Feb. 28th, 2017

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Charles Kenneth Scott Moncrieff, MC was a Scottish writer, most famous for his English translation of most of Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu, which he published under the Shakespearean title Remembrance of Things Past.
Born: September 25, 1889, Stirlingshire, United Kingdom
Died: February 28, 1930, Rome
Education: University of Edinburgh
Buried: Cimitero Comunale Monumentale Campo Verano, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy
Find A Grave Memorial# 149830874
Books: Marcel Proust - An English Tribute, more

Cemetery: The Campo Verano is a cemetery in Rome that was founded in the early XIX century. The cemetery is currently divided into sections: the Jewish cemetery, the Catholic cemetery, and the monument to the victims of the World War I.

Address: Piazzale del Verano, 1, 00185 Roma, Italy (41.90173, 12.52183)
Phone: +39 06 4923 6331
Website: www.cimitericapitolini.it

Place
The Verano is located in the quartiere Tiburtino of Rome, near the Basilica of San Lorenzo fuori le mura. The name verano a refers to the Ancient Roman campo dei Verani that was located here. The zone contained ancient Christian catacombs. But a modern cemetery was not established till the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy during 1807-1812, when the architect Giuseppe Valadier was commissioned designs after the Edict of Saint Cloud required burials to take place outside of the city walls. The papal authorities still have some control over the administration. Pope Francis celebrated All Saints Day Mass here on a papal visit to the Cemetery on Saturday, November 1, 2014.

Notable queer burials at Campo Verano:
• Ronald Firbank (1886-1926), English novelist. Openly gay and chronically shy, he was an enthusiastic consumer of alcohol and cannabis. He died of lung disease in Rome, aged 40.
• Charles Kenneth Scott Moncrieff (1889-1930), Scottish writer, most famous for his English translation of most of Proust's “À la recherche du temps perdu,” which he published under the Shakespearean title “Remembrance of Things Past.” During his time at Edinburgh University, Scott Moncrieff met Philip Bainbrigge, then an undergraduate at Trinity College, Cambridge, later a schoolmaster at Shrewsbury and the author of miscellaneous homoerotic odes to Uranian Love. Bainbrigge was killed in action at Épehy in September 1918. At the January 1918 wedding of Robert Graves, Scott Moncrieff met the war poet Wilfred Owen in whose work he took a keen interest. Through his role at the War Office Scott Moncrieff attempted to secure Owen a Home posting which would have prevented his return to the Front. According to Owen's biographer the evidence suggests a “brief sexual relationship that somehow failed.” After Owen's death, Scott Moncrieff's failure to secure a "safe" posting for Owen was viewed with suspicion by his friends, including Osbert Sitwell and Siegfried Sassoon. During the 1920s, Scott Moncrieff maintained a rancorous rivalry with Sitwell, who depicted him unflatteringly as "Mr. X" in “All At Sea.” Scott Moncrieff responded with the pamphlet “The Strange and Striking Adventure of Four Authors in Search of a Character, 1926,” a satire on the Sitwell family. Through his friendship with the young Noël Coward, he made the acquaintance of Mrs Astley Cooper and became a frequent house guest at her home Hambleton Hall. He dedicated the first volume of his translation of Proust to Mrs Astley Cooper. Scott Moncrieff died of cancer at Calvary Hospital in Rome in 1930. His remains lie in a small communal ossuary with those who died in the same month at the same convent. The exact place can be located by doing a search by name and date of death at the gate.
• George Santayana (1863-1952) was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. Originally from Spain, Santayana was raised and educated in the United States from the age of eight and identified himself as an American, although he always kept a valid Spanish passport. He wrote in English and is generally considered an American man of letters. Santayana never married. His romantic life, if any, is not well understood. Some evidence, including a comment Santayana made late in life comparing himself to A. E. Housman, and his friendships with people who were openly homosexual and bisexual, has led scholars to speculate that Santayana was perhaps homosexual or bisexual himself, but it remains unclear whether he had any actual heterosexual or homosexual relationships. At the age of forty-eight, Santayana left his position at Harvard and returned to Europe permanently, never to return to the United States. His last wish was to be buried in the Spanish pantheon in Rome.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Henry James was an American-born British writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of 19th-century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
Born: April 15, 1843, New York City, New York, United States
Died: February 28, 1916, Chelsea, London, United Kingdom
Education: Harvard University
Lived: 16 Lewes Crescent, Brighton
Lamb House, West St, Rye, Sussex TN31 7ES, UK (50.95023, 0.73273)
15 Beaumont Street, Oxford
34 De Vere Gardens, W8
21 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5TS, UK
Buried: Cambridge Cemetery
Find A Grave Memorial# 538
Short stories: The Beast in the Jungle, The Aspern Papers, more
Movies: The Innocents, The Heiress, The Portrait of a Lady, more

House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: Hale House, 34 De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London W8 5AQ, Henry James (1843-1916), “Writer, lived here 1886-1902.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840-1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe. The relationship between Woolson and Henry James has prompted much speculation by biographers, especially Lyndall Gordon in her 1998 book, “A Private Life of Henry James.” In 1893 Woolson rented an elegant apartment on the Grand Canal of Venice. Suffering from influenza and depression, she either jumped or fell to her death from a fourth story window in the apartment in January 1894, surviving for about an hour after the fall. The event stunned Henry James. After travelling to Italy for Woolson’s funeral, James found himself returning to and eventually moving into the house that she had once occupied at 15 Beaumont St, Oxford OX1 2NA.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: Lamb House was the home of E. F. Benson and model for Mallards in the Lucia series.

Address: West Street, Rye, East Sussex TN31 7ES, UK (50.95023, 0.73273)
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 11.00-17.00 (managed by the National Trust)
Phone: +44 1580 762334
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lamb-house
English Heritage Building ID: 435064 (Grade II, 1951)

Place
Lamb House is an XVIII century house situated in Rye, East Sussex, and in the ownership of the National Trust. The house is run as a writer’s house museum. It was the home of Henry James from 1897 to 1916, and later of E.F. Benson. Lamb House was built in 1722 by James Lamb, a wealthy wine merchant and local politician. In the winter of 1726 King George I took refuge at the house after his ship was washed ashore at nearby Camber Sands. James Lamb gave up his bedroom for the King, while Mrs Lamb gave birth to a baby boy during the night. The child was named George and the king consented to be the boy’s godfather. A detached Garden Room, with a large bay window overlooking the street, was built at right angles to the house in 1743, and originally served as a banqueting room. Both Henry James and E. F. Benson later used the Garden Room as a base for their writing during the summer months. The Garden Room was destroyed by a German bomb in 1940. Benson wrote lovingly of both the garden and house, which he renamed Mallards, in his popular Mapp and Lucia novels. Lamb House is the subject of Joan Aiken’s supernatural book “The Haunting of Lamb House” (1993), comprising three novellas about residents of the house at different times, including James and Benson (both of whom also wrote ghost stories.) Other tenants have included, the novelist Rumer Godden, the author and academic A. C. Benson, the author, politician for homosexual law reform H. Montgomery Hyde, the publisher Sir Brian Batsford, politician William Mabane, 1st Baron Mabane, the literary agent Graham Watson and the writers John Senior and Sarah Philo. In 1950 the widow of Henry James’s nephew gave Lamb House to the National Trust. Today the house is administered and maintained on the Trust’s behalf by its current tenant. Some of James’s personal possessions are on display, and there is an extensive walled garden, designed by Alfred Parsons at the request of Henry James, which is open to the public along with the house.

Life
Who: Henry James, OM (April 15, 1843 – February 28, 1916), Edward Frederic Benson (July 24, 1867 – February 29, 1940) and Harford Montgomery Hyde (August 14, 1907 – August 10, 1989)
The principal setting of four of the Mapp and Lucia books is a town called Tilling, which is recognizably based on Rye, East Sussex, where E.F. Benson lived for many years and served as mayor from 1934 (he moved there in 1918.) Benson’s home, Lamb House, served as the model for Mallards, Mapp’s—and for a short while Lucia’s—home in some of the Tilling series. There really was a handsome Garden Room adjoining the street but it was destroyed by a bomb in WWII. Lamb House attracted writers: it was earlier the home of Henry James, and later of Rumer Godden. E.F. Benson donated a Church window of the main parish church in Rye, St Mary’s, in memory of his brother, as well as providing a gift of a viewing platform overlooking the Town Salts. Benson died in 1940 of throat cancer at the University College Hospital, London. He is buried Rye Cemetery (Rye Hill, Rye, East Sussex, TN31 7NH). H. Montgomery Hyde , born in Belfast, was a barrister, politician (Ulster Unionist MP for Belfast North), prolific author and biographer. He was deselected by his party in 1959, after arguing in favour of the decriminalisation of homosexuality in a debate about implementing the Wolfenden report on 2November 6, 1958: a debate he had been most prominent in seeking. Indeed, Hyde was the most vocal of any MP in the 1950s about homosexual law reform. Hyde was earlier a tenant of Lamb House, once home to his distant cousin, Henry James.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: Henry James (1843-1916), American novelist, author of such classics as “What Maisie Knew,” “The Ambassadors” and “The American,” amongst other works, and a leading figure in literary realism, spent much of his life and died in England. He spent Christmas of 1905 and 1906 at 16 Lewes Cres, Brighton BN2 1GB.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 4 Cheyne Walk, Mary Ann Cross (née Evans) aka George Eliot (1819–1880), "Novelist died here"

Address: Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5TS, UK

Place
Cheyne Walk is a historic street, in Chelsea, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Cheyne Walk forms part of the A3212 and A3220 trunk roads; it extends eastwards from the southern end of Finborough Road past the Battersea and Albert Bridges, after which the A3212 becomes the Chelsea Embankment. It marks the boundary of the, now withdrawn, extended London Congestion Charge Zone. East of the Walk is the Chelsea Physic Garden with its cedars. To the West is a collection of residential houseboats which have been in situ since the 1930s. Cheyne Walk takes its name from William Lord Cheyne who owned the manor of Chelsea until 1712. Most of the houses were built in the early XVIII century. Before the construction in the XIX century of the busy Embankment, which now runs in front of it, the houses fronted the River Thames. The most prominent building is Carlyle Mansions.

Notable queer residents of Cheyne Walk:
• At the time of his death, Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), composer, was living at 1 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5LS.
• George Eliot (1819-1880) spent the last three weeks of her life at 4 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5QZ. Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, acquired it in 2015.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 16 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5RA, Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882) and Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837–1909), "Lived here." Dante Gabriel Rossetti was banned from keeping peacocks due to the noise.
• Henry James (1843-1916) spent his last years at 21 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5RA.
• W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) stayed at 27 Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5HH, in 1904, the same address of Bram Stoker.
• Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier of Brighton (1907-1989) and Jill Esmond lived at 74 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW3 5TT, in the 1930s.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 96 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW10 0DQ, James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) "Painter and ercher lived here." Also Diana Mitford, Lady Mosley (1910-2003) lived at no. 96 with her first husband Bryan Guinness in 1932.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) and Peter Pears (1910-1986) lived at Ursula Nettleship’s house, 104A Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London SW10 0DQ, 8 weeks at £1 a week each. Light and heath, £2, telephone £9. Total £27.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.

Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
Website: http://mountauburn.org/
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.

Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997) (Location: Willow Pond Knoll, Lot 11000), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman, later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman (Location: Willow Pond Knoll, Lot 11000).
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Charlotte Cushman (1816–1876) (Location: Palm Avenue, Lot 4236), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Martha May Eliot (1891–1978), was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. She was a scion of the Eliot family, an influential American family that is regarded as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy and held sway over the American education system in the late XIX and early XX centuries. Her father, Christopher Rhodes Eliot, was a Unitarian minister, and her grandfather, William G. Eliot, was the first chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis. The poet, playwright, critic, and Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot was her first cousin. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner. She was cremated at Mount Auburn but buried elsewhere.
• Mary Katherine Keemle "Kate" Field (1838-1896), American journalist, lecturer, and actress, of eccentric talent. She was the daughter of actors Joseph M. Field and Eliza Riddle. Kate Field never married. In October 1860, while visiting his mother's home in Florence, she met the celebrated British novelist Anthony Trollope. She became one of his closest friends and was the subject of Trollope's high esteem. Trollope scholars have speculated on the nature of their warm friendship. Twenty-four of his letters to Kate survive, at the Boston Public Library; hers to Trollope do not.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915) (Location: Elder Path, Lot 2700), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) (Location: Oxalis Path, Lot 2900) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Charles Hammond Gibson, Jr. (1874–1954) (Location: Sweetbrier Path, Lot 472), Boston writer and bachelor bon vivant, best known for having preserved his family's Beacon Street home as a museum of Victorian style and taste. “The Wounded Eros,” a short documentary film by Todd Gernes, explores the aesthetic relationship between Gibson's literary production and the material culture contexts of his museum and library, set within the social history of turn-of-the-century gay Boston. He had an enduring relationship with the eccentric self-styled "Count" Maurice de Mauny Talvande.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908) (Location: Hemlock Path, Lot 3747), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925) (Location: Bellwort Path, Lot 3401), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906) (Location: Thistle Path, Lot 709), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) (Location: Walnut Avenue, Lot 7108) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848-1920) (Location: Pilgrim Path, Lot 4141) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851-1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934) (Location: Willow Avenue, Lot 453), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Karl-Maria Kertbeny or Károly Mária Kertbeny was an Austrian-born Hungarian journalist, memoirist, and human rights campaigner. He is best known for coining the words heterosexual and homosexual.
Born: February 28, 1824, Vienna, Austria
Died: January 23, 1882, Budapest, Hungary
Buried: Kerepesi Cemetery, Budapest, Budapest Capital District, Hungary
Find A Grave Memorial# 85895043

Cemetery: Karl-Maria Kertbeny (1824-1882) was an Austrian-born Hungarian journalist, memoirist, and human rights campaigner. He is best known for coining the words heterosexual and homosexual. The Benkert family moved to Budapest when he was a child — he was equally at home in Austria, Germany and Hungary. Hungarian writer and literary historian Lajos Hatvany has described him in these terms: "This moody, fluttering, imperfect writer is one of the best and undeservedly forgotten Hungarian memoir writers." As a young man, while working as a bookseller's apprentice, Benkert had a close friend who was gay. This young man killed himself after being blackmailed by an extortionist. Benkert later recalled that it was this tragic episode which led him to take a close interest in the subject of homosexuality, following what he called his "instinctive drive to take issue with every injustice." His gravesite was traced in 2001 by sociologist Judit Takács who conducted extensive research on his life. It is located in Kerepesi Cemetery (Budapest, Fiumei út 16-18, 1086 Hungary), the final resting place of numerous prominent Hungarians of the XIX and XX centuries. The gay community set a new tombstone on it, and since 2002 it has been a recurring event at Hungarian gay festivals to place a wreath at his grave.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Buried: in the back yard of the sister of his companion Peter Fisher in Springfield, MA
Buried alongside: Peter Fisher
Find A Grave Memorial# 161932869

Peter Randolph Fisher graduated from high school in Eastchester, NY. He did two years at Amherst College, a short term in the Air Force then graduated from Columbia University in 1969. He joined Gay Activist Alliance (GAA) in 1970 and met his lover Marc Rubin (a founder and leader of New York City's Gay Teachers Association) - they were together until Marc's death in 2007. Fisher’s first book, The Gay Mystique, was published by Stein & Day in 1972 and was named co-winner of the American Library Association’s Gay Book of the Year Award. Fisher and Rubin were joint authors of the book Special Teachers/Special Boys. Rubin also wrote poetry from 1954 to 1969 and 1970-1974 with at least one poem published. Peter and Marc are together in the 1971 Out of the Closet film. Marc Rubin was the one taking care of Tom Doerr, a fellow GAA friend, dying of AIDS. Partners for 37 years, Fisher donated Marc's and his own papers to the Center, The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center, in NYC. Peter committed suicide on August 15, 2012, apparently never getting over losing Marc.

Together from 1970 to 2007: 37 years.
Marc Rubin (April 2, 1932 - February 28, 2007)
Peter Fisher (May 19, 1944 - August 15, 2012)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Married: October 4, 2008

Gloria Galasso aka G. J. Paterson lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma, with her partner since 1980 (and spouse since 2008), Miz Patricia, 3 dogs and 5 cats, rescue pets. She writes book reviews for The Gayly, a regional newspaper, and is at work on a new novel. She is active in the LGBT civil rights struggle and is a proud member and volunteer at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center. “It never was about the musician or the instrument - it was about the laser notes in a hall of mirrors, the music itself. It was going to change the world for the better and it has. I am old now and only a house cat sunning herself in the window - but I was a tigress once and I remember. I still remember.” Bird
of Paradise, G.J. Paterson’s first novel, a mystery/thriller set in 1978 in the Los Angeles music world, was released on October 31, 2013.

Together since 1980: 35 years.
Gloria Galasso (born November 14)
Miz Patricia (February 28)
Married: October 4, 2008



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Sir Stephen Harold Spender CBE was an English poet, novelist and essayist who concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle in his work.
Born: February 28, 1909, Kensington, London, United Kingdom
Died: July 16, 1995, Westminster, United Kingdom
Education: Gresham's School
University of Oxford
University College School
Lived: 15 Loudoun Road, NW8
25 Randolph Crescent, W9
Buried: St Mary Paddington Green Churchyard, Paddington, City of Westminster, Greater London, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 7537182
Parents: Harold Spender
Nominations: Lambda Literary Award for Gay Fiction
Spouse: Natasha Spender (m. 1941–1995), Inez Pearn (m. 1936–1939)

House: In 1933 W.H. Auden (1907-1973) lodged at 25 Randolph Cres, London W9 1DP, with Stephen Spender, English poet and author. Spender's sexuality has been the subject of debate. Spender's seemingly changing attitudes have caused him to be labeled bisexual. Many of his friends in his earlier years were gay. Spender himself had many affairs with men in his earlier years, most notably with Tony Hyndman (who is called "Jimmy Younger" in his memoir “World Within World”). Following his affair with Muriel Gardiner he shifted his focus to heterosexuality, though his relationship with Hyndman complicated both this relationship and his short-lived marriage to Inez Pearn (1936–39). His marriage to Natasha Litvin in 1941 seems to have marked the end of his romantic relationships with men, although not the end of all homosexual activity, as his unexpurgated diaries reveal.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: In 1963, W.H. Auden stayed with Stephen Spender (1909-1995) at this latter home at 15 Loudoun Rd, London NW8 0LS. This is the house where Spender died of a heart attack on 16 July 1995, aged 86. He was buried in the graveyard of St Mary on Paddington Green Church (St Mary's Square, London W2 1LG).



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Stephen James Napier Tennant was a British socialite known for his decadent lifestyle. He was called "the brightest" of the "Bright Young People".
Born: April 21, 1906, Wilsford cum Lake, United Kingdom
Died: February 28, 1987, Wilsford cum Lake, United Kingdom
Lived: Wilsford Manor, Wilsford cum Lake, Amesbury, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 7BL, UK (51.15668, -1.80983)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161194839
Parents: Edward Tennant, 1st Baron Glenconner
Partner: Siegfried Sassoon
Books: Blaydar's Children, Dark Winter Riders, Leaves from a Missionary's Notebook
Grandparent: Sir Charles Tennant, 1st Baronet

Stephen Tennant was a British aristocrat known for his decadent lifestyle. It is said, albeit apocryphally, that he spent most of his life in bed. During the 20s and 30s, Tennant was an important member - the "Brightest", it is said - of the "Bright Young People." His friends included Rex Whistler, Cecil Beaton, the Sitwells (Dame Edith Sitwell and Sir Osbert Sitwell), Lady Diana Manners and the Mitford girls – part of the set that made the Nordstrom Sisters popular at The Ritz in 1939. He is widely considered to be the model for Cedric Hampton in Nancy Mitford's novel Love in a Cold Climate; one of the inspirations for Lord Sebastian Flyte in Waugh's Brideshead Revisited and a model for Hon. Miles Malpractice in some of his other novels. Stephen Tennant had a sexual affair with the poet Siegfried Sassoon. His relationship with Sassoon was to be his most important: it lasted some four years before Tennant off-handedly put an abrupt end to it. Sassoon was reportedly depressed afterwards for three months, until he married in 1933 and became a father in 1936. Siegfried Sassoon died one week before his 81st birthday in 1967. When Tennant died in 1987, he had far outlived most of his contemporaries.

Together from 1929 to 1933: 4 years.
Siegfried Loraine Sassoon (September 8, 1886 – September 1, 1967)
Stephen James Napier Tennant (April 21, 1906 – February 28, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: For most of his life, Stephen Tennant tried to start or finish a novel – “Lascar: A Story You Must Forget.” It is popularly believed that he spent the last 17 years of his life in bed at his family manor at Wilsford cum Lake, Wiltshire, which he had redecorated by Syrie Maugham.

Address: Wilsford cum Lake, Amesbury, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 7BL, UK (51.15668, -1.80983)
Phone: +44 1980 676 109
Website: http://www.wilsfordmanor.co.uk/

Place
Built at the beginning of the XX century, Design by Detmar Blow (1867-1939)
The two principle houses in the parish are Wilsford Manor and Lake House, with both manors likely referenced in the Domesday book; held by Hamon de Masci of Hugh de Avranches, assumed to be Lake, and other by Hugh of Robert fitz Gerold, Wilsford. Wilsford Manor house was built on the site of an older house. Detmar Blow had previously worked on the Lake House restoration, as a reproduction XVII century manor house with stone mullioned windows, and stone and flint chequer-work walls. Before 1247 the Verdun family held the manor of Wilsford, who maintained a taper continually burning at the high altar of Salisbury Cathedral. It continued in the hands of the Verdun family, through service of ¼ knight’s fee, rental from the Bishop of Salisbury, and again by the service of maintaining a candle. After 1426-8, when it was still held of the Bishop but by unknown means, the overlordship ends. Upon the death of Theobald in 1316, the manor was held by his widow, Elizabeth de Burgh, after which it was transferred to Thomas de Furnival, son of one of Theobald’s female heirs. Through marriage the manor came to Thomas de Neville, later Lord Furnival. Their daughter, Maud, married John Talbot, Lord Furnival and later Earl of Shrewsbury. The manor then descended with the Talbot earldom of Shrewsbury throughout the XV and XVI centuries. In 1766 the manor was sold to John Pinkney, who along with his successor owned other holdings in the parish, and united the remaining freeholds from the manor. By 1846 the manor was in the hands of Giles Loder until it was subsequently acquired by Arthur Newall in 1890. From the early XX century the estate was leased to Sir Edward Priaulx Tennant, who bought the estate after becoming Lord Glenconner in 1911. He also united the manors of Lake and Wilsford in 1918. Glenconner’s widow married Viscount of Falloden (Foreign Secretary during WWI) who lived there until his wife died in 1928. The Tennant family maintained the manor house, and in 1932 it was occupied by the Hon. David Tennant and his wife, actress Hermione Baddeley (younger sister of Angela Baddeley, who married Glen Byam Shaw, former lover of Siegfried Sassoon, before Sassoon met Stephen Tennant), and subsequently by the Hon. Stephen Tennant, famous for his decadent lifestyle and association with, amongst others, Greta Garbo, Cecil Beaton, E.M. Foster, Virginia Woolf and Siegfried Sassoon. The Nobel Peace Prize for Literature winner V.S. Naipaul lived in a cottage in the grounds of Wilsford Manor during Stephen Tennant’s ownership. The author spent time walking around Springbottom while staying at Wilsford Manor, and much of his 1987, primarily autobiographical, “Enigma of Arrival” is set in the Wiltshire landscape.

Life
Who: Stephen James Napier Tennant (April 21, 1906 – February 28, 1987)
Stephen Tennant was a British socialite known for his decadent lifestyle. During the 1920s and 1930s, Tennant was an important member – the "Brightest,” it is said – of the "Bright Young People." His friends included Rex Whistler, Cecil Beaton, the Sitwells, Lady Diana Manners and the Mitford girls. He is widely considered to be the model for Cedric Hampton in Nancy Mitford’s novel “Love in a Cold Climate,” one of the inspirations for Lord Sebastian Flyte in Evelyn Waugh’s “Brideshead Revisited,” and a model for the Hon. Miles Malpractice in some of Waugh’s other novels. During the 1920s and 1930s, Tennant had a sexual affair with the poet Siegfried Sassoon. Prior to this, he had proposed to a friend, Elizabeth Lowndes, but had been rejected (Philip Hoare relates how Tennant discussed plans with Lowndes about bringing his nanny with them on their honeymoon.) His relationship with Sassoon, however, was to be his most important: it lasted some four years before Tennant off-handedly put an abrupt end to it. Sassoon was reportedly depressed afterwards for three months, until Sassoon married in 1933 and became a father in 1936. When Tennant died in 1987, he had far outlived most of his contemporaries. The contents of Wilsford Manor were sold by Sotheby’s raising some £1.6 million.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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