, and there was much visiting back and forth, as Mrs. Bowen was one of the chief supporters of Jane Addams’s Hull House Settlement in Chicago, and donor of the Bowen Country Club. Miss Addams once famously said that she could raise more money in a single month in Bar Harbor than all the rest of the year back home in Chicago. Jane Addams sold the house in 1932 to Harry Hill Thorndikes, which renamed it Thorncraig. Mrs. Thorndike’s sister, Miss Belle Gurnee, owned the property between Yule Craig and Baymeath, a large chalet built in Switzerland and imported to her property on Lookout Point. Thorncraig was inherited by the Thorndike’s son, Augustus Gurnee Thorndike, and was later purchased by John J. Emery. Emery’s aunt was married to Benjamin Moore, brother-in-law of Mrs. Moore who later owned Baymeath. Thorncraig proved to have notoriously irresolvable plumbing troubles, and was demolished in the early 1980’s. Another famous queer resident at Bar Harbor was Natalie Clifford Barney. Alice Pike Barney (1857-1931) was an artist, actor, playwright, and socialite. The daughter of Cincinnati millionaire and patron of the arts Samuel Napthali Pike, Alice was born into a life of privilege. She married Albert Clifford Barney, son of a wealthy manufacturer of railway cars, prior to her twentieth birthday. The Barney’s had two daughters, Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972) and Laura Clifford Barney (1879-1974.) The family split their time between New York City and Paris, France, until 1900, when they purchased a home in Washington, DC. Well aware of the steamy summers of the eastern United States, the Barney’s would vacation in Bar Harbor, Maine, and in 1888, commissioned a "summer cottage" in Bar Harbor they named "Ban-y-Bryn." Designed by Architect S. V. Stratton, Ban-y-Bryn was built on a steep bluff, with the front of the cottage facing the rustic Maine landscape. The rear of the home, with its prominent turret and several grand porches, overlooked Frenchman’s Bay. Rising to four stories, the home consisted of 27 rooms, including seven bedrooms, five bathrooms, five fireplaces, a large stable, seven servants’ bedrooms, and additional servants’ facilities. The top floor was reserved as studio space for Ms. Barney and her artistic pursuits. Ban-y-Bryn’s exterior was constructed of granite. The interior featured exotic hardwoods and materials, and was furnished with antiques acquired by the Barney’s during their global travels. Ban-y-Bryn was one of their many luxuries; interest in the home began to fade as their respective pursuits and tastes evolved over time. The Barney’s sold their marvelous summer dwelling in 1930. Sadly, Ban-y-Bryn was one of 67 summer cottages incinerated in the Bar Harbor fire of October 1947.
Life
Who: Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) and Mary Rozet Smith (1868-1934)
Mary Rozet Smith was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years. Smith provided the financing for the Hull House Music School and donated the school’s organ as a memorial to her mother. There has been much speculation of Addams and Smith’s life and relationship. Many of their letters were burned by Addams, but Addams referred to their relationship as a "marriage.” They traveled together, co-owned a home in Maine, and were committed to each other. In 1895, after Addams had suffered from a bout with typhoid fever, she went abroad with Smith, traveling to London. There, they visited several settlement houses, including Oxford House, Browning House, Bermondsey Settlement and others. They proceeded on to Moscow and met Tolstoy, then traveled through southern Russia, into Poland and Germany, before returning to Chicago. Early in 1934, Addams had a heart attack and Smith nursed her at her home, neglecting her own illness. Smith succumbed to pneumonia, fell into a coma and then died on February 22, 1934. Addams was considered too ill to descend the stairs to attend Smith’s memorial service, which she could hear from her second-floor room. Addams died on May 21, 1935.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Graceland Cemetery is a large Victorian era cemetery located in the north side community area of Uptown, in the city of Chicago, Illinois. Established in 1860, its main entrance is at the intersection of Clark Street and Irving Park Road. The Sheridan stop on the Red Line is the nearest CTA "L" station.
Address: 4001 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60613, USA (41.95483, -87.66188)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 773-525-1105
National Register of Historic Places: 00001628, 2001
Place
In the XIX century, a train to the north suburbs occupied the eastern edge of the cemetery where the "L" now rides. The line was also used to carry mourners to funerals, in specially rented funeral cars, requiring an entry on the east wall, now closed. At that point, the cemetery would have been well outside the city limits of Chicago. After the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Lincoln Park which had been the city's cemetery, was deconsecrated and some of the bodies moved here. The edge of the pond around Daniel Burnham's burial island was once lined with broken headstones and coping transported from Lincoln Park. Lincoln Park then became a recreational area, with a single mausoleum remaining, the "Couch tomb", containing the remains of Ira Couch. The Couch Tomb is probably the oldest extant structure in the City, everything else having been destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire. The cemetery is typical of those that reflect Queen Victoria's reconception of the early XIX century "graveyard". Instead of poorly maintained headstones, and bodies buried on top of each other, on an ungenerous parcel of land, the cemetery became a pastoral landscaped park dotted with memorial markers, with room left over for picnics, a common usage of cemeteries. The landscape architecture for Graceland was designed by Ossian Cole Simonds. The cemetery's walls are topped off with wrought iron spear point fencing. Many of the cemetery's tombs are of great architectural or artistic interest, including the Getty Tomb, the Martin Ryerson Mausoleum (both designed by architect Louis Sullivan, who is also buried here), and the Schoenhofen Pyramid Mausoleum. The industrialist George Pullman was buried at night, in a lead-lined coffin within an elaborately reinforced steel-and-concrete vault, to prevent his body from being exhumed and desecrated by labor activists. Along with its other famous burials the cemetery is notable for two statues by sculptor Lorado Taft, Eternal Silence for the Graves family plot and The Crusader that marks Victor Lawson's final resting place. The cemetery is also the final resting place of several victims of the tragic Iroquois Theater fire in which more than 600 people died.
Notable queer burials at Graceland Cemetery:
• Louise DeKoven Bowen (1859–1953) was an American philanthropist, civic leader, social reformer, and suffragist. Assisting Jane Addams, Bowen became an officer and trustee of the Hull House.
• James Deering (November 12, 1859 – September 21, 1925) was an industrial executive in the family Deering Harvester Company and subsequent International Harvester, a socialite, and an antiquities collector. He is known for his landmark Vizcaya estate, where he was an early XX-century resident on Biscayne Bay in the present day Coconut Grove district of Miami, Florida.
• Mary Rozet Smith (1868-1934) was a Chicago-born US philanthropist who was one of the trustees and benefactors of Hull House. She was the companion of activist Jane Addams for over thirty years. Smith provided the financing for the Hull House Music School and donated the school's organ as a memorial to her mother. She was active in several social betterment societies in Chicago at the turn of the XX century.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson was a wealthy American patron of the arts, who was particularly associated with the Taos art colony.
Born: February 26, 1879, Buffalo, New York, United States
Died: August 13, 1962, Taos, New Mexico, United States
Lived: 23 Fifth Avenue
240 Morada Ln, Taos, NM 87571, USA (36.40837, -105.56653)
Finney Farm, Finney Farm Rd, Croton-On-Hudson, NY 10520, USA (41.21709, -73.89533)
Villa Curonia, Via Suor Maria Celeste, 13, 50125 Firenze FI, Italy (43.74615, 11.2487)
Buried: Kit Carson Memorial Cemetery, Taos, Taos County, New Mexico, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 36.24478, -105.34214
Find A Grave Memorial# 9650
Spouse: Maurice Sterne (m. 1917)
Organizations: Taos art colony, Armory Show

Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy American patron of the arts. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly detailed her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography Intimate Memories (1933). Her first marriage was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner in 1900. Karl died in a hunting accident leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Later she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. The Dodges lived in Florence from 1905 to 1912. At her palatial Medici villa—the Villa Curonia in Arcetri, not far from Florence—she entertained local artists, as well as Gertrude Stein, her brother Leo, Alice B. Toklas, and other visitors from Paris, including André Gide. In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. Often in attendance were such luminaries as Carl Van Vechten, Margarett Sargent, Emma Goldman, Charles Demuth, "Big Bill" Haywood, Max Eastman, Lincoln Steffens, Hutchins Hapgood, Neith Boyce, Walter Lippmann, and John “Jack” Reed (who became her lover). In 1916, Dodge married Maurice Sterne. In 1919 Dodge, her husband, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. In 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she married Tony Luhan, a Native American. The couple lived together until Mabel died, a year before Tony did.
Together from 1923 to 1962: 39 years
Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Tony Luhan (died in 1963)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Mabel Dodge Luhan purchased the XV century Medici palace Villa Curonia at Arcetri, overlooking the city. Determined to restore it to its Renaissance glory, Mabel expensively furnished it in the style of the time and even had Renaissance costumes made to wear when playing hostess to her many guests.
Address: Via Suor Maria Celeste, 13, 50125 Firenze FI, Italy (43.74615, 11.2487)
Type: Private Property
Place
Famous for her lavish entertaining, Mabel Dodge Luhan in Florence sought the company of resident expatriates, visiting artists, writers and colourful eccentrics. When, in 1913, she invited Gertrude Stein to visit, she wrote, “Please come down here soon-the house is full of pianists, painters, pederasts, prostitutes, and peasants.” In Stein’s bestselling autobiography of her lifelong companion, Alice B. Toklas, she tells about the visit, describing Mabel as “a stoutish woman with a very sturdy fringe of heavy hair over her forehead, heavy long lashes and very pretty eyes and a very old-fashioned coquetry. She had a lovely voice.” She also recounts how Mabel relished in teasing her guests, especially with ghost stories. Apparently, Stein explains, “there were two of them in the Villa Curonia and Mabel was very fond of frightening visiting Americans with them, which she did in her suggestive way very effectively. Once she drove a house party... quite mad with fear. And at last to complete the effect she had the local priest in to exorcise the ghosts.” Stein, in fact, was so taken with Mabel, she wrote a piece about her entitled “Portrait of Mabel Dodge at the Villa Curonia.” Flattered, Mabel paid to publish it and, once back in America, it made her a celebrity. However, the friendship between Stein and bisexual Mabel was short lived, as Toklas became jealous of her.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
The Dodges lived in Florence from 1905 to 1912. At her palatial Medici villa—the Villa Curonia in Arcetri, not far from Florence—she entertained local artists, as well as Gertrude Stein, her brother Leo, Alice B. Toklas, and other visitors from Paris, including André Gide. A troubled liaison with her chauffeur led to two suicide attempts. For three months in 1913, Mabel again sojourned at Villa Curonia, accompanied by her latest lover, the communist journalist John (Jack) Reed, who became famous for his chronicles of the Mexican and Russian revolutions at the beginning of the XX century. Their tortuous, on-and-off relationship lasted until 1917, when Mabel married her third husband, Russian-born artist Maurice Sterne.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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In mid-1912, Mabel Dodge Luhan returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue. Often in attendance were such luminaries as Carl Van Vechten, Margaret Sanger, Emma Goldman, Charles Demuth, "Big Bill" Haywood, Max Eastman, Lincoln Steffens, Hutchins Hapgood, Neith Boyce, Walter Lippmann, and John Reed. Van Vechten took Dodge as the model for the character "Edith Dale" in his novel “Peter Whiffle.”



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Mabel Dodge’s connection with Croton began when she arrived in a chauffer-driven limousine and rented a small house on Mt. Airy Road, locally called “Miss Sharkey’s cottage.” It was small, old, simple, and supposed to be haunted. Robert Edmond Jones, who had a studio in a shack on the property and later achieved fame as a stage designer, saw the ghost once or twice—“a nice old lady.” The cottage, hidden from view behind a tall fence, is virtually unchanged today.
Address: Finney Farm Rd, Croton-On-Hudson, NY 10520, USA (41.21709, -73.89533)
Type: Private Property
Place
Leasing Croton’s ample Finney Farm made it easier for Mabel Dodge to entertain her wide circle of friends and guests. Among them, journalist Jack Reed, her former lover, accepted her offer of the third floor of the house as a writing studio. Maurice Sterne, a Russian-born artist and sculptor, occupied a cottage behind the house. Her latest sexual partner, he spent his days painting portraits of her. She had met him at a dance recital given by young students of the Duncan school. Mabel was friend with Elizabeth Duncan, Isadora’s sister and Elizabeth asked Mabel to accompany her on a visit to Finney Farm located on the side of a hill sloping down toward the Hudson River. Almost on a whim, she decided to make Sterne her third husband--but first she had to get free of Edwin Dodge, who gallantly allowed her to charge him with desertion. Mabel and Sterne were married in Peekskill by a justice of the peace in August of 1917. When he suggested a honeymoon, she pointed out that the lease on her city apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue was about to expire and the building was to be demolished. New space had to be found. “You go on a little honeymoon out West, and I will stay here,” she told him. Sterne wrote frequent letters on the trip, but one written from Santa Fe in New Mexico would change the course of her life. He urged her to come to the Southwest and "save the Indians, their art, their culture and reveal it to the world." It was a challenge Mabel could not resist.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
When Mabel Dodge Luhan moved to Finney Farm, a large Croton estate, Maurice Sterne, who was to become Dodge’s third husband, was staying in a cottage behind the main house. Dodge offered Jack Reed the third floor of the house as a writing studio; he moved in for a short period but the situation was untenable. Later that year, 1916, Dodge married Sterne.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Mabel Dodge Luhan House, also known as Big House and St. Teresa House, is a house in Taos, New Mexico. It was a home of artist Mabel Dodge Luhan and was a haven for artists and writers.
Address: 240 Morada Ln, Taos, NM 87571, USA (36.40837, -105.56653)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 575-751-9686
National Register of Historic Places: 78001832, 1978. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The house is "one of the earliest examples of Pueblo Revival style in Taos." It is located on Luhan Lane, off Morada Lane, in Taos. It is now used as a hotel and conference center.
Life
Who: Mabel Evans Dodge Sterne Luhan, née Ganson (February 26, 1879 – August 13, 1962)
Mabel Dodge Luhan was a wealthy patron of the arts. She is particularly associated with the Taos art colony. Her first marriage, in 1900 at the age of 21, was to Karl Evans, the son of a steamship owner. They had one son, and Karl died in a hunting accident two and a half years later, leaving her a widow at the age of 23. Her family sent her to Paris because she was having an affair with a prominent Buffalo gynecologist. Later that year she married Edwin Dodge, a wealthy architect. She was actively bisexual during her early life and frankly details her passionate physical encounters with young women in her autobiography “Intimate Memories” (1933.) In mid-1912, the Dodges returned to America, and she began to set herself up as a patron of the arts, holding a weekly salon in her new apartment at 23 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village. She sailed to Europe at the end of June 1913. Her new acquaintance John Reed (Jack)—worn out from having recently organized the Paterson Pageant—travelled with her. They became lovers after arriving in Paris, where they socialized with Stein and Pablo Picasso. They moved down to the Villa Curonia, where the guests this time included Arthur Rubinstein. They returned to New York in late September 1913. In October 1913 Reed was sent to report on the Mexican Revolution by Metropolitan Magazine. Dodge followed him to Presidio, a border town, but left after a few days. Over 1914–16 a deep and continuing relationship developed between the intelligentsia of Greenwich Village and Provincetown. In 1915 she went to Provincetown with painter Maurice Sterne. She then moved to Finney Farm, a large Croton estate. In 1919 Dodge, her by then husband, Maurice Sterne, and Elsie Clews Parsons moved to Taos, New Mexico, and started a literary colony there. On the advice of Tony Luhan, a Native American whom she would marry in 1923, after divorcing Sterne, she bought a 12-acre (49,000 m2) property. D.H. Lawrence accepted an invitation from her to stay in Taos and he arrived, with Frieda his wife, in early September 1922. Dodge and Luhan hosted a number of influential artists and poets including Marsden Hartley, Arnold Ronnebeck, Louise Emerson Ronnebeck, Ansel Adams, Willa Cather, Robinson Jeffers and his wife Una, Florence McClung, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mary Hunter Austin, Frank Waters, Jaime de Angulo, and others. Dennis Hopper bought the Mabel Dodge Luhan House after seeing it while filming “Easy Rider.” Dodge died at her home in Taos in 1962 and was buried in Kit Carson Cemetery (Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos, NM 87571). Antonio "Tony" Lujan (1879-1963) is buried at Taos Pueblo Cemetery (Taos Pueblo, NM).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Buried: Central Cemetery, Randolph, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 161694742

Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman was a prominent 19th century American author. She is best known for two collections of stories, A Humble Romance and Other Stories (1887) and A New England Nun and Other Stories (1891). Her stories deal mostly with New England life and are among the best of their kind. Many of her celebrated stories are characterized by intense love and passionate devotion between women. Freeman is also remembered for her novel Pembroke (1894), and she contributed a notable chapter to the collaborative novel The Whole Family (1908). After her father's death, she went to live with the family of her life-long friend Mary John Wales. The two Marys lived together until her often-postponed marriage to Dr. Charles M. Freeman in 1902. Mary John was one of her few friends and it was a friendship of such intensity and love that it would survive until Mary John's death in 1914 (?). In April 1926, Freeman became the first recipient of the William Dean Howells Medal for Distinction in Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She died in Metuchen and was interred in Hillside Cemetery in Scotch Plains, New Jersey.
Together from 1883 to 1914: 31 years.
Mary E. Wilkins Freeman (October 31, 1852 - March 13, 1930)
Mary J. Wales (February 26,1847 – December 24, 1900)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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At Central Cemetery (327 North St, Randolph, MA 02368) is buried Mary Wales (1847-1900). When Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman’s father died suddenly in 1883, leaving her without any immediate family and an estate worth only $973, she moved in with her friend Mary John Wales and began writing as her only source of income.

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Nicolas Fatio de Duillier was a Swiss mathematician known for his work on the zodiacal light problem, for his very close relationship with Isaac Newton, for his role in the Newton v. Leibniz calculus ...
Born: February 26, 1664, Basel, Switzerland
Died: May 12, 1753, Worcester, United Kingdom
Buried: St Nicholas, St Nicholas Lane, off Hastings Drive & Berkeley way in Warndon Villages, half a mile from junction of the M5, Warndon, Worcestershire, WR4 0SL
Find A Grave Memorial# 161223794
Influenced by: Isaac Newton
Field: Mathematics

Sir Isaac Newton’s work laid the foundation for physics that prevailed until the theories of Einstein and Planck in the 20th century. (Newton’s laws do still apply, except on very small scales where quantum mechanics takes over.) Newton had been reluctant to publish his calculus because he feared controversy and criticism. He was close to the Swiss mathematician Nicolas Fatio de Duillier, whom he met in London around 1690. In 1691, Duillier started to write a new version of Newton's Principia. In 1693, the relationship between Duillier and Newton deteriorated, at the same time Newton suffered a nervous breakdown, and the book was never completed. Some of their correspondence has survived. Newton never married. Although it is impossible to verify, it is commonly believed that he died a virgin, as has been commented on by such figures as mathematician Charles Hutton, economist John Maynard Keynes, and physicist Carl Sagan. In 1733, Voltaire publicly stated that Newton "had neither passion nor weakness; he never went near any woman".
They met (around) 1690 and remained friends until 1693: 3 years.
Sir Isaac Newton PRS MP (December 25, 1642 – March 20, 1727)
Nicolas Fatio de Duillier (alternative names are Facio or Faccio; February 26, 1664 – May 12, 1753)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Nicolas Fatio de Duillier (February 26, 1664 - May 12, 1753) was a Swiss mathematician known for his work on the zodiacal light problem, for his very close relationship with Isaac Newton, for his role in the Newton v. Leibniz calculus controversy, and for originating the "push" or "shadow" theory of gravitation. He died in 1753 in Maddersfield near Worcester and is buried at St Nicholas (St Nicholas Lane, off Hastings Drive & Berkeley way in Warndon Villages, half a mile from junction of the M5, Warndon, Worcestershire, WR4 0SL). 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Born: 1899
Education: Mount Holyoke College
Lived: Manchester, VT 05255, USA (43.16361, -73.07228)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161802046
Books: Ghosts, ghosts, ghosts, Speed, speed, speed, more

Clara Sipprell was a Canadian-born, early 20th century photographer who lived most of her life in the US. She was well known for her pictorial landscapes and for portraits of many famous actors, artists, writers and scientists. In 1915, Sipprell and long-time family friend and teacher Jessica Beers moved to New York, where they shared an apartment on Morningside Drive. In the late 1910s, Sipprell met Irina Khrabroff, who became her friend, traveling companion and, later, dealer and business manager. When they first met Sipprell still shared her apartment with Beers, but when Beers moved out in 1923, Khrabroff moved in. Later that year Khrabroff married Feodor Cekich, and the three of them lived together. In 1937, Sipprell moved to Manchester, Vermont, and soon after, she met Phyllis Fenner, a writer, librarian, and anthologist of children's books. 14 years younger than Sipprell, Fenner soon became Sipprell's housemate and traveling companion. They had architect Harold Olmstead build them a house in Manchester. Sipprell’s ashes are buried in a plot near an outcropping of rock in Manchester. Attached to the rock is a small bronze tablet on which, in accordance with her wishes, are engraved her name along with the names of Jessica Beers and Phyllis Fenner.
Together from 1937 to 1975: 38 years.
Clara Estelle Sipprell (October 31, 1885 – April 1975)
Phyllis Reid Fenner (October 24, 1899 – February 26, 1982)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Clara Sipprell’s ashes are buried in a plot near an outcropping of rock in Manchester. Attached to the rock is a small bronze tablet on which, in accordance with her wishes, are engraved her own name along with the names of Jessica Beers and Phyllis Fenner.
Address: Manchester, VT 05255, USA (43.16361, -73.07228)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Manchester Village Historic District (US 7A, Union St., and Taconic Ave.), 84003438, 1984
Place
Manchester is a town in, and one of two shire towns (county seats) of, Bennington County, Vermont. The population was 4,391 at the 2010 census. Manchester Village, an incorporated village, and Manchester Center are settlement centers within the town. Manchester has become a tourist destination, especially for those from New York and Connecticut, offering visitors factory outlet stores of national chain retailers such as Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren, as well as many locally owned businesses, including the Northshire Bookstore, one of America’s leading independent bookstores. The town was one of several chartered in 1761 by Benning Wentworth, colonial governor of New Hampshire. It was his custom to name new towns after prominent English aristocrats of the day, hoping they might adopt a patronly interest in their namesakes. Wentworth named Manchester for Robert Montagu, 3rd Duke of Manchester. First settled in 1764, the town was laid out in 1784. The land was better suited for grazing than tillage, so by 1839 about 6,000 sheep roamed the pastures and hillsides. Other industries came to include iron mines, marble quarries and mills, and lumber companies. The arrival of the railroad from industrialized centers like New York City brought tourists, drawn by Manchester’s historic architecture and beautiful setting among mountains. Following the Civil War, the town developed into an affluent resort area, which it remains today. Between 1812 and 1819 Manchester was made famous by the Boorn–Colvin case, called "America’s first wrongful conviction murder case,” the subject of several books and still studied today. In 1850 Ward Manor was built on the now Ward-Equinox Estate on the 200 Acre well known Equinox Mountain. Bought by Rutherford Ward from Poplar Bluff, Missouri he moved here as threats of a Civil War was being whispered through the south and the southern part of the mid-west. It is the only brick structure ever to be built in the town’s history. It was abandoned until 1950 when Rutherford’s grandson the well known Industrialist Farmer, Dewey H. Ward renovated it and called it home during the summers. When he passed in 2002 it was left to his daughter well known jeweler and founder of Marchesa Jewelry, Louise O’Kief-Trout and his great grandson Nicholas Silvestri. Orvis is a family-owned retail and mail-order business specializing in high-end fly fishing, hunting and sporting goods. Founded in Manchester in 1856 by Charles F. Orvis to sell fishing tackle, it is the oldest mail-order retailer in the United States. Jake Burton Carpenter, founder of Burton Snowboards, perfected snowboard design in his garage in Manchester. The company operated out of Manchester until 1992 when it relocated to Burlington, Vermont. The town has three distinct state-recognized historic districts—the Depot district located on Highland Avenue and Elm Street, Bonnet Street, just north of Main Street, and Main Street itself.
Life
Who: Clara Sipprell (October 31, 1885–1975)
Clara Sipprell was a Canadian-born, early XX century photographer who lived most of her life in the United States. She was well known for her pictorial landscapes and for portraits of many famous actors, artists, writers and scientists. In 1915 Sipprell and long-time family friend and teacher Jessica Beers moved to New York, where they shared an apartment on Morningside Drive. The big city better suited Sipprell’s growing bohemian tastes, which quickly came to include smoking cigars, and pipes; drinking bourbon, driving fast convertibles, and wearing capes, exotic jewelry and embroidered Slavic clothing. One friend recalled that she "did not make her work her life, but instead crafted a life that was a work of art." Within a few months Sipprell established a portrait studio and soon established a long list of clients due to her already well-known artistry. Over the next forty years she would photograph some of the most famous artists, writers, dancers and other cultural icons of the time, including Alfred Stieglitz, Pearl S. Buck, Charles E. Burchfield, Fyodor Chaliapin, Ralph Adams Cram, W. E. B. Du Bois, Albert Einstein, Robert Frost, Granville Hicks, Malvina Hoffman, Langston Hughes, Robinson Jeffers, Isamu Noguchi, Maxfield Parrish and Eleanor Roosevelt. In the late 1910s Sipprell met a young Russian woman named Irina Khrabroff, who became her lifelong friend, traveling companion and, later, her dealer and business manager. When they first met Sipprell still shared her apartment with Beers, but when Beers moved out in 1923 Khrabroff moved in. Later that year Khrabroff married a man named Feodor Cekich, and the three of them lived together in the same apartment for many years. In 1924 the threesome traveled to Europe, where Sipprell photographed the Adriatic Coast and, through connections with the Khrabroffs, members of the Moscow arts community. Later these same connections gave her access to many Russian expatriates whom she also photographed, including Countess Alexandra Tolstoy, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Sergei Koussevitzky. Two years later Sipprell and Khrabroff, without her husband, traveled again to Yugoslavia, and Sipprell made another series of photographs of the countryside and the people. Throughout the 1920s Sipprell continued to exhibit and have her work published, and in 1928 and 1929 she was given her first one-person shows, at San Jose State Teachers College. She also continued her friendship and living arrangement with the Khrabroffs, even after they had a daughter in 1927. However, around 1932 tension developed between Sipprell and her close friends over the rise of the Stalinist government in Russia. The Khrabroffs remained loyal to the ousted czarists, and they felt Sipprell’s continued association with some who were sympathetic to the Stalinists was intolerable. By 1935 the friendship was over, and Sipprell started living on her own for the first time. In 1937 Sipprell moved to Manchester, Vermont, at the suggestion of Vermont poets Walter Hard and Robert Frost. Soon after she met Phyllis Fenner (1899–1982), a writer, librarian, and anthologist of children’s books. Fourteen years younger than Sipprell, Fenner soon became Sipprell’s housemate and traveling companion. This relationship continued through the final thirty-eight years of Sipprell’s life. In the mid-1960s, they had architect Harold Olmsted build them a house in Manchester, which included the first darkroom that Sipprell ever had in the same place she lived. Clara Sipprell died in Apr. 1975 at the age of eighty-nine. Jessica Beers had died in 1957 and is buried at Acacia Memorial Park (14951 Bothell Way NE, Seattle, WA 98155).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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