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Alfred Corn (born August 14, 1943) is an American poet and essayist.

Alfred Corn was born in Bainbridge, Georgia in 1943 and raised in Valdosta, Georgia.

Corn graduated from Emory University in 1965 with a B.A. in French literature. Corn earned an M.A. in French literature at Columbia University in 1967.

Corn travelled to France on a Fulbright Scholarship where he met Ann Jones, whom he would later marry. After he and Ann Jones divorced, he was partnered with the architect Walter Brown in the years 1971-1976,and then with J.D. McClatchy from 1977 until 1989.

His first book of poems, All Roads at Once, appeared in 1976, followed by A Call in the Midst of the Crowd (1978), The Various Light (1980), Notes from a Child of Paradise (1984), The West Door (1988), Autobiographies (1992). His seventh book of poems, titled Present, appeared in 1997, along with a novel titled 'Part of His Story'., and a study of prosody, The Poem’s Heartbeat (Story Line Press, 1997; Copper Canyon Press, 2008). Stake: Selected Poems, 1972-1992, appeared in 1999, followed by Contradictions in 2002. He has also published a collection of critical essays titled The Metamorphoses of Metaphor (1988) and a work of art criticism, Aaron Rose Photographs (Abrams Books, 2001). In January 2013, Tables, a volume of poems, was published by Press53.


Alfred Corn and J.D. McClatchy, 1987, by Robert Giard
Alfred Corn is an American poet and essayist. Corn travelled to France on a Fulbright Scholarship where he met Ann Jones, whom he would later marry. After he and Ann Jones divorced, he was partnered with the architect Walter Brown in the years 1971-1976, and then with J.D. McClatchy from 1977 until 1989. Corn received an Award in Literature from the Academy of Arts and Letters in 1983 and a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1986. In 1987, he was awarded a Fellowship of the Academy of American Poets.

Corn was awarded the 1982 Levinson Prize by Poetry Magazine.

Corn received an Award in Literature from the Academy of Arts and Letters in 1983 and a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1986. In 1987, he was awarded a Fellowship of the Academy of American Poets.

Additional fellowships and prizes awarded for his poetry include the National Endowment for the Arts, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a residency at The Bellagio Center for the Rockefeller Foundation.

For many years (1983-2001) he taught in the Graduate Writing Program of the Columbia University School of the Arts and has held visiting posts at UCLA, the City University of New York, the University of Cincinnati, Ohio State University, Oklahoma State University, Sarah Lawrence, Yale University, and the University of Tulsa. As critic, he has written for The New York Times Book Review, The Nation, The Washington Post Book World, and The New Republic. Beginning in 1989 and continuing to the present, he has published reviews and articles for Art in America and ARTnews magazines. For 2004-2005, he held the Amy Clampitt residency in Lenox, Massachusetts. In 2005-2006, he lived in London, teaching a course for the Poetry School, and one for the Arvon Foundation at Totleigh Barton, Devon. In 2007 he directed a poetry-writing course at Wroxton College in Oxfordshire, and in 2008 he taught at the Almássera Vella Arts Center in Spain. His first play, Lowell’s Bedlam opened at Pentameters Theatre in London in 2011. He was a Visiting Fellow at Clare Hall, Cambridge in 2012 and after his residency was made a Life Fellow. In the same year, he published an e-book, Transatlantic Bridge: A Concise Guide to American and British English, detailing differences in vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar and punctuation.

The critic Harold Bloom singled out Corn’s All Roads at Once as the best first book of that year (The New Republic, 1976) and said in a jacket comment for A Call in the Midst of the Crowd:
“Alfred Corn’s second book of poems goes well beyond fulfilling the authentic promise of his first. The title poem is an extraordinary and quite inevitable extension of the New York tradition of major visionary poems, which goes from Poe’s ‘City in the Sea’ and Whitman’s ‘Crossing Brooklyn Ferry’ to Hart Crane’s The Bridge and Ashbery’s ‘Self Portrait in a Convex Mirror.’ Corn achieves an authority and resonance wholly worthy of his precursors. I know of nothing else of such ambition and realized power in Corn’s own generation of American poets. He has had the skill and courage to confront, absorb, and renew our poetic tradition at its most vital. His aesthetic prospects are remarkable, even in this crowded time.”
Bloom’s characterization of these books as belonging to the tradition of American Romanticism was a stimulus for much of the critical attention, positive or negative, focused on Corn during the following decades. Critics and poet-critics as diverse as Richard Howard, Charles Molesworth, Robert B. Shaw, Joel Conarroe, Jay Parini, John Hollander, Wayne Koestenbaum, David Lehmann, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Amy Clampitt, and Carolyn Forché, have made penetrating observations about his work.

The New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (Princeton University Press, 1993) grouped Corn with poets who came to be known as the “New Formalists” (see New Formalism) but in fact Corn has never appeared in the anthologies associated with this group. On the other hand, a noticeable percentage of his poetry uses meter, rhyme, and verseform, and he has written a widely circulated introduction to English-language prosody, The Poem’s Heartbeat. The critic Robert K. Martin, in his The Homosexual Tradition in American Poetry (1979, revised 1998) placed Corn’s poetry in a line that begins with Whitman and continues through Crane, Merrill, and Thom Gunn to the present; and in fact Corn has appeared in several anthologies of gay poetry such as The World In Us (2000). But he has also appeared in more general anthologies such as The Norton Anthology of Poetry (Fourth and Fifth Edition, 1996 and 2005) and The Making Of a Poem (Mark Strand and Eavan Boland, 2000). Unusual for a poet, he has published one novel (favorably received by critic A.O. Scott in The Nation in a 1997 review) and several short stories; he has also written a second novel not yet scheduled for publication. Since the 1990s, he has been associated with poets like Marilyn Hacker, Sam Hamill, and Marie Ponsot, whose work reflects liberal and progressive political perspectives. Perhaps because he is hard to place in a single, simple category, Corn has not yet been the subject of a book-length critical study. He remains active as poet, critic, and fiction-writer, and the task of defining his achievement is still to be done.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Corn  

Chip Kidd (born 1964) is an American author, editor, and graphic designer, best known for his book covers. Kidd lives on Manhattan's Upper East Side. His partner is poet and literary critic J. D. McClatchy. J. D. "Sandy" McClatchy (born August 12, 1945) is an American poet and literary critic. He is editor of the Yale Review and president of The American Academy of Arts and Letters. McClatchy was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, in 1945. He was educated at Georgetown and Yale, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1974. From 1977 to 1989 he was partner of fellow poet and essayist Alfred Corn. He lives in Stonington, Connecticut and New York. (Photo: Comic book creator Chip Kidd at a June 28, 2012 signing of Daredevil Born Again: Artist Edit by David Mazzucchelli at Midtown Comics Downtown in Manhattan. © Luigi Novi / Wikimedia Commons.)

Mr. McClatchey calls their apartment the Bat Cave. When he and Mr. Kidd met, at a party for a book one had edited and the other designed, he was 50 years old, a grown man for whom much of pop culture, he said, was a foreign country. But he learned the language quickly, its codes, its neighborhoods and its citizens, and he cherished the experience. ''The trouble with falling in love when you are a certain age is you bring a wary experience to things,'' he said, marveling at how he shed his wariness. ''You also trail an accumulation of tastes and objects that, when they are different from your beloved's, have to be accommodated. It's like a third person in the marriage.''


J. D. "Sandy" McClatchy (born August 12, 1945) is an American poet and literary critic. He is editor of the Yale Review and president of The American Academy of Arts and Letters. McClatchy was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, in 1945. He was educated at Georgetown and Yale, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1974. From 1977 to 1989 he was partner of fellow poet and essayist Alfred Corn. He lives in Stonington, Connecticut and New York. His partner is graphic designer Chip Kidd.

Kidd is currently associate art director at Knopf, an imprint of Random House. He first joined the Knopf design team in 1986, when he was hired as a junior assistant. Turning out jacket designs at an average of 75 a year, Kidd has freelanced for Amazon, Doubleday, Farrar Straus & Giroux, Grove Press, HarperCollins, Penguin/Putnam, Scribner and Columbia University Press in addition to his work for Knopf. Kidd also supervises graphic novels at Pantheon, and in 2003 he collaborated with Art Spiegelman on a biography of cartoonist Jack Cole, Jack Cole and Plastic Man: Forms Stretched to Their Limits. His output includes cover concepts for books by Mark Beyer, Bret Easton Ellis, Haruki Murakami, Dean Koontz, Cormac McCarthy, Frank Miller, Michael Ondaatje, Alex Ross, Charles Schulz, Osamu Tezuka, David Sedaris, Donna Tartt, John Updike and others. His design for Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park novel was carried over into marketing for the film adaptation. Oliver Sacks and other authors have contract clauses stating that Kidd design their books.

Kidd worked with writer Lisa Birnbach on True Prep, a follow-up to her 1980 book The Official Preppy Handbook.

Publishers Weekly described his book jackets as "creepy, striking, sly, smart, unpredictable covers that make readers appreciate books as objects of art as well as literature." USA Today also called him "the closest thing to a rock star" in graphic design today, while author James Ellroy has called him “the world's greatest book-jacket designer.”

Kidd has often downplayed the importance of cover designs, stating, "I'm very much against the idea that the cover will sell the book. Marketing departments of publishing houses tend to latch onto this concept and they can't let go. But it's about whether the book itself really connects with the public, and the cover is only a small part of that." He is also known to be humorously self-deprecating in regards to his work with statements such as "I piggy-backed my career on the backs of authors, not the other way around. The latest example of that is The Road, by Cormac McCarthy. I'm lucky to be attached to that. Cormac McCarthy is not lucky to have me doing his cover."

Kidd is as a fan of comic book media, particularly Batman, and has written and designed book covers for several DC Comics publications, including The Complete History of Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman, The Golden Age of DC Comics: 365 Days, and the aforementioned Jack Cole and Plastic Man. He also designed Mythology: The DC Comics Art of Alex Ross and wrote an exclusive Batman/Superman story illustrated by Ross for the book. Kidd once stated that the first cover he ever noticed was "no doubt for some sort of Batman comic I saw when I was about 3, enough said. Or maybe not enough said: the colors, the forms, the design. Batman himself is such a brilliant design solution." Veronique Vienne, who wrote an eponymous book about Kidd in 2006, described Kidd's Batman fandom as a "childhood obsession and lasting adult passion."

His first novel, The Cheese Monkeys, (Simon and Schuster, 2001) is an academic satire and coming-of-age tale about state college art students who struggle to meet the demands of a sadistic graphic design instructor. The book draws on Kidd's real-life experiences during his art studies at Penn State.

Kidd's second novel, The Learners, finds the protagonist of The Cheese Monkeys drawn into the infamous Milgram experiment, thanks to an incidental newspaper ad assignment. The novel uses the experiment as an extended metaphor for advertising, wherein the "content" is masked and fed – sometimes unwillingly — to its consumers.

It was announced at New York Comic Con 2011 that Kidd would be writing Batman: Death By Design, an original graphic novel.

In 1996, Kidd designed and wrote Batman: Collected. Kidd also worked with fellow Batman collector Saul Ferris on another book of a more particular subject matter, Bat-Manga!: The Secret History of Batman in Japan, which was released for sale in October 2008.

In early 2008, Kidd started a new wave/alternative rock band, writing and recording music under the name Artbreak. He takes the role of song writing, vocals, and percussion, and while the group began as hobby, Kidd has expressed interest in making a serious project out of it. As of 2008, the group performs across the United States and has a tour schedule on their MySpace. They plan to record their original songs for an album entitled Wonderground.

In 2010, Kidd collaborated with the writing staff of the animated series Batman: The Brave and the Bold on the episode "Bat-Mite Presents: Batman's Strangest Cases!" The episode contained a segment that was heavily inspired by the Batman cartoon from the 1960s.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chip_Kidd

J. D. "Sandy" McClatchy (born August 12, 1945) is an American poet and literary critic. He is editor of the Yale Review and president of The American Academy of Arts and Letters.

McClatchy was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, in 1945. He was educated at Georgetown and Yale, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1974. From 1977 to 1989 he was partner of fellow poet and essayist Alfred Corn. He lives in Stonington, Connecticut and New York. His partner is graphic designer Chip Kidd.

"Before I met him," says the poet J. D. McClatchy of his partner, Chip Kidd, "My idea of rock music was Die Walküre, and Superman a character in Nietzsche. Now I live in the pinball machine of pop culture."

McClatchy is an adjunct professor at Yale University and editor of the Yale Review. He also edits the "Voice of the Poet" series for Random House AudioBooks.

His book Hazmat (Alfred A. Knopf, 2002) was nominated for the 2003 Pulitzer Prize. He has written texts for musical settings, including eight opera libretti, for such composers as Elliot Goldenthal, Daron Hagen, Lowell Liebermann, Lorin Maazel, Tobias Picker, Ned Rorem, Bruce Saylor, and William Schuman. His honors include an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters (1991). He has also been one of the New York Public Literary Lions, and received the 2000 Connecticut Governor’s Arts Award.

In 1999, he was elected into the membership of The American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in January 2009 he was elected president. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation (1987), the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Academy of American Poets (1991). He served as Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 1996 until 2003.

With UCLA professor and poet Stephen Yenser, McClatchy serves as co-executor for the literary estate of James Merrill (1926–1995).

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J.D._McClatchy


J.D. McClatchy, 1987, by Robert Giard


Alfred Corn, 1987, by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)


Further Readings:

The Poem's Heartbeat: A Manual of Prosody (Copper Canyon Classics) by Alfred Corn
Paperback: 140 pages
Publisher: Copper Canyon Press (October 1, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1556592817
ISBN-13: 978-1556592812
Amazon: The Poem's Heartbeat: A Manual of Prosody

Finally back in print, this slender, user-friendly guide to rhyme, rhythm, meter, and form sparks “intuitive and technical lightning-fl ashes” for poets and readers curious to know a poem’s inner workings. Clear, good-humored, and deeply readable, Alfred Corn’s book is the modern classic on prosody—the art and science of poetic meter. Each of the book’s ten chapters is a progressive, step-by-step presentation rich with examples to illustrate concepts such as line, stress, scansion marks, slant rhyme, and iambic pentameter. “By the book’s end,” noted a rave review in The Boston Review, “Corn, magi-teacher and impeccable guide, has taught the novice to become artist and magician.” The Poem’s Heartbeat also includes a selected bibliography and encourages readers and students to carry their investigations further.

Stake: Poems, 1972-1992 by Alfred Corn
Hardcover: 208 pages
Publisher: Counterpoint Press (October 1999)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1582430241
ISBN-13: 978-1582430249 A
mazon: Stake: Poems, 1972-1992

Written over a twenty-year period and selected by the author, these poems are the indispensable record of wide-ranging explorations of experience and of language. Brought together, they draw in bold, clear lines the profile of a central figure in contemporary poetry.. Alfred Corn draws with extraordinary skill on narrative, figurative, and metrical resources to frame challenging contemporary issues, autobiographical themes, and vivid observations of both the extraordinary and the everyday. Reflecting on subjects ranging from the comic to the classical, Corns poetry is musical, meditative, passionate, and direct.These poems were gathered from six of Corns previous collections: All Roads at Once (1976), A Call in the Midst of the Crowd (1978), The Various Light (1980), Notes from a Child of Paradise (1984), The West Door (1988), and Autobiographies (1992).

Contradictions by Alfred Corn
Paperback: 96 pages
Publisher: Copper Canyon Press (September 1, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1556592868
ISBN-13: 978-1556592867
Amazon: Contradictions

"Alfred Corn is one of our finest living poets."--The Nation

The Cheese Monkeys: A Novel In Two Semesters by Chip Kidd
Paperback: 320 pages
Publisher: Harper Perennial; New edition (January 8, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0061452483
ISBN-13: 978-0061452482
Amazon: The Cheese Monkeys: A Novel In Two Semesters
Amazon Kindle: The Cheese Monkeys: A Novel In Two Semesters

After 15 years of designing more than 1,500 book jackets at Knopf for such authors as Anne Rice and Michael Chrichton, Kidd has crafted an affecting an entertaining novel set at a state university in the late 1950s that is both slap-happily funny and heartbreakingly sad. The Cheese Monkeys is a college novel that takes place over a tightly written two semesters. The book is set in the late 1950s at State U, where the young narrator, has decided to major in art, much to his parents’ dismay. It is an autobiographical, coming-of-age novel which tells universally appealing stories of maturity, finding a calling in life, and being inspired by a loving, demanding, and highly eccentric teacher.

Guys Like Us: Citing Masculinity in Cold War Poetics by Michael Davidson
Paperback: 296 pages
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (December 15, 2003)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0226137406
ISBN-13: 978-0226137407
Amazon: Guys Like Us: Citing Masculinity in Cold War Poetics

Guys Like Us considers how writers of the 1950s and '60s struggled to craft literature that countered the politics of consensus and anticommunist hysteria in America, and how notions of masculinity figured in their effort. Michael Davidson examines a wide range of postwar literature, from the fiction of Jack Kerouac to the poetry of Gwendolyn Brooks, Frank O'Hara, Elizabeth Bishop, and Sylvia Plath. He also explores the connection between masculinity and sexuality in films such as Chinatown and The Lady from Shanghai, as well as television shows, plays, and magazines from the period. What results is a virtuoso work that looks at American poetic and artistic innovation through the revealing lenses of gender and history.

Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets by J. D. McClatchy
Paperback: 228 pages
Publisher: University of California Press (December 21, 1989)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0520069714
ISBN-13: 978-0520069718
Amazon: Poets on Painters: Essays on the Art of Painting by Twentieth-Century Poets

What are poets looking at, looking for, when they walk into a room of pictures? Poets on Painters attempts to answer this question by bringing together, for the first time, essays by modern American and British poets about painting. The poets bring to their task a fresh eye and a freshened language, vivid with nuance and color and force.

Mercury Dressing: Poems by J.D. McClatchy
Paperback: 112 pages
Publisher: Knopf; Reprint edition (May 17, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0375711783
ISBN-13: 978-0375711787
Amazon: Mercury Dressing: Poems

This beautiful collection from J. D. McClatchy holds up a mirror to the soul, considering heroic and human figures in poems that “balance mandarin wit with enormous learning, a fully twenty-first-century sensibility and a deft use of the demotic” (Bookpage)

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