Mar. 5th, 2017

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Buried: Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA, Plot: Court of Liberty, Lot 1475
Buried alongside: Paul Winfield
Find A Grave Memorial# 10782150

Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries is a corporation that owns and operates a chain of cemeteries and mortuaries in Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties in Southern California.

Addresses:
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Hollywood Hills), 6300 Forest Lawn Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.14688, -118.32208)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Glendale), 1712 S Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, USA (34.12524, -118.24371)
Forest Lawn Cemetery (Cathedral City), 69855 Ramon Rd, Cathedral City, CA 92234, USA (33.81563, -116.4419)

Place
The company was founded by a group of San Francisco businessmen in 1906. Dr. Hubert Eaton assumed management control in 1917 and is credited with being Forest Lawn’s "founder" because of his origination of the "memorial-park" plan. The first location was in Tropico which later became part of Glendale, California. Its facilities are officially known as memorial parks. The parks are best known for the large number of celebrity burials, especially in the Glendale and Hollywood Hills locations. Eaton opened the first mortuary (funeral home) on dedicated cemetery grounds after a long battle with established funeral directors who saw the "combination" operation as a threat. He remained as general manager until his death in 1966 when he was succeeded by his nephew, Frederick Llewellyn.

Notable queer burials at Forest Lawn Memorial Parks:
• Lucile Council (1898-1964) (Glendale, Section: Section G, Map #: 01, Lot: 5, Space: 9, Property: Ground) and Florence Yoch (1890–1972) were influential California landscape designers, practicing in the first half of the XX century in Southern California.
• George Cukor (1899-1983) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Honor Map #: G28, Lot: 0, Space: 69, Property: Distinguished Memorial), American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations.
• Brad Davis (1949-1991) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Remembrance/Columbarium of Valor, Map #: G64054, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: N.A.), American actor, known for starring in the 1978 film Midnight Express and 1982 film Querelle. Davis married Susan Bluestein, an Emmy Award-winning casting director. They had one child, Alex, a transgender man born as Alexandra. Davis acknowledged having had sex with men and being bisexual in an interview with Boze Hadleigh.
• Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) (Glendale, Section: Utility Columbarium, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 4524, Property: Niche) died penniless in Los Angeles on January 6, 1949, and was buried under the name “Gayne Adolphus Demeyer”.
• Helen Ferguson (1901-1977) (Glendale, Section: Ascension, Map #: L-7296, Lot: N.A., Space:1, Property: N.A.), for nearly thirty years, former actress and publicist, had an intimate relationship with Barbara Stanwyck. In 1933, Ferguson left acting to focus on publicity work, a job she became very successful in and which made her a major power in Hollywood; she was representing such big name stars as Henry Fonda, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young and Robert Taylor, among others.
• Edmund Goulding (1891–1959) (Glendale, Section: Wee Kirk Churchyard, Map #: A01, Lot: 260, Space: 4, Property: Ground), British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the Ghosts in the 1922 British made Paramount silent “Three Live Ghosts” alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as “Love” (1927), “Grand Hotel” (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, “Dark Victory” (1939) with Bette Davis, and “The Razor's Edge” (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir “Nightmare Alley” (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama “The Dawn Patrol.” He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer.
• Howard Greenfield (1936-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance Wall Crypts, Map #: E25, Lot: 0, Space: 3515, Property: Wall Crypt) and Tory Damon (1939-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance Wall Crypts, Map #: E25, Lot: 0, Space: 3514, Property: Wall Crypt). Damon’s epitaph reads: Love Will Keep Us Together..., Greenfield’s continues: ... Forever.
• Francis Grierson aka Jesse Shepard (1849-1927) (Glendale, Section: Coleus Mezzanine Columbarium, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 1059, Property: Niche), composer and pianist.
• Edward Everett Horton (1886-1970) (Glendale, Section: Whispering Pines, Map #: 03, Lot: 994, Space: 3, Property: Ground Interment, at the top of the hill), American character actor, he had a long career in film, theater, radio, television, and voice work for animated cartoons.
• J. Warren Kerrigan (1879-1947) (Glendale, Section: Sanct. of Prophecy, Holly Terrace, Map #: 01, Lot: 0, Space: 10698, Property: Mausoleum Crypt) was an American silent film actor and film director. Kerrigan was homosexual. He never married, and lived with his lover James Vincent from about 1914 to Kerrigan's death in 1947.
• Charles Laughton (1899–1962) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Remembrance, Map #: C-310, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: wall crypt), English stage and film character actor, director, producer and screenwriter.
• W. Dorr Legg (1904-1994) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Eternal Love, Map #: E09, Lot: 1561, Space: 3, Property: Ground), landscape architect and one of the founders of the U.S. gay rights movement, then called the homophile movement.
• David Lewis (1903-1987) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 19748, Property: Niche) and James Whale (1889-1957) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 20076, Property: Niche). When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer, James Curtis, had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale’s.
• Liberace (1919-1987) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Courts of Remembrance, Map #: A39, Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: Distinguished Memorial, Sarcophagus 4), American pianist, singer, and actor. A child prodigy and the son of working-class immigrants, Liberace enjoyed a career spanning four decades of concerts, recordings, television, motion pictures, and endorsements.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Revelation, Map #: G01, Lot: 3275, Space: 1, Property: Ground) and Roger Horwitz (1941-1986) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Revelation, Map #: G01, Lot: 3275, Space: 2, Property: Ground). Horwitz’s headstone reads: “My little friend, we sail together, if we sail at all.”
• Marion Morgan (1881-1971) (Glendale, Section: Florentine Col. - Dahlia Terr. GM, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 8446, Property: Niche), choreographer, longtime companion of motion picture director Dorothy Arzner.
• George Nader (1921-2002), Mark Miller, with friend Rock Hudson (1925-1985) (Cathedral City, Section: N.A., Map #: N.A., Lot: N.A., Space: N.A., Property: N.A.). Nader inherited the interest from Rock Hudson’s estate after Hudson’s death from AIDS complications in 1985. Nader lived in Hudson’s LA home until his own death. This is a memorial, George Nader’s ashes were actually scattered at sea.
• Alla Nazimova (1879-1945) (Glendale, Section: Whispering Pines, Map #: N.A., Lot: 1689, Space: N.A., Property: N.A.), actress.
• Orry-Kelly (1897-1964) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Columbarium of Remembrance & Radian, Map #: 1E2, Lot: 0, Space: 60282, Property: Niche), prominent Australian-American Hollywood costume designer. 3 times Oscar Winner. His partner was Milton Owen, a former stage manager, a relationship that was acknowledged also by Kelly's mother. When Orry-Kelly died, his pallbearers included Cary Grant, Tony Curtis, Billy Wilder and George Cukor and Jack Warner read his eulogy.
• Charles Pierce (1926–1999) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Columbarium of Providence, Map #: ELC0, Lot: 0, Space: 64953, Property: Niche), one of the XX century's foremost female impersonators, particularly noted for his impersonation of Bette Davis. He performed at many clubs in New York, including The Village Gate, Ted Hook's OnStage, The Ballroom, and Freddy's Supper Club. His numerous San Francisco venues included the Gilded Cage, Cabaret/After Dark, Gold Street, Bimbo's 365 Club, Olympus, The Plush Room, the Venetian Room at the Fairmont Hotel, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Opera House. He died in North Hollywood, California, aged 72, and was cremated. His memorial service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park was carefully planned and scripted by Pierce before his death.
• George Quaintance (1902-1957) (Glendale, Section: Eventide, Map #: 01, Lot: 2116, Space: 1, Property: Ground), American artist famous for his "idealized, strongly homoerotic" depictions of men in physique magazines. In 1938, he returned home with his companion Victor Garcia, described as Quaintance's "model, life partner, and business associate". In the early 1950s, Quaintance and Garcia moved to Rancho Siesta, which became the home of Studio Quaintance, a business venture based around Quaintance's artworks.
• Robert J. Sandoval (1950–2006) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Honor, Map #: G58, Lot: 7463, Space: 1, Property: Garden Crypt), judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. Sandoval and his long-time partner, Bill Martin, adopted a son in 1992, making them one of the first gay male couples in Los Angeles County to adopt a child. The couple named their son Harrison Martin-Sandoval, combining their last names to symbolize their familial unity. Sandoval died in 2006. He is survived by his partner of 24 years, Bill Martin, and his son, Harrison Martin-Sandoval. After his death, his alma mater McGeorge School of Law honored his contributions by placing him on the Wall of Honor.
• Emery Shaver (1903-1964) and Tom Lyle (1896-1976) (Glendale, Section: Col. of Memory, Memorial Terr, Map #: 1, Lot: 0, Space: 20047, Property: Niche). Tom Lyle was the founder of Maybelline.
• Ethel Waters (1896-1977) (Glendale, Section: Garden of Ascension, Map #: E48, Lot: 7152, Space: 4, Property: Ground), African-American blues, jazz and gospel vocalist and actress. In 1962. Ethel Waters had a lesbian relationship with dancer Ethel Williams that led to them being nicknamed “The Two Ethels.”
• Paul Winfield (1941–2004) (Hollywood Hills, Section: Court of Liberty, Map #: H18, Lot: 1475, Space: 2, Property: Garden Crypt) was an American television, film and stage actor. He was known for his portrayal of a Louisiana sharecropper who struggles to support his family during the Great Depression in the landmark film “Sounder,” which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1978 television miniseries “King,” for which he was nominated for an Emmy Award. Winfield was also known to science fiction fans for his roles in “The Terminator,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” and “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” Winfield was gay, but remained discreet about it in the public eye. His partner of 30 years, architect Charles Gillan, Jr., died on March 5, 2002, of bone cancer. Winfield died of a heart attack in 2004 at age 62, at Queen of Angels – Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles. Winfield and Gillan are interred together.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Sir Edwin Hardy Amies, KCVO, known as Hardy Amies, was an English fashion designer, founder of the Hardy Amies label and best known for his official title as dressmaker for Queen Elizabeth II, from her ...
Born: July 17, 1909, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 5, 2003, London, United Kingdom
Education: Brentwood School, Essex
Lived: 29 Cornwall Gardens, SW7
70 Delaware Mansions, Elgin Avenue, W9
17b Eldon Road, W8
Find A Grave Memorial# 7289430
Books: ABC of Men's Fashion, more
Organization founded: Hardy Amies

Sir Edwin Hardy Amies was an English fashion designer, founder of the Hardy Amies label and best known for his official title as dressmaker for Queen Elizabeth II, from her accession to the throne 1952 until his retirement in 1989. He established the monarch’s crisp, understated style of dress. “I don’t think she feels clothes which are too chic are exactly very friendly,” he told one fashion editor. “The Queen’s attitude is that she must always dress for the occasion”. Initially discreet about his homosexuality, Amies became more candid in old age; and, when speaking of Sir Norman Hartnell, he commented: "It's quite simple. He was a silly old queen and I'm a clever old queen". Amies and his partner, Kenneth Fleetwood, Design Director
of Hardy Amies Ltd, were together for 43 years until Fleetwood's death in 1996. Amies died at home in 2003, aged 93. In 1961, Amies made fashion history by staging the first men's ready-to-wear catwalk shows, at the Savoy Hotel, London. The runway show was a first on many levels, as it was both the first time music was played and that the designer accompanied models on the catwalk.

Together from 1953 to 1996: 43 years.
Sir Edwin Hardy Amies (July 17, 1909 - March 5, 2003)
Ken Fleetwood (November 11, 1930 - August 9, 1996)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: Sir Edwin Hardy Amies (1909–2003), dressmaker and fashion designer, was born at 70 Delaware Mansions, Elgin Ave, London W9 2HB, the elder son and eldest of the three children of Herbert William Amies, a surveyor for London county council who later became the council's principal resident agent for the Beacontree housing estate, and his first wife, Mary, née Hardy (d. 1938), who worked as a saleswoman for London court dressmakers until the birth of her daughter and second child in 1915.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: 17B Eldon Rd, Kensington, London W8 5PT, is a narrow London garden, measuring 20 x 7 metres, that had once belonged to fashion designer Hardy Amies (1909-2003) from 1961 to 1979. He had used L-shapes of pleached dwarf pear trees to instil structure and create privacy. The house had since been sold to a young Swedish couple with small children and dogs. They wanted to use the garden primarily for entertaining and favoured a traditionally English style of garden.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

House: “My best memory of London is my early-morning walk along the Serpentine before going to the couture house in Savile Row. At the time, I lived at Cornwall Gardens and the walk gave me exercise, time to think and the opportunity to admire the park.” Edwin Hardy Amies (1909-2003) lived at 29 Cornwall Gardens, Kensington, London SW7 4AP, in the 1990s.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lived: 601 Lorna Ln, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA (34.05636, -118.46985)
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Buried alongside: William Haines
Find A Grave Memorial# 23570553

William Haines was an American film actor and interior designer. On a trip to New York in 1926, Haines met James "Jimmie" Shields, probably as a pick-up on the street. Haines convinced Shields to move to Los Angeles, promising to get him work as an extra. In 1933, Haines was asked to choose between a sham marriage and his relationship with Shields. Haines chose Shields. Haines and Shields remained together for the rest of their lives. Haines died from lung cancer; soon afterward Shields, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, put on Haines' pajamas, took an overdose of pills, and crawled into their bed to die. They were interred side by side in Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery. Joan Crawford, with whom the two men maintained a lifelong friendship, called them "the happiest married couple in Hollywood."

Together from 1926 to 1973: 47 years.
Jimmie Shields (1905 - 1974)
William Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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House: The duplex at 1712 N. Stanley Avenue was once the home of Billy Haines, the legendary interior designer beloved by Old Hollywood actresses such as Joan Crawford, Carol Lombard, and Claudette Colbert.

Address: 1712 N Stanley Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046, USA (34.10212, -118.35583)

Place
Built in 1926
Rare and beautiful, very large English townhouse style Duplex. Designer William Haynes lived and worked here. According to the book “Tallulah!,” William Haines also rented the home to his friend Tallulah Bankhead for a time in the early 1930s. Floorplan features 4 bedrooms, grand staircase, 2 fireplaces, incredible living room with high ceilings and fireplace, patio/garden, gated, formal entry with amazing panelling, spacious kitchen, beautiful hardwood detailing throughout, hardwoodfloors, 12 Ft ceiling, kitchen and kitchenette, beautiful courtyard patio, den or office, 3 bedrooms. Monthly rent for the unit in 2010 was $3,995. In September 1926, after meeting Jimmie Shields, William Haines bought the house at 1712 North Stanley Drive, just off Sunset Boulevard, from Charles and Bettie Kimble. While most of the movie elite was moving into Beverly Hills, Billy opted to stay right in the heart of Hollywood. He paid $12.500 (along with a trust deed of record for $8.000) for the plain, two-story Spanish home. Billy was determined to transform his house into a showplace. One of the older homes in the area, 1712 North Stanley was built soundly, with deep foundations and heavy timbers. Such solid construction had attracted Billy, as it could withstand significant structural changes. He and Jimmie moved in and began taking measurements, drawing up rough floor plans. He abhorred the mishmash of historical styles that so characterized Hollywood architecture of the time, especially the pseudo-Spanish style that had been the rage of the 1910s and early 1920s. When Billy and Jimmie moved from their elegant movie-star house in Hollywood to a more modest but infinitely better located address in Brentwood, Billy didn’t sell the house on North Stanley right away; for a time he rented it out to the actor John Garfield.

Life
Who: Charles William "Billy" Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973) and Jimmie Shields (May 24, 1905 – March 5, 1974)
William Haines was a film actor and interior designer. Haines was discovered by a talent scout and signed with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) in 1922. His career gained momentum when he was loaned out to Columbia Pictures where he received favorable reviews for his role in “The Midnight Express.” Haines returned to MGM and was cast in the 1926 film “Brown of Harvard.” The role solidified his screen persona as a wisecracking, arrogant leading man. By the end of the 1920s, Haines had appeared in a string of successful films and was a popular box office draw. On a trip to New York in 1926, Haines met James "Jimmie" Shields, possibly as a pick-up on the street. Haines convinced Shields to move to Los Angeles, promising to get him work as an extra. The pair were soon living together and viewed themselves as a committed couple. His career was cut short by the 1930s due to his refusal to deny his homosexuality. Haines quit acting in 1935 and started a successful interior design business with his life partner Jimmie Shields, and was supported by friends in Hollywood. Among their early clients were friends such as Joan Crawford, Gloria Swanson, Carole Lombard, Marion Davies and George Cukor. Their lives were disrupted in June 1936 when approximately 100 members of a white supremacist group dragged the two men from their El Porto home (221 Moonstone Street, El Porto, Manhattan Beach) and beat them, because a neighbor had accused the two of propositioning his son. The incident was widely reported at the time, but Manhattan Beach police never brought charges against the couple’s attackers. The child molestation accusations against Haines and Shields were unfounded and the case was dismissed due to a lack of evidence.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: William Haines’s companion of nearly 50 years was devastated by his lover’s death. On the evening of March 5, 1974, Jimmie Shields, 69, telephoned several friends from the Brentwood home at 601 Lorna Lane he had shared with Haines for many years. After making the last call, he swallowed an entire bottle of sleeping pills.

Address: 601 Lorna Ln, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA (34.05636, -118.46985)

Place
L.A.’s most iconic designers, William Haines, lived at 601 Lorna Ln., in a 3,500 sq. ft. home, on a 22,000 sq. ft. lot. Completely out of place in this neighborhood of 3,000-5,000 sq. ft. houses. Haine’s home was considered, by celebrities, and designers alike, to be one of the most tasteful, elegant homes in town. After the grandeur of the previous house in North Stanley, many of Billy’s friends and associates were surprised by his choice. The new house was set in a modest neighbourhood on a small lot, built by the previous owners with a loan from the Federal Housing Administration. (Billy would joke that he decorated castles, but lived in an FHA house.) The property was purchased for just $5.600 from Arthur James Zander on May 22, 1944. Notably, for the first time, Jimmie’s name was included on the deed. Both he and Billy were granted an “undivided, one-half interest” in the property. Billy called in an architect, made plans to raise the ceilings by four feet, then took off for Europe with Jimmie. By the time they’d returned, the house had begun its transformation. “This is where I bring clients and prospective clients,” Billy said. “If we were selling automobiles, this would be our demonstration car. Not that we take pen and ink in hand and sign a client at the table. It’s simply the best way to expose them to a certain quality of life as I live it. Showing is always more meaningful than telling over the barren top of a desk.” He filled his new home with the treasures of his old residence: the antique chairs, the magnificent chandeliers, the priceless paintings. In the living room, a XIX century white marble fireplace rose from the center of the floor. He knocked down a few walls and installed large glass windows overlooking the pool. Outside, Greek and Roman statuary stood among the cypress trees. Most memorable, however was the hand-painted wallpaper that formed an elaborate mural, “Les Incas,” in the sunken living room and the bar area. It was so beautiful that Jack Warner instisted he needed it for a film. Billy agreed to have it all peeled off very carefully and sent over to the studio. In 1951 they’d marked their silver anniversary – 25 years – with an intimate gathering at Lorna Lane. Clifton Webb was there, and Orry-Kelly, and, of course, Joan Crawford and Eleanor Boardman. The house on Lorna Lane was sold in March 1975 for over $200.000 to a husband and wife, both physicians.

Life
Who: Charles William "Billy" Haines (January 2, 1900 – December 26, 1973) and Jimmie Shields (May 24, 1905 – March 5, 1974)
William Haines and Jimmie Shields settled in the Hollywood community of Brentwood and their business prospered until their retirement in the early 1970s, except for a brief interruption when Haines served in WWII. Their clients included Betsy Bloomingdale and Ronald and Nancy Reagan when Reagan was governor of California. Haines and Shields remained together until Haines’ death. Joan Crawford described them as "the happiest married couple in Hollywood." On December 26, 1973, Haines died from lung cancer in Santa Monica, California at the age of 73. Soon afterward, Shields took an overdose of sleeping pills. His suicide note read in part, "Goodbye to all of you who have tried so hard to comfort me in my loss of William Haines, whom I have been with since 1926. I now find it impossible to go it alone, I am much too lonely."



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Cemetery: Billy Haines (1900–1973) and Jimmie Shields (1905–1974) were interred side by side in Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery in Santa Monica (1847 14th St, Santa Monica, CA 90404). In the same cemetery are also buried Dame Christabel Pankhurst (1880–1958) and Evelyn Hooker (1907–1996).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Louise Pearce was an American pathologist at the Rockefeller Institute who helped develop a treatment for African sleeping sickness.
Born: March 5, 1885, Winchester, Massachusetts, United States
Died: August 10, 1959, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Stanford University
Boston University
Johns Hopkins University
Lived: Trevenna Farm, 208 Orchard Rd, Montgomery, NJ 08558, USA (40.42026, -74.66956)
Buried: Henry Skillman Burying Ground, Skillman, Somerset County, New Jersey, USA
Buried alongside: Ida Alexa Ross Wylie
Find A Grave Memorial# 45275089
Field: Pathology
Institution: Rockefeller University

Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for contributing to public health system. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, better known as I.A.R. Wylie, was an Australian-British-American novelist, screenwriter, magazine writer and poet. She is probably best known as the author of the novel that became the basis of the film Keeper of the Flame (1942), directed by George Cukor and starring Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn. More than 30 of her works were made into films between 1915 and 1953. Sara Josephine Baker wrote very little about her personal life; however, she spent much of the later part of her life with Wylie, who self-identified as a 'woman-oriented woman'. When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography. In 1935, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, together with their friend Louise Pearce. While Baker and Pearce left little documentation of their personal lives, Wylie was open about her orientation, although she did not identify either Baker or Pearce in her writings.

Together from 1920 to 1945: 25 years.
Ida Alexa Ross “I.A.R.” Wylie (March 16, 1885 - November 4, 1959)
Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 - February 22, 1945)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: Trevenna Farm, 11.85 Acres In Montgomery Twp, was last sold in 2013

Address: 208 Orchard Rd, Montgomery, NJ 08558, USA (40.42026, -74.66956)

Place
The history of Trevenna Farm is a fascinating tale of a modest country dwelling dating to 1727 evolving into a refined 4U-bedroom home that graciously welcomes gatherings and personal pursuits without losing its pre-revolutionary ambiance. 11.85 acres in Montgomery Township include a pond, extra garage and barn surrounded by deep lawns. An early XIX century expansion added generous formal rooms and a center hall, now joined by a light-filled family room and well-planned kitchen wing. Skillman is named after the Skillman family. The first Skillmans were Dutch, but lived in England before moving to Brooklyn in 1664, according to family accounts. In 1729, Thomas Skillman ventured westward, buying some 500 acres (2.0 km2) of farmland on the Millstone River, near the village of Rocky Hill, for his sons, Jan and Isaac. That purchase was the Skillman family's entry into Montgomery. The Skillman area got its name when the railroads arrived in the 1870s, according to the Skillman family. Joseph A. Skillman, was a teamster who owned "wild Missouri mules," according to family accounts. When railroad workers were trying to lay tracks, their horses got bogged down in thick, clay mud, and Joseph A. Skillman came to the rescue with his mules. Railroad officials also socialized at the home of another Skillman nearby, and the new train station was named for the family. A post office opened in the station and a small village, with a hay press, feed store and hardware store, sprouted around it. It took the Skillman name, too. (While the train station is gone, remnants of the village still exist at the spot where Camp Meeting Avenue and Skillman Road meet. A clay and sculpting supply business occupies some of the buildings.) Also in Skillman was the sprawling New Jersey Village for Epileptics, a 250-acre (1.0 km2) complex opened around 1900 that had its own dairy, laundry, and movie theater. Visitors would arrive by train. Skillman was a busy little country place. There were 1,637 residents in Montgomery in 1910, compared with more than 23,000 now, according to Census data. The community now has more traffic, fewer farms and more houses (specifically developments). In 2011, Montgomery Township sold what remained of the North Princeton Developmental Center (also known as Skillman Village) to Somerset County in order for the village to be demolished.

Life
Who: Ida Alexa Ross Wylie (March 16, 1885 – November 4, 1959), aka I. A. R. Wylie, Louise Pearce (March 5, 1885 – August 10, 1959) & Sara Josephine Baker (November 15, 1873 – February 22, 1945)
Sara Josephine Baker was an American physician notable for making contributions to public health, especially in the immigrant communities of New York City. Not much is known about Baker's personal life because she is said to "have destroyed all her personal papers." However, she spent much of the later part of her life with Ida Alexa Ross Wylie, a novelist, essayist, and Hollywood scriptwriter from Australia who identified as a "woman-oriented woman." When Baker retired in 1923, she started to run their household while writing her autobiography, “Fighting For Life.” In 1935 and four years before her autobiography was published, Baker and Wylie decided to move to Princeton, New Jersey, with their friend Louise Pearce. They lived there together until Baker died in 1945, followed by Pearce, and then later Wylie who died on November 4, 1959 at the age of 74. Ida Alexa Ross Wylie was an Australian-British-American novelist, screenwriter, short story writer, and poet who was honored by the journalistic and literary establishments of her time, and was known around the world. Between 1915 and 1953, more than thirty of her novels and stories were adapted into films, including “Keeper of the Flame” (1942), which was directed by George Cukor and starred Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Louise Pearce was an American pathologist at the Rockefeller Institute who helped develop a treatment for African sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis). The three women were members of Heterodoxy, a feminist biweekly luncheon discussion club, of which many members were lesbian or bisexual. After Baker's death in 1945, Wylie and Pearce continued living at Trevenna Farm until both died in 1959. Her home was described as a "most delightful and interesting place to live and study. Her shelves were crowded with many old editions of medical treasures, the latest scientific literature and the latest works on international questions. She had a wonderful collection of Chinese carvings and porcelains." Ida Alexa Ross Wylie and Dr Louise Pearce are buried at Henry Skillman Burying Ground (Orchard Rd, Trevenna Farms in Rocky Hill, Montgomery Twp., Somerset, NJ) alongside Sarah Wylie, I.A.R. Wylie's bull terrier, died in 1943. Sara Josephine Baker is buried at Poughkeepsie Rural Cemetery (342 South Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Mary Elizabeth Garrett was an American suffragist and philanthropist.
Born: March 5, 1854, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: April 3, 1915, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States
Lived: Evergreen Museum & Library, 4545 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21210, USA (39.34902, -76.62084)
Buried: Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA, GPS (lat/lon): 39.30766, -76.6067
Find A Grave Memorial# 37473299
Parents: John W. Garrett

Mary Garrett was the daughter of John W. Garrett, president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O). She became the wealthiest "spinster woman" in the country with the demise of her father. Miss Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President M. Carey Thomas $15,000,000 to be disposed of as she saw fit. Helen Horowitz's book Power and Passion suggests very strongly that the relationship was longstanding even during M. Carey Thomas’s relationship with Mamie Gwinn, and that Thomas in fact was deeply engaged with Garrett throughout it. Carey Thomas acknowledged Mary as the source of her “greatest happiness” and the one who was responsible for her “ability to do work.” Nor was the fleshly aspect missing, as Carey wrote to her “lover.” “A word or a photo does all, and the pulses beat and heart longs in the same old way.” Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother, she described it as a "loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. She left the college in the capable hands of Marion Edwards Park. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters
of the Thomas Library.

Together from 1904 to 1915: 11 years.
Martha Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857 - December 2, 1935)
Mary Elizabeth Garrett (March 5, 1854 - 1915)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: 48-room Gilded Age mansion housing fine arts and furnishings, a library and formal gardens.

Address: 4545 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21210, USA (39.34902, -76.62084)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-17.00
Phone: +1 443-840-9585
Website: http://evergreenevents.library.jhu.edu/
National Register of Historic Places: 83002932, 1983

Place
Built in the mid-XIX century
Evergreen Museum & Library, also known as Evergreen House, is a historical museum of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. It is located between the campuses of the College of Notre Dame and Loyola College. It, along with Homewood Museum, make up the Johns Hopkins University Museums. John Garrett’s son T. Harrison added a wing containing a billiard room, bowling alley, and a gymnasium, which in later years were converted into an art gallery and private theater. Evergreen House served as a home for the family until 1952, when it was donated to the university. The mansion was bought in 1878 by the president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, John W. Garrett. Railroads were then a key industry in the United States and, as Baltimore’s Garrett family owned and managed one of the biggest rail companies, the home grew and became both luxurious and famous. The house, a magnificent example of Gilded Age architecture, sits on a 26 acres (11 ha) landscaped site in Northern Baltimore. The initial design was a more modest Italianate house but, with the Garretts, it became a 48-room mansion with a 23-karat gold plated bathroom, a 30,000-book library, and a theatre painted by famous Russian artist Léon Bakst. The abundant decorative items in the house reflect the Garretts’ travels and interests, including a red Asian room displaying Japanese and Chinese items, paintings by Picasso, Modigliani, and Degas, glass by Tiffany or Dutch marquetry. The exterior of the house was an influence for the exterior of the Haunted Mansion at Disneyland in California, as noted in “Haunted Mansion: From The Magic Kingdom To The Movies” by Jason Surrell. Today, the university manages the museum and offers guided tours.

Life
Who: Mary Elizabeth Garrett (March 5, 1854 - April 3, 1915)
Mary Garrett was a suffragist and philanthropist, daughter of John W. Garrett, a philanthropist and president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O.) She became the wealthiest "spinster woman" in the country with demise of her father. Garrett was a part of a group of intellectual women known as "Friday Evening" whose fathers were all on the board at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine or Johns Hopkins Hospital, who were instrumental in advocating for autonomy and more privileges for women, especially intellectually. Garrett helped found the Bryn Mawr School for Women, so named to reference the already-popular Bryn Mawr College of Pennsylvania, which focused on scholastic achievement in traditionally male-dominated disciplines, such as mathematics and science. Although she was greatly hailed for her work, she was also condemned for having such a prominent role in the teaching of controversial (for women at the time) subjects, stating that women do not need so much education just to be homemakers. She also enriched Bryn Mawr College, donating $10,000 per year to help the college. She also endowed the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and secured the rights of women to attend thus making it the first co-educational, graduate-level medical school in the United States. Garrett was also heavily involved in the Women’s Suffrage Movement, organizing the National American Woman Suffrage Association’s national convention in 1906. She continued to donate heavily to the movement until her death. At her death, she gave $15,000,000 to M. Carey Thomas (1857-1935), the president of Bryn Mawr College, with whom she was romantically involved and had lived with at Bryn Mawr in the Deanery. She is buried in Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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School: Bryn Mawr College is a private women’s liberal arts college founded in 1885 in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, in Pennsylvania, four miles (6.4 km) west of Philadelphia. The phrase bryn mawr means "big hill" in Welsh.

Address: 101 N Merion Ave, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010, USA (40.02665, -75.31439)
Phone: +1 610-526-5000
Website: https://www.brynmawr.edu/
National Register of Historic Places: Bryn Mawr College Historic District (Morris Ave., Yarrow St. and New Gulph Rd.), 79002299, 1979. M. Carey Thomas Library is also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
Martha Carey Thomas was president at Bryn Mawr College from 1894 until 1922 and remained as Dean until 1908. Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sister colleges, and is part of the Tri-College Consortium along with two other colleges founded by Quakers—Swarthmore College and Haverford College. The school has an enrollment of about 1300 undergraduate students and 450 graduate students. Bryn Mawr was the name of an area estate granted to Rowland Ellis by William Penn in the 1680s. Ellis’s former home, also called Bryn Mawr, was a house near Dolgellau, Merionnydd, Gwynedd, Wales. The College was largely founded through the bequest of Joseph W. Taylor, and its first president was James Evans Rhoads. Bryn Mawr was the first higher education institution to offer graduate degrees, including doctorates, to women. The first class included 36 undergraduate women and eight graduate students. Bryn Mawr was originally affiliated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), but by 1893 had become non-denominational. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked it 25th in Best Liberal Arts Colleges. In 1912, Bryn Mawr became the first college in the United States to offer doctorates in social work, through the Department of Social Economy and Social Research. This department became the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research in 1970. In 1931, Bryn Mawr began accepting men as graduate students, while remaining women-only at the undergraduate level. From 1921 to 1938 the Bryn Mawr campus was home to the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, which was founded as part of the labor education movement and the women’s labor movement. The school taught women workers political economy, science, and literature, as well as organizing many extracurricular activities. On February 9, 2015, the Board of Trustees announced approval of a working group recommendation to expand the undergraduate applicant pool. Trans women and intersex individuals identifying as women may now apply for admission, while trans men may not. This official decision made Bryn Mawr the fourth women’s college in the United States to accept trans women.

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Bryn Mawr:
• Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), upon receiving a substantial ($2,500) traveling fellowship (Lucy Martin Donelly Fellowship) in 1951, set off to circumnavigate South America by boat.
• Ethel Collins Dunham (1883-1969), and her life partner, Martha May Eliot, devoted their lives to the care of children.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health.
• H.D. (1886-1961) attended Bryn Mawr College to study Greek literature, but left after only three terms due to poor grades and the excuse of poor health.
• Edith Hamilton (1867-1963), educator and author who was "recognized as the greatest woman Classicist.”
• Margaret Hamilton (1871-1969), taught English at Bryn Mawr and took over as head of the school when her sister Edith retired.
• Katherine Hepburn (1907-2003), began to act while studying at Bryn Mawr College.
• Ellen Kushner (born 1955), writer of fantasy novels.
• Clara Landsberg (1873-1966), after graduating from Bryn Mawr, became a part of Hull House in Chicago, founded by Jane Addams, and shared a room with Alice Hamilton (sister of Edith.) She eventually left Hull House to teach Latin at Bryn Mawr while Edith was headmistress.
• Mary Meigs (1917-2002), American-born painter and writer.
• Frieda Miller (1909-1973) was an economics professor at Bryn Mawr College.
• Tracy Dickinson Mygatt (1885-1973), writer and pacifist, co-founder with Frances M. Witherspoon of the War Resisters League, and longtime officer of the Campaign for World Government.
• Edith Russell (1879-1975) was an American fashion buyer, stylist and correspondent for Women's Wear Daily, best remembered for surviving the 1912 sinking of the RMS Titanic with a music box in the shape of a pig. The paper mache toy, covered in pigskin and playing a tune known as "The Maxixe" when its tail was twisted, was used by Edith Russell to calm frightened children in the lifeboat in which she escaped. Her story became widely known in the press at the time and was later included in the best-selling account of the disaster “A Night to Remember” by Walter Lord. She was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, into a wealthy Jewish family in 1879. Her father was Harry Rosenbaum, who rose to prominence in the dry goods field as a director of Louis Stix & Co. in Cincinnati. He was later influential as a cloak and suit manufacturer in his own right and an investor in garment industry real estate in New York, where he moved with his wife, the former Sophia Hollstein, and daughter Edith in 1902. Edith was educated in Cincinnati public schools and a succession of finishing schools, including the Mt. Auburn Young Ladies Institute (later called the H. Thane Miller School) in Cincinnati and Miss Annabel's in Philadelphia. At age 16 in 1895 she attended the Misses Shipley's at Bryn Mawr and later Bryn Mawr College.
• Eva Palmer-Sikelianos (1874–1952), American woman notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music
• Martha Carey Thomas (1857-1935), notable for her study and promotion of Classical Greek culture, weaving, theater, choral dance and music, at Bryn Mawr she studied literature and the theater arts.
• Paula Vogel (born 1951) is an American playwright and university professor. She received the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play How I Learned to Drive.
• Agnes E. Wells (1876-1959), one of the American’s leading educators, and a vigorous standard bearer in the women’s equal rights movement
• Agnes Wergeland (1857-1914) was the first woman ever to earn a doctoral degree in Norway. She received a fellowship in history from Bryn Mawr College in 1890 and lectured there for two years before lecturing at the University of Illinois in 1893. She was a docent in history and nonresident instructor at the University of Chicago from 1896 to 1902. In 1902, Wergeland was offered the position of chair of the department of history at the University of Wyoming. Agnes Wergeland remained a University of Wyoming history professor until her death.
• Frances May Witherspoon (1886-1973), writer and activist, co-founder with Tracy Dickinson Mygatt of the War Resisters League, and executive secretary of the New York Bureau of Legal Advice, a forerunner of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Life
Who: Martha Carey Thomas (2 January 1857 – December 2, 1935)
Martha Carey Thomas was an educator, suffragist, linguist, and second President of Bryn Mawr College. In 1882, Thomas wrote a letter to the trustees of Bryn Mawr College, requesting that she be made president of the university. She was not granted the position, however, as the trustees were concerned about her relative youth and lack of experience. Instead, Thomas entered in 1884 as the dean of the college and chair of English. Despite not receiving her desired role at Bryn Mawr, Thomas was active in the college’s administration, working closely with then President James Rhoads. According to the biographical dictionary Notable American Women: 1607–1950, by 1892 she was "acting president in all but name.” In 1885 Thomas, together with Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), Marie “Mamie” Gwinn (1861-1940), Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College. In 1894, President Rhoads died, and Thomas was narrowly elected to succeed him on September 1, 1894. With respect to the President Rhoads’s recent death, Thomas was not given any ceremony. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery.” When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett. Thomas shared her campus home, the Deanery, with Garrett and together they endeavored to grow Bryn Mawr’s resources. Upon her death, Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left to President Thomas "a sum which would, in 1994, be close to $15,000,000" to be disposed of as she saw fit. M. Carey Thomas had firm views on marriage, and in a letter to her mother she described it as a "Loss of freedom, poverty, and a personal subjection for which I see absolutely no compensation." Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. Mary Garrett left a considerable fortune to Thomas, who spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France. Thomas died at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 2, 1935 of a coronary occlusion. She had returned to the city to address Bryn Mawr College on the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters of the Thomas Library.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cemetery: Green Mount Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland. Established on March 15, 1838, and dedicated on July 13, 1839, it is noted for the large number of historical figures interred in its grounds as well as a large number of prominent Baltimore-area families. It retained the name Green Mount when the land was purchased from the heirs of Baltimore merchant Robert Oliver.

Address: 1501 Greenmount Ave, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA (39.30922, -76.60588)
Phone: +1 410-539-0641
Website: www.greenmountcemetery.com
National Register of Historic Places: 80001786, 1980

Place
Green Mount is a treasury of precious works of art, including striking works by major sculptors including William H. Rinehart and Hans Schuler. Nearly 65,000 people are buried here, including the poet Sydney Lanier, philanthropists Johns Hopkins and Enoch Pratt, Napoleon Bonaparte's sister-in-law Betsy Patterson, John Wilkes Booth, and numerous military, political and business leaders. In addition to John Wilkes Booth, two other conspirators in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln are buried here, Samuel Arnold and Michael O'Laughlen. It is common for visitors to the cemetery to leave pennies on the graves of the three men; the one-cent coin features the likeness of the president they successfully sought to murder. Until a 1965 agreement with Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor had planned for a burial in a purchased plot in Rose Circle at Green Mount Cemetery, near where the father of the Duchess was interred. The 1965 agreement allowed for the former King Edward VIII and wife, the Duchess of Windsor, to be buried near other members of the royal family in the Royal Burial Ground near Windsor Castle.

Notable queer burials at Green Mount Cemetery:
• Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), American suffragist and philanthropist. At her death, she gave $15,000,000 to M. Carey Thomas, the president of Bryn Mawr College, with whom she was romantically involved and had lived with at Bryn Mawr in the Deanery.
• Mamie Gwinn (1860-1940). In 1885 M. Carey Thomas, together with Mary Garrett, Mamie Gwinn, Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery". When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein's “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett.
• Harry Lehr (1869-1929), American socialite during the Gilded Age. He was known for staging elaborate parties alongside Marion "Mamie" Fish, such as the so-called "dog's dinner", in which 100 pets of wealthy friends dined at foot-high tables while dressed in formal attire At a later party, he impersonated the Czar of Russia, and was henceforth dubbed "King Lehr". He was married to heiress Elizabeth "Bessie" Wharton Drexel. He refused to sleep with her on their wedding night.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Pier Paolo Pasolini was an Italian film director, poet, writer and intellectual. Pasolini also distinguished himself as an actor, journalist, philosopher, novelist, playwright, filmmaker, painter and political figure.
Born: March 5, 1922, Bologna
Education: University of Bologna
Buried: Cimitero di Casarsa, Casarsa della Delizia, Provincia di Pordenone, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy, Plot: Buried close to his mother, to the left of the entrance.
Find A Grave Memorial# 6956532
Assassinated: November 2, 1975, Ostia
Books: Ragazzi di vita, Petrolio, Corsair Writings, more
Influenced by: Marquis de Sade, William Shakespeare, more
Film music credits: Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom, Medea, The Canterbury Tales, Oedipus Rex, Location Hunting in Palestine

Cemetery: Pier Paolo Pasolini (1922–1975) was an Italian film director, poet, writer and intellectual. Pasolini also distinguished himself as an actor, journalist, philosopher, novelist, playwright, filmmaker, painter and political figure. Pasolini began writing poems at the age of seven, inspired by the natural beauty of Casarsa. One of his early influences was the work of Arthur Rimbaud. Pasolini was buried in Casarsa (Via Valvasone, 97, 33072 Casarsa della Delizia PN), in his beloved Friuli.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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