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David Herbert Richards "D. H." Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter.
Born: September 11, 1885, Eastwood, United Kingdom
Died: March 2, 1930, Vence, France
Education: University of Nottingham
Nottingham High School
Lived: 9 Selwood Terrace, SW7
D. H. Lawrence Birthplace Museum, 8a Victoria St, Eastwood, Nottingham NG16 3AW, UK (53.01859, -1.30706)
25 Rossetti Garden Mansions, Flood Street, Chelsea, SW3
Hotel Café Royal, 68 Regent Street, W1B
D. H. Lawrence Ranch, Lawrence Ranch Road, Arroyo Seco, NM 87514, USA (36.58075, -105.60291)
Tinner’s Arms, Zennor, St. Ives, Saint Ives TR26 3BY, UK (50.19162, -5.56772)
Higher Tregerthen, between Lower Tregerthen farmstead and the B3306
Durban House Heritage Centre, Mansfield Rd, Eastwood, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG16 3DZ, UK (53.02176, -1.30734)
1 Byron Villas, Vale of Health, London NW3, UK (51.56286, -0.17619)
Quinta Quetzacoatl, Calle Zaragoza 307, Chapala Centro, 45900 Chapala, Jal., Mexico (20.28815, -103.19097)
Fontana Vecchia, Via David Herbert Lawrence, 98039 Taormina ME, Italy (37.85911, 15.28719)
Buried: Kiowa Ranch Cemetery, San Cristobal, Taos County, New Mexico, USA, Plot: The Lawrence Memorial, Specifically: Body cremated-ashes mixed in cement used in construction of memorial altar, GPS (lat/lon): 36.24478, -105.34214
Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA (memorial)
Find A Grave Memorial# 1564
Short stories: The Rocking-Horse Winner, more
Movies: Lady Chatterley, Women in Love, The Rainbow, The Fox, more

Much of the bitterness of the war years, along with D.H. Lawrence's disenchantment with English narrow-mindedness, can be found in what is perhaps the novelist's greatest exploration of homosexual subject matter, Women in Love. Here Lawrence and Frieda are depicted as Rupert Birkin and Ursula Brangwen in a tale based partly on Lawrence's clamorous relationship with the writer Katherine Mansfield, her husband, the literary critic John Middleton-Murry, and Lady Ottoline Morrell. It was during the composition of Women in Love that Lawrence, frustrated by his failure to forge a deeper bond with Murry, evidently had a sexual relationship with a Cornish farmer named William Henry Hocking in the town of Tregerthen. The short-lived affair was the culmination of a long-standing struggle with homosexual feelings. "I would like to know why nearly every man that approaches greatness tends to homosexuality, whether he admits it or not," Lawrence wrote to a friend in 1913. "I believe the nearest I've come to perfect love was with a coal-miner when I was about 16.”

Together from 1914 to 1930: 16 years.
David Herbert Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930)
Frieda Weekley (née von Richthofen) (August 11, 1879 – August 11, 1956)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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House: The D.H. Lawrence Birthplace Museum is a writer’s home museum dedicated to the writer D.H. Lawrence situated in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, near Nottingham.

Address: 8A Victoria Street, Eastwood, Nottinghamshire NG16 3AW, UK (53.01859, -1.30706)
Phone: +44 1773 717353
Website: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/dhlheritage/visitor-attractions/birthplace-museum.aspx
English Heritage Building ID: 429408 (Grade II, 1972)

Place
It is the house in which D.H. Lawrence was born in 1885 and one of the four houses the family occupied in Eastwood. Like its sister site Durban House Heritage Centre it belongs to D.H. Lawrence Heritage and is managed by Broxtowe Borough Council. Visitors enter the museum through the house next door, through the museum shop. The house has been laid out in the style of a late XIX century working class miner’s house, with the furniture being mostly from the family of the women who founded it. There are a few original items from Lawrence’s family; the artifacts are as close to the 1880s as possible and from Nottinghamshire to make the contents as authentic as possible for the period. The house is set out as it was thought to have been when the Lawrences lived there. Visitors are given a guided tour which takes approximately 45 minutes. The significance of each room (parlour, kitchen, communal yard, washhouse, parents’ bedroom, children’s bedroom and attic) is explained and questions encouraged. There is a small exhibition of Lawrence’s early original water colour paintings and a DVD room that starts the tour giving basic information on his life in Eastwood and thereafter. Photocopies of his later paintings are also displayed. A recent addition to the collection was Lawrence’s original gravestone, which has been on display since September 11, 2009, the anniversary of his birthday.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: The D.H. Lawrence Heritage Centre is closed to the public since April 2016.

Address: Mansfield Rd, Eastwood, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG16 3DZ, UK (53.02176, -1.30734)

Place
D. H. Lawrence Heritage Centre was formally known as the Durban House Heritage Centre and was the sister site of the D.H. Lawrence Birthplace Museum in Eastwood, near Nottingham. Both sites formally went under the name of D.H. Lawrence Heritage. The D.H. Lawrence Heritage Centre contained an exhibition on the social history of Eastwood during the time that the writer lived there, including information on the educational system, mining, trams, retail along with D.H. Lawrence and the people who were affiliated with him. In addition there was an art gallery, a bistro, conference rooms, civil wedding, funeral, birthday and education facilities.

Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930) aka D.H. Lawrence
D.H. Lawrence was a novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter. His collected works, among other things, represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. In them, some of the issues Lawrence explores are emotional health, vitality, spontaneity and instinct. In March 1912 Lawrence met Frieda Weekley (née von Richthofen), with whom he was to share the rest of his life. Six years older than her new lover, she was married to Ernest Weekley, his former modern languages professor at University College, Nottingham, and had three young children. She eloped with Lawrence to her parents’ home in Metz, a garrison town then in Germany near the disputed border with France. Lawrence and Frieda returned to Britain in 1913 for a short visit, during which they encountered and befriended critic John Middleton Murry and New Zealand-born short story writer Katherine Mansfield. While writing “Women in Love” in Cornwall during 1916–17, Lawrence developed a strong and possibly romantic relationship with a Cornish farmer named William Henry Hocking. Although it is not clear if their relationship was sexual, Frieda said she believed it was. After being discharged from a sanatorium, Lawrence died March 2, 1930 at the Villa Robermond in Vence, France, from complications of tuberculosis. Frieda Weekley commissioned an elaborate headstone for his grave bearing a mosaic of his adopted emblem of the phoenix. After Lawrence’s death, Frieda lived with Angelo Ravagli on the ranch in Taos and eventually married him in 1950. In 1935 Ravagli arranged, on Frieda’s behalf, to have Lawrence’s body exhumed and cremated and his ashes brought back to the ranch to be interred there in a small chapel amid the mountains of New Mexico, while instead the original tombstone was later taken to Eastwood.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930) and Frieda returned to Britain in the summer of 1914, upon the outbreak of war, and stayed at 9 Selwood Terrace, Kensington, London SW7 3AT (Charles Dickens once lodged at number 11). During this time he married Frieda. The house was put up for rent a couple of years ago, with an asking price of £1,750 a week.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 1 Byron Villas, Vale of Health, D. H. Lawrence (1885–1930), "Novelist and Poet lived here in 1915"

Address: 1 Byron Villas, London NW3 1AX, UK (51.56286, -0.17619)
English Heritage Building ID: 478443 (Grade II, 1974)

Place
D.H. Lawrence and Frieda lived at 1 Byron Villas, London NW3 1AX, for a few months in 1915. A blue plaque marks the spot. After D.H.Lawrence lived at 32 Well Walk, London NW3 1BX, in 1917. Well Walk takes its name from the chalybeate spring which brought fame and fashion to the area. The faded gentility of the 1930s Hampstead was caught by Vita SackvilleWest in her novel, “All Passion Spent.” In 1930 the whole area between New End and Gayton Road east of High Street, and around Perrin's Court and Holly Bush Vale on the west, was occupied by “skilled workers or similar,” as was South End Green. D. H. Lawrence lodged from 1926 to 1927 at 30 Willoughby Rd, London NW3 1RU, and similarly had shown “how depressing and void he found the 18th-century charm of Hampstead.”

Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930)
In March 1912 Lawrence met Frieda Weekley (née von Richthofen), with whom he was to share the rest of his life. Six years older than her new lover, she was married to Ernest Weekley, his former modern languages professor at University College, Nottingham, and had three young children. She eloped with Lawrence to her parents’ home in Metz, a garrison town then in Germany near the disputed border with France. Their stay there included Lawrence’s first encounter with tensions between Germany and France, when he was arrested and accused of being a British spy, before being released following an intervention from Frieda’s father. After this incident, Lawrence left for a small hamlet to the south of Munich, where he was joined by Frieda for their "honeymoon,” later memorialised in the series of love poems titled “Look! We Have Come Through” (1917.) 1912 also saw the first of Lawrence’s so-called "mining plays,” “The Daughter-in-Law,” written in Nottingham dialect. The play was never to be performed, or even published, in Lawrence’s lifetime. From Germany they walked southwards across the Alps to Italy, a journey that was recorded in the first of his travel books, a collection of linked essays titled “Twilight in Italy” and the unfinished novel, “Mr Noon.” During his stay in Italy, Lawrence completed the final version of “Sons and Lovers” that, when published in 1913, was acknowledged to be a vivid portrait of the realities of working class provincial life. Lawrence, though, had become so tired of the work that he allowed Edward Garnett to cut about a hundred pages from the text. Lawrence and Frieda returned to Britain in 1913 for a short visit, during which they encountered and befriended critic John Middleton Murry and New Zealand-born short story writer Katherine Mansfield. Lawrence was able to meet Welsh tramp poet W. H. Davies, whose work, much of which was inspired by nature, he greatly admired. Davies collected autographs, and was particularly keen to obtain Lawrence’s. Georgian poetry publisher Edward Marsh was able to secure an autograph (probably as part of a signed poem), and invited Lawrence and Frieda to meet Davies in London on 28 July, under his supervision. Lawrence was immediately captivated by the poet and later invited Davies to join Frieda and himself in Germany. Despite his early enthusiasm for Davies’ work, however, Lawrence’s opinion changed after reading “Foliage” and he commented after reading “Nature Poems” in Italy that they seemed “so thin, one can hardly feel them.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Restaurant/Bar: The Tinner's Arms is a traditional Cornish pub in Zennor, Cornwall. The name is derived from the Tinners, with records of tin extraction in the area dating back to Tudor times. D.H. Lawrence stayed at the Tinner's Arms in 1916 with his wife Frieda, while looking for a cottage to rent. They eventually found Higher Tregerthen. The pub sign pictures a tin miner at work, testimony to its origins. It is the only pub in the village.

Address: B3306, Zennor, Cornwall TR26 3BY, UK (50.19162, -5.56772)
Phone: +44 1736 796927
English Heritage Building ID: 70659 (Grade II, 1988)

Place
It is located opposite St Senara's Church and was supposedly originally built in 1271 to house the masons building the church. There is some disagreement about the age of the building as English Heritage believes it was probably built around the early XVIII century and extended in the XIX and XX centuries. "The building is built of granite rubble with granite moorstone dressings. Grouted or slurried scantle slate roofs. Dressed granite stacks over the original gable ends." It originally had a two-room plan with a larger hall/kitchen to the right and a parlour over lower ground to the left. There may have been an unheated middle room as there is a small blocked window to the right of the doorway. The two rooms have been consolidated into one and the building was extended in the XIX century to the left at right angles to the front. It is described as "all low beams and dark wood" with a "warm fire in the winter", and retains a medieval ambiance. Its specials are "Tinner's" and "Zennor Mermaid" (Sharp's Special). The Daily Telegraph notes its "sleepy, timeless quality and the way it's just not changed in centuries." Next door is White House, originally named Bos Cres, or "house in the middle", a Grade II-listed building dated to 1838 and restored in 2005, promoted as accommodation with the pub. The AA notes its "pigeon breast with mushrooms and tarragon sauce; Terras Farm duck breast with braised peas and new potatoes; chocolate fudge cake with clotted cream; or 'Moomaid' ice cream made on the local farm." The Good Pub Guide ranks it 4.5 stars of 5 saying it has "enjoyable ploughman's with three cornish cheeses and home-baked bread, long unspoilt bar with flagstones, granite, stripped pine and real fires each end, back dining room, well kept ales such as St Austell, Sharps Doom Bar and Wadworths 6X from casks behind counter, farm cider."

Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930)
When D.H. Lawrence arrived in Zennor with his German wife, Frieda, in 1916 he thought he had found paradise on earth: “It is a most beautiful place. A tiny granite village nestling under high, shaggy moor-hills, and a big sweep of lovely sea beyond.” The dream was to turn sour for the Lawrences – wrongly suspected of spying for Germany, they were ordered to leave Cornwall 18 months later – but the landscape remains as inspiring as he described it. From the Tinners Arms, where the Lawrences put up while they looked for a cottage to rent, the route crosses prehistoric field systems where Lawrence himself liked to toil when not writing (he completed “Women in Love” here). As you walk eastwards, the cottage he and Frieda rented, Higher Tregerthen, Zennor TR26 3BP, lies to the south between Lower Tregerthen farmstead and the B3306. The route takes you on to the coast – where the Lawrences were accused of signalling to German submarines – and back along the South West Coast Path to Zennor Head. As the tubercular genius said, this place “isn’t really England, nor Christendom. It has… that flicker of Celtic consciousness.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Accomodation: Fontana Vecchia is the oldest house on the east side of Taormina, Sicily. Named by its most famous tenant, D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia was years later repeatedly sprinkled about in Truman Capote’s writings.

Address: Via David Herbert Lawrence, 98039 Taormina ME, Italy (37.85911, 15.28719)

Place
Built in the mid-XVII century
To this day, Fontana Vecchia remains as bewitching as it was in Lawrence’s time. Thousands of tourists each year take the short walk from Taormina just to glimpse the villa from the street below. Built into the side of the mountain, the villa’s stone walls are a half-meter thick. Many of those stones were taken from an ancient Roman aqueduct. The villa faces southeast, so there are few days of cold wind, even on the chilliest winter days. Because of its thick walls, the temperature inside is comfortable year-round. When Lawrence lived in the house (1920-1922), it was located in a field of orange and lemon groves. A winding dirt road led to town. Thirty years later, Truman Capote moved into the villa.

Life
Who: Truman Streckfus Persons (September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984) and John Paul "Jack" Dunphy (August 22, 1914 – April 26, 1992)
When Jack Dunphy met Truman Capote in 1948, Dunphy had written a well-received novel, “John Fury,” and was just getting over a painful divorce from Joan McCracken. In 1950 the two writers settled in Taormina, Sicily. Ten years older than Capote, Dunphy was in many ways Capote’s opposite, as solitary as Capote was exuberantly social. Though they drifted more and more apart in the later years, the couple stayed together until Capote’s death. During the early XX century Taormina became a colony of expatriate artists, writers, and intellectuals. Albert Stopford grew roses in his Edwardian garden; D.H. Lawrence stayed at the Fontana Vecchia from 1920 to 1922. (He wrote a number of his poems, novels, short stories, and essays, and a travel book, “Sea and Sardinia.”) Thirty years later, from April 1950 through September 1951, the same villa was home to Truman Capote, who wrote of his stay in the essay "Fontana Vecchia." Also Tennessee Williams, Jean Cocteau and Jean Marais visited the place. Charles Webster Leadbeater, the theosophical author, found out that Taormina had the right magnetics fields for Jiddu Krishnamurti to develop his talents, so the young Krishnamurti dwelt here from time to time. Halldór Laxness, the Icelandic author and Nobel Prize winner, worked here on the first modern Icelandic novel, “Vefarinn mikli frá Kasmír.” By this time Taormina had become "a polite synonym for Sodom" as Harold Acton described it. Later, however, after WWII, Acton was visiting Taormina with Evelyn Waugh and, coming upon a board advertising “Ye Olde English Teas” he sighed and commented that Taormina “was now quite as boring as Bournemouth.”



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Accomodation: “Here we are, in our own house—a long house with no upstairs—shut in by trees on two sides.—We live on a wide verandah, flowers round—it is fairly hot—I spend the day in trousers and shirt, barefoot—have a Mexican woman, Isabel, to look after us—very nice. Just outside the gate the big Lake of Chapala—40 miles long, 20 miles wide. We can’t see the lake, because the trees shut us in. But we walk out in a wrap to bathe.—There are camions—Ford omnibuses—to Guadalajara—2 hours. Chapala village is small with a market place with trees and Indians in big hats. Also three hotels, because this is a tiny holiday place for Guadalajara. I hope you’ll get down, I’m sure you’d like painting here.—It may be that even yet I’ll have my little hacienda and grow bananas and oranges.” – (letter dated 3 May 1923, to Kai Gotzsche and Knud Merrild, quoted in Knud Merrild’s book, “A Poet and Two Painters: A Memoir of D.H. Lawrence.”)

Address: Calle Zaragoza 307, Chapala Centro, 45900 Chapala, Jal., Mexico (20.28815, -103.19097)
Phone: +52 376 765 3653

Place
“Lawrence went to Guadalajara and found a house with a patio on the Lake of Chapala. There, Lawrence began to write his “Plumed Serpent.” He sat by the lake under a pepper tree writing it. The lake was curious with its white water. My enthusiasm for bathing in it faded considerably when one morning a huge snake rose yards high, it seemed to me, only a few feet away. At the end of the patio, we had the family that Lawrence describes in the “Plumed Serpent,” and all the life of Chapala. I tried my one attempt at civilizing those Mexican children, but when they asked me one day, “Do you have lice too, Niña,” I had enough and gave up in a rage. At night I was frightened of bandits and we had one of the sons of the cook sleeping outside our bedroom door with a loaded revolver, but he snored so fiercely that I wasn’t sure whether the fear of bandits wasn’t preferable. We quite sank into the patio life. Bynner and Spud came every afternoon, and I remember Bynner saying to me one day, while he was mixing a cocktail: “If you and Lawrence quarrel, why don’t you hit first?” I took the advice and the next time Lawrence was cross, I rose to the occasion and got out of my Mexican indifference and flew at him.” – (Frieda Lawrence, “Not I, But the Wind…”, (1934)) The house the Lawrences rented was at Zaragoza #4 (since renumbered Zaragoza #307) and became the basis for the description of Kate’s living quarters in “The Plumed Serpent.” The Lawrences lived in the house from the start of May 1923 to about 9 July that year. Interestingly, the house subsequently had several additional links to famous writers and artists. Immediately after the Lawrences departed, the next renters were American artists Everett Gee Jackson and Lowell Houser, who lived there for 18 months. They did not realize the identity of the previous tenant – “an English writer” – until the following year. Their time in Chapala is described, with great wit and charm, in Jackson’s “Burros and Paintbrushes” (1985.) Jackson visited Mexico many times and made several return visits to Chapala, including one in 1968 when he, his wife and young grandson, “rented the charming old Witter Bynner house right in the center of the village of Chapala. It had become the property of Peter Hurd, the artist…” In 1923, Bynner and Johnson stayed at the Hotel Arzapalo. In 1930, Bynner bought a home in Chapala (not the one rented by Lawrence) and was a frequent winter visitor for many years. Over the years, the house on Zaragoza that Lawrence and Frieda had occupied was extensively remodeled and expanded. The first major renovation was undertaken in about 1940 by famed Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Another large-scale renovation took place after the house was acquired in 1954 by American artist and architect Roy MacNicol. In the late 1970s, Canadian poet Al Purdy, a great admirer of Lawrence (to the point of having a bust of Lawrence on the hall table of his home in Ontario), wrote a hand-signed and numbered book, The D.H. Lawrence House at Chapala, published by The Paget Press in 1980, as a limited edition of 44 copies. The book includes a photograph, taken by Purdy’s wife Eurithe, of the plumed serpent tile work above the door of the Lawrence house. The town of Chapala today would be totally unrecognizable to Lawrence, but the home where he spent a productive summer writing the first draft of “The Plumed Serpent” eventually became the Quinta Quetzalcoatl, an exclusive boutique hotel.

Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930) aka D.H. Lawrence
D. H. Lawrence, together with his wife Frieda, and friends Witter Bynner and Willard (“Spud”) Johnson, visited Mexico in March 1923, initially staying in Mexico City. By the end of April, Lawrence was becoming restless and actively looking for somewhere where he could write. The traveling party had an open invitation to visit Guadalajara, the home of Idella Purnell, a former student of Bynner’s at the Univeristy of California, Berkeley. After reading about Chapala in Terry’s “Guide to Mexico,” Lawrence decided to catch the train to Guadalajara and then explore the lakeside village of Chapala for himself. Lawrence liked what he saw and, within hours of arriving in Chapala, he sent an urgent telegram back to Mexico City pronouncing Chapala “paradise” and urging the others to join him there immediately. Lawrence and his wife Frieda soon established their home for the summer in Chapala, on Calle Zaragoza. In a letter back to two Danish friends in Taos, Lawrence described both the house and the village. Life was not without its incidents and travails. Frieda, especially, was unconvinced about the charms of Chapala. Instead Witter Bynner and Robert Hunt made frequent visits to a second home in Chapala, Mexico. Their home (on the square at Galeana #441, the street name was later changed to Francisco I. Madero) was purchased from Mexican architect Luis Barragán in 1940 and was on the town’s plaza, a short distance from the lake. Hunt restored the house and, in 1943, added an extensive, rooftop terrace, which had clear views of Lake Chapala and near-by mountains. It became Bynner and Hunt’s winter home. Bynner spent much of the 1940s and early 1950s there, until he began to lose his eyesight. He returned to the USA, received treatment, and traveled to Europe with Hunt, who by the late 1950s and early 1960s took increasing responsibility for the ailing poet. Upon Bynner’s death, John Liggett Meigs and Peter Hurd, together, purchased Bynner’s house in Chapala. Along with the house, Bynner had included its content in the transfer of ownership. John described there being only four buildings on the block where the house was, and said that the house had two floors, the rooftop terrace that Hunt had added, and a “tower” overlooking Lake Chapala. The other buildings on the block included a “wonderful cantina,” which became a supermarket; another two-story house, next door, with a high wall between that house and Bynner’s house’s courtyard; and a two-story hotel on the corner. However, after John and Hurd bought Bynner’s house, they discovered that the owners of the hotel had sold the airspace over the hotel, and, one time, when John arrived, he discovered a twenty foot by forty foot “President Brandy” advertisement sign on top of the hotel, blocking his view of the lake. John said that was when he and Hurd decided to sell the place.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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House: The D.H. Lawrence Ranch, as it is now known, was the New Mexico home of the English novelist D.H. Lawrence for about two years during the 1920s.

Address: Lawrence Ranch Road, Arroyo Seco, NM 87514, USA (36.58075, -105.60291)
National Register of Historic Places: D.H. Lawrence Ranch Historic District (Lawrence Rd., approx 2.75 mi. E of NM 522 on US Forest Service Rd. 7), 03001410, 2004

Place
The 160-acre (0.65 km2) property, originally named the Kiowa Ranch, is located at 8,600 feet (2,600 m) above sea level on Lobo Mountain near San Cristobal in Taos County, about eighteen miles (29 km) northwest of Taos. It is a 4.2 mile drive from the boarded-up historic marker and turnoff on route NM522 to the locked gate of the ranch. It was owned by Mabel Dodge Luhan as part of more extensive holdings nearby, although it had been occupied by homesteaders and several structures existed on the property dating back to the 1890s. In giving it to Frieda Lawrence (after Lawrence himself declined), it became first the summer home of the couple and then Frieda’s home until her death in 1956. It was closed to visitors from 2008 to 2014 for repairs, but re-opened to the public in March 2015. While the couple spent a relatively short time there, the ranch became the only property that they ever owned during their marriage and it became a place of rest and relaxation, where Lawrence wrote much of his novel, “St Mawr” and began “The Plumed Serpent,” during five months of the summer of 1924. Aldous Huxley is known to have visited the Lawrences at the ranch. By October 1924, Lawrence and Frieda left for Mexico and it was while they were in Oaxaca that he was diagnosed with tuberculosis. The couple returned to the US, and by April 1925 they were back at the Ranch where they spent the summer, Lawrence continuing work on the novel which became “The Plumed Serpent.” However, with his better health and their six-month visa about to expire, Lawrence was determined to return to Europe. They left Taos on September 11, Lawrence’s 40th birthday, and settled in Italy. Although he never returned to New Mexico, in a letter to Hon. Dorothy Brett in December 1929 from Bandol, France Lawrence expressed some interest in doing so: "I really think that I shall try to come back in the spring. I begin to believe that I shall never get well over here." However, D.H. Lawrence died in France on March 2, 1930 and his body was buried near Vence. In 1935, at Frieda’s request, his remains were exhumed and then cremated and his ashes were brought to the ranch by Angelo Ravagli (Frieda’s lover and the man who became her third husband in 1934) with the intention that they be buried there. After Lawrence’s death, Frieda returned to the ranch and lived there with Ravagli, who constructed the white plastered 12 ft. x 15 ft. Memorial building in 1934. At her death in Taos in 1956, Frieda was buried on the ranch property and she bequeathed it to the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque, the present owner. Her grave is located just outside the Memorial building.

Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930) aka D.H. Lawrence
The Lawrences arrived in the US in September 1922. Here they encountered Mabel Dodge Luhan, a prominent socialite, and considered establishing a utopian community on what was then known as the 160-acre (0.65 km2) Kiowa Ranch near Taos, New Mexico. After arriving in Lamy, New Mexico via train, they bought the property, now called the D.H. Lawrence Ranch, from Luahn in 1924, in exchange for the manuscript of “Sons and Lovers.” Lawrence stayed in New Mexico for two years, with extended visits to Lake Chapala and Oaxaca in Mexico.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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House: D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930) and Frieda travelled on to England for the last visit on July 29, 1926, arriving in London on the evening of the following day. With the help of Millicent Beveridge, Lawrence had rented a top-floor flat at 25 Rossetti Garden Mansions, The Lodge Cheyne Court, Chelsea, London SW3 5TP, for the whole of August; it was close enough to the Victoria and Albert Museum for Frieda to spend time with her son, Monty.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Historic District: Vence is a commune set in the hills of the Alpes Maritimes department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in southeastern France between Nice and Antibes.

Address: 06140 Vence, France (43.72232, 7.1117)

Place
Within the historic village, a medieval walled village, there are numerous interesting sights and monuments. The Peyra Gate was remodelled in 1810. The fountain was rebuilt in 1822 replacing an older one dating from 1578. Nearby is an oak, donated by François I and planted in 1538. The castle is today the Fondation Émile Hugues, a modern and contemporary art museum. The cathedral was built in the IV century on the site of a Roman temple. The stone of the western façade dates from 239. Another, on the right, was engraved in December 220. Other stones in the external walls represent funerary dedications. Also on the western side of the church, the Pierre du Tauroble evokes the cult of Cybele and also the Great mother of the Gods of Mount Ida. A chapel in the cathedral has a mosaic by Marc Chagall, dated 1911. The rue des Portiques is a section of the old Roman road. The town has a small chapel, the Cité Historique Chapelle du Rosaire (1948, completed in 1951), decorated with stained glass and other fittings by Henri Matisse, who owned a home in the village towards the end of his life. Vence is famous for its spring water, which can be collected from numerous fountains in the town. American artists and life partners for more than 50 years, Maud Hunt Squire (1873-1954) and Ethel Mars (1876-1959), forged distinguished careers in book illustration, painting, and woodblock printing. Émigrées to France, they frequented Gertrude Stein's salons and, during WWI, were among the Provincetown artists working in new methods of printmaking. Squire and Mars were the subject of Stein's whimsical word portrait "Miss Furr and Miss Skeene" (Squire's nickname was Skeene), written between 1909 and 1911. With characteristic playfulness, Stein in this piece spoofs young ladies who come to Paris to "cultivate something." Stein's incessant reiteration of the word "gay" at a time when its coded meaning was not in mainstream use is interpreted today as an in-group double entendre. At the beginning of WWI, Squire and Mars returned to the U.S. and eventually relocated to Provincetown, Massachusetts. The quaint fishing community at the tip of Cape Cod, with its old-world ambience and affordable rentals, had by this time become an artists' colony, and the international reputations of Squire and Mars attracted other artists to the town. In the 1920s Squire and Mars returned to Europe, eventually settling in Vence on the French Riviera. There Squire and Mars were active in an artists' community that included Marsden Hartley and Reginald Marsh. The couple continued to collaborate on children's book illustration and each again took up painting and drawing. Mars, who concentrated on modernist painting and gouache drawing, exhibited in Paris during the 1920s. Squire concentrated on large-scale watercolors of outdoor public scenes. The couple continued working until about 1930. During WWII, Squire and Mars, then in their sixties, went into hiding near Grenoble. After the war, they returned to their home, La Farigoule, in Vence. Squire died on October 25, 1954; Mars on March 23, 1959. The two women are buried together at Saint Paul de Vence Cemetery (Chemin de Saint-Paul, 06570 Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France).

Life
Who: David Herbert Richards Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930)
D.H. Lawrence was in Bandol from October 1929 until February 1930, when he was persuaded to move to Vence to care for his long-neglected tuberculosis. At the Ad Astra sanatorium he was examined and attended by Doctor Madinier. As the news spread that his life was in danger, H.G. Wells and the Aga Khan, called on him, and the American sculptor Jo Davidson made a model of his bust. He did not take kindly to life in the clinic, and left it on March 1st for the Villa Robermond, where he died the next day, in the care of his wife Frieda von Richthofen, of the English writer Aldous Huxley and his Belgian wife Maria Nys.Lawrence was buried in the old Vence cemetery on a March 1930. His remains were exhumed in March 1935 in the presence of Mrs Gordon Crotch, an English resident, and incinerated at Marseille on March 13. A wooden box holding a sealed zinc container in which were his ashes, was then delivered, together with the appropriate transatlantic transport authorization by the Prefecture, dated 14 March, to the former captain of Bersaglieri Angelo Ravagli, at that time the factotum and lover of Lawrence's widow. His mission was to take the ashes to Taos (New Mexico) in "a beautiful vase" specially ordered by Frieda for this purpose. The ashes brought to Taos by Ravagli in grotesque cicumstances were cast by him into the concrete slab of a "shrine" which he built at the Kiowa ranch at San Cristobal near Taos. When Baron de Haulleville and his sister-in-law Rose Nys-de Halleville (who knew Ravagli through the Huxleys) were Ravagli's guests atTaos, Ravagli after partaking from a bottle of bourbon, confessed late one night to having dumped the box and ashes between Marseille and Villefranche-sur-Mer (where he was due to sail on the Conte di Savoia), so as to avoid the expense and trouble of transporting them to the USA. When in New York he collected Frieda's vase, mailed "to be called for" from Marseille, and put into it some locally procured ashes which he took to Taos. The Villa Robermond, later called the Villa Aurella, was demolished and on its site is now a small apartment house, Le Saint Martin, on the Chemin de Clairefontaine, Quartier de Saint Donat, off the road to Grasse. Of the original villa there only remains part of the old entrance gate, under a metal arch. A memorial plate sent by the Broxtowe district council was unveiled on the garden wall in 1985 for the centenary of Lawrence's death. A tombstone decorated with Lawrence's emblem, the Phoenix, designed in seashore pebbles by the Veneois Dominique Matteucci, was saved after the exhumation by Mrs Crotch, who kept it many years in Vence then moved it to England. It was ultimately rescued by professor Vivian de Sola Pinto and taken to Eastwood.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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