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2017-03-27 08:19 pm

Michael Schofield (June 24, 1919 – March 27, 2014)

Michael George Schofield was a pioneer of social research into homosexuality in the 1950s and 1960s, and a campaigner for the Homosexual Law Reform Society at a time before the Sexual Offences Act 1967 ...
Born: June 24, 1919, Leeds, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 2014
Lived: Belsize Park
Find A Grave Memorial# 173560440
Books: The Sexual Behaviour of Young People, more

Michael George Schofield (June 24, 1919 –March 27, 2014) was a pioneer of social research into homosexuality in the 1950s and 1960s, and a campaigner for the Homosexual Law Reform Society at a time before the Sexual Offences Act 1967 partially decriminalised homosexual activity in the UK. He played a prominent role in the law reform lobbies of the 1960s and 1970s. He is the author of many books including “Sociological Aspects of Homosexuality” (1965) and “The Sexual Behaviour of Young People” (1965). Schofield retired in 1985 from public life and lived with his partner (whom he met in 1952), Anthony Skyrme, in Belsize Park until his death in 2014.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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2017-03-27 08:18 pm

Lester Welch Webb (July 29, 1919 - March 27, 1985)

Buried: Lewes Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Lewes, Sussex County, Delaware, USA
Buried alongside: Joseph V. Hayward
Find A Grave Memorial# 89367928

Cemetery: From the few info you can find, Joseph V. Hayward (1918-1965) and Lester Welch Webb (1919-1985) were not relatives, nevertheless they are buried together at Lewes Presbyterian Church Cemetery (133 Kings Hwy, Lewes, DE 19958) with twin tombstone even if Lester died 20 years after Joseph.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532901909
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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2017-03-27 08:13 pm

Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John 'Pop' Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker.
Born: March 27, 1902, Scotland, United Kingdom
Died: 1971, Cetona
Lived: Villa Tuoro, Via Tuoro, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)
Villa Kenwin, 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Riant Chateau, Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161096858
Spouse: Bryher (m. 1927–1947)
Movies: Borderline, Dreams That Money Can Buy

Bryher was the pen name of the novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. In 1921, she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. The same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D. 's lover (H.D. was Bryher’s lover as well). In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin (Kenneth + Winifred). They formally adopted H.D.'s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson's child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, even if she continued to provide for him. Bryher and H.D. no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until H.D.’s death in 1961. Bryher, H.D., and Macpherson formed the film magazine Close Up, and the POOL Group. Only one POOL film, Borderline (1930), starring H.D. and Paul Roberson, survives in its entirety.

Together from 1927 to 1947: 20 years.
Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro", which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Coucy Lyons. Bryher, Macpherson’s wife, supported her husband and his friend on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the aging Douglas. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas's death in 1952, writing an epitaph for Douglas, from which the Latin inscription, on Douglas's gravestone, is derived (Omnes Eodem Cogimur = "We are all driven to the same end" (i.e., death)). Douglas’s last words apparently were: "Get those fucking nuns away from me." Macpherson was Douglas’s heir, and upon his death, everything went to Islay Lyons.

They met in 1931 and remained friends until Douglas’s death in 1952: 21 years.
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 – June 14, 1971)
Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868 - February 7, 1952)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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Islay Lyons was a notable Welsh photographer, novelist and linguist. During the WWII, he served in North Africa and then he was sent to the Far East to learn Japanese in 3 months. He did this with amongst others, Richard Mason, who was a lifelong friend and cousin by marriage. The character ‘Peter’ in Mason’s book The Wind Cannot Read portrays Lyons. Lyons had been the last lover of the filmmaker, Kenneth Macpherson, both of them living in the ‘Villa Tuoro’ on Capri. Norman Douglas was was their constant companion, there, during the last years of Douglas’s life. Both Macpherson and Lyons were at Norman Douglas’s bedside when he died. Douglas’s estate went to Macpherson, and at Macpherson’s death, to Islay Lyons. Another lover of Macpherson was New York cabaret singer, Jimmie Daniels. Macpherson’s wife, Bryher, financed Daniels and Macpherson’s life in New York. Before Kenneth Macpherson, in Daniels’s life there was the famed architect, Philip Johnson. They met around 1934 when Jimmie was first starting to get some real recognition as an entertainer.

Together from 1947 to 1971: 24 years.
Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Jimmie Daniels (1908 - June 29, 1984)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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House: In September 1931, Kenneth Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build on plans drawn up several years earlier by Alexander Ferenczy.

Address: 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)

Place
The home, which overlooked Lake Geneva, came to be known as Kenwin, derived from the names of its commissioners, Kenneth and Winifred, and would double as a film studio and home, not only for themselves, but also for an assortment of dogs, cats, and monkeys. Bryher gave her address, at the time, as Villa Kenwin, Chemin de Vallon, 1814 Burier-La-Tour, Vaud, Switzerland. During the war years, Bryher would use Kenwin as a staging post for the evacuation of refugees from Nazi Germany. Abandoned after the death of Bryher who will live there until 1983, it was bought in 1987 by the architect Giovanni Pezzoli who undertook a complete renovation. It is registered as a Swiss cultural object of national importance. In 1996, a documentary film entitled "Kenwin" and telling the story of the villa Kenwin was directed by Véronique Goël on the basis of archive footage.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. Her father was the shipowner and financier John Ellerman, who at the time of his death in 1933, was the richest Englishman who had ever lived. He lived with her mother Hannah Glover, but did not marry her until 1908. During the 1920s, Bryher was an unconventional figure in Paris. Among her circle of friends were Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach and Berenice Abbott. Her wealth enabled her to give financial support to struggling writers, including Joyce and Edith Sitwell. She also helped with finance for Sylvia Beach’s bookshop Shakespeare and Company and certain publishing ventures, and started a film company Pool Group. She also helped provide funds to purchase a flat in Paris for the destitute Dada artist and writer Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. In 1918 she met and became involved in a lesbian relationship with poet Hilda Doolittle “H.D.” The relationship was an open one, with both taking other partners. In 1921 she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. That same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D.’s lover. In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin. They formally adopted H.D.’s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson’s child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, she and Doolittle no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until Doolittle’s death in 1961.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Riant Chateau, Territet (1820)

House: Since 1921, H.D. had been a close friend of Bryher. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle.

Address: Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)

Place
Built in 1913, Design by Michel Polak (1885-1948)
The Riant Chateau was built for Belgian businessman Lucien Kaisin. This complex was built for a cosmopolitan clientele and was considered very advanced for its time. It had the most modern elevators and central heating of its time, and was furnished with luxurious fittings. In its heyday, it was the meeting place for avant-garde of the cinema; it was frequently visited by such notables as Eisenstein, Room and Pabst and housed the headquarters of the publishers of the magazine Pool. The redevelopment program has ensured that the spirit of the building has been retained, while all essential services have been replaced and modern technology added. The interior of the building reflects the extravagance and luxury of the Belle Époque, with high ceilings, elaborate cornices, inlaid mirrors, stained glass, heavy oak doors, and antique oak parquet floors. Bordering the Riant Chateau is Rose Park, a beautiful park which extends to the Anglican church. At present an underground parking space is being built beneath Rose Park which is being re-landscaped and replanted with more trees for added privacy. On the other side of the garden lies the Anglican church, and beyond that the terminus of the Mont Pelerin funicular. Rose Park was a favorite haunt of the Austrian Empress Sissi, whose statue serves as a reminder to today’s visitors.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971), Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983) and Hilda "H.D." Doolittle (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)
It was in 1927, from their base in Territet, that Kenneth Macpherson, Bryher and HD launched themselves as the Pool Group. Pool would veer away from the West’s commercial model of film production, and produce material which would promote cinematography as an “art form.” Their model would be based on the work coming out of Germany, particularly G W Pabst, and coming out of Russia, particularly Sergei Eisenstein. Their subject matter would be human behaviour, and its many facets, and their task would be representing this behaviour on screen, influenced by the work of Freud. Also at Territet, Macpherson founded the influential film journal, Close Up, dedicated to "independent cinema and cinema from around the world.” The first issue of Close Up, describing itself on the front cover as an "international magazine devoted to film art,” appeared in July 1927. Macpherson was editor, with Bryher as assistant editor, and Doolittle making regular contributions. Macpherson, who was particularly influenced by the Russian film-maker Sergei Eisenstein and whom he first met in 1929, "dictated the tone and direction of the publication, contributing articles that defined the role of the director and defended the integrity of cinema and its right to be considered as art.” Close Up published many of the first translations of Eisenstein’s ideas. Macpherson continued as the main editor until the magazine’s demise in 1933. Bryher is buried at Cimetière Saint-Martin (Boulevard Saint-Martin, 1800 Vevey).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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House: Villa Tuoro is forever linked to the figure of Scots writer Norman Douglas, who lived here from the post-war period up until the time of his death in 1952. During those years, the house was the property of his great friend Kenneth McPherson. McPherson went on living there until 1957 together with Islay Bowe-Lyons, a cousin of the Queen Mother of England.

Address: Via Tuoro, 80076 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)

Place
Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro,” which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons. Today Villa Tuoro is the residence of Semiramis Zola and her husband John Lee, who bought it directly from Kenneth McPherson. Bowe-Lyons personally attended to the landscaping of the garden. On the ground floor, in the room where Douglas used to work, his writing desk and books are still in place. The windows here all look onto the garden, while as one mounts the stairs to the main floor, a panorama appears that stretches from Marina Piccola to the Certosa, and from Monte Solaro all the way to Ischia.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John “Pop” Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker. His 1930 film, “Borderline,” is now vey much part of the curriculum in the study of modern cinematography today. In his work with the Pool Group (1927–1933), which he co-founded with Bryher and HD, Macpherson also established the influential film journal, Close Up. Macpherson’s story began in 1927, when he married English writer, Annie Winifred Ellerman, (known as Bryher in the literary world), the daughter of a British shipping magnate. Bryher’s inherited fortune would help to finance Macpherson’s projects. Although Bryher’s and Macpherson’s marriage lasted for twenty years, for much of the marriage, both Macpherson and Bryher had extra-marital affairs. Bryher was lesbian but Macpherson was distinctly bi-sexual. A sexual partner, common to both Bryher and Macpherson, was the American poet, Hilda Doolittle (known in literary circles as "HD.”) Doolittle had been a close friend of Bryher’s since 1921. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle, who brought along her 9-year-old daughter, Perdita. (Perdita’s father was Cecil Gray, the Scottish music critic and composer.) In 1928, Doolittle had a sexual relationship with Macpherson, becoming pregnant by him. The pregnancy would be aborted later that year. In the same year, Macpherson and Bryher formally adopted Perdita, registering her name as Frances Perdita Macpherson. In September 1931, Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build. After spending a few months in New York in 1935, Macpherson eventually based himself there to focus on writing, photography and his art collection. In 1947, Macpherson returned from America, spending much of his time in Switzerland and Italy. Bryher supported her husband and his friend, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons, on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the ageing Norman Douglas, the Scottish novelist. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas’s death in 1952, writing an epitaph for his gravestone, “Omnes Eodem Cogimur,” “Where we all must gather.” Macpherson then moved to Rome, and then, in 1965, he “retired” to Tuscany and then Thailand. Macpherson died in Cetona on June 14, 1971, leaving everything, including his inheritance from Douglas, to De Courcy Lyons. Lyons died on 1November 7, 1993, in Chiang-Mai (Mueang Chiang Mai District, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand). Following Lyons’s death, his heir, Manop Charoensuk, arranged for publication of a volume of Lyons’s photographs.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906692
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2017-03-27 08:10 pm

James VI and I of England (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625)

James VI and I was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death.
Born: June 19, 1566, Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 1625, De Vere Theobalds Estate
Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA
Buried alongside: George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Find A Grave Memorial# 1974
Spouse: Anne of Denmark (m. 1589–1619)
Children: Charles I of England, more
Parents: Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, Mary, Queen of Scots

Church: In the chapel of St John the Baptist in Westminster Abbey there is the tomb of Mary Kendall (died March 13, 1709/1710) dating from 1710 with an inscription recording: "That close Union and Friendship, In which she lived, with the Lady Catharine Jones (died April 23, 1740); And in testimony of which she desir’d That even their Ashes, after Death, Might not be divided.”

Address: 20 Dean’s Yard, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK (51.49929, -0.1273)
Hours: Monday and Tuesday 9.30-15.30, Wednesday 9.30-18.00, Thursday and Friday 9.30-15.30, Saturday 9.30-13.30
Phone: +44 20 7222 5152
Website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/

Place
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church. According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the VII century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III. Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held there. There have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey since 1100. Two were of reigning monarchs (Henry I and Richard II), although, before 1919, there had been none for some 500 years.

Notable queer burials at Westminster Abbey:
• Anne, Queen of Great Britain (1665-1714). Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, became close to the young Princess Anne in about 1675, and the friendship grew stronger as the two grew older. Correspondence between the Duchess and the Queen reveals that the two women enjoyed a royally passionate romance. They called each other pet names: Sarah was “Mrs. Freeman” and Anne was “Mrs. Morley.” When Anne came to the throne in 1702, she named Sarah “Lady of the Bedchamber.” Anne and Sarah were virtually inseparable; no king’s mistress had ever wielded the power granted to the Duchess. Over time, Sarah became overconfident in her position and developed an arrogant attitude toward Anne, even going to far as to insult the queen in public. A cousin of Sarah’s, Abigail Hill, caught the Queen’s eye during Sarah’s frequent absences from Court, and eventually replaced her in Anne’s affections. After her final break with Anne in 1711, Sarah and her husband were dismissed from the court. Sarah enjoyed a "long and devoted" relationship with her husband of more than 40 years, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. The money she inherited from the Marlborough trust left her one of the richest women in Europe.
• Sir Frederick Ashton (1904–1988), ballet dancer and choreographer, Memorial in Poet’s Corner (buried St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Yaxley)
• W. H. Auden (1907-1973), poet and essayist. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey in 1974, adjoining the grave of John Masefield. Another memorial is at Christ College Cathedral, Oxford, where he graduated (buried Kirchstetten, Austria) (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for Boys which was an inspiration for the Scout Movement, founder and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association and founder of the Girl Guides. In the south aisle of the nave of Westminster Abbey, against the screen of St George’s chapel, there is a memorial stone to Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, by W.Soukop. Both are buried in Kenya and each had a memorial service held at the Abbey (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), Prime Minister, memorial. A memorial to Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, was unveiled in the nave of Westminster Abbey in 1997. Designed by Donald Buttress and cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was a dramatist in the English Renaissance theatre, most famous for his collaborations with John Fletcher (1579–1625.) According to a mid-century anecdote related by John Aubrey, they lived in the same house on the Bankside in Southwark, "sharing everything in the closest intimacy." About 1613 Beaumont married Ursula Isley, daughter and co-heiress of Henry Isley of Sundridge in Kent, by whom he had two daughters, one posthumous. Francis Beaumont and his brother Sir John Beaumont are both buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, at the entrance to St Benedict's chapel near Chaucer's monument. Fletcher died in 1625 and is buried inside the Southwark Cathedral, London Bridge, London SE1 9DA. On 1November 6, 1996 the cathedral became a focus of controversy when it hosted a twentieth-anniversary service for the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement. In 1997 openly gay cleric, Jeffrey John became Canon Chancellor and Theologian of the Cathedral (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. Behn’s close association with royalty, especially her friendship with the King’s mistress, Nell Gwyn, and her long-standing liaison with John Hoyle (died 1692), whose affairs with other men were notorious, made Behn a prime subject for court and theater gossip. Just as Behn was notorious for presenting sensational subjects on stage despite societal taboos, she achieved a reputation for unusually explicit accounts of erotic and sexual episodes in her poems. Many of these celebrated gay male and lesbian relationships. She was buried in the east cloister of Westminster Abbey, near the steps up into the church. The inscription on her tombstone, written by John Hoyle, reads: "Here lies a Proof that Wit can never be Defence enough against Mortality." John Hoyle was stabbed to death on May 1692 and is buried in the vault of the Inner Temple church, Temple, London EC4Y 7BB) (Location in the Abbey: Cloisters; East Cloister).
• William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709) and King William III of England (1650-1702), are buried next to Queen Mary II. King William III is buried in great simplicity in the South Aisle of the Chapel of Henry VI, and his companion William Bentinck is buried in a vault nearby. Several members of the Bentinck family are buried in the Ormond vault at the eastern end of Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey. None have monuments but their names and dates of death were added to the vaultstone in the late XIX century (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915) died at 4:46 pm on April 23, 1915 in a French hospital ship moored in a bay off the island of Skyros in the Aegean on his way to the landing at Gallipoli. As the expeditionary force had orders to depart immediately, he was buried at 11 pm in an olive grove on Skyros, Greece. His grave remains there today. On 11 November 1985, Brooke was among 16 WWI poets commemorated on a slate monument unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976), musician and composer. In the north choir (or Musicians) aisle in Westminster Abbey there is a memorial stone. Britten refused a formal burial since he wanted to be buried beside his partner Peter Pears (Location in the Abbey: North Quire Aisle).
• Robert Browning (1812-1889), poet, is buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. He was born on 7 May 1812 in London, a son of Robert Browning (1782-1866) and Sarah (Wiedemann). He married Elizabeth Barrett, a famous poet in her own right, in September 1846 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• George, 6th Baron Byron (1788-1824). The memorial stone in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey was given by the Poetry Society and unveiled on May 8, 1969 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), composer and playwright. A memorial was unveiled in 1984 in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. The black marble stone was cut by Ralph Beyer. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend" (Location in the Abbey: South Quire Aisle).
• Major-General Sir Herbert Edwardes (1819–1868) was an administrator, soldier, and statesman active in the Punjab, India. He is buried in Highgate Cemetery. A memorial by sculptor William Theed junior, is on the wall of the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. He is also commemorated by a stained glass window in the chapel of King’s College London. Brigadier-General John Nicholson (1822–1857) was a Victorian era military officer known for his role in British India. Nicholson never married, the most significant people in his life being his brother Punjab administrators Sir Henry Lawrence and Herbert Edwardes. At Bannu, Nicholson used to ride one hundred and twenty miles every weekend to spend a few hours with Edwardes, and lived in his beloved friend’s house for some time when Edwardes’ wife Emma was in England. At his deathbed he dictated a message to Edwardes saying, "Tell him that, if at this moment a good fairy were to grant me a wish, my wish would be to have him here next to my mother." The love between him and Edwardes made them, as Edwardes’ wife latter described it "more than brothers in the tenderness of their whole lives.” In the retaking of Delhi, India, Nicholson led 2,000 men (mostly British, Pathan, and Punjabi troops) through the Kashmiri Gate in Delhi. Mortally wounded he died at the hour of British victory and is buried at New Delhi (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Eliot (1819-1880) was not buried in Westminster Abbey because of her denial of the Christian faith and her "irregular" though monogamous life with Lewes. She was buried in Highgate Cemetery (East), Highgate, London, in the area reserved for religious dissenters and agnostics, beside the love of her life, George Henry Lewes. On 2June 1, 1980 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. Stone by John Skelton (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771)’s biographer William Mason erected a memorial to him, designed by John Bacon the Elder, in the east aisle of Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey in 1778. (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner)
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), Poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in 1975 in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. By sculptor David Peace (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936), poet, has a memorial panel in the window above Chaucer's monument in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner). he has a memorial also at St Laurence (College Street, Ludlow, Shropshire, SY8 1AN).
• Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon (1661-1723), was the only son of Henry and his first wife Theodosia, daughter of Lord Capel. As Viscount Cornbury was governor of New York from 1702 to 1708. He had a very bad reputation and "his character and conduct were equally abhorred in both hemispheres". He secretly married Catherine O'Brien in 1688 and died in obscurity and debt. His only surviving son Edward as Lord Clifton took his seat in the House of Lords but died unmarried of a fever after a drinking bout. His daughter Theodosia married John Bligh, later Earl of Darnley, and both were buried in the vault (Location in the Abbey: North ambulatory)
• Henry James (1843-1916), American born novelist. On June 17, 1976 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets’ Corner Westminster Abbey by his great grand-nephew. Cut by Will Carter (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• James Kendall, politician and governor of Barbados, is buried in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. James’s niece Mary Kendall was buried in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Abbey and has a monument there with a kneeling alabaster figure of herself. The inscription, written by the Dean of Westminster Francis Atterbury, reads: "Mrs Mary Kendall daughter of Thomas Kendall Esqr. and of Mrs Mary Hallet, his wife, of Killigarth in Cornwall, was born at Westminster Nov.8 1677 and dy’d at Epsome March 4 1709/10, having reach’d the full term of her blessed Saviour’s life; and study’d to imitate his spotless example. She had great virtues, and as great a desire of concealing them: was of a severe life, but of an easy conversation; courteous to all, yet strictly sincere; humble, without meanness; beneficient, without ostentation; devout, without superstition. These admirable qualitys, in which she was equall’d by few of her sex, surpass’d by none, render’d her every way worthy of that close uion and friendship in which she liv’d with the Lady Catherine Jones; and in testimony of which she desir’d that even their ashes, after death, might not be divided: and, therefore, order’d her selfe here to be interr’d where, she knew, that excellent Lady design’d one day to rest, near the grave of her belov’d and religious mother, Elizabeth, Countess of Ranelagh. This monument was erected by Capt. Charles Kendall." Her name was inscribed on the vault stone in front of the monument in the late XIX century. Mary’s father Thomas Kendall, son of a merchant, died in 1684 and Mary lived with the Earl of Ranelagh’s family while James was in the West Indies. Lady Catherine Jones (d.1740) was the Earl’s daughter. Charles was Mary’s cousin and was in the Royal Navy. Her estates were left to her cousin Canon Nicholas Kendall. The coats of arms show those for Kendall and also "or, a chief gules overall on a bend engrailed sable three bezants" for Hallet.
• Herbert, 1st Earl Kitchener (1850-1916), Sirdar of the Egyptian army (Commander in Chief), is remembered on the altar in the south aisle of the Lady Chapel (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel)
• D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930), novelist and poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey on 1November 6, 1985. By David Parsley (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• In July 2002, a memorial window to Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) – a gift of the Marlowe Society – was unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey. Controversially, a question mark was added to the generally accepted date of death. On 2October 5, 2011 a letter from Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells was published by The Times newspaper, in which they called on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence.” In 2012, they renewed this call in their e-book Shakespeare Bites Back, adding that it "denies history,” and again the following year in their book Shakespeare Beyond Doubt. (Buried St Nicholas Churchyard, Deptford)
• Just inside the west door of Westminster Abbey there is a memorial brass, by Christopher Ironside, to Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900-1979) and his wife, Countess Mountbatten of Burma. He was Admiral of the Fleet (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• It has been said that the greatest love of Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727)’s life was with a fellow mathematician, Fatio de Duillier. They collaborated for several years, and when they broke up over an argument in 1693, Newton suffered symptoms of a nervous breakdown. Fatio assisted John Conduitt (Newton’s nephew) in planning the design, and writing the inscription for Newton’s monument in Westminster Abbey. His large monument is by William Kent and J.M.Rysbrack. Newton has also a Memorial at Trinity College, Cambridge. Fatio died in 1753 and was buried at the church of St. Nicholas, Worcester (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• After being ill for the last twenty-two years of his life, Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) died of renal failure on 11 July 1989 at his home near Steyning, West Sussex. His cremation was held three days later. The ashes of the greatest actor of his generation, are buried in the south transept of Westminster Abbey. His stone was cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: South Transept).
• Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. The inscription on the stone is taken from Owen’s "Preface" to his poems; "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." (Buried Ors Communal Cemetery, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)
• Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902). A small tablet was unveiled in Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey in 1953 (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Seigfried Sassoon (1886-1967), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. (Buried St Andrew Churchyard, Mells, Somerset)
• Henry John Alexander Seely (1899-1963), 2nd Lord Mottistone, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. A statue by Edwin Russell remembers him (Location in the Abbey: St Catherine's Chapel Garden; Little Cloister).
• Robert Stewart (1769-1822), Viscount Castlereagh and 2nd Marquis of Londonderry, politician, was buried in the centre of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. His statue is by sculptor John Evan Thomas (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628) and King James I of England (1566-1625) are buried in the Henry VII Chapel. King James I’s tomb was lost and not rediscovered until 1869. On His Majesty’s left is the magnificent tomb of his lover George Villiers. On his right is the tomb (with huge bronze figures representing Hope, Truth, Charity and Faith) of Ludovic Stuart, Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1574-1624), son of one of his earliest lovers, Esme Stuart.
• On 14 February 1995 a small stained glass memorial was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey for Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wilde (1854-1900), playwright and aesthete (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-27 08:05 pm

Henry Davis Sleeper (March 27, 1878 - September 22, 1934)

Henry Davis Sleeper was a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. He was born March 27, 1878, in Boston to Major Jacob Henry Sleeper, a distinguished Civil War veteran and Maria ...
Born: 1878, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: September 22, 1934, West End, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: Beauport, 75 Eastern Point Blvd, Gloucester, MA 01930, USA (42.59114, -70.66009)
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery
Find A Grave Memorial# 33029215

Henry Davis Sleeper was a noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. The Harvard economist A. Piatt Andrew who had built a handsome summer mansion, Red Roof, on a rock ledge above the harbor, introduced Henry Sleeper to the Eastern Point in Gloucester, Massachusetts in the spring of 1906. Sleeper was much taken by the location and immediately decided to build a little further along the ledge from Red Roof. Construction of Beauport, Sleeper's relatively modestly scaled Arts and Crafts-style house began in the fall of 1907 and was sufficiently finished to receive A. Piatt Andrew as a houseguest in May 1908. Abram Piatt Andrew Jr. was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. Also Sleeper became the U.S. Representative, and a major fundraiser for the American Field Service, an ambulance corps founded by Andrew early during World War I. Sleeper died in Massachusetts General Hospital of leukemia on September 22, 1934 and is buried in his family's plot in Mount Auburn Cemetery located in Watertown and Cambridge, Massachusetts. Andrew wrote the memorial tribute published in the Gloucester Daily Times. A gay man, some source say that Sleeper was in a relationship with Andrew. Others state that the two were just friends.

Together from 1906 to 1934: 28 years.
Abram Piatt Andrew Jr. (February 12, 1873 – June 3, 1936)
Henry Davis Sleeper (March 27, 1878 - September 22, 1934)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: Beauport, also known as Sleeper-McCann House, Little Beauport, or Henry Davis Sleeper House, is a historic house in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Address: 75 Eastern Point Blvd, Gloucester, MA 01930, USA (42.59114, -70.66009)
Hours: Tuesday to Saturday 10.00-17.00
Phone: +1 978-283-0800
Website: http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/Beauport
National Register of Historic Places: 03000641, 2003 & 76000246, 1976. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
Built starting in 1907
Beauport was the summer home of interior decorator and antique collector Henry Davis Sleeper. Situated on the rocks overlooking Gloucester Harbor, the structure was repeatedly enlarged and modified by Sleeper, and filled with a large collection of fine art, folk art, architectural artifacts, and other collectible materials. Sleeper decorated the (ultimately 56) rooms to evoke different historical and literary themes. After his death, Charles and Helena Woolworth McCann acquired the house and its contents. They preserved much of the Sleeper’s designs and decorations, but made some modifications, including adding their porcelain collection to the house. Their heirs donated the property to the Society for the Protection of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England) in 1947, who operate the property as a house museum. Beauport served as Sleeper’s escape, a backdrop for summer parties, and as a showcase for his professional skills. The house has frequently been written about in books and magazines, with the first major article appearing in House Beautiful in 1916. It has been featured in such diverse publications as Architectural Digest, Country Living, and The Boston Globe, and as been showcased on televisions programs such as America’s Castles. In addition to the main house, the property also has a gate house, garage, and toolshed that were built by Sleeper. The gate house has been adapted by Historic New England as a visitor reception area, and the toolshed now houses restrooms. The garage is used for storage and as office space. There is a single non-contributing building on the property, a caretaker’s house, which is potentially of local historic interest as an example of a prefabricated post- WWII residential structure.

Life
Who: Henry Davis Sleeper (March 27, 1878 - September 22, 1934)
Henry Davis Sleeper was a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. He was grandson of Jacob Sleeper, one of the founders of Boston University as well as a clothier and manager of a real estate trust. Henry Sleeper was introduced to the Eastern Point in Gloucester, Massachusetts in the spring of 1906 by the Harvard economist A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) who had built a handsome summer mansion, Red Roof, on a rock ledge above the harbor. Sleeper was much taken by the location and immediately decided to build a little further along the ledge from Red Roof. Eastern Point was an enclave occupied by a somewhat louche group of "Bohemian" artists and intellectuals with frequent visits from some of the more colorful and unconventional members of Boston Society, in particular Isabella Stewart Gardner, the legendary art collector and builder of Fenway Court in the Back Bay Fens, now the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Construction of Beauport, Sleeper’s relatively modestly scaled Arts and Crafts-style house began in the fall of 1907 and was sufficiently finished to receive A. Piatt Andrew as a house guest in May 1908. As property flanking Sleeper’s became available, Beauport was expanded several times until 1925, often in response to events or important experiences in his life. The house was now not only a home but a major showcase for Sleeper’s interior design and decoration business. Clients could choose wallpapers, window treatments, or entire rooms to have reproduced in their own houses. Sleeper had a specialty in "Puritan Revival,” the Jacobean-American architecture and decorative arts of the original American colonies, but his tastes and interests included French decor of several centuries and a great deal of orientalia. Isabella Stewart Gardner commissioned work from him; Henry Francis du Pont engaged his assistance with the big new wing of the family’s massive house, Winterthur (5105 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, DE 19735), now a famed museum of American decorative arts; he designed for Hollywood stars Joan Crawford and Fredric March. Henry Davis Sleeper died in Massachusetts General Hospital of leukemia on September 22, 1934, and is buried in his family’s plot in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Watertown and Cambridge, Massachusetts. Andrew wrote the memorial tribute published in the Gloucester Daily Times. Sleeper had never married and left no direct descendants. Beauport passed to his brother Stephen whose real estate income was unequal to Henry’s debts. Beauport was sold to Helena Woolworth McCann who was contacted by Henry Francis Du Pont urging that Sleeper’s rooms remain exactly as they were as the value of the house and its collection of art objects depended primarily on their being left unchanged. Mrs McCann preserved the house as it was; at her death, the house was inherited by her daughters from whose hands it passed into the care of Historic New England in 1942.

Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.

Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
Website: http://mountauburn.org/
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.

Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997) (Location: Willow Pond Knoll, Lot 11000), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman, later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman (Location: Willow Pond Knoll, Lot 11000).
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Charlotte Cushman (1816–1876) (Location: Palm Avenue, Lot 4236), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Martha May Eliot (1891–1978), was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. She was a scion of the Eliot family, an influential American family that is regarded as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy and held sway over the American education system in the late XIX and early XX centuries. Her father, Christopher Rhodes Eliot, was a Unitarian minister, and her grandfather, William G. Eliot, was the first chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis. The poet, playwright, critic, and Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot was her first cousin. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner. She was cremated at Mount Auburn but buried elsewhere.
• Mary Katherine Keemle "Kate" Field (1838-1896), American journalist, lecturer, and actress, of eccentric talent. She was the daughter of actors Joseph M. Field and Eliza Riddle. Kate Field never married. In October 1860, while visiting his mother's home in Florence, she met the celebrated British novelist Anthony Trollope. She became one of his closest friends and was the subject of Trollope's high esteem. Trollope scholars have speculated on the nature of their warm friendship. Twenty-four of his letters to Kate survive, at the Boston Public Library; hers to Trollope do not.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915) (Location: Elder Path, Lot 2700), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) (Location: Oxalis Path, Lot 2900) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Charles Hammond Gibson, Jr. (1874–1954) (Location: Sweetbrier Path, Lot 472), Boston writer and bachelor bon vivant, best known for having preserved his family's Beacon Street home as a museum of Victorian style and taste. “The Wounded Eros,” a short documentary film by Todd Gernes, explores the aesthetic relationship between Gibson's literary production and the material culture contexts of his museum and library, set within the social history of turn-of-the-century gay Boston. He had an enduring relationship with the eccentric self-styled "Count" Maurice de Mauny Talvande.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908) (Location: Hemlock Path, Lot 3747), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925) (Location: Bellwort Path, Lot 3401), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906) (Location: Thistle Path, Lot 709), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) (Location: Walnut Avenue, Lot 7108) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848-1920) (Location: Pilgrim Path, Lot 4141) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851-1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934) (Location: Willow Avenue, Lot 453), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-27 08:01 pm

Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988)

William Gordon Merrick was a Broadway actor, best-selling author of gay-themed novels and one of the first authors to write about homosexual themes for a mass audience.
Born: August 3, 1916, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: March 27, 1988, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Education: Princeton University
Lived: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)
25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)
Buried: Greenwood Cemetery, Brielle, Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 92151384

Gordon Merrick was a Broadway actor, a best-selling author of gay-themed novels, and one of the first authors to write about homosexual themes for a mass audience. Merrick wrote stories, which depicted well-adjusted gay men engaged in romantic relationships. Each of his books had a happy ending. Merrick's best-known book is The Lord Won't Mind. The first in a trilogy, Merrick followed it up with One for the Gods in 1971 and Forth into Light in 1974. Merrick enrolled at Princeton University in 1936. He quit in the middle of his junior year and moved to New York City, where he became an actor. He landed the role of Richard Stanley in George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's The Man Who Came to Dinner and became Hart's lover for a time. In 1980 he moved to Ceylon (now known as Sri Lanka), having bought property there in 1974. He returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville. For the rest of his life, he divided his time between the two countries. Charles Gerald Hulse, a dancer turned actor turned novelist (In Tall Cotton, 1987), was his partner
of 32 years, until Merrick's death in 1988, in Sri Lanka where they moved together.

Together from 1956 to 1988: 32 years.
Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, NJ 08544. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was the fourth chartered institution of higher education in the Thirteen Colonies and thus one of the nine colonial colleges established before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, where it was renamed Princeton University in 1896. Mathematician, computer and artificial intelligence pioneer, and code-breaker Alan Turing attended Princeton University for his PhD from 1936-1938. He studied in Fine Hall (now Jones Hall) and the Palmer Physical Laboratory. Fine Hall has not change significantly since Turing's time there. In the 1950s, Turing was charged with gross indecency, and avoided prison by agreeing to drug treatments (essentially medical castration). He died of cyanide poisoning in 1954. Queen Elizabeth II granted him a posthumous pardon in 2013. Notable queer alumni and faculty at Princeton University: A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936), James Biddle (1929–2005), Lem Billings (1916-1981), George Henry Boker (1823-1890), Richard Halliburton (1900-1939), John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), William Morris Meredith (1919-2007), Gordon Merrick (1916–1988), Alan Turing (1912-1954), Thornton Wilder (1897–1975), Russel Wright (1904–1976).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Historic District: Gordon Merrick left France to avoid the unrest which accompanied the Algerian War of Independence. Merrick and his partner Charles Hulse moved to Greece and took up residence on the island of Hydra.

Address: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)

Place
Hydra is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Saronic Gulf and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by a narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea (Υδρέα, derived from the Greek word for "water"), a reference to the springs on the island. The municipality of Hydra consists of the islands Hydra (area 52 km2 (20.1 sq mi)), Dokos (pop. 18, area 13.5 km2 (5.2 sq mi)), and a few uninhabited islets. The province of Hydra was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality. It was abolished in 2006. There is one main town, known simply as "Hydra port" (pop. 1,900 in 2011.) It consists of a crescent-shaped harbor, around which is centered a strand of restaurants, shops, markets, and galleries that cater to tourists and locals (Hydriots.) Steep stone streets lead up and outward from the harbor area. Most of the local residences, as well as the hostelries on the island, are located on these streets. Other small villages or hamlets on the island include Mandraki (pop. 11), Kamini, Vlychos (19), Palamidas, Episkopi, and Molos. Since 1960, the Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen has owned a house on the island.
Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In the 1950s Hydra became home to Charles Hulse and Gordon Merrick. Merrick was an American author who wrote more than a dozen novels, which were known for their gay themes. His most successful, “The Lord Won’t Mind,” was written on Hydra. While on vacation visiting the Greek island of Hydra in 1956, Merrick and Hulse bought a house on the island which was to become their home for the next twenty years. At the time, Merrick was working on his fifth novel, and Hulse and Merrick spent the years between 1960 and 1980 travelling mainly between Paris, Hydra and Galle in Sri Lanka. While on Hydra, Hulse and Merrick were hosts to socialites, intellectuals and artists from all over the world. During their theatre career, and here, Hulse and Merrick came to know people, such as Charles Laughton, Jules Dassin, Melina Mercouri, Jacqueline Onassis, Leonard Cohen and others. Hulse restored and furnished the house on Hydra, which was admired by and photographed extensively for various international magazines. In 1974 the couple bought land in Sri Lanka. Six years later they quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Merrick and Hulse also returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville, Normandy. For the rest of their life, they divided their time between the two countries.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: In 1974 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse bought land in Sri Lanka.

Address: 25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)

Place
Galle is a major city in Sri Lanka, situated on the southwestern tip, 119 km from Colombo. Galle is the administrative capital of Southern Province, Sri Lanka and is the district capital of Galle District. Galle is the fifth largest city in Sri Lanka after the capital Colombo, Kandy, Jaffna and Negombo. According to James Emerson Tennent, Galle was the ancient seaport of Tarshish, from which King Solomon drew ivory, peacocks and other valuables. Cinnamon was exported from Sri Lanka as early as 1400 BC and the root of the word itself is Hebrew, so Galle may have been a main entrepot for the spice. Galle had been a prominent seaport long before western rule in the country. Persians, Arabs, Greeks, Romans, Malays, Indians, and Chinese were doing business through Galle port. In 1411, the Galle Trilingual Inscription, a stone tablet inscription in three languages, Chinese, Tamil and Persian, was erected in Galle to commemorate the second visit to Sri Lanka by the Chinese admiral Zheng He. The "modern" history of Galle starts in 1502, when a small fleet of Portuguese ships, under the command of Lourenço de Almeida, on their way to the Maldives, were blown off course by a storm. Realising that the king resided in Kotte close to Colombo, Lourenço proceeded there after a brief stop in Galle. In 1640, the Portuguese had to surrender to the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch built the present fort in the year 1663. They built a fortified wall, using solid granite, and built three bastions, known as "Sun,” "Moon" and "Star.” After the British took over the country from the Dutch in the year 1796, they preserved the Fort unchanged, and used it as the administrative centre of the district.

Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In 1980 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Hulse and Merrick bought a house at 25 Rampart Street within the precinct of Galle’s XVII century fortress. Here, Hulse worked on interior design, and began to write. By this time, Merrick had already published several books and was a celebrity. Hulse helped Merrick to prepare manuscripts for publication and the two travelled together frequently during this period. Gordon Merrick died in Colombo, Sri Lanka, of lung cancer on March 27, 1988. He was survived by his companion, Charles G. Hulse.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Cemetery: At Greenwood Cemetery (707 Schoolhouse Rd, Brielle, NJ 08730) are buried Roy Strickland (1918-2003) and William Wynkoop (1916-2003): they both died in 2003, 2 months apart, William 87 and Roy 85, after living together for more than 53 years. Moreover also Gordon Merrick (1916–1988), author best-known for his “The Lord Won't Mind” trilogy, is buried here.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-27 07:55 pm

George Tooker (August 5, 1920 – March 27, 2011)

George Clair Tooker, Jr. was an American figurative painter. His works are associated with Magic realism, Social realism, Photorealism and Surrealism.
Born: August 5, 1920, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died: March 27, 2011, Hartland, Vermont, United States
Education: Art Students League of New York
Harvard University
Phillips Academy
Lived: Hartland (05048 Vermont)
Bleecker Street, Greenwich Village
9 W 18th St, New York, NY 10011
77 State St, Brooklyn, NY 11201
Buried: Sea View Cemetery, Mount Sinai, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 67683783
Books: George Tooker: Working Drawings
Periods: Social realism, Surrealism

School: Phillips Academy Andover (also known as Phillips Academy, Andover, or PA, 180 Main St, Andover, MA 01810) is a co-educational university-preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9–12, along with a post-graduate (PG) year. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957); Daniel Pinkham (1923–2006), George Tooker (1920-2011), John Horne Burns (1916–1953), William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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The Art Students League of New York is an art school located ar 215 W 57th St, 10019. The League has historically been known for its broad appeal to both amateurs and professional artists and has maintained, for over 130 years, a tradition of offering reasonably priced classes on a flexible schedule to accommodate students from all walks of life. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Paul Cadmus (1904–1999), Paul Chalfin (1874-1959), Russell Cheney (1881–1945), Kate Cory (1861–1958), Eyre de Lanux (1894-1996), Thomas Eakins (1844–1916), Jared French (1905-1988), Marsden Hartley (1877–1943), Wilna Hervey (1894–1979), Georgia O'Keeffe (1887–1986), Violet Oakley (1874-1961), George Quaintance (1902-1957), Robert Rauschenberg (1925–2008), Man Ray (1890–1976), Marion Sanford (1904-1987), Maurice Sendak (1928–2012), Prentiss Taylor (1907–1991), Paul Thek (1933-1988), George Tooker (1920–2011), Cy Twombly (1928-2011), Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875-1942), Alice Morgan Wright (1881-1975), Russel Wright (1904–1976).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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In 1945 with a stipend of $90 a month from his family, George Tooker (1920-2011) moved to a cold-water flat on Bleecker Street, 10012, in New York's Greenwich Village (rent $17 per month) where he was to live for five years. A year later, upon Lincoln Kirstein’s suggestion, he was included in Dorothy Miller’s exhibition, Fourteen Americans, at the Museum of Modern Art, which had a major impact on his developing career.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: Upon graduating in 1942, George Tooker (1920-2011) enlisted in the Marine Corps. Returning to New York, he enrolled at the Art Students League and studied with Reginald Marsh in 1943 and 1944. While he was a monitor in one of Marsh’s classes, he met Paul Cadmus, who in turn introduced him to Jared and Margaret French, artists who became lifelong friends. They also introduced him to their wider circle of friends, an accomplished group of writers, composers, dancers, and artists, including Lincoln Kirstein, W.H. Auden, Christopher Isherwood, Monroe Wheeler, and George Platt Lynes. In 1949 he met his long-time partner, William R. Christopher, who died in 1973. After a fire damaged the loft at 9 W 18th St, New York, NY 10011 in which Tooker and Christopher, were living in 1953, they bought and renovated a brownstone on State Street in Brooklyn Heights.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: After a fire damaged the loft on West 18th Street in which George Tooker (1920-2011) and his partner, William Christopher (1923-1973), painter and cabinetmaker, were living in 1953, they bought and renovated a brownstone at 77 State St, Brooklyn, NY 11201. They resided there until a short time after George's mother died in 1960, at which time they removed to Hartland, Vermont, and sold the house in Brooklyn Heights. A rooming house across the street inspired a number of his paintings in the years that followed, including his windows series. In 1954, Tooker received a commission to design the sets for Gian Carlo Menotti’s opera, “The Saint of Bleecker Street,” again thanks to Kirstein’s recommendation.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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School: In 1981, George Tooker (1920-2011) purchased from Geoffrey Fraser Champlain the Pond Cottage (249 Beaver Dam Rd, Brookhaven, NY 11719). In 1994 he sold it to the Post Morrow Foundation. Tooker found that the change experienced by the locale since he was young, and the passing of the people he associated with the area, were difficult for him; he explained, “when I was out there, I just remembered the past. ... And that's why I didn't stay. I sold the house because I was living in the past when I was down there. And I thought, in Vermont I live in the present.”

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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House: Later in the 1940s, Jared French (1905-1988) and his wife formed a complicated relationship with Paul Cadmus and Cadmus' then lover, George Tooker (1920–2011). When French and his wife bought a home in Hartland (05048 Vermont), they gave Cadmus a house of his own on the property. French later took the house back and gave it to his Italian lover. French died in Rome in 1988 and many of his paintings remain with his friend, Roberto Gianatta. In 1960, George Tooker and his life partner, Bill Christopher, move to Vermont. They buy a barn in White River Junction and move it to their home site in Hartland, not far from Jared and Margaret French’s summer home. They cut the Barn down quite a bit and then add on additional rooms. They permanently relocated from Brooklyn. Tooker returned to New York quite often, though, and taught at the Art Student’s League from 1965 to 1968. In order to escape the harsh Vermont weather, Tooker and Christopher began spending winters in Spain. They bought an apartment in Malaga in 1968, which Tooker maintained for the next two decades. A few years after Christopher died in 1973, Tooker converted to Catholicism and became deeply involved with his church in Vermont, the St. Francis of Assisi Church (28 Union St, Windsor, VT 05089). He painted an elaborate seven-panel work, The Seven Sacraments, which was installed in the church in 1981. In the years that followed, Tooker increasingly focused on his art and spiritual life in the relative solitude of his Vermont home. He typically followed a daily pattern of attending early Mass, returning home to paint in his studio until late afternoon, and then often sketching in the evening. He died at home in April 2011.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Cemetery: George Tooker (1920–2011) was an American figurative painter. His works are associated with Magic realism, Social realism, Photorealism and Surrealism. In 1968, he was elected to the National Academy of Design and was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Tooker was one of nine recipients of the National Medal of Arts in 2007. Tooker died at his home in Hartland and is buried at Seaview Cemetery (233 N Country Rd, Mt Sinai, NY 11766).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-27 07:52 pm

Freda Stark (March 27, 1910 – March 19, 1999)

Freda Beatrice Stark was a New Zealand dancer, and a prosecution witness after the prescription drug overdose of her lover, Thelma Mareo, in 1935.
Born: March 27, 1910, New Zealand
Died: March 19, 1999, Massey, New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand
Buried: Waikumete Cemetery & Crematorium, Glen Eden, Auckland Council, Auckland, New Zealand, Plot: 95 Row 2 Div G Anglcan
Buried alongside: Thelma Mareo
Find A Grave Memorial# 72268236

Freda Stark was a New Zealand dancer. In 1933, Stark joined Ernest Rolls' revue, and met a young dancer named Thelma Trott, and the two women fell in love. In 1934, Stark was in the chorus of the Duchess of Danitz, while Trott starred. At this time, Trott married Eric Mareo, their conductor. The relationship was cut short in 1935 when Trott took a fatal overdose of the prescription drug Veronal in unexplained circumstances, leading to Mareo being charged with her murder. During the Second World War, Freda was a famed exotic dancer at Auckland's Wintergarden cabaret and nightclub, and a favorite of American troops stationed there, where she earned the title "Fever of the Fleet." Freda Stark longed to be reunited with her long dead lover Thelma Mareo and her friends made sure that wish was granted after her death in 1999: Freda, who died at 88 in a West Auckland rest home, was cremated and her ashes were buried at the foot of Thelma's grave in Waikumete Cemetery, under the words she put there long before: “Waiting till we meet again… Freda.”

Together from 1933 to 1935: 2 years.
Freda Stark (March 27, 1910 – March 19, 1999)
Thelma Clarice Trott (1906 – April 15, 1935)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Cemetery: Freda Stark (1910-1999) was a New Zealand dancer. In 1933, Stark joined Ernest Rolls' revue, and met a young dancer named Thelma Trott (1906-1935), and the two women fell in love. Trott married Eric Mareo. The relationship was cut short in 1935 when Trott took a fatal overdose of the prescription drug Veronal in unexplained circumstances, leading to Mareo being charged with her murder. Freda Stark longed to be reunited with her long dead lover Thelma Mareo and her friends made sure that wish was granted after her death in 1999: Freda, who died at 88 in a West Auckland rest home, was cremated and her ashes were buried at the foot of Thelma's grave in Waikumete Cemetery (4128 Great North Rd, Glen Eden, Waitakere 0602), under the words she put there long before: “Waiting till we meet again… Freda.”

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1544068433
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2017-03-27 07:49 pm

Farley Granger (July 1, 1925 – March 27, 2011)

Farley Earle Granger, Jr. was an American actor, best known for his two collaborations with director Alfred Hitchcock; Rope in 1948 and Strangers on a Train in 1951.
Born: July 1, 1925, San Jose, California, United States
Died: March 27, 2011, New York City, New York, United States
Education: North Hollywood High School
Find A Grave Memorial# 67599447
Books: Include Me Out: My Life from Goldwyn to Broadway
Parents: Farley Earle Granger I, Eva Hopkins
Anniversary: November 22, 1963

Farley Earle Granger was an American actor, best known for his collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock, Rope and Strangers on a Train. Despite his three unsuccessful Broadway experiences, Granger continued to focus on theater in the early 1960s. He accepted an invitation from Eva Le Gallienne to join her National Repertory Theatre. During their first season, while the company was in Philadelphia, John Fitzgerald Kennedy was assassinated. The President had attended NRT's opening night and post-performance gala in the nation's capital, so the news hit everyone in the company especially hard. Granger had become close friends with production supervisor Robert Calhoun, and although both had felt a mutual attraction, they never had discussed it. That night they became lovers.

Together from 1963 to 2008: 45 years.
Farley Granger (July 1, 1925 – March 27, 2011)
Robert Calhoun (1931 - May 24, 2008)
Anniversary: November 22, 1963

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: North Hollywood High School (5231 Colfax Ave, North Hollywood, CA 91601) is a public high school in Valley Village in Los Angeles, California. NHHS is located in the San Fernando Valley and enrolls approximately 3,000 students each year. It is located in District 2 of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Built in 1927, Lankershim High School was named for the town of Lankershim (first called Toluca, now North Hollywood) and its founding family. It opened with only a main building, auditorium, gymnaisum, and a shop & mechanics building, with 800 students, graduating its first class in 1928. The Board of Education was asked to employ teachers who were already residents of North Hollywood, creating jobs and education opportunities right in the area. Lankershim High School was renamed North Hollywood High School in 1929. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Farley Granger (1925–2011), Susan Sontag (1933-2004).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Theatre: Helen Arthur was a theatre manager, known for managing the Neighborhood Playhouse for thirteen seasons (1915-1927). Arthur was the manager of several notable actors, including Ruth Draper.

Address: 340 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75658, -73.96529)

Place
The Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre is a full-time professional conservatory for actors located at 340 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, and is known as the home of the Meisner technique. Neighborhood Playhouse had originally been founded as an off-Broadway theatre by philanthropists Alice Lewisohn and Irene Lewisohn in 1915, but closed in 1927. The following year, it re-opened as the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre with the addition of Rita Wallach Morgenthau. Sanford Meisner joined the faculty in 1935 from the Group Theatre. Meisner used his study of Russian theatre and acting innovator, Konstantin Stanislavski's System to develop his own technique, as an alternative to Lee Strasberg's Method acting. In 1955, Farley Granger (1925-2011) moved to New York and began studying with Bob Fosse, Gloria Vanderbilt, James Kirkwood and Tom Tryon in a class taught by Sandy Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse.

Life
Who: Helen Jean Arthur (March 29, 1879 – December 9, 1939) and Agnes Morgan (October 31, 1879 - May 25, 1976)
Helen Arthur was born in Lancaster, Wisconsin to Lemuel John Arthur (a lawyer) and Mary Emma Ziegler Arthur. She attended Evanston Township High School, followed by a year at Northwestern University (1897-1898), and received a Bachelor of Law degree from New York University in 1901. She was the first woman to try a criminal case in New York State. During her time in law practice she co-authored the handbook "Domestic Employment: A Handbook" which sought to explain applicable laws to an area which was subject to abuse. Helen Arthur's legal work brought her into contact with Lillian Wald of the Henry Street Settlement. Arthur was in residence at the Settlement during 1906, and was one of two people known to have had romantic relationships with Wald. The two vacationed together during August-September 1906. While practicing law Arthur began writing theatre reviews for a small publication. She soon gave up her law practice and became the agent for actress Grace George. She performed secretarial work for the theatrical managers, the Shubert brothers Lee and Jacob J. Shubert. A 1915 notice in Variety announced her leaving the Shuberts brothers "after seven or eight years." The notice also mentioned that Arthur, an "occasional authoress," had written a skit based on the Shuberts featuring characters Jake and Lee and that Arthur had taken the "Jake" part. By 1915, Alice Lewisohn (later Alice Crowley) and her sister Irene Lewisohn were in need of legal help for their nascent theatrical project, the Neighborhood Playhouse. Alice called upon Arthur to assist her, becoming part of the staff, despite Sarah Cowell Le Moyne's (the head teacher) distaste for "all feminists who invade the profession of men." A 1916 article in Variety described Arthur as publicity director. Arthur was responsible for introducing Agnes Morgan (by that time her partner) to Lewisohn, who went on to become one of the Playhouse's most significant directors. In her memoir of the Playhouse, Lewisohn (now Crowley) described Arthur as "lithe, shirt-waisted, and stiff-colored Helen Arthur, dapper, bright-eyed, keen; and her friend the quiet, serious, watchful Agnes Morgan." A Playhouse performer described her as "quite a pixie, bright as a whistle, and a little devilish too." Of the relationship between Arthur and Agnes Morgan, another Playhouse performer said they "were a lesbian couple; just everyone knew." Helen Arthur also engaged in pursuits outside of the Playhouse. In 1916 she was the manager for actress Doris Keane. In 1918 Arthur managed the Over There Theatre League in which a number of actors sailed for France and England to perform for the troops stationed there. She was director of the Casino Theatre in Newport, Rhode Island from 1935-1939 during its summer seasons. The plays she produced there included “At Marian's” (with Laurette Taylor), “Night in the House” and two plays written by Morgan, “If Love Were All” and “Grandpa” (written under the pseudonym Cutler Hatch). In 1936 she and Morgan joined the Popular Price Unit of the Federal Theatre Project where they presented “American Holiday,” “Thirteenth Chair” and “Class of '29.” In 1938-1939 she was appointed executive director of the Ann Arbor Dramatic Season for 1938. After the Neighborhood Playhouse closed in 1927, Helen Arthur and Agnes Morgan formed their own company, Actor-Managers, Inc. Arthur continued to manage notable actresses including Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Florence Roberts as well as the singer Marion Kirby and dancer Angna Enters. She managed Ruth Draper for ten years, from 1929 until her death in 1939. Helen Arthur died of cerebral thrombosis at the Neurological Institute of New York. Her obituary stated that she had homes in New York City and Pleasantville, New York. Agnes Morgan was a director, playwright, actress and theatrical producer. She is most known for her association with the Neighborhood Playhouse where she was a director and functioned in numerous other roles. Morgan was born in Le Roy, New York to Frank H. Morgan, an editor, and Sarah L. Cutler Morgan, a teacher. Lewisohn described Morgan as "quiet, serious, watchful." In speaking the Lewisohn sister, founders of the Playhouse joining with Morgan and Helen Arthur, Lewisohn added "...never had five people cast in such different molds joined forces with more congeniality." In speaking of two comedies, “Great Catherine: Whom Glory Still Adores” by Shaw and “The Queen's Enemies” by Lord Dunsany, Crowley recalled that "the spirited quality in both productions was largely due to Agnes Morgan's skillful direction. Perhaps Great Catherine was paving the way to her gift in handling burlesque, which was later to create an infectious vogue on Grand Street and Broadway through the [Grand Street Follies].” Crowley described Morgan as an essential part of the Playhouse: “Agnes Morgan's apprentices were the stage crew, a neighborhood corps of assistant property boys, scene shifters, and painters But her technical facility was such that she was everywhere in the theatre, combining a collection of functions the mere mention of which would drive any "self-respecting" member of the theatre union of today into a decline. Skilled as an actor, she played an occasional role; she developed the technical side of lighting, and had an instinctive gift for direction, as for the function of stage manager. As an amateur she responded to any production need while pursuing her professional career as playwright.” Grand St. Follies: Neighborhood Playhouse had an in-house burlesque. While searching for an experimental play (promised to subscribers), Lewisohn suggested that the in-house burlesque be open to the subscribers. It had been the inspiration and creation of Agnes Morgan and Helen Arthur. The following season, staff were concerned as to whether they could equal the success of the first Grand Street Follies. "...it was clear that her genius for brilliant satire had flowered overnight. Morgan directed thirty-one out of forty-four dramas mounted at the Neighborhood Playhouse between 1915 and its closing in 1927, as well as dance and festival shows. After the Playhouse closed she formed her own company, originally sharing the name of the annual Grand Street Follies and later called Actor-Managers, Inc. which existed until 1939. She directed eight plays on Broadway between 1927 and 1935 as well as three plays for the Federal Theatre Project. In 1931 she wrote the play “If Love Were All” under the pseudonym Cutler Hatch and staged it as well. In 1940 Morgan became associate director of the Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey, a position she held until 1972. Morgan died in 1976 in San Bernardino, California.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-27 07:45 pm

Edith Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)

Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England.
Born: December 9, 1869, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 1947, Tenterden, United Kingdom
Education: Royal Academy of Music
Lived: Priest’s House, Small Hythe Rd, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, UK (51.51107, -0.12449)
Fallows Green, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
7 Smith Square, SW1P
Burleigh Mansions, 96 St Martin’s Lane, WC2N
22 Barkston Gardens, SW5
221 Camden Road, NW1
44 Finborough Road, SW10
33 Longridge Road, SW5
20 Taviton Street, WC1H
Buried: St John the Baptist, Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN307NG (memorial)
Buried alongside: Christabel Marshall and Clare Atwood
Find A Grave Memorial# 161166985
Movies: Victory and Peace, Her Greatest Performance, God and the Man, The Impossible Woman
Parents: Edward William Godwin, Ellen Terry
Siblings: Edward Gordon Craig

Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter
of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive English architect-designer Edward William Godwin. Her marriage to Martin Shaw in 1903 was prevented by Ellen Terry, out of jealousy for her daughter's affection, and by Christabel Marshall, with whom she lived from 1899 until they were joined in 1916 by the artist Clare Atwood, living in a ménage à trois until Craig's death in 1947. Her family looked down her lesbian lifestyle. Her brother Edward said Edith's sexuality was a result of her "hatred of men, initiated by the hatred of her father". Craig became involved in several books about her mother and George Bernard Shaw, which created a rift with her brother, who asked Craig not to write about their mother. In 1932, Craig adopted Ruby Chelta Craig. Craig was reconciled with her brother some time before her death.

Together from 1899 to 1947: 48 years.
Christabel Gertrude Marshall aka Christopher Marie St John (October 24, 1871 – October 20, 1960)
Clare “Tony” Atwood (May 11, 1866 – August 2, 1962)
Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: The Royal Academy of Music (Marylebone Rd, Marylebone, London NW1 5HT) is a conservatoire in London, a constituent college of the University of London and is one of the top conservatoires in the world. It was founded in 1822 and is Britain's oldest degree-granting music school. It received a Royal Charter in 1830. Edith Craig (1869–1947) attended the Royal Academy of Music and held a certificate in piano from Trinity College. In her later years, after the death of her mother, Craig dictated her memoirs to her friend Vera Holme, known as Jacko. Jacko wrote them down in a quarto notebook that was "lost in an attic" for decades and then sold to Ann Rachlin in 1978. They included Craig's reminiscences of her childhood and life with her mother, Edward Gordon Craig and Henry Irving. Rachlin published them in her book “Edy was a Lady” in 2011.

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House: Edith “Edy” Craig (1869-1947), like her younger brother Edward, was illegitimate, as her mother, Ellen Terry, was still married to her first husband George Frederic Watts when she eloped with architect-designer Edward William Godwin in 1868. Edith Craig was born the following year at Gusterwoods Common in Hertfordshire, and was given the surname “Craig” to avoid the stigma of illegitimacy. The family lived in Fallows Green, Harpenden AL5 4HD, designed by Godwin, until 1874. The couple separated in 1875.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: In 1916 Clare Atwood moved into the flat at 31 Bedford Street, Covent Garden, that Edith Craig shared with Christabel Marshall, forming a permanent ménage à trois.

Address: 31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, UK (51.51107, -0.12449)

Place
Christabel Marshall lived with Ellen Terry’s daughter Edith Craig from 1899 to Craig’s death in 1947. They lived together at 7 Smith Square, Westminster, London SW1P 3HT, from 1899 to 1907, and then 31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, from 1910 to 1940, as well as Priest’s House, Tenterden, Kent. Ellen Terry’s physical and mental health deteriorated slowly over a number of years. By the 1920s her eyesight was very poor and she had become increasingly confused. For financial reasons she was obliged to sell her Chelsea house in 1921 and took up residence in a smaller flat in Burleigh Mansions, 96 St Martin's Ln, London WC2N 4AX. In her diary for April 26, she reflects upon the move: “I am unhinged (not unhappy) and comfortable. I wonder where everything is. Cannot remember new things. All is changed. Change at 73 puzzles the will. I live in puzzledom.” She retained her country home at Smallhythe, however, and it was there she spent her last years, gradually “drifting away into a strange vague world where nothing is real and people bear no names.” She died early in the morning on 21 July 1928, following a paralysing stroke. The writer Christopher St John (née Christabel Marshall), present at Ellen’s bedside with her daughter Edith Craig, described her final hours: “The face had not been much changed by that cruel blow from Nature. But the breath of life had changed. It came more and more painfully as the dawn approached. The hand, gripping Edy’s, moved from finger to finger, and with a last effort of the voice, not miraculously clear and loud now, but thick and indistinct, spelt out on those fingers the word ‘Happy’, ‘H-a-p-p-y’ over and over again.” Their friends Radclyffe Hall (1880-1943) and Una Troubridge lived from 1933 to 1935 in nearby 17 Talbot House, 98 St Martin's Ln, London WC2N 4AX. At the same address, 31 Bedford Street, lived Margaret Webster (1905-1972), American-British theater actress, producer and director, when she was a child with her parents. Margaret Webster was born in New York City, the daughter of two famous actors, Ben Webster and Dame May Whitty. In the summer of 1906, the family sailed back to England, where Margaret was baptized on October 29, 1907, in St. Paul’s Church (known as the “Actors’ Church”) in Covent Garden. The Websters lived in an upstairs flat in a multistory, redbrick Victorian building. When she was two years old in November 1907, the family returned to the United States and settled in New York City. When the family returned to London a year later, they settled again into the flat on Bedford Street where they remained until the WWII.

Life
Who: Christabel Gertrude Marshall (October 24, 1871 – October 20, 1960), aka Christopher Marie St John
Christabel Marshall was a British campaigner for women’s suffrage, a playwright and author. Marshall lived in a ménage à trois with the artist Clare Atwood and the actress, theatre director, producer and costume designer Edith Craig from 1916 until Craig’s death in 1947. She, Edith Craig and Clare Atwood were friends with many artists and writers including lesbian novelist Radclyffe Hall, who lived near Tenterden in Rye. As Christopher St John in 1915, she published her autobiographical novel “Hungerheart,” which she had started in 1899, and which she based on her relationship with Edith Craig and her own involvement in the women’s suffrage movement. St John was contracted by Ellen Terry to assist on various publications. After Terry’s death in 1928, St John published the “Shaw–Terry Correspondence” (1931) and “Terry’s Four Lectures on Shakespeare” (1932.) St John and Craig revised and edited “Terry’s Memoirs” (1933.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Some of St John’s papers have survived in the National Trust’s Ellen Terry and Edith Craig Archive. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960.

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House: The home of Victorian actress Ellen Terry, where you can explore the house, cottage garden and even attend a show at the XVII century thatched Barn Theatre.

Address: B2082, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 11.00-17.00 (managed by the National Trust)
Phone:+44 1580 762334
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/smallhythe-place
English Heritage Building ID: 179818 (Grade II, 1950)

Place
Built in the late XV or early XVI century
Smallhythe Place in Small Hythe, near Tenterden in Kent, is a half-timbered house and since 1947 is cared for by the National Trust. The house was originally called “Port House” and before the River Rother and the sea receded it served a thriving shipyard: in Old English hythe means "landing place.” It was the home of the Victorian actress Ellen Terry from 1899 to her death in the house in 1928. The house contains Ellen Terry’s theatre collection, while the cottage grounds include her rose garden, orchard, nuttery and the working Barn Theatre. Terry first saw the house in the company of Henry Irving, the manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London’s Covent Garden, with whom she shared a famous theatrical partnership for nearly 24 years. The house was opened to the public by Terry’s daughter Edith Craig in 1929, as a memorial to her mother. The National Trust supported Craig in her running of the museum from 1939, and took over the property when she died in 1947. There are several paintings by the artist Clare Atwood, one of the romantic companions of Edith Craig. In an adjoining room is a letter from Oscar Wilde begging Terry to accept a copy of his first play. There is also a selection of sumptuous costumes dating from Terry’s time at the Lyceum Theatre. In 1929, Craig set up the Barn Theatre in the house’s grounds, where the plays of William Shakespeare were performed every year on the anniversary of her mother’s death. This tradition continues to this day.

Life
Who: Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)
Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women’s suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive architect-designer Edward William Godwin, and the sister of theatre practitioner Edward Gordon Craig. As a lesbian, an active campaigner for women’s suffrage, and a woman working as a theatre director and producer, Edith Craig has been recovered by feminist scholars as well as theatre historians. Craig lived in a ménage à trois with the dramatist Christabel Marshall (Christopher Marie St John, 1871-1960) and the artist Clare “Tony” Atwood (1866-1962) from 1916 until her death. Virginia Woolf is said to have used Edith Craig as a model for the character of Miss LaTrobe in her novel “Between the Acts” (1941.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960. Atwood suffered a fractured femur, senile myocarditis and heart failure, and died at Kench Hill Nursing Home, Tenterden, Kent, on August 2, 1962. When Edith Craig died she left a request that her ashes be buried with her two lesbian partners. By the time they passed away in the 1960s, Edy’s ashes were mislaid. Dismayed at the loss of her ashes, her two friend opted for burial and they lie side by side next to the gate of the tiny churchyard at St John the Baptist (Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN30 7NG), leading to the Priest’s House where they had lived with Edy. A memorial stone to Edith Craig is in the same cemetery.

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2017-03-27 07:42 pm

Dorothy “Dottie” D’Anna (March 27, 1918 – August 1, 2012)

Education: Dock Street Theatre, 135 Church Street, Charleston
Find A Grave Memorial# 173457557

Theatre: Dock Street Theatre (135 Church Street, 29401) was the location of an XVIII century playhouse, and later that of the ante-bellum Planter’s Hotel. With federal funds during the depression, a reproduction of an early London theatre was created within the walls of the Planter’s Hotel and on the site of the early theatre. As is likely to happen, many gay people were associated with the Dock Street Theatre and the various production companies that performed here. Dorothy D’Anna (1918-2012) was Associate Director of the Footlight Players and taught at the College of Charleston; she and her beloved partner Carol “Kit” Lyons (1927-2011) founded and ran the Little Theatre School for children, staging the productions down Queen Street at the Workshop Theatre. In the 1950s, petty thief James Blake (1922-1979), a literary sensation of his time, promoted by Nelson Algren and others, published his letters in the Paris Review. Blake, a gay man who was “kept” by a local Charleston aristocrat (whose name Blake masked in his letters), made a plea to the young gay bohemians associated with the Dock Street Theatre, revealing a homophobic and racist city where even the gay men turned on themselves. “Less Cleverness,” was what he requested. “More kindness. For the good of the breed, such as it is.”

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-27 07:38 pm

Adrienne Rich (May 16, 1929 - March 27, 2012)

Adrienne Cecile Rich was an American poet, essayist and radical feminist. She was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century", and was credited with ...
Born: May 16, 1929, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: March 27, 2012, Santa Cruz, California, United States
Education: Harvard University
Find A Grave Memorial# 87498497
Spouse: Alfred H. Conrad (m. 1953–1970)
Children: David Conrad, Jacob Conrad, Pablo Conrad
Employer: Brandeis University

Adrienne Rich was a poet, essayist and feminist. She was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century", credited with bringing "the oppression of women and lesbians to the forefront of poetic discourse." The senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award selected her first collection of poetry, A Change of World; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1976, Rich began her lifelong partnership with Jamaican-born novelist and editor Michelle Cliff. From 1976 to 1979, Rich taught at City College as well as Rutgers University as an English Professor. In 1979, she received an honorary doctorate from Smith College and moved with Cliff to Montague, MA. Ultimately, they moved to Santa Cruz, where Rich continued her career as a professor, lecturer, poet, and essayist. Rich and Cliff took over editorship of the lesbian arts journal Sinister Wisdom (1981–1983). Rich taught and lectured at Scripps College, San Jose State University, and Stanford University during the 1980s and 1990s. From 1981 to 1987, Rich served as an A.D. White Professor-At-Large for Cornell University.

Together from 1976 to 2012: 36 years.
Adrienne Rich (May 16, 1929 - March 27, 2012)
Michelle Cliff (born November 2, 1946)

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Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Marshall Kirk (1957-2005) was valedictorian of his high school class and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980, majoring in psychology, and writing his honors thesis on the testing of gifted children. In 1987 Kirk partnered with Hunter Madsen (writing under the pen-name "Erastes Pill") to write an essay, "The Overhauling of Straight America." The pair developed their argument in the 1989 book "After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ’90s." The book outlined a public relations strategy for the LGBT movement.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Agnes Morgan (1879-1976) attended Radcliffe College and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1901 and her Master of Arts in 1903. In 1904 she attended George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop at Harvard University.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Harry Elkins Widener (1885-1912) was the son of George and Eleanor Widener. He lived in Elkins Park, PA. Harry studied at Hill School, a private establishment in Pottstown, PA; graduating in 1903 he left to study at Harvard (graduated 1907). Harry was a noted collector of rare books, included in his collection was a Shakespeare Folio and a Gutenberg Bible. Harry developed his bibliophilic interests while in college, when he did research among early books with coloured plates illustrating costumes for a Hasty Pudding Theatrical. In the spring of 1912, he went to England to buy books (including the second edition of Bacon's Essais, 1598) and it was while returning from this visit that he lost his life along with many of the books purchased. Harry boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg with his father and mother, George Widener's valet Edwin Keeping and Mrs Widener's maid Emily Geiger. The Widener's occupied cabins C-80-82. On the night of April 14th Harry and his parents threw a party in honour of Captain Smith which was attended by some of the most wealthy passengers on board the Titanic. Later that night Harry helped his mother into boat 4 and then stood back to await his fate, at one point he was joined by William Ernest Carter who advised him to try for a boat but Harry "I'll think I'll stick to the big ship, Billy, and take a chance." A story, never confirmed by Mrs Widener, romanticizes the death of her son. He was about to step into a lifeboat that would have saved his life when he remembered a newly acquired and unique copy of Bacon's Essais and ran back to get it. After his death the librarians turned to Mrs Widener for a donation in memory of her bibliophile son. His mother gave $2,000,000 for the construction of the building that would also house her son's collection and in 1915 the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library was dedicated. Horace Trumbauer (hon. A.M. 1915) of Philadelphia designed the library building. Harvard still pays for fresh flowers to be placed under a portrait of Widener in the chapel.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.

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School: Brandeis University (415 South St, Waltham, MA 02453) is an American private research university in Waltham, Massachusetts, 9 miles (14 km) west of Boston. Founded in 1948 as a non-sectarian, coeducational institution sponsored by the Jewish community, Brandeis was established on the site of the former Middlesex University. The university is named after Louis Brandeis, the first Jewish Justice of the U.S Supreme Court. Notable queer alumni and faculty: poet Olga Broumas (born 1949); Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), composer and conductor; author Stephen McCauley (born 1955); Michael McDowell (1950-1999), novelist and script writer; Pauli Murray (1910-1985), feminist, civil rights advocate, lawyer, and ordained priest; Adrienne Rich (1929-1955), poet, essayist and feminist; Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), First Lady of the United States.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-26 12:54 pm

Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819 - March 26, 1892)

Walter "Walt" Whitman was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works.
Born: May 31, 1819, West Hills, New York, United States
Died: March 26, 1892, Camden, New Jersey, United States
Lived: 99 Ryerson St, Brooklyn, NY 11205
330 Mickle Boulevard, Camden, NJ 08103, USA (39.94246, -75.12353)
431 Stevens Street, Camden
246 Old Walt Whitman Rd, Huntington Station, NY 11746
Buried: Harleigh Cemetery, Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 1098
Poems: Song of Myself, O Captain! My Captain!, more
Awards: Golden Kite Award for Picture Book Illustration

Walt Whitman was an American poet, essayist and journalist. He was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality. Peter Doyle may be the most likely candidate for the love of Whitman's life, according to biographer David S. Reynolds. Doyle was a 21 years old bus conductor whom Whitman met around 1866, when he was 45, and the two were inseparable for several years. Interviewed in 1895, Doyle said: "We were familiar at once—I put my hand on his knee—we understood. He did not get out at the end of the trip—in fact went all the way back with me.” Oscar Wilde met Whitman in America in 1882 and wrote to the homosexual rights activist George Cecil Ives that there was "no doubt" about the great American poet's sexual orientation—"I have the kiss of Walt Whitman still on my lips", he boasted. In 1924 Edward Carpenter, then an old man, described an erotic encounter he had had in his youth with Whitman to Gavin Arthur, who recorded it in detail in his journal.

Together from 1866 to 1892: 26 years.
Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 - March 26, 1892)
Peter Doyle (June 3, 1843 - April 19, 1907)

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House: Walt Whitman (1819-1892) was born in West Hills, Town of Huntington, Long Island (246 Old Walt Whitman Rd, Huntington Station, NY 11746), to parents with interests in Quaker thought, Walter and Louisa Van Velsor Whitman. The second of nine children, he was immediately nicknamed "Walt" to distinguish him from his father. Walter Whitman, Sr. named three of his seven sons after American leaders: Andrew Jackson, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson. The oldest was named Jesse and another boy died unnamed at the age of six months. The couple's sixth son, the youngest, was named Edward. At age four, Whitman moved with his family from West Hills to Brooklyn, living in a series of homes, in part due to bad investments. Whitman looked back on his childhood as generally restless and unhappy, given his family's difficult economic status. One happy moment that he later recalled was when he was lifted in the air and kissed on the cheek by the Marquis de Lafayette during a celebration in Brooklyn on July 4, 1825.

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House: Walt Whitman (1819-1892) lived at 99 Ryerson St (Brooklyn, NY 11205) in 1855, the year he published his poetry collection “Leaves of Grass.” When this collection was published, it is said many reviewers labeled it as “obscene” and one reviewer allegedly came close to calling him gay, saying “he is guilty of that horrible sin that is not to be named among Christians.”

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House: The Walt Whitman House is a historic building in Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, which was the last residence of poet Walt Whitman, in his declining years before his death. It is located at 330 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, known as Mickle St. during Whitman’s time there.

Address: 330 Mickle Boulevard, Camden, NJ 08103, USA (39.94246, -75.12353)
Hours: Wednesday through Saturday 10.00-12.00, 13.00-16.00, Sunday 13.00-16.00
Phone: +1 856-964-5383
Website: http://www.nj.gov/dep/parksandforests/historic/whitman/
National Register of Historic Places: 66000461, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Address: Harleigh Cemetery, 1640 Haddon Ave, Camden, NJ 08103, USA (39.92614, -75.09425)
Hours: Monday through Saturday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 856-963-3500
Website: http://www.harleighcemetery.org/

Place
When Whitman was 65 he bought the Mickle Street House and it was the first home he owned. Whitman called it his "shanty" or "coop,” emphasizing its shabbiness. His brother George did not approve of the purchase and the decision strained their relationship. Others questioned Whitman’s judgment as well. A friend called it "the worst house and the worst situated.” Another friend noted it "was the last place one would expect a poet to select for a home."

Life
Who: Walter "Walt" Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892)
In 1873, Walt Whitman suffered a paralytic stroke and in May the same year, his mother Louisa Whitman died; both events left him depressed. Louisa was in Camden, New Jersey at the time and Whitman arrived three days before her death. He returned to Washington, D. C., where he had been living, only briefly before returning to Camden to live with his brother George, paying room and board. The brothers lived on 431 Stevens St, Camden, NJ 08103 (burned in 1994) and Walt lived there for the next eleven years. Whitman spent the Christmas of 1883 with friends in Germantown, Pennsylvania while his brother was building a farmhouse in Burlington, New Jersey that included accommodations for the poet. Instead of moving with his brother, however, Whitman purchased the Mickle Street House in Camden in the spring of 1884. The lot on which the home was standing was purchased in 1847 by a clerk named Adam Hare for $350. It was likely Hare who built the house. By the time Whitman bought it, it was a two-story row house with six rooms and no furnace. Its recent occupant was Alfred Lay, the grandfather of a young friend of Whitman. When Lay couldn’t pay the rent for March, Whitman loaned him the $16 he needed. Whitman soon after purchased the home for $1,750, which he earned from sales of a recent edition of “Leaves of Grass” and through a loan from publisher George William Childs. Lay continued to live there with his wife, cooking to cover part of their rent and paying $2 a week; the Lays moved out on January 20, 1885. Whitman later invited Mary Davis, a sailor’s widow living a few blocks away, to serve as his housekeeper in exchange for free rent in the house. She moved in February 24, 1885, bringing with her a cat, a dog, two turtledoves, a canary, and other assorted animals. While living in the home, Whitman completed several poems, many focused on public events. One was a sonnet published in the February 22, 1885, issue of the Philadelphia Press called "Ah, Not This Granite Dead and Cold" which commemorated the completion of the Washington Monument. Some of Whitman’s writing was done in his bedroom, which visitors noted was similar to a newspaper office, piled with stacks of paper. During his years in the house, however, Whitman only earned an estimated $1,300, of which only $20 came from royalties from “Leaves of Grass” and about $350 came from new works. The majority of his earnings were donations from admirers and well-wishers. Whitman’s health had been failing since before he moved into the home and he began making preparations for his death. For $4,000, he commissioned a granite house-shaped mausoleum which he visited often during its construction. In the last week of his life, too weak to lift a knife or fork, he wrote: "I suffer all the time: I have no relief, no escape: it is monotony — monotony — monotony — in pain." He spent his last years preparing a final edition of “Leaves of Grass”. At the end of 1891, he wrote to a friend: "L. of G. at last complete—after 33 y’rs of hackling at it, all times & moods of my life, fair weather & foul, all parts of the land, and peace & war, young & old.” In January 1892, an announcement was published in the New York Herald in which Whitman asked that "this new 1892 edition... absolutely supersede all previous ones. Faulty as it is, he decides it as by far his special and entire self-chosen poetic utterance." The final edition of “Leaves of Grass” was published in 1892 and is referred to as the "deathbed edition.” Whitman died at 6:43 p.m. on March 26, 1892, a few days before his 73rd birthday. His autopsy was performed at the home and revealed that the left lung had collapsed and the right was at one-eighth its breathing capacity. A public viewing of Whitman’s body was also held at the Camden home; over one thousand people visited in three hours. In his final years, Whitman had noted his appreciation for the house and for Camden. He wrote, "Camden was originally an accident—but I shall never be sorry. I was left over in Camden. It has brought me blessed returns." Four days after his death, he was buried in his tomb at Harleigh Cemetery (1640 Haddon Ave, Camden, NJ 08103). After Whitman’s death, the majority of the home’s contents remained at the house. His heirs sold it to the city of Camden in 1921 and it was opened to the public five years later. In 1947, ownership was passed to the state of New Jersey. The Walt Whitman House is operated as a museum by the New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry. The home is now open to the public. It is operated with help from the Walt Whitman Association. Included in the collection is the bed in which the poet died and the death notice that was taped to his front door.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-26 12:48 pm

Sarah Bernhardt (October 22, 1844 - March 26, 1923)

Sarah Bernhardt was a French stage and early film actress. She was referred to as "the most famous actress the world has ever known", and is regarded as one of the finest actors of all time.
Born: October 22, 1844, Paris, France
Died: March 26, 1923, 17th arrondissement, Paris, France
Education: Conservatoire de Paris
Lived: Omni Parker House, 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
Musée Sarah Bernhardt, Pointe des Poulains, 56360 Sauzon, France (47.38575, -3.24933)
The Savoy Hotel, Strand, WC2R
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 44, #6, GPS (lat/lon): 48.86119, 2.39489
Find A Grave Memorial# 1333
Movies: Hamlet, Les Amours de la reine Élisabeth, Jeanne Doré, more

Louise Abbema was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Epoque. She first received recognition when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly lover. Bernhardt was a French stage and early film actress, and has been referred to as "the most famous actress the world has ever known." In 1990, a painting by Abbema, depicting the two on a boat ride on the lake in the Bois de Boulogne, was donated to the Comedie-Francaise. The enclosed letter stated that the painting was "Peint par Louise Abbéma, le jour anniversaire de leur liaison amoureuse (Painted by Louise Abbema on the anniversary of their love affair)." Abbéma was among the female artists whose works were exhibited in the Women's Building at the 1893 World Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Sarah Bernhardt died "peacefully, without suffering, in the arms of her son” in 1923. Abbéma died in Paris in 1927. At the end of the 20th century, as contributions by women to the arts in past centuries received more critical and historical attention, her works have been enjoying a renewed popularity.

Together from 1875 to 1923: 48 years.
Louise Abbéma (October 30, 1853 – July 10, 1927)
Sarah Bernhardt (October 22, 1844 - March 26, 1923)

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School: The Conservatoire de Paris (209 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 75019) is a college of music and dance founded in 1795, now situated in the avenue Jean Jaurès in the 19th arrondissement of Paris, France. The Conservatoire offers instruction in music, dance, and drama, drawing on the traditions of the "French School". Notable queer alumni and faculty: Camille Saint-Saëns (1835–1921); Germaine Tailleferre (1892–1983); Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829–1869); Raymond Roussel (1877–1933); Reynaldo Hahn (1874–1947); Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923); Virgil Thomson (1896–1989).

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House: In August 1894, at the age of 50, Sarah Bernhardt discovered the delights of Belle-Île with her friend, the painter Georges Clairin. Succumbing to the charms of the landscape, she immediately bougth a former military fort on the Pointe des Poulains.

Address: Musée Sarah Bernhardt, Pointe des Poulains, 56360 Sauzon, France (47.38575, -3.24933)
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 10.30-17.30
Phone: +33 2 97 31 61 29
Website: http://www.belleileenmer.com/

Place
Built in 1897
In order to accommodate her family every summer for three months, Sarah Bernhardt built at Belle-Île, opposite the fort, a new villa called the “Les cinq Parties du Monde” (Five Parties of the World.) "The first time I saw Belle Isle, I saw it as a haven, a paradise, a shelter. I discovered at the windiest end a safe place, especially inaccessible, especially uninhabitable, especially uncomfortable and therefore enchanted me." Sarah Bernhardt. Each room in “Les cinq Parties du Monde” is named after a continent ("My nurse and I lived in Asia and Africa, my father and my mother in America, my sister in Europe and Oceania.”) The construction of the villa "Lysiane" (the first name of her granddaughter), a hundred meters further south, will allow to accommodate her many friends, like the painter Georges Clairin. Sarah Bernhardt deviated from a romantic vision of nature to create from scratch a more "urban" place with villas, a park, gazebo, and expanded trails that lead to the beach. Great sportwoman, she had a tennis court built. She regularly organized parties, where prestigious guests like Edouard VII, the King of the United Kingdom were invited. The actress will become the sole owner of Pointe des Poulains after buying the mansion Penhoët (Sarah Bernhardt feared that the building was to be converted into a hotel by a new owner) and the property built in the eastern part of the site by Baron Meunier du Houssoy in 1898. The tourist office of Belle-Île (created in 1911) and tour guides of the 1930s were living between the wars with the memory of the actress and her imprint on the place, using it as a "selling point" to maintain the attractiveness of the site and more broadly the island, and they built a "tourist resort" in 1927: "The tourist who excursionne in the region must visit Belle-Ile-en-Mer. They will first appreciate the charm of the voyage often deemed too short, and will be amazed by the grandiose and impressive sites of the world famous Belle-Ile, aptly named, and of which our great actress Sarah Bernhardt, who had chosen as a resting resident, said: "I like to come every year in this wonderful island in the middle of its simple and friendly people, taste the charm of its wild and imposing beauty and invigorating under its sky new artistic sources"(The Rougery Blondel, 1928.)

Life
Who: Sarah Bernhardt (c. October 22/23, 1844 – March 26, 1923)
Sarah Bernhardt’s friendship with Louise Abbéma (1853-1927), a French impressionist painter, some nine years her junior, was so close and passionate that the two women were rumored to be lovers. In 1990, a painting by Abbéma, depicting the two on a boat ride on the lake in the bois de Boulogne, was donated to the Comédie-Française. The accompanying letter stated that the painting was "Peint par Louise Abbéma, le jour anniversaire de leur liaison amoureuse" (loosely translated: "Painted by Louise Abbéma on the anniversary of their love affair.”) In 1922, the actress who wanted to end her days in what she called “her paradise” was forced to sell her house at Belle-Île. She died in March 1923, few months after her last holidays in her fort. The actress is buried in the Père Lachaise cemetery.

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Accomodation: The Savoy Hotel (Strand, London WC2R 0EU) is a luxury hotel in central London. Built by the impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte with profits from his Gilbert and Sullivan opera productions, it opened on August 6, 1889. It was the first in the Savoy group of hotels and restaurants owned by Carte's family for over a century. The Savoy was the first luxury hotel in Britain, introducing electric lights throughout the building, electric lifts, bathrooms in most of the lavishly furnished rooms, constant hot and cold running water and many other innovations. Carte hired César Ritz as manager and Auguste Escoffier as chef de cuisine; they established an unprecedented standard of quality in hotel service, entertainment and elegant dining, attracting royalty and other rich and powerful guests and diners. Notable queer residents: Sarah Bernhardt in 1913, Marlon Brando in 1967, Dorothy Caruso in 1902, Noël Coward from 1941 to 1943, Sergei Diaghilev in 1919, Marlene Dietrich from 1924 to 1925, Cary Grant in 1966, Katharine Hepburn, Vaslav Nijinsky in 1911, Oscar Wilde.

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Accomodation: With its close proximity to Boston’s Theater District, the Omni Parker House (60 School St, Boston, MA 02108) played an important role for thespians. Many of the XIX century’s finest actors made the Parker House a home away from home, including Charlotte Cushman, Sarah Bernhardt, Edwin Booth, and the latter’s handsome, matinee-idol brother, John Wilkes. Charlotte Cushman (1816-1876) died of pneumonia in her hotel room on the third floor in 1876, aged 59. During the XX century, that list expanded to include stars of stage, screen, and television—including Joan Crawford, Judy Garland, Ann Magret, and Marlow Thomas.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Cemetery: Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.

Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Website: www.parisinfo.com

Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on 2May 1, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”

Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) (Plot: Division 44, #6) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942) (Plot: Division 74, row 2.), buried together.
• Jean Börlin (1893-1930) was a Swedish dancer and choreographer born in Härnösand. He worked with Michel Fokine, who was his teacher in Stockholm. Jean Borlin was a principal dancer of the Royal Swedish Ballet when Rolf de Mare brought him to Paris in in 1920 as first dancer and choreographer of the Ballets Suedois at the Theatre de Champs-Elysees. According to Paul Colin, de Mare “was very rich” and he had brought the Swedish Ballet to Paris “especially to show his young lover, Jean Borlin.” The Stockholm press derided de Mare's sexual orientation. In contrast, open-minded Paris welcomed the Ballets Suedois. One wonders what might have happened if de Mare had not disbanded the company in 1925, reportedly because its recent performances had disappointed him. But he had a new lover. Borlin's last years were melancholy. By 1925, he was exhausted: he had choreographed all 23 ballets in his company's repertory and danced in each of its 900 performances -- a grueling schedule that led him to alcohol and drugs. In 1930, he opened a school in New York but died of heart failure shortly thereafter. He was only 37. He was buried at his own wish in the cemetery of Pére Lachaise in Paris in January l931. A stricken de Mare founded Les Archives Internationales de Danse, in his memory.
• Jean Jacques Régis de Cambacérès (1753-1824) 1st Duke of Parma, later 1st Duke of Cambacérès, was a French lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire, best remembered as the author of the Napoleonic Code, which still forms the basis of French civil law and inspired civil law in many countries. The common belief that Cambacérès is responsible for decriminalizing homosexuality in France is in error. Cambacérès was not responsible for ending the legal prosecution of homosexuals. He did play a key role in drafting the Code Napoléon, but this was a civil law code. He had nothing to do with the Penal Code of 1810, which covered sexual crimes. Before the French Revolution, sodomy had been a capital crime under royal legislation. The penalty was burning at the stake. Very few men, however, were ever actually prosecuted and executed for consensual sodomy (no more than five in the entire XVIII century). Sodomites arrested by the police were more usually released with a warning or held in prison for (at most) a few weeks or months. The National Constituent Assembly abolished the law against sodomy when it revised French criminal law in 1791 and got rid of a variety of offenses inspired by religion, including blasphemy. Cambacérès was a homosexual, his sexual orientation was well-known, and he does not seem to have made any effort to conceal it. He remained unmarried, and kept to the company of other bachelors. Napoleon is recorded as making a number of jokes on the subject. Robert Badinter once mentioned in a speech to the French National Assembly, during debates on reforming the homosexual age of consent, that Cambacérès was known in the gardens of the Palais-Royal as "tante Turlurette".
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) (Plot: Division 4, #6) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) (Plot: Division 26) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Elsie de Wolfe, Lady Mendl (1859/1865–1950) died in Versailles, at 84. Cremated, her ashes were placed in a common grave, the lease expired, in Pere Lachaise Cemetery.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) (Plot: Division 87 (columbarium), urn 6796) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Loie Fuller (1862–1928) (Plot: Division 87 (columbarium), urn 5382) was an American dancer who was a pioneer of both modern dance and theatrical lighting techniques. Fuller supported other pioneering performers, such as fellow United States-born dancer Isadora Duncan. Fuller helped Duncan ignite her European career in 1902 by sponsoring independent concerts in Vienna and Budapest. She was cremated and her ashes are interred in the columbarium at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Her sister, Mollie Fuller, had a long career as an actress and vaudeville performer.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Eileen Gray (1878–1976) was an Irish furniture designer and architect and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture. Gray was bisexual. She mixed in the lesbian circles of the time, being associated with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller, the singer Damia and Natalie Barney. Gray's intermittent relationship with Damia (or Marie-Louise Damien, 1889-1978) ended in 1938, after which they never saw each other again, although both lived into their nineties in the same city. Damia died at La Celle-Saint-Cloud, a western suburb of Paris, and was interred in the Cimetière de Pantin (163 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 93500 Aubervilliers). Today, she is considered to be the third greatest singer of chansons réalistes, after Edith Piaf and Barbara.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) (Plot: Division 85) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Guy Hocquenghem (1946–1988) (Plot: Division 87 (columbarium), urn 407) was a French writer, philosopher, and queer theorist. Hocquenghem was the first gay man to be a member of the Front Homosexuel d'Action Révolutionnaire (FHAR), originally formed by lesbian separatists who split from the Mouvement Homophile de France in 1971. Hocquenghem died of AIDS related complications on 28 August 1988, aged 41.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990) (Plot: Division 16), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Marie Laurencin (1883-1956) (Plot: Division 88) was a French painter and printmaker. She became an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde as a member of the Cubists associated with the Section d'Or. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire, and has often been identified as his muse. In addition, Laurencin had important connections to the salon of the American expatriate and famed lesbian writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She had heterosexual and lesbian affairs. During WWI, Laurencin left France for exile in Spain with her German-born husband, Baron Otto von Waëtjen, since through her marriage she had automatically lost her French citizenship. The couple subsequently lived together briefly in Düsseldorf. After they divorced in 1920, she returned to Paris, where she achieved financial success as an artist until the economic depression of the 1930s. During the 1930s she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She lived in Paris until her death.
• Jean Le Bitoux (1948-2010) was a French journalist and gay activist. He was the founder of “Gai pied,” the first mainstream gay magazine in France (its name was found by philosopher Michel Foucault). He was a campaigner for Holocaust remembrance of homosexual victims. By 1978, he ran for the National Assembly as a "homosexual candidate" alongside Guy Hocquenghem; they lost the election. In 1994, Le Bitoux co-authored the memoir of Pierre Seel, a French homosexual who was deported by the Nazis for being gay.
• Mary Elizabeth Clarke Mohl (1793–1883) was a British writer who was known as a salon hostess in Paris. She was known by her nickname of "Clarkey". She was admired for her independence and conversation. She eventually married the orientalist Julius von Mohl. She was an ardent Francophile, a feminist, and a close friend of Florence Nightingale. She wrote about her interest in the history of women's rights. She was buried with her husband, Julius von Mohl, at Père Lachaise Cemetery (56th division).
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Anna, Comtesse Mathieu de Noailles (1876–1933) (Plot: Division 28), Romanian-French writer. She died in 1933 in Paris, aged 56, and was interred in the Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) (Plot: Division 5) was a French composer and pianist. The biographer Richard D. E. Burton comments that, in the late 1920s, Poulenc might have seemed to be in an enviable position: professionally successful and independently well-off, having inherited a substantial fortune from his father. He bought a large country house, Le Grande Coteau (Chemin Francis Poulenc, 37210 Noizay), 140 miles (230 km) south-west of Paris, where he retreated to compose in peaceful surroundings. Yet he was troubled, struggling to come to terms with his sexuality, which was predominantly gay. His first serious affair was with the painter Richard Chanlaire, to whom he sent a copy of the Concert champêtre score inscribed, "You have changed my life, you are the sunshine of my thirty years, a reason for living and working". Nevertheless, while this affair was in progress Poulenc proposed marriage to his friend Raymonde Linossier. As she was not only well aware of his homosexuality but was also romantically attached elsewhere, she refused him, and their relationship became strained. He suffered the first of many periods of depression, which affected his ability to compose, and he was devastated in January 1930, when Linossier died suddenly at the age of 32. On her death he wrote, "All my youth departs with her, all that part of my life that belonged only to her. I sob ... I am now twenty years older". His affair with Chanlaire petered out in 1931, though they remained lifelong friends. On January 30, 1963, at his flat opposite the Jardin du Luxembourg, Poulenc suffered a fatal heart attack. His funeral was at the nearby church of Saint-Sulpice. In compliance with his wishes, none of his music was performed; Marcel Dupré played works by Bach on the grand organ of the church. Poulenc was buried at Père Lachaise Cemetery, alongside his family.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) (Plot: Division 85) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Raymond Radiguet (1903–1923) (Plot: Division 56) was a French novelist and poet whose two novels were noted for their explicit themes, and unique style and tone. In early 1923, Radiguet published his first and most famous novel, “Le Diable au corps” (The Devil in the Flesh). The story of a young married woman who has an affair with a sixteen-year-old boy while her husband is away fighting at the front provoked scandal in a country that had just been through WWI. Though Radiguet denied it, it was established later that the story was in large part autobiographical. He associated himself with the Modernist set, befriending Picasso, Max Jacob, Jean Hugo, Juan Gris and especially Jean Cocteau, who became his mentor. Radiguet also had several well-documented relationships with women. An anecdote told by Ernest Hemingway has an enraged Cocteau charging Radiguet (known in the Parisian literary circles as "Monsieur Bébé" – Mister Baby) with decadence for his tryst with a model: "Bébé est vicieuse. Il aime les femmes." ("Baby is depraved. He likes women.") Radiguet, Hemingway implies, employed his sexuality to advance his career, being a writer "who knew how to make his career not only with his pen but with his pencil." Aldous Huxley is quoted as declaring that Radiguet had attained the literary control that others required a long career to reach. On December 12, 1923, Radiguet died at age 20 in Paris of typhoid fever, which he contracted after a trip he took with Cocteau. Cocteau, in an interview with The Paris Review stated that Radiguet had told him three days prior to his death that, "In three days, I am going to be shot by the soldiers of God." In reaction to this death Francis Poulenc wrote, "For two days I was unable to do anything, I was so stunned". In her 1932 memoir, “Laughing Torso,” British artist Nina Hamnett describes Radiguet's funeral: "The church was crowded with people. In the pew in front of us was the negro band from the Boeuf sur le Toit. Picasso was there, Brâncuși and so many celebrated people that I cannot remember their names. Radiguet's death was a terrible shock to everyone. Coco Chanel, the celebrated dressmaker, arranged the funeral. It was most wonderfully done. Cocteau was too ill to come." ... "Cocteau was terribly upset and could not see anyone for weeks afterwards.”
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) (Plot: Division 20) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robbie Ross (1869-1918) (Plot: Division 89, Ross's remains are buried in Wilde's tomb), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) (Plot: Division 89) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) (Plot: Division 94) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) (Plot: Division 94) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. She is buried together with Gertrude Stein.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) (Plot: Division 89) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-26 12:46 pm

Ross Fraser (born March 26)

Married: December 1, 1978

Richard Summerbell is a Canadian mycologist, author and award-winning songwriter. He was editor in chief of an international scientific journal in mycology from 2000 to 2004. In the 1970s and 80s, he was a gay activist and an early commentator on (then) controversial topics such as AIDS and promiscuity and attitudes to homosexuality in organized religion. Summerbell trained as a botanist, receiving his master's degree from the University of British Columbia and his doctorate degree from the University of Toronto. He has lived with his partner, Ross Fraser, since 1978 and currently resides in Toronto, Canada. In 1985, he published a humorous look at gay life and culture entitled Abnormally Happy: A Gay Dictionary that satirizes stereotypical views
of gays and lesbians. As a songwriter and musician, Summerbell released an independent CD, Light Carries On, in 2004. One song from the CD, Thank you for being My Dog, won the 7th Annual Great American Song Contest in the Special Music category and won Summerbell a place in the Great American Song Hall of Fame.

Together since 1978: 37 years.
Richard Summerbell (born June 29, 1956)
Ross Fraser (born March 26)
Married: December 1, 1978

The anniversary of our self-annealed union is December 1. That's in memory of December 1, 1978. We'd first met in October, when he came to a house party I'd organized, with friends, for the new school year's members of what was then called Gay People of UBC, in Vancouver. I noticed a remarkably attractive and intelligent boy talking to one of our resident geniuses, librarianship student Bill Richardson - later to become a CBC host and well known writer of humour. Ross Fraser, the boy was called. I was busy being a host that night, but at a later event, a downtown gay club tour for students, I danced with him. He was sure I'd ask him home, but I went into a sort of courtship mode and didn't press. So at our third social encounter, the gay club's Christmas dance, he took the initiative and invited me to his '28th Floor Apartment' (The title of the most popular song I ever released). He shocked me by ordering a cab and taking me all the way from UBC on Point Grey to the West End - what a gesture for a student! That was December 1. Then he went home and spent Christmas with his mom in Nova Scotia, and, while there, drew a pencil sketch of a beautiful young man who had a distinct, idealized resemblance to me. I'm not a visual artist, but in some way, a similar sketch of him has remained in my heart to this day.-- Richard Summerbell 

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2017-03-26 12:32 pm

Noël Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973)

Sir Noël Peirce Coward was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise".
Born: December 16, 1899, Teddington, United Kingdom
Died: March 26, 1973, Port Maria, Jamaica
Education: Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts
Lived: 404 E 55th St
Firefly Estate, Firefly Hill Rd., Ocho Rios, Jamaica (18.4035, -76.9384)
Les Avants, 1833, Switzerland (46.4533, 6.9429)
131 Waldegrave Road, Teddington
Lord Milner Hotel, 111 Ebury Street, SW1W
56 Lenham Road, Suttton
37 Chesham Place, SW1X
Algonquin Hotel, 59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036
Hotel Café Royal, 68 Regent Street, W1B
Hotel and Café des Artistes, 1 W 67th St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77341, -73.97892)
17 Gerald Rd, Belgravia, London SW1W 9EH, UK (51.49326, -0.15181)
Prince of Wales Mansions, 70 Prince of Wales Drive, Battersea
The Ritz, London, 150 Piccadilly, W1J
The Savoy Hotel, Strand, WC2R
The Langham, London, 1C Portland Pl, Regent St, W1B
Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA (memorial)
Firefly Estate, Montego Bay, Saint James, Jamaica
St Paul Churchyard, Covent Garden, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England (memorial)
Find A Grave Memorial# 4389
Movies: In Which We Serve, Brief Encounter, Blithe Spirit, more

Sir Noël Coward was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise". Coward's most important relationship, which began in the mid-1940s and lasted until his death, was with South African-born English actor and singer Graham Payn. Coward did not publicly acknowledge his homosexuality, but it was discussed candidly after his death by biographers, including Payn, and in Coward's diaries and letters, published posthumously. On 28 March 1984, the Queen Mother unveiled a memorial stone in Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey. Thanked by Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend.” Coward had a 19-year friendship with Prince George, Duke of Kent. Coward reportedly admitted to the historian Michael Thornton that there had been "a little dalliance". Coward said, on the duke's death, "I suddenly find that I loved him more than I knew."

Together from 1945 to 1973: 28 years.
Graham Payn (April 25, 1918 - November 4, 2005)
Sir Noel Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973)

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School: The Italia Conti Academy is a co-educational independent school for pupils aged from 10 to 19 years, and a theatre arts training school, based in London, England. It was founded in 1911 by the actress Italia Conti. The academy grew out of the first production of the play Where the Rainbow Ends. Italia Conti, an established actress with a reputation for her success working with young people, was asked to take over the job of training the cast. The play was a triumph and the school was born in basement studios in London’s Great Portland Street. The school moved to a church building at 14 Lamb's Conduit St, London WC1N 3LE. During WWII, the school was bombed, destroying all early records of the school. In 1972 the school moved to a building in Landor Road. It was the home to all full-time Italia Conti pupils for 9 years. In 1981 the school moved again for the final time to Goswell Road. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Gertrude Lawrence (1898–1952), Noël Coward (1899–1973).

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House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 131 Waldegrave Rd, Teddington TW11 8LL, Sir Noël Coward (1899–1973), “Actor, Playwright and Songwriter born here." There is a bust of Coward, sculpted by Avril Vellacott, in Teddington Library, which is only a short distance away.

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House: Sir Noël Coward (1899-1973), dramatist, actor and composer lived for a few years of his childhood (1906-1909) at 56 Lenham Rd, Sutton SM1 4BG. His first public appearance on stage was on July 23rd 1907 in a concert at Sutton Public Hall when he was about 8 years old.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Sir Noël Coward (1899-1973), English playwright, actor, director and singer. Most notable works include “Hayfever” (1925), “Blithe Spirit” (1941), his films, “In Which We Serve” (1942, Director, Actor, Screenwriter), “Our Man In Havana” (1959, Actor), “The Italian Job” (1969, Actor). Childhood and adolescent address was 70 Prince of Wales Mansions (Prince of Wales Dr, London SW11 4BG).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Nellie Burton kept a lodging house at 40 Half Moon St, Mayfair, London W1J 7BH, before, during, and after the Great War. She let out rooms to single gentlemen who were mostly “so,” and as the house was convenient to the hunting grounds along Piccadilly and in Green Park she acquired a flourishing clientele. Among her distinguished lodgers was Robbie Ross (1869-1918), Oscar Wilde’s literary executor, who spent his declining years here. He brought in his friend Siegfried Sassoon (‘ St. Siegfried’ Burton called him.) Sassoon lodged here during the war and sang her praises in numerous diary entries. Osbert Sitwell would drop by for tea, on one occasion accompanied by Anthony Powell. Sir Roderick Meiklejohn was a regular. The dour Scotsman was private secretary to Herbert Asquith, the prime minister. “He was a homosexual,” Max Egremont, Sassoon’s biographer, reported, “sustained by food, wine, bridge, the classics and obscene poetry.” His curious habit of mumbling and gesticulating wildly at the young men who attracted him made him an object of their mirth. One of these was the young actor Noël Coward, whom he introduced to 40 Half Moon Street. Even the composer Lord Berners, “short, swarthy, bald, dumpy, and simian,” his friend Beverley Nichols called him, was known to take the occasional room.

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House: Ebury Street was built mostly in the period 1815 to 1860, though the houses near 180 were called Fivefields Row when Mozart lived there in 1764. An area around here called "Eia" is mentioned in the Domesday Book and is the origin of the word "Ebury.”

Address: 182 Ebury St, Belgravia, London SW1W, UK (51.49131, -0.15245)

Place
Ebury Street is a street in Belgravia, City of Westminster, London. It runs from the Grosvenor Gardens junction south-westwards to Pimlico Road. The odd numbers run from 1 to 231 on the east side and even numbers 2 to 230 on the west side. There is a blue plaque at 22b to indicate that Ian Fleming lived here from 1934 to 1945. This building was constructed in 1830 as a Baptist church but is now divided into several flats. In 1847 Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson lived at number 42. During the period immediately following WWI, Number 42 was the workplace or head office of the "Soldiers’ Embroidery Industry.” Textile bags and workboxes were labelled thus, including the words "Made by the Totally Disabled,” i.e. disabled veterans doing rehabilitation work. An early photographer, William Downey (1829 - 1881), had studios at 57 and 61. He made some of the most famous photographs of celebrities of his day--Sarah Bernhardt, Oscar Wilde and the then Princess of Wales. At 65-69 is "Ken Lo’s Memories of China" a celebrated restaurant established in 1981 by Ken Lo (1920 - 2001.) At 109/11 is a blue plaque commemorating the actress Edith Evans. At 121 another plaque celebrates George Moore (novelist.) He spent his last years here and wrote “Conversations in Ebury Street” (1924.) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart lived at Fivefields Row from 5 August to September 24, 1764. The street is now called Mozart Terrace, but numbered in such a way that it is continuous with Ebury Street. At 231 Ebury Street is "La Poule au Pot" an expensive, celebrated restaurant. In 2006 it was voted number one in "Best for business" and "Best for romance" in Harden’s guide. Where Ebury Street meets Pimlico Road is a triangular area with seating and a bronze statue of Mozart (aged 8) by Philip Jackson. The area is unofficially called Mozart Square. The actor Terence Stamp shared a flat on this street with Michael Caine in 1963. Several houses on Ebury Street have been converted to hotels. Lygon Place is a terrace of Grade II listed buildings located off Ebury Street. The terrace dates from about 1900 and is an Arts and Crafts influenced design, by Eustace Balfour and Hugh Thackeray Turner. Notable former residents include Freeman Freeman-Thomas, 1st Marquess of Willingdon. Number 5 was an official residence of the Italian Air Attache. Institutions based here included the Margarine and Shortening Manufacturers’ Association; the Lion Services Club; and the Institution of Highways and Transportation.

Notable queer residents at Ebury Street:
• Playwright and all-round talented man Noël Coward (1899-1973) lived at number 111 Ebury Street, SW1W 9QU, from 1917. His parents ran it as a lodging house. This is where he wrote “The Vortex,” his first significant success. From 1922 onwards Coward travelled extensively, but kept a room at number 111 for whenever he was back in London. For a few years until fairly recently this was named the Noël Coward Hotel in his honour. Today it is the Lord Milner Hotel.
• Godfrey Winn (1906–1971) was an English journalist known as a columnist, and also a writer and actor. His career as a theatre actor began as a boy at the Haymarket Theatre and he appeared in many plays and films. He went on to write a number of novels and biographical works, and became a star columnist for the Daily Mirror and the Sunday Express newspapers, where he wrote "Dear Abby" articles for lovelorn women. Journalists nicknamed him “Winifred God” because of his popularity with women readers. Winn was homosexual, and never married. He lived at 115 Ebury Street, SW1W 9QU.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 182 Ebury Street, SW1W 8UP, Harold Nicholson (1886–1968) and Vita Sackville-West (1892–1962), "Writers and Gardeners lived here"

Life
Who: The Hon. Victoria Mary Sackville-West, Lady Nicolson, CH (March 9, 1892 – June 2, 1962), aka Vita Sackville-West, and Sir Harold George Nicolson KCVO CMG (November 21, 1886 – May 1, 1968)
Vita Sackville-West’s first close friend was Rosamund Grosvenor (1888-1944), who was four years her senior. She was the daughter of Algernon Henry Grosvenor (1864–1907), and the granddaughter of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Baron Ebury. Vita met Rosamund at Miss Woolf’s school in 1899, when Rosamund had been invited to cheer Vita up while her father was fighting in the Second Boer War. Rosamund and Vita later shared a governess for their morning lessons. As they grew up together, Vita fell in love with Rosamund, whom she called “Roddie” or “Rose” or “the Rubens lady.” Rosamund, in turn, was besotted with Vita. "Oh, I dare say I realized vaguely that I had no business to sleep with Rosamund, and I should certainly never have allowed anyone to find it out," she admits in her journal, but she saw no real conflict: "I really was innocent." Lady Sackville, Vita’s mother, invited Rosamund to visit the family at their villa in Monte Carlo; Rosamund also stayed with Vita at Knole House, at Rue Lafitte in Paris, and at Sluie, Scotland. During the Monte Carlo visit, Vita wrote in her diary, "I love her so much." Upon Rosamund’s departure, Vita wrote, "Strange how little I minded [her leaving]; she has no personality, that’s why." Their secret relationship ended in 1913 when Vita married Sir Harold Nicolson. Rosamund died in London in 1944 during a German V1 rocket raid. Vita Sackville-West and Sir Harold Nicolson had two children: Nigel (1917–2004), who became a well-known editor, politician, and writer, and Benedict (1914–1978), an art historian. In the 1930s, the family acquired and moved to Sissinghurst Castle, near Cranbrook, Kent. Sissinghurst had once been owned by Vita’s ancestors, which gave it a dynastic attraction to her after the loss of Knole.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: This unique property was the home of the renowned English actor and playwright Noël Coward from 1930 to 1956. He used to sit in his studio overlooking the grand reception room writing his famous plays including “Design for Living” and songs like “Mad Dogs and Englishmen.”

Address: 17 Gerald Rd, Burton Mews, Westminster, London SW1W 9 SW1W 9EH, UK (51.49326, -0.15181)
English Heritage Building ID: 471102 (Grade II, 1998)

Place
Former coach house and hayloft, concealed behind Nos.13 and 15 Gerald Road. Late XIX century, converted into flats early XX century. No. 17 much remodelled in 1930-56 when occupied by Sir Noël Coward. Stock brick with red brick dressings, painted at ground floor level; slate roofs. Small paned windows with opening casements under gauged brick heads. The ground floor has an elaborate early XX century doorcase in Queen Anne style which has been inserted and some elaborate ironwork over the entrance and to adjoining window with the initials JT. There is a large early XX century casement to the left side elevation and mid-XX century French windows to one side. Interior: a well staircase embellished with finials of carved wooden urns with fruit decoration leads via a corridor with panelled walls and ceiling to the first floor former hayloft which Coward converted into a room with stage at one end, which is said to have had dining alcove below and sleeping arrangements above. The original four wooden bays of the hayloft with iron ties remain but some more elaborate wrought ironwork has been added. There is a bolection-moulded fireplace and two elaborate pairs of double doors. At gallery level there is a purpose-built corner desk with built-in bookcases which overlooks the rest of the hayloft. Separate rooms at first-floor level are his former library which has a bolection-moulded fireplace. A further bedroom has a bolection-moulded fireplace and early XVIII century style panelling. A guest bedroom has a low flight of steps and oak handrail to bathroom.

Life
Who: Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973)
17 Gerald Road was the principal residence of Noël Coward from 1930 until 1956, the most important years of his fame and where he wrote his most popular works. Coward came to prominence in 1924 with “The Vortex,” a controversial play about drug addiction, but it was his nine-year collaboration with C.B. Cochran (from 1925) which established his ascendency in the world of musical comedy and revue. “Private Lives” in 1930 was followed by “Cavalcade” in 1931 and “Design for Living” in 1932, and a string of hits continued with only a brief pause in the early war years. “Blithe Spirit” in 1941 and “In Which We Serve” in 1942 further established his position as the leading popular playwright and songsmith of his generation, his work encapsulating the fine manners and social mores of upper-class England through these years. In the post-war era his personal performances became so successful that in 1956 he left England for tax exile in Bermuda, Switzerland and Jamaica. No. 17 Gerald Road, with its early Georgian fixtures and touches of frivolity, and in particular with its built-in stage and writing desk, perfectly captures the blend of style, wit and tradition that was the key to his success. It is his very personal signature on the building in which he lived for his crucial middle years that make it of special historical interest for listing. Lord Louis Mountbatten gave a defining description of Noël at his 70th birthday celebration in 1969: “There are probably greater painters than Noel, greater novelists than Noel, greater librettists, greater composers of music, greater singers, greater dancers, greater comedians, greater tragedians, greater stage producers, greater film directors, greater cabaret artists, greater TV stars. If there are, they are fourteen different people. Only one man combined all fourteen different labels – “The Master.”

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Noël Coward (1899-1973) stayed at 37 Chesham Place, SW1X 8HB, whilst giving his last stage performacnes in “Suite for Three Keys.”

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: 450 East 52nd, The Campanile, is a 14-story brick cooperative apartment building overlooking the East River. It was home to celebrities such as Greta Garbo and John Lennon.

Address: The Campanile, 450 E 52nd St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75405, -73.96328)

Place
In October 1953, Greta purchased a seven-room apartment here. It is located on the fifth floor of the Campanile at 450 East Fifty-second Street. Greta said that she had a hard time getting this apartment. She told a friend that they didn’t like actresses in this building. Her friends George and Valentina Schlee lived on the ninth floor. They may have helped her to get the apartment. The flat was located ideally for Garbo. Situated at the end of a rare Manhattan cul-de-sac, with and unobstructed view up and down the East River. The building had a list of colourful residents, long before Garbo arrived in 1953. The 14-story, brown-brick building is a cooperative and has only 16 apartments and a pool. Garbo was in the middle of Manhattan, any place was near and reachable by foot. Lexington and Madison were just a few blocks away. The Museum of Modern Art was very close and Central Park in easy reach. A cul-de-sac must have given her an additional feel of protection. Any person, following her from her many walks, would have been easily spotted by her when she turned into her street. The Campanile’s newest tenant would take great pleasure in watching the river traffic from her living room window. The quiet cul-de-sac is dotted with high-priced cooperative buildings. Greta’s investment of $38,000 in 1953 was worth well over $1 million in the mid 1990s. Also Noël Coward resided at The Campanile while in New York City.

Life
Who: Greta Lovisa Gustafsson (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) aka Greta Garbo
Greta Garbo died while resident at the Campanile, on April 15, 1990, aged 84, in the hospital, as a result of pneumonia and renal failure. She was cremated in Manhattan, and her ashes were interred in 1999 at Skogskyrkogården Cemetery just south of her native Stockholm.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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House: 360 E. 55th Street, 404 E. 55th Street and 405 E. 54th Street are known as The Sutton Collection. Located in the heart of Sutton Place, the Sutton Collection is made up of three unique buildings, each building is filled with exceptional architectural details and true New York style that can only be found in the rarest of pre-war properties. At 404 E 55th St, 10022 resided Noël Coward (1899-1973), this was the playwright’s last Manhattan residence.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Restaurant/Bar: Café des Artistes was a fine restaurant at One West 67th Street in Manhattan and was owned by George Lang. He closed the restaurant for vacation at the beginning of August 2009 and, while away, decided to keep it closed permanently. He announced the closure on August 28, 2009. His wife, Jenifer Lang, had been the managing director of the restaurant since 1990.

Address: 1 W 67th St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77341, -73.97892)
Phone: +1 212-877-6263
National Register of Historic Places: West 67th Street Artists' Colony Historic District (1--39 and 40--50 W. 67th St.), 85001522, 1985

Place
The restaurant first opened in 1917. Café des Artistes was designed for the residents of the Hotel des Artistes, since the apartments lacked kitchens. Artists such as Marcel Duchamp, Norman Rockwell, Isadora Duncan and Rudolph Valentino were patrons. In early September 2009, two years into the Great Recession, Lang announced that the café was closing; shortly thereafter, Lang filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection, claiming debts of nearly $500,000, some of which was owed to a union benefit trust. At the time, he also faced a lawsuit from the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union Welfare Fund. In 2011, a new restaurant, The Leopard at des Artistes, opened in the location. Like its forerunner, it caters to the upper echelon of New York society. The restaurant’s famous murals, retained in the new restaurant’s 2011 renovation, were painted by Howard Chandler Christy, famous artist who also painted Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States that hangs in the US Capitol. Christy was a tenant of the building, Hotel des Artistes, until his death in 1952. There are six panels of wood nymphs - the first of which were completed in 1934. Other Christy works on display include paintings such as The Parrot Girl, The Swing Girl, Ponce De Leon, Fall, Spring, and the Fountain of Youth. Harry Crosby, a tortured poet of the 1920s, killed himself and his girlfriend, Josephine Bigelow, here on December 10, 1929. These luxurious studio apartments have been home to Rudolph Valentino, Norman Rockwell, Isadora Duncan, Fannie Hurst, and Berenice Abbott.

Life
Who: Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973)
While in New York, Noël Coward resided at: Hotel des Artistes (1 W 67th St), The Campanile (450 E 52nd St), and Sutton Place (404 E 55th St, this was the playwright’s last Manhattan residence.)

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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Accomodation: In 1919, the Algonquin Hotel (59 W 44th St, 10036) hosted the Algonquin Round Table, a lunch-time gathering of wits. Members included drama critic Alexander Woollcott and writer Dorothy Parker, Talullah Bankhead, Estelle Winwood, Eva LaGallienne, and Blythe Daly. Overnight guests included Noël Coward, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Gertrude Stein, and Alice B. Toklas.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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ISBN-10: 1544066589
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Historic District: Regent Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was built under the direction of the architect John Nash. The street runs from Waterloo Place in St James's at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Circus, to All Soul's Church. From there Langham Place and Portland Place continue the route to Regent's Park.

Address: Regent Street, London W1B, UK

Place
• The Langham, London (1C Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1JA) is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium. Since the XIX century the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as “A Scandal in Bohemia” and “The Sign of Four” partly at the Langham. The Langham continued throughout the XX century to be a favoured spot with members of the royal family, such as Diana, Princess of Wales, and many high-profile politicians including Winston Churchill and Charles de Gaulle. Other guests included Noël Coward, Wallis Simpson, Don Bradman, Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, W. Somerset Maugham and Ayumi Hamasaki. Guy Burgess (1911-1963), one of the “Cambridge Five”, a spying ring who fed official secrets to the Soviets during the Cold War, stayed at the Langham while working for the BBC.
• Horace Walpole (1717-1797) lived in 1743 at 5 Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1PW.
• Edward FitzGerald (1809-1883), English writer and translator, lived at 39 Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1QQ, in his childhood. He married Lucy, the daughter of the Quaker poet Bernard Barton in Chichester on 4 November 1856, following a death bed promise to Bernard made in 1849 to look after her. The newly married pair went to Brighton, and then settled for a time at 31 Great Portland St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 8QG. A few days of married life were enough to disillusionise FitzGerald. The marriage was evidently unhappy, for the couple separated after only a few months, despite having known each other for many years, including collaborating on a book about her father's works in 1849.
• Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) was evicted by his landlords as they had heared that he planned to exhibt "erotic" paintings at 2 All Souls' Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 3DA.
• While Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932) was at Charterhouse, his family moved from Hanwell to a house behind All Souls Church in Langham Place (1 All Souls' Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 3DA).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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Accomodation: The Hotel Café Royal is a five-star hotel at 68 Regent St, Soho, London W1B 4DY. Before its conversion in 2008-2012 it was a restaurant and meeting place. By the 1890s the Café Royal had become the place to see and be seen at. Its patrons have included Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, Winston Churchill, Noël Coward, Brigitte Bardot, Max Beerbohm, George Bernard Shaw, Jacob Epstein, Mick Jagger, Elizabeth Taylor, Muhammad Ali and Diana, Princess of Wales. The café was the scene of a famous meeting on 24 March 1895, when Frank Harris advised Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) to drop his charge of criminal libel against the Marquess of Queensberry, father of Alfred Douglas. Queensberry was acquitted, and Wilde was subsequently tried, convicted and imprisoned.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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Accomodation: The Ritz, London (150 Piccadilly, St. James's, London W1J 9BR) is a Grade II listed 5-star hotel located in Piccadilly. A symbol of high society and luxury, the hotel is one of the world's most prestigious and best known hotels. It is a member of the international consortium, The Leading Hotels of the World. The hotel was opened by Swiss hotelier César Ritz in May 1906, eight years after he established the Hôtel Ritz Paris. After a weak beginning, the hotel began to gain popularity towards the end of WWI, and became popular with politicians, socialites, writers and actors of the day. Noël Coward (1899-1973) was a notable diner at the Ritz in the 1920s and 1930s. Another notable queer resident was Tallulah Bankhead in 1957.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Accomodation: The Savoy Hotel (Strand, London WC2R 0EU) is a luxury hotel in central London. Built by the impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte with profits from his Gilbert and Sullivan opera productions, it opened on August 6, 1889. It was the first in the Savoy group of hotels and restaurants owned by Carte's family for over a century. The Savoy was the first luxury hotel in Britain, introducing electric lights throughout the building, electric lifts, bathrooms in most of the lavishly furnished rooms, constant hot and cold running water and many other innovations. Carte hired César Ritz as manager and Auguste Escoffier as chef de cuisine; they established an unprecedented standard of quality in hotel service, entertainment and elegant dining, attracting royalty and other rich and powerful guests and diners. Notable queer residents: Sarah Bernhardt in 1913, Marlon Brando in 1967, Dorothy Caruso in 1902, Noël Coward from 1941 to 1943, Sergei Diaghilev in 1919, Marlene Dietrich from 1924 to 1925, Cary Grant in 1966, Katharine Hepburn, Vaslav Nijinsky in 1911, Oscar Wilde.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: In the 1950s, Noël Coward left the UK for tax reasons, receiving harsh criticism in the press. He first settled in Bermuda but later bought houses in Jamaica and Switzerland (in the village of Les Avants, near Montreux), which remained his homes for the rest of his life. His expatriate neighbours and friends included Joan Sutherland, David Niven, Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, and Julie Andrews and Blake Edwards in Switzerland and Ian Fleming and his wife Ann in Jamaica. Coward was a witness at the Flemings’ wedding, but his diaries record his exasperation with their constant bickering.

Address: Les Avants, 1833, Switzerland (46.4533, 6.9429)

Place
In 1958, Noël Coward went to Switzerland and settled in Les Avants in upper Montreux. He bought a spacious chalet with a lush vegetable garden, set in a large estate surrounded by forests. The property had belonged to an English family called the Petries, and Noel Coward had seen the ad in the London Daily Telegraph. The actor renovated the residence and welcomed many artists and friends such as Vivian Leigh, Peter Ustinov and Graham Greene. When Coward died peacefully at his home in Jamaica in March 1973, both Graham Payn and Cole Lesley were with him. Much of his Jamaican property was handed over to the Jamaican Government but Payn and Lesley returned to his Swiss chalet from where Lesley administered the Coward Estate with his customary efficiency. When Lesley died in 1980, Payn took on the role of Executor, a role he had never anticipated and always felt himself ill-qualified to play. It was a role that would gain him no column inches in the newspapers but for the next twenty five years he quietly succeeded in managing a complex estate with charm, tact, firmness and an unwavering sense of “what Noël would have wanted.”

Life
Who: Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) and Graham Payn (April 25, 1918 – November 4, 2005)
Graham Payn was brought to England as a young boy by his opera singer mother. There, he found early success as a boy soprano. It was at an audition for Coward’s 1932 revue, “Words and Music” where he first met the man himself. Even the world-weary Coward had never before seen a 13-year old sing “Nearer My God To Thee” while doing a tap dance and his stunned reaction was reported to be simply, “We’ve got to have that kid in the show!.” It would be the first of his many Coward shows. During the war years Payn, who was by now a professional singer and dancer specialising in West End revues, was signed by Coward for his own post-war revue, “Sigh No More,” where he achieved great success with “Matelot,” a song that was associated with him for the rest of his life. The show had another lasting legacy, as Coward’s nickname for his new found friend, “Little Lad” was derived from another song which featured in the same revue. Following his personal success in “Words and Music,” Payn was welcomed into the Coward “family,” which included Cole Lesley, who was Coward’s personal assistant, Lorne Loraine, his secretary, the designer Gladys Calthrop and actress Joyce Carey. Payn was to survive his friends by many years. Noël Coward lived in upper Montreux from 1958 until his death. Born in 1899 in the poor London suburb of Teddington, he embarked in the theater at a very young age, making his stage debut in 1909. At the age of 15, he was already a well-known actor and began writing plays and composing songs and operettas. The actor was in fact a piano virtuoso. After WWII, Noel Coward pursued acting, both comedy and tragedy, and wrote novels and poetry. The actor and composer worked a lot and also devoted time to his hobby of painting, which is why he was not often seen in the village. In 1970, Noel Coward was knighted by Queen Elizabeth. His reputation only continued to grow and many people considered him to be the English Sacha Guitry. Noel Coward died in his second home in Jamaica at the age of 73. Part of his collection of books has been donated to the Musée du Vieux-Montreux. Graham Payn, lifelong friend of Noël Coward, and sole remaining Executor of Coward’s Estate, died in Les Avants near Montreux, Switzerland on 2nd November 2005 at the age of 87 and his buried at Cimetière de Clarens-Montreux (1815 Montreux).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Church: In the chapel of St John the Baptist in Westminster Abbey there is the tomb of Mary Kendall (died March 13, 1709/1710) dating from 1710 with an inscription recording: "That close Union and Friendship, In which she lived, with the Lady Catharine Jones (died April 23, 1740); And in testimony of which she desir’d That even their Ashes, after Death, Might not be divided.”

Address: 20 Dean’s Yard, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK (51.49929, -0.1273)
Hours: Monday and Tuesday 9.30-15.30, Wednesday 9.30-18.00, Thursday and Friday 9.30-15.30, Saturday 9.30-13.30
Phone: +44 20 7222 5152
Website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/

Place
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church. According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the VII century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III. Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held there. There have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey since 1100. Two were of reigning monarchs (Henry I and Richard II), although, before 1919, there had been none for some 500 years.

Notable queer burials at Westminster Abbey:
• Anne, Queen of Great Britain (1665-1714). Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, became close to the young Princess Anne in about 1675, and the friendship grew stronger as the two grew older. Correspondence between the Duchess and the Queen reveals that the two women enjoyed a royally passionate romance. They called each other pet names: Sarah was “Mrs. Freeman” and Anne was “Mrs. Morley.” When Anne came to the throne in 1702, she named Sarah “Lady of the Bedchamber.” Anne and Sarah were virtually inseparable; no king’s mistress had ever wielded the power granted to the Duchess. Over time, Sarah became overconfident in her position and developed an arrogant attitude toward Anne, even going to far as to insult the queen in public. A cousin of Sarah’s, Abigail Hill, caught the Queen’s eye during Sarah’s frequent absences from Court, and eventually replaced her in Anne’s affections. After her final break with Anne in 1711, Sarah and her husband were dismissed from the court. Sarah enjoyed a "long and devoted" relationship with her husband of more than 40 years, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. The money she inherited from the Marlborough trust left her one of the richest women in Europe.
• Sir Frederick Ashton (1904–1988), ballet dancer and choreographer, Memorial in Poet’s Corner (buried St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Yaxley)
• W. H. Auden (1907-1973), poet and essayist. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey in 1974, adjoining the grave of John Masefield. Another memorial is at Christ College Cathedral, Oxford, where he graduated (buried Kirchstetten, Austria) (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for Boys which was an inspiration for the Scout Movement, founder and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association and founder of the Girl Guides. In the south aisle of the nave of Westminster Abbey, against the screen of St George’s chapel, there is a memorial stone to Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, by W.Soukop. Both are buried in Kenya and each had a memorial service held at the Abbey (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), Prime Minister, memorial. A memorial to Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, was unveiled in the nave of Westminster Abbey in 1997. Designed by Donald Buttress and cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was a dramatist in the English Renaissance theatre, most famous for his collaborations with John Fletcher (1579–1625.) According to a mid-century anecdote related by John Aubrey, they lived in the same house on the Bankside in Southwark, "sharing everything in the closest intimacy." About 1613 Beaumont married Ursula Isley, daughter and co-heiress of Henry Isley of Sundridge in Kent, by whom he had two daughters, one posthumous. Francis Beaumont and his brother Sir John Beaumont are both buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, at the entrance to St Benedict's chapel near Chaucer's monument. Fletcher died in 1625 and is buried inside the Southwark Cathedral, London Bridge, London SE1 9DA. On 1November 6, 1996 the cathedral became a focus of controversy when it hosted a twentieth-anniversary service for the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement. In 1997 openly gay cleric, Jeffrey John became Canon Chancellor and Theologian of the Cathedral (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. Behn’s close association with royalty, especially her friendship with the King’s mistress, Nell Gwyn, and her long-standing liaison with John Hoyle (died 1692), whose affairs with other men were notorious, made Behn a prime subject for court and theater gossip. Just as Behn was notorious for presenting sensational subjects on stage despite societal taboos, she achieved a reputation for unusually explicit accounts of erotic and sexual episodes in her poems. Many of these celebrated gay male and lesbian relationships. She was buried in the east cloister of Westminster Abbey, near the steps up into the church. The inscription on her tombstone, written by John Hoyle, reads: "Here lies a Proof that Wit can never be Defence enough against Mortality." John Hoyle was stabbed to death on May 1692 and is buried in the vault of the Inner Temple church, Temple, London EC4Y 7BB) (Location in the Abbey: Cloisters; East Cloister).
• William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709) and King William III of England (1650-1702), are buried next to Queen Mary II. King William III is buried in great simplicity in the South Aisle of the Chapel of Henry VI, and his companion William Bentinck is buried in a vault nearby. Several members of the Bentinck family are buried in the Ormond vault at the eastern end of Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey. None have monuments but their names and dates of death were added to the vaultstone in the late XIX century (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915) died at 4:46 pm on April 23, 1915 in a French hospital ship moored in a bay off the island of Skyros in the Aegean on his way to the landing at Gallipoli. As the expeditionary force had orders to depart immediately, he was buried at 11 pm in an olive grove on Skyros, Greece. His grave remains there today. On 11 November 1985, Brooke was among 16 WWI poets commemorated on a slate monument unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976), musician and composer. In the north choir (or Musicians) aisle in Westminster Abbey there is a memorial stone. Britten refused a formal burial since he wanted to be buried beside his partner Peter Pears (Location in the Abbey: North Quire Aisle).
• Robert Browning (1812-1889), poet, is buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. He was born on 7 May 1812 in London, a son of Robert Browning (1782-1866) and Sarah (Wiedemann). He married Elizabeth Barrett, a famous poet in her own right, in September 1846 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• George, 6th Baron Byron (1788-1824). The memorial stone in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey was given by the Poetry Society and unveiled on May 8, 1969 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), composer and playwright. A memorial was unveiled in 1984 in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. The black marble stone was cut by Ralph Beyer. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend" (Location in the Abbey: South Quire Aisle).
• Major-General Sir Herbert Edwardes (1819–1868) was an administrator, soldier, and statesman active in the Punjab, India. He is buried in Highgate Cemetery. A memorial by sculptor William Theed junior, is on the wall of the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. He is also commemorated by a stained glass window in the chapel of King’s College London. Brigadier-General John Nicholson (1822–1857) was a Victorian era military officer known for his role in British India. Nicholson never married, the most significant people in his life being his brother Punjab administrators Sir Henry Lawrence and Herbert Edwardes. At Bannu, Nicholson used to ride one hundred and twenty miles every weekend to spend a few hours with Edwardes, and lived in his beloved friend’s house for some time when Edwardes’ wife Emma was in England. At his deathbed he dictated a message to Edwardes saying, "Tell him that, if at this moment a good fairy were to grant me a wish, my wish would be to have him here next to my mother." The love between him and Edwardes made them, as Edwardes’ wife latter described it "more than brothers in the tenderness of their whole lives.” In the retaking of Delhi, India, Nicholson led 2,000 men (mostly British, Pathan, and Punjabi troops) through the Kashmiri Gate in Delhi. Mortally wounded he died at the hour of British victory and is buried at New Delhi (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Eliot (1819-1880) was not buried in Westminster Abbey because of her denial of the Christian faith and her "irregular" though monogamous life with Lewes. She was buried in Highgate Cemetery (East), Highgate, London, in the area reserved for religious dissenters and agnostics, beside the love of her life, George Henry Lewes. On 2June 1, 1980 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. Stone by John Skelton (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771)’s biographer William Mason erected a memorial to him, designed by John Bacon the Elder, in the east aisle of Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey in 1778. (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner)
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), Poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in 1975 in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. By sculptor David Peace (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936), poet, has a memorial panel in the window above Chaucer's monument in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner). he has a memorial also at St Laurence (College Street, Ludlow, Shropshire, SY8 1AN).
• Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon (1661-1723), was the only son of Henry and his first wife Theodosia, daughter of Lord Capel. As Viscount Cornbury was governor of New York from 1702 to 1708. He had a very bad reputation and "his character and conduct were equally abhorred in both hemispheres". He secretly married Catherine O'Brien in 1688 and died in obscurity and debt. His only surviving son Edward as Lord Clifton took his seat in the House of Lords but died unmarried of a fever after a drinking bout. His daughter Theodosia married John Bligh, later Earl of Darnley, and both were buried in the vault (Location in the Abbey: North ambulatory)
• Henry James (1843-1916), American born novelist. On June 17, 1976 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets’ Corner Westminster Abbey by his great grand-nephew. Cut by Will Carter (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• James Kendall, politician and governor of Barbados, is buried in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. James’s niece Mary Kendall was buried in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Abbey and has a monument there with a kneeling alabaster figure of herself. The inscription, written by the Dean of Westminster Francis Atterbury, reads: "Mrs Mary Kendall daughter of Thomas Kendall Esqr. and of Mrs Mary Hallet, his wife, of Killigarth in Cornwall, was born at Westminster Nov.8 1677 and dy’d at Epsome March 4 1709/10, having reach’d the full term of her blessed Saviour’s life; and study’d to imitate his spotless example. She had great virtues, and as great a desire of concealing them: was of a severe life, but of an easy conversation; courteous to all, yet strictly sincere; humble, without meanness; beneficient, without ostentation; devout, without superstition. These admirable qualitys, in which she was equall’d by few of her sex, surpass’d by none, render’d her every way worthy of that close uion and friendship in which she liv’d with the Lady Catherine Jones; and in testimony of which she desir’d that even their ashes, after death, might not be divided: and, therefore, order’d her selfe here to be interr’d where, she knew, that excellent Lady design’d one day to rest, near the grave of her belov’d and religious mother, Elizabeth, Countess of Ranelagh. This monument was erected by Capt. Charles Kendall." Her name was inscribed on the vault stone in front of the monument in the late XIX century. Mary’s father Thomas Kendall, son of a merchant, died in 1684 and Mary lived with the Earl of Ranelagh’s family while James was in the West Indies. Lady Catherine Jones (d.1740) was the Earl’s daughter. Charles was Mary’s cousin and was in the Royal Navy. Her estates were left to her cousin Canon Nicholas Kendall. The coats of arms show those for Kendall and also "or, a chief gules overall on a bend engrailed sable three bezants" for Hallet.
• Herbert, 1st Earl Kitchener (1850-1916), Sirdar of the Egyptian army (Commander in Chief), is remembered on the altar in the south aisle of the Lady Chapel (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel)
• D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930), novelist and poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey on 1November 6, 1985. By David Parsley (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• In July 2002, a memorial window to Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) – a gift of the Marlowe Society – was unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey. Controversially, a question mark was added to the generally accepted date of death. On 2October 5, 2011 a letter from Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells was published by The Times newspaper, in which they called on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence.” In 2012, they renewed this call in their e-book Shakespeare Bites Back, adding that it "denies history,” and again the following year in their book Shakespeare Beyond Doubt. (Buried St Nicholas Churchyard, Deptford)
• Just inside the west door of Westminster Abbey there is a memorial brass, by Christopher Ironside, to Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900-1979) and his wife, Countess Mountbatten of Burma. He was Admiral of the Fleet (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• It has been said that the greatest love of Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727)’s life was with a fellow mathematician, Fatio de Duillier. They collaborated for several years, and when they broke up over an argument in 1693, Newton suffered symptoms of a nervous breakdown. Fatio assisted John Conduitt (Newton’s nephew) in planning the design, and writing the inscription for Newton’s monument in Westminster Abbey. His large monument is by William Kent and J.M.Rysbrack. Newton has also a Memorial at Trinity College, Cambridge. Fatio died in 1753 and was buried at the church of St. Nicholas, Worcester (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• After being ill for the last twenty-two years of his life, Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) died of renal failure on 11 July 1989 at his home near Steyning, West Sussex. His cremation was held three days later. The ashes of the greatest actor of his generation, are buried in the south transept of Westminster Abbey. His stone was cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: South Transept).
• Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. The inscription on the stone is taken from Owen’s "Preface" to his poems; "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." (Buried Ors Communal Cemetery, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)
• Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902). A small tablet was unveiled in Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey in 1953 (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Seigfried Sassoon (1886-1967), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. (Buried St Andrew Churchyard, Mells, Somerset)
• Henry John Alexander Seely (1899-1963), 2nd Lord Mottistone, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. A statue by Edwin Russell remembers him (Location in the Abbey: St Catherine's Chapel Garden; Little Cloister).
• Robert Stewart (1769-1822), Viscount Castlereagh and 2nd Marquis of Londonderry, politician, was buried in the centre of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. His statue is by sculptor John Evan Thomas (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628) and King James I of England (1566-1625) are buried in the Henry VII Chapel. King James I’s tomb was lost and not rediscovered until 1869. On His Majesty’s left is the magnificent tomb of his lover George Villiers. On his right is the tomb (with huge bronze figures representing Hope, Truth, Charity and Faith) of Ludovic Stuart, Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1574-1624), son of one of his earliest lovers, Esme Stuart.
• On 14 February 1995 a small stained glass memorial was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey for Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wilde (1854-1900), playwright and aesthete (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Noël Coward died at his home, Firefly Estate, in Jamaica on March 26, 1973 of heart failure and was buried three days later on the brow of Firefly Hill, overlooking the north coast of the island.

Address: Firefly Hill Rd., Ocho Rios, Jamaica (18.4035, -76.9384)
Hours: Monday through Thursday 9.00-17.00, Saturday 9.00-17.00
Phone: 997-7201 or 994-0920

Place
Built in 1956
Firefly Estate, located 10 km (6 mi) east of Oracabessa, Jamaica, is the burial place of Sir Noël Coward and his former vacation home. It is now listed as a National Heritage Site by the Jamaica National Heritage Trust. Although the setting is Edenic, the house is surprisingly spartan, considering that he often entertained jet-setters and royalty. The building has been transformed into a writer’s house museum. Noël Coward’s mountaintop Jamaican home and burial site was originally owned by the infamous pirate and one-time governor of Jamaica, Sir Henry Morgan (1635-1688.) The property offered a commanding view of the St. Mary harbour, and Morgan used it as a lookout. As part of the hideaway, Morgan had caused a secret escape tunnel to be dug, opening at Port Maria. Named for the luminous insects seen in the warm evenings, Firefly estate has entertained a wide range of guests, including both the Queen Mother and Queen Elizabeth II, Sir Winston Churchill, Sir Laurence Olivier, Sophia Loren, Elizabeth Taylor, Sir Alec Guinness, Peter O’Toole, Richard Burton, and neighbours Errol Flynn, Ruth Bryan Owen and Ian Fleming. "An Englishman has an inalienable right to live wherever he chooses,” said Winston Churchill, who instructed Coward in oil-painting technique while visiting at Firefly. The Firefly art studio holds Coward’s paintings and photographs of his coterie of famous friends, including Laurence Olivier, Errol Flynn and Marlene Dietrich. Of his time at the Firefly estate, Coward wrote in his diary: "Firefly has given me the most valuable benison of all: time to read and write and think and get my mind in order . . . I love this place, it deeply enchants me. Whatever happens to this silly world, nothing much is likely to happen here." Writing, he believed, came easier when he was here, "the sentences seemed to construct themselves, the right adjectives appeared discretely at the right moment. Firefly has magic for me. . . ." Coward died of myocardial infarction at Firefly on March 26, 1973, aged 73 and is buried in a marble tomb in the garden near the spot where he would sit at dusk watching the sun set as he sipped his brandy with ginger ale chaser and looked out to sea and along the lush green coast spread out beneath him. A statue of him gazing out over the blue harbour graces the lawn. The stone hut on the lawn that was once a lookout for Henry Morgan, then converted to a bar by Sir Noël, is now a gift shop and restaurant. On one of Firefly’s walls is written his last poem. It begins:
When I have fears, as Keats had fears,
Of the moment I’ll cease to be,
I console myself with vanished years,
Remembered laughter, remembered tears,
And the peace of the changing sea.

Life
Who: Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) and Graham Payn (April 25, 1918 – November 4, 2005)
Sir Noël Coward was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise.” Coward did not publicly acknowledge his homosexuality, but it was discussed candidly after his death by biographers including Payn, his long-time partner, and in Coward’s diaries and letters, published posthumously. Coward’s most important relationship, which began in the mid-1940s and lasted until his death, was with South African stage and film actor Graham Payn. Coward featured Payn in several of his London productions. Payn later co-edited with Sheridan Morley a collection of Coward’s diaries, published in 1982. Coward’s other relationships included the playwright Keith Winter, actors Louis Hayward and Alan Webb, his manager John (Jack) C. Wilson (1899–1961) and the composer Ned Rorem, who published details of their relationship in his diaries. Coward had a 19-year friendship with Prince George, Duke of Kent, but biographers differ on whether it was platonic. Payn believed that it was, though Coward reportedly admitted to the historian Michael Thornton that there had been "a little dalliance.” Coward said, on the duke’s death, "I suddenly find that I loved him more than I knew." On March 28, 1984 a memorial stone was unveiled by the Queen Mother in Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend." After Coward died in 1973, Payn’s career for the rest of his life became the administration of the Coward estate. Barry Day wrote, "It was not a job he ever wanted or expected but he brought to it a dedication and focus that Noël would have been surprised and pleased to see. He was thrust into his biggest role and played it as he knew Noël would have wanted him to. It was a fitting farewell performance." Coward’s biographer, Philip Hoare, wrote, "Graham disproved his partner’s assessment of himself as “an illiterate little sod” by publishing his memoir and by managing the Coward estate. He was a generous, uncomplicated man, and he will be missed by his many friends." In 1988, 15 years after Coward’s death, Payn, who "hadn’t the heart to use it again,” gave their Jamaican home, the Firefly Estate, to the Jamaica National Heritage Trust. He retained their other home in Switzerland, where he died in 2005, aged 87.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-26 12:30 pm

Lillien Jane Martin (June 7, 1851 – March 26, 1943)

Lillien Jane Martin was an American psychologist. She published over twelve books. Martin experienced ageism and sexism as an early woman in psychology.
Born: June 7, 1851, Olean, New York, United States
Died: March 26, 1943, San Francisco, California, United States
Education: Vassar College
Lived: Shreve Building, 210 Post St, San Francisco, CA 94108, USA (37.78894, -122.40549)
Buried: Bench at Golden Gate Park with Fidelia Jewett (memorial)
Buried alongside: Fidelia Jewett
Find A Grave Memorial# 171945144
Books: Sweeping the Cobwebs, Mental Hygiene: Two Years' Experience of a Clinical Psychologist

School: Vassar College (124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604) is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college in the town of Poughkeepsie, New York. Founded in 1861 by Matthew Vassar, it was the first degree-granting institution of higher education for women in the United States. It became coeducational in 1969, and now has a gender ratio at the national average. The school is one of the historic Seven Sisters, the first elite female colleges in the U.S., and has a historic relationship with Yale University, which suggested a merger with the college before coeducation at both institutions. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Alma Lutz (1890-1973), Delia Sherman (born 1951), Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892–1950), Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), Lilian May Miller (1895-1943), Lillien Jane Martin (1851–1943), Louise Crane (1913–1997), Marguerite Smith (died 1959), Rhoda Bubendey Metraux (1914–2003), Ruth Benedict (1887–1948).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: Shreve & Company is an established retailer of jewelry, from timepieces to diamonds, headquartered in San Francisco, California. Incorporated in 1894 by George Rodman and Albert J. Lewis, it is considered the oldest commercial establishment in San Francisco. Shreve & Co has had a tumultuous history, ranging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 1992 to most recently losing their lease to Harry Winston.

Address: 210 Post St, San Francisco, CA 94108, USA (37.78894, -122.40549)
Phone: +1 415-421-2600
Website: www.shreve.com

Place
The company's precursor, The Shreve Jewelry Company, was established by Rodman's father and uncle, George and Samuel Shreve, who had moved to San Francisco from New York City. George learned goldsmithing from his older half-brother, Benjamin. The latter had established Shreve, Crump & Low in Boston. By the 1880s, The Shreve Jewelry Company was considered among the finest silversmiths in the United States, selling high quality timepieces, gold, and silver jewelry, aside from diamonds and precious stones. The store, which had opened at Montgomery and Clay, soon moved to Market Street. Just a month before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Shreve & Co. opened its new eleven-story building at Post and Grant. Built with the latest engineering technologies of its time, the Shreve & Co. building was one of a few San Francisco buildings that survived the April 18 earthquake. With its building rendered unusable, the company opened shop in Oakland, where it stayed for two years. The company's first flatware products and illustrated catalogs were created at this time. In 1992, Shreve & Co filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy (owned at the time by Birks Group of Canada) and was sold to The Schiffman Group in North Carolina and to Suna Bros Inc. in New York. In 2011, after more than a century of operating within California, the company launched its first store in Portland, Oregon, offering timepieces from A. Lange & Söhne, Baume & Mercier, IWC, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Officine Panerai, Patek Philippe, Rolex, Wellendorff and Vacheron Constantin. In 2015, Shreve & Co lost their lease to Harry Winston due to skyrocketing rents around Union Square. They relocated further down to 150 Post St.

Life
Who: Lillien Jane Martin (1851–1943)
Lillien Jane Martin was an American psychologist. She published over twelve books. Martin experienced ageism and sexism as an early woman in psychology. Lillien Jane Martin obtained her Bachelor of Arts from Vassar College and taught as a high school science teacher. She then studied at the University of Göttingen from 1894 until 1898. She started teaching psychology at Stanford University in 1899. She was awarded an honorary degree from the University of Bonn in 1913. Historically, The University of Bonn had declined to admit her because she was a woman. After leaving Stanford in 1916, she became a consulting psychologist and psychopathologist. She was the head of a mental health clinic in San Francisco, California. This mental health clinic was the first in the world for elderly people and non-handicap children. Martin paid for a bench, now in Golden Gate Park, to Honor: “Fidelia Jewett (October 3, 1851-1933), A Public School Teacher in San Francisco, For Almost Fifty Years, A Founder in Salvaging Old Age”. On the base at the rear of the bench, now barely visible above the grass, there is more lettering: “Lillien J. Martin (1851-1943), Guide the Child, Salvage the Old. In 1889, Martin attended a teachers convention in San Francisco and landed a job as vice principal and head of the science department at the Girls High School. There she met Miss Jewett. Fidelia Jewett was born in Weybridge, Vermont. Jewett taught mathematics and botany without a college degree since the 1880s at the Girls High School in San Francisco. She and Martin were intimate friends almost from the moment their paths crossed and they remained friends until Jewett's death in 1933. In 1894 Martin resigned from the Girls High School to earn a doctoral degree in psychology in Gottingen. Jewett joined her there the following year. Back in San Francisco, Jewett resumed her teaching at the same high school. When Martin returned to the United States in 1898, she was immediately offered a position teaching psychology at Stanford. But between the time she returned from Germany and her job began at Stanford, Martin had no source of income. Jewett gave Martin half of her salary until Stanford paid Martin. Martin, an equally supportive friend, encouraged Jewett to earn a college degree. The bench was originally a monument to Jewett in downtown San Francisco's posh Union Square, near Martin’s apartment in the Shreve Building, where it was placed in 1933 for $2000. It was considered no longer in accord with the Square's decor in 1946 and moved to the park, presumably acquiring its inscription about Martin during that decade. Fidelia Jewett has also a stone at Union Cemetery (730 Potomac Avenu, Bakersfield, CA 93307), but the cemetery has no record of her being buried there.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-26 12:23 pm

Gerald Murphy (March 26, 1888 – October 17, 1964)

Gerald Clery Murphy and Sara Sherman Wiborg were wealthy, expatriate Americans who moved to the French Riviera in the early 20th century and who, with their generous hospitality and flair for parties, ...
Education: Yale University
Lived: 50 West 11th Street, New York City
Wiborg Beach, Hwy Behind the Pond, East Hampton, NY 11937, USA (40.94874, -72.17874)
Villa America, 112 Chemin des Mougins, 06160 Antibes, France (43.55932, 7.12715)
23 Quai des Grands Augustins, 75006 Paris, France (48.85427, 2.34317)
Buried: South End Cemetery, East Hampton, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 20643895

Gerald Clery Murphy and Sara Sherman Wiborg were wealthy, expatriate Americans who moved to the French Riviera in the early 20th century and who, with their generous hospitality and flair for parties, created a vibrant social circle, particularly in the 1920s, that included a great number of artists and writers of the Lost Generation. Gerald had a brief but significant career as a painter. Gerald Murphy was born in Boston to the family that owned the Mark Cross Company, sellers of fine leather goods. He failed the entrance exams at Yale three times before matriculating, although he performed respectably there. He joined DKE and the Skull and Bones society. He befriended a young freshman named Cole Porter (Yale class of 1913) and brought him into DKE. Sara Sherman Wiborg was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, into the wealthy Wiborg family, owners of the printing ink and varnish company Frank Bestow Wiborg. In East Hampton Sara Wiborg and Gerald Murphy met when they were both adolescents. Gerald was five years younger than Sara was, and for many years they were more familiar companions than romantically attached; they became engaged in 1915, when Sara was 32 years old. Gerald's primary orientation was homosexual; but Sara had always been the most important thing in his life. Gerald died in 1964 in East Hampton, two days after his friend Cole Porter.

Together from 1915 to 1964: 49 years.
Gerald Clery Murphy (March 25, 1888 – October 17, 1964)
Sara Sherman Wiborg (November 7, 1883 – October 10, 1975)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Yale University is an American private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut.

Address: New Haven, CT 06520 (41.31632, -72.92234)
Phone: +1 203-432-4771
Website: www.yale.edu

Place
Founded in 1701 in Saybrook Colony as the Collegiate School, the University is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. The school was renamed Yale College in 1718 in recognition of a gift from Elihu Yale, who was governor of the British East India Company. Established to train Congregationalist ministers in theology and sacred languages, by 1777 the school's curriculum began to incorporate humanities and sciences. In the XIX century the school incorporated graduate and professional instruction, awarding the first Ph.D. in the United States in 1861 and organizing as a university in 1887. Skull and Bones is an undergraduate senior secret society at Yale University. It is the oldest senior class landed society at Yale. The society's alumni organization, the Russell Trust Association, owns the society's real estate and oversees the organization. The society is known informally as "Bones", and members are known as "Bonesmen". Hendrick Hall at Yale University (165 Elm St., New Haven, CT) housed a variety of LGBTQ organizations in the late 1970s: Yalesbians, the New Haven Gay Alliance, the New Haven Gay Coffeehouse, and the New Haven Gay Switchboard.

Notable Queer Alumni and Faculty at Yale University:
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University, where he contributed to campus humor magazine The Yale Record.
• John Boswell (1947-1994), prominent historian and professor.
• Russell Cheney (1881-1945) graduated in 1904, member of the Skull and Bones.
• Anderson Cooper (born 1967), resided in Trumbull College, inducted into the Manuscript Society, majoring in political science and graduated with a B.A. in 1989.
• Tom Dolby (born 1975) graduated from The Hotchkiss School in 1994 and Yale University.
• Rick Elice (born 1956) earned a BA from Cornell University, an MFA from the Yale Drama School and is a Teaching Fellow at Harvard. He was the salutatorian graduate of Francis Lewis High School in Queens, New York (class of 1973).
• John Safford Fiske (1838-1907), graduated in 1863. He was nominated by President Andrew Johnson U. S. consul in Leith, Scotland, in 1868. While abroad he fell deeply in love with Thomas Ernest Boulton aka “Stella”. Fiske’s steamy letters to Stella became evidence at the Boulton and Park trial. Fiske was acquitted along with Boulton and Park, but his diplomatic career was ruined. He resigned his post, traveled to Constantinople, Germany, and France, rented a house near Paris with an English friend, and in 1882 moved permanently to Alassio. Late in life he lectured at Hobart College, was rewarded with an honorary degree, and left the college his library of 4,000 books.
• James Whitney Fosburgh (1910-1978)
• Henry Geldzahler (1935-1994) graduated in 1957, member of Manuscript Society
• John Glines (born 1933) graduated from Yale in 1955 with a BA in drama.
• Leonard C. Hanna, Jr (1889-1957), a philanthropist who, after graduation from Yale, he worked in the iron and steel industry to gain experience.
• Roger Dennis Hansen (1936-1991), “Denny”, was tops in his class, magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, a varsity swimmer, Rhodes scholar and a member of the best clubs and societies. His classmates believed he would be elected president of the United States. He was found dead at the home of a friend in Rehoboth Beach. Hansen took his life by inhaling carbon monoxide from his car.
• Lord Nicholas Hervey (1961–1998) took a degree in the History of Art and studied Economics in depth. In 1981 he founded the Rockingham Club, a Yale social club for descendants of royalty and aristocracy, which was later modified to allow membership to the children of the "super-wealthy". The Club and Nicholas Hervey were profiled in Andy Warhol's Interview magazine but was dissolved shortly thereafter in 1986. Nicholas' older half-brother John was posthumously reported to be a friend of Andy Warhol.
• Richard Isay (1934–2012), Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry 1962-1965.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) carried out post-doctoral research at Yale University, the Getty Center in Los Angeles, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Since entering private practice in 1990 Longstaffe-Gowan has advised on a number of public and private historic landscapes. He has developed and implemented long-term landscape management plans for the National Trust, English Heritage and a wide range of private owners in the UK and abroad. He has similarly had extensive input in the conservation and redevelopment of a variety of historic landscapes including The Tower of London, Hampton Court Palace, Kensington Palace Gardens and The Crown Estate (Central London).
• George Platt Lynes (1907–1955) was sent to Paris in 1925 with the idea of better preparing him for college. His life was forever changed by the circle of friends that he would meet there including Gertrude Stein, Glenway Wescott, Monroe Wheeler. He attended Yale University in 1926, but dropped out after a year to move to New York City.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950), graduated in 1923, managing editor of the Yale Daily News, editor of the Yale Literary Magazine and member of Skull and Bones
• James McCourt (born 1941) has been with his life partner, novelist Vincent Virga (born 1942), since 1964 after they met as graduate students in the Yale School of Drama. McCourt's and Virga's papers are held at Yale's Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) graduated in 1967
• Gerald Clery Murphy (1888–1964) failed the entrance exams three times before matriculating. He joined DKE and the Skull and Bones society.
• Richard Thomas Nolan (born 1937) received his master's in Religion from the Yale University Divinity School in 1967; during his studies, he was also an instructor in math and religion, and associate chaplain at the Cheshire Academy from 1965 to 1967.
• Jamie Pedersen (born 1968) graduated summa cum laude in American Studies from Yale and received his law degree from Yale Law School. Pedersen was an active member of the Yale Russian Chorus while an undergraduate and law student, and remains active in the alumni of the Yale Russian Chorus. He clerked for Judge Stephen Williams on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) majored in English, minored in music, and also studied French. He was a member of Scroll and Key and Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, and contributed to campus humor magazine The Yale Record. He was an early member of the Whiffenpoofs a cappella singing group and participated in several other music clubs; in his senior year, he was elected president of the Yale Glee Club and was its principal soloist.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) was the Chair of Yale University's Department of Architecture for six years (1958-1964). His most famous work is the Yale Art and Architecture Building (A&A Building), a spatially complex brutalist concrete structure.
• Thomas Schippers (1930–1977) went on to Yale University, where he had some lessons in composition with Paul Hindemith.
• Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) obtained a PhD degree from the University of London and a JSD degree from Yale University. He was a fellowship at Yale Law School (1958).
• John William Sterling (1844–1918) graduated with a B.A. in 1864 and was a member of Skull and Bones and president of Brothers in Unity during his senior year. He graduated from Columbia Law School as the valedictorian of the class of 1867 and was admitted to the bar in that year. He obtained an M.A. degree in 1874. He became a corporate lawyer in New York City, and helped found the law firm of Shearman & Sterling in 1871, a firm that represented Jay Gould, Henry Ford, the Rockefeller family, and Standard Oil. On his death in 1918, Sterling left a residuary estate of $15 million to Yale, at the time the "largest sum of money ever donated to an institution of higher learning in history"—equivalent to about $200 million in 2011 dollars. Sterling never married. In 2003, historian Jonathan Ned Katz uncovered evidence that Sterling lived for nearly fifty years in a same-sex intimate partnership with cotton broker James O. Bloss, who was 3 years younger and also a Yale man, class of 1875.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Harvard professor and gardner designer, was drafted into the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1943 and after the war took a job teaching city planning at Yale. Enjoying the work, he did little further garden design, and reached the post of professor and chairman of the department of city planning. His publications in this area include articles such as America's super-cities and a number of books on city design in the U.S. Despite a previous long-term same-sex relationship with Gerald Schlesinger with whom he lived in England, Tunnard married Lydia Evans of Boston, Massachusetts in 1945. They had a son, Christopher. Tunnard died in New Haven in 1979. Tunnard and his wife are buried at Oak Grove Cemetery (Summer St, Plymouth, MA 02360), Plot: Oak Grove, Plot 562. In the nearby Vine Hills Cemetery (102 Samoset St, Plymouth, MA 02360) is buried Joseph Everett Chandler (1863–1946), Colonial Revival architect and pioneering designer of queer space.
• Donald Vining (1917–1998) was a student at West Chester University in Pennsylvania between 1937 and 1939, where he was active in local theater groups, before to his admission to the Yale School of Drama as a playwrighting major. Before World War II, a number of his plays were produced for the stage and for the WICC Radio "Listeners' Theatre", broadcast on the Yankee Network. His plays were subsequently published in such volumes as Yale Radio Plays and Plays For Players.
• Paula Vogel (born 1951) was Chair of the playwriting department at the Yale School of Drama.
• Thornton Wilder (1897–1975) earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1920, was member of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, a literary society.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: The Greenwich Village townhouse explosion occurred on March 6, 1970, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It was caused by the premature detonation of a bomb that was being assembled by members of the Weather Underground, an American radical left group. The bomb was under construction in the basement of 18 West 11th Street, when it accidentally exploded; the blast reduced the four-story townhouse to a burning, rubble-strewn ruin.

Address: W 11th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

Place
11th Street is in two parts. It is interrupted by the block containing Grace Church between Broadway and Fourth Avenue. East 11th streets runs from Fourth Avenue to Avenue C and runs past Webster Hall. West 11th Street runs from Broadway to West Street. 11th Street and 6th Avenue was the location of the Old Grapevine tavern from the 1700s to its demolition in the early XX century.

Notable queer residents at West 11th Street:
• No. 18, 10011: James Merrill (1926-1995) was born in New York City to Charles E. Merrill (1885-1956), the founding partner of the Merrill Lynch investment firm, and Hellen Ingram Merrill (1898-2000), a society reporter and publisher from Jacksonville, Florida. He was born at a residence which would become the site of the Greenwich Village townhouse explosion. The Greek Revival townhouse at 18 West 11th Street, located between Fifth Avenue and the Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), was originally built in 1845. In the 1920s the home belonged to Charles E. Merrill. In 1930 Merrill wrote a note to its subsequent owner, Broadway librettist Howard Dietz, wishing him joy in "the little house on heaven street." James Merrill, who spent his infancy and first few years in the house, lamented the bombing in a 1972 poem titled "18 West 11th Street":
“In what at least
Seemed anger the Aquarians in the basement
Had been perfecting a device
For making sense to us
If only briefly and on pain
Of incommunication ever after.
Now look who’s here. Our prodigal
Sunset. Just passing through from Isfahan.
Filled by him the glass
Disorients.”
Actor Dustin Hoffman and his wife Anne Byrne were living in the townhouse next door at the time of the explosion. He can be seen in the documentary “The Weather Underground” (2002), standing on the street during the aftermath of the explosion. After considerable debate by New York City’s Landmarks Preservation Commission, the home was rebuilt in 1978 in an angular, modernist style by renowned architect Hugh Hardy. (“It was this whole idea that a new building should express something new,” Hardy has said, adding, “we were deeper into diagonals at that point.”) The home was sold for $9,250,000 in December 2012. The new owner was revealed in 2014 to be Justin Korsant of Long Light Capital, who renovated the town house using the architecture firm H3, the successor to Hardy’s firm.
• No. 50, 10011: After marrying, Gerald Murphy (1888-1964) and Sara Wiborg (1883-1975) lived at 50 West 11th Street in New York City, where they had three children.
• No. 307, 10014: Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) revised “On the Road” here at his girlfriend Helen Weaver’s courtyard apartment. He also wrote part of “Desolation Angels,” which mentions this building and its "Dickensian windows." Felice Picano lived here from 1977-1993: “Pretty gay building. There was a courtyard in the front with a big English Plane tree in the middle. Across the street is another literary landmark, The White Horse Tavern. That is the building I wrote about in “True Stories Too, The Federalist”.” --Felice Picano. Now owned by photographer Annie Leibowitz (born 1949), her renovation is creating controversy.
• No. 360, 10014: Julian Schnabel (born 1951) resides at 360 West 11th Street, in a former West Village horse stable that he purchased and converted for residential use, adding five luxury condominiums in the style of a Northern Italian palazzo. It is named the Palazzo Chupi and it’s easy to spot because it is painted pink. The building is controversial in its Greenwich Village neighborhood because it was built taller than a rezoning, happening at the same time as the construction began, allowed. Neighbors also alleged illegal work done on the site. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and allies called on the city for stricter enforcement, but Schnabel’s home eventually rose to the 167 feet he desired, rather than the new 75-foot limit imposed by the Far West Village downzoning of 2005. Until his death, Lou Reed lived across the street from Schnabel, who considered him his best friend. Schnabel is the director of “Basquiat” (1996), biopic of queer artist Jean‑Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) and of “Before Night Falls” (2000), biopic of queer Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright Reinaldo Arenas (1943-1990)

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: The Murphys purchased a villa in Cap d’Antibes and named it Villa America; they resided there for many years. When the Murphys arrived on the Riviera, lying on the beach merely to enjoy the sun was not a common activity. Occasionally, someone would go swimming, but the joys of being at the beach just for sun were still unknown at the time. The Murphys, with their long forays and picnics at La Garoupe, introduced sunbathing on the beach as a fashionable activity.

Address: 112 Chemin des Mougins, 06160 Antibes, France (43.55932, 7.12715)

Place
After vacationing with Cole Porter at Château de la Garoupe the glamorous and wealthy American expats Gerald Murphy, scion of the family owned leather goods empire Mark Cross, and his wife Sara ensconced themselves in their own vacation home, Villa America, in 1922. Famous for their unique brand of style and sophistication they became famous for entertaining modern artists, such as Pablo Picasso and Jean Cocteau, and the literary world of Dorothy Parker, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, creating the French Riviera’s first artists’ enclave. Gerald Murphy modified a modest chalet with a pitched roof into an Art Deco variation on a Mediterranean theme incorporating a flat roof for sunning – perhaps the first of its kind on the Riviera. Gerald, an artist in his own right, created a gouache for Villa America. The interiors were strikingly spare and crisp, with waxed black tile floors, white walls, black satin slip covers, fireplaces framed in mirror, and shots of pink and purple. Not the sort of decor one usually associates with beach-side living. The French Riviera was, and is, a completely different scene, with its own set of traditions and aesthetics.

Life
Who: Gerald Clery Murphy (March 25, 1888 – October 17, 1964) and Sara Sherman Wiborg (November 7, 1883 – October 10, 1975)
Prior to the arrival on the French Riviera of the Murphys, the region was experiencing a period when the fashionable only wintered there, abandoning the region during the high summer months. However, the activities of the Murphys fueled the same renaissance in arts and letters as did the excitement of Paris, especially among the cafés of Montparnasse. In 1923 the Murphys convinced the Hotel du Cap to stay open for the summer so that they might entertain their friends, sparking a new era for the French Riviera as a summer haven.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Rue des Grands Augustins is a street in Saint-Germain-des-Prés in the 6th arrondissement of Paris, France.

Address: 23 Quai des Grands Augustins, 75006 Paris, France (48.85427, 2.34317)
Place
In 1921, Alice De Lamar bought a ground-floor apartment in Paris from Gerald and Sarah Murphy at 23 Quai des Grands Augustins (or 1 rue Git-le-Cœur), along the Left Bank of the Seine. Alice De Lamar knew Gerald’s sister, Esther, at the Spence School and remained close to her.

Life
Who: Gerald Clery Murphy (March 25, 1888 – October 17, 1964) and Sara Sherman Wiborg (November 7, 1883 – October 10, 1975)
Gerald and Sara Murphy are often referred to as the “Golden Couple” of the Lost Generation of American ex-patriates in France in the 1920s. Both were rich, talented, and good-looking. They fled the stuffy confines of New York City society and reinvented themselves in France, becoming legendary party givers, friends of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Picasso, and many others. Fitzgerald based the Dick and Nicole Diver characters in “Tender is the Night” on the Murphys.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Frank Bestow Wiborg, was a self-made millionaire by the age of 40. The family spent most of their time in New York City and, later, East Hampton, where they built the 30-room mansion "The Dunes" on 600 acres just west of the Maidstone Club in 1912. It was the largest estate in East Hampton up to that time. Wiborg Beach in East Hampton is named for the family.

Address: Hwy Behind the Pond, East Hampton, NY 11937, USA (40.94874, -72.17874)
Phone: +1 631-324-4150
Website: www.easthamptonvillage.org

Place
Gerald and Sara Murphy’s romance started and ended in the Hamptons, where her self-made-millionaire father owned 600 acres—property that would be worth well over $1 billion today. At the beginning of the XX century, 16-year-old Gerald Murphy met beautiful 20-year-old Sara Wiborg at a party in East Hampton. Sara’s father, Frank B. Wiborg, who’d made his fortune selling printing ink in Cincinnati, built the Dunes, the largest house in East Hampton at the time, with 30 rooms and grounds that included Italianate sunken gardens, stables, a working dairy, and separate servants’ quarters. By the time the Dunes was finished in 1910, he was down to the mere 80 acres, a parcel that’s now covered by multimillion-dollar mansions, golf courses and other markers of Hamptons status crammed onto some of the world’s most valuable real estate. Gerald and Sara married in 1915, eleven years after that party, and became the kind of couple that seems invented for fiction: worldly, artistic, bohemian, glamorous. Years later, their friend F. Scott Fitzgerald would use them as the model for Dick and Nicole Driver in “Tender Is the Night.” They spent the twenties living on the French Riviera with their three children. They bought a house in Cap d’Antibes, remodeled it, and named it Villa America. Gerald painted and exhibited in Paris at the Salon des Independents in 1925, and had a posthumous retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 1974, and the couple entertained their luminary friends: Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Jean Cocteau, Cole Porter. But in 1933, when Europe began to roil and their son Patrick was diagnosed with tuberculosis, they came back to the U.S. and Gerald ran the leather-goods company Mark Cross, which his father had founded. Though it seemed golden-hued, the Murphys’ life was far from perfect. Both their sons died before adulthood: Baoth, the elder, in 1935, from meningitis, then Patrick, two years later, to tuberculosis. After their deaths, their daughter, Honoria, became their sole heir. The legendary 600 acres had already shrunk by 1910, and when Gerald and Sara moved there in the thirties, they began to sell off parcels. The enormous, financially burdensome Dunes was demolished in 1941 when the Murphys couldn’t find a buyer or renter. Sara and Gerald took up residence in the dairy barn, renovated it and named it Swan Cove. “I remember home movies where Grandma and Grandpa were bundled up in coats and Dos Passos and Bob Benchley were popping out of the big urns at Swan Cove,” recalls their granddaughter Laura Donnelly. In 1959, Sara and Gerald built a house they called the Little Hut next to the servants’ quarters and garage, which Honoria renovated and dubbed the Pink House; it was where her children spent their summers. “I remember seeing the Léger in the living room,” Donnelly says of the many treasures on the walls of the Little Hut. There were other, more down-to-earth charms, like the antique hand-carved farm tools that Gerald collected and displayed, or the mirror that he framed with rope and hung in the front hallway. Gerald died in the Little Hut in 1964, courtly to the last; his final words to his wife and daughter were “Smelling salts for the ladies.” Today, the Murphy legacy lives on with his grandchildren, who still own the last remnants of the great Wiborg property.

Life
Who: Gerald Clery Murphy (March 25, 1888 – October 17, 1964) and Sara Sherman Wiborg (November 7, 1883 – October 10, 1975)
Gerald Clery Murphy and Sara Sherman Wiborg were wealthy, expatriate Americans who moved to the French Riviera in the early XX century and who, with their generous hospitality and flair for parties, created a vibrant social circle, particularly in the 1920s, that included a great number of artists and writers of the Lost Generation. Gerald had a brief but significant career as a painter. In 1921 the Murphys moved to Paris to escape the strictures of New York and their families’ mutual dissatisfaction with their marriage. In Paris Gerald took up painting, and they began to make the acquaintances for which they became famous. Eventually they moved to the French Riviera, where they became the center of a large circle of artists and writers of later fame, especially Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, Fernand Léger, Jean Cocteau, Pablo Picasso, Archibald MacLeish, John O’Hara, Cole Porter, Dorothy Parker and Robert Benchley. Gerald died October 17, 1964 in East Hampton, two days after his friend Cole Porter. Sara died on October 10, 1975 in Arlington, Virginia. Gerald and Sara are both buried at South End Cemetery (34 James Ln, East Hampton, NY 11937).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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2017-03-26 12:17 pm

Charles Hulse (born March 26, 1929)

Lived: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)
25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)

Gordon Merrick was a Broadway actor, a best-selling author of gay-themed novels, and one of the first authors to write about homosexual themes for a mass audience. Merrick wrote stories, which depicted well-adjusted gay men engaged in romantic relationships. Each of his books had a happy ending. Merrick's best-known book is The Lord Won't Mind. The first in a trilogy, Merrick followed it up with One for the Gods in 1971 and Forth into Light in 1974. Merrick enrolled at Princeton University in 1936. He quit in the middle of his junior year and moved to New York City, where he became an actor. He landed the role of Richard Stanley in George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's The Man Who Came to Dinner and became Hart's lover for a time. In 1980 he moved to Ceylon (now known as Sri Lanka), having bought property there in 1974. He returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville. For the rest of his life, he divided his time between the two countries. Charles Gerald Hulse, a dancer turned actor turned novelist (In Tall Cotton, 1987), was his partner
of 32 years, until Merrick's death in 1988, in Sri Lanka where they moved together.

Together from 1956 to 1988: 32 years.
Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Historic District: Gordon Merrick left France to avoid the unrest which accompanied the Algerian War of Independence. Merrick and his partner Charles Hulse moved to Greece and took up residence on the island of Hydra.

Address: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)

Place
Hydra is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Saronic Gulf and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by a narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea (Υδρέα, derived from the Greek word for "water"), a reference to the springs on the island. The municipality of Hydra consists of the islands Hydra (area 52 km2 (20.1 sq mi)), Dokos (pop. 18, area 13.5 km2 (5.2 sq mi)), and a few uninhabited islets. The province of Hydra was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality. It was abolished in 2006. There is one main town, known simply as "Hydra port" (pop. 1,900 in 2011.) It consists of a crescent-shaped harbor, around which is centered a strand of restaurants, shops, markets, and galleries that cater to tourists and locals (Hydriots.) Steep stone streets lead up and outward from the harbor area. Most of the local residences, as well as the hostelries on the island, are located on these streets. Other small villages or hamlets on the island include Mandraki (pop. 11), Kamini, Vlychos (19), Palamidas, Episkopi, and Molos. Since 1960, the Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen has owned a house on the island.
Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In the 1950s Hydra became home to Charles Hulse and Gordon Merrick. Merrick was an American author who wrote more than a dozen novels, which were known for their gay themes. His most successful, “The Lord Won’t Mind,” was written on Hydra. While on vacation visiting the Greek island of Hydra in 1956, Merrick and Hulse bought a house on the island which was to become their home for the next twenty years. At the time, Merrick was working on his fifth novel, and Hulse and Merrick spent the years between 1960 and 1980 travelling mainly between Paris, Hydra and Galle in Sri Lanka. While on Hydra, Hulse and Merrick were hosts to socialites, intellectuals and artists from all over the world. During their theatre career, and here, Hulse and Merrick came to know people, such as Charles Laughton, Jules Dassin, Melina Mercouri, Jacqueline Onassis, Leonard Cohen and others. Hulse restored and furnished the house on Hydra, which was admired by and photographed extensively for various international magazines. In 1974 the couple bought land in Sri Lanka. Six years later they quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Merrick and Hulse also returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville, Normandy. For the rest of their life, they divided their time between the two countries.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: In 1974 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse bought land in Sri Lanka.

Address: 25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)

Place
Galle is a major city in Sri Lanka, situated on the southwestern tip, 119 km from Colombo. Galle is the administrative capital of Southern Province, Sri Lanka and is the district capital of Galle District. Galle is the fifth largest city in Sri Lanka after the capital Colombo, Kandy, Jaffna and Negombo. According to James Emerson Tennent, Galle was the ancient seaport of Tarshish, from which King Solomon drew ivory, peacocks and other valuables. Cinnamon was exported from Sri Lanka as early as 1400 BC and the root of the word itself is Hebrew, so Galle may have been a main entrepot for the spice. Galle had been a prominent seaport long before western rule in the country. Persians, Arabs, Greeks, Romans, Malays, Indians, and Chinese were doing business through Galle port. In 1411, the Galle Trilingual Inscription, a stone tablet inscription in three languages, Chinese, Tamil and Persian, was erected in Galle to commemorate the second visit to Sri Lanka by the Chinese admiral Zheng He. The "modern" history of Galle starts in 1502, when a small fleet of Portuguese ships, under the command of Lourenço de Almeida, on their way to the Maldives, were blown off course by a storm. Realising that the king resided in Kotte close to Colombo, Lourenço proceeded there after a brief stop in Galle. In 1640, the Portuguese had to surrender to the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch built the present fort in the year 1663. They built a fortified wall, using solid granite, and built three bastions, known as "Sun,” "Moon" and "Star.” After the British took over the country from the Dutch in the year 1796, they preserved the Fort unchanged, and used it as the administrative centre of the district.

Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In 1980 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Hulse and Merrick bought a house at 25 Rampart Street within the precinct of Galle’s XVII century fortress. Here, Hulse worked on interior design, and began to write. By this time, Merrick had already published several books and was a celebrity. Hulse helped Merrick to prepare manuscripts for publication and the two travelled together frequently during this period. Gordon Merrick died in Colombo, Sri Lanka, of lung cancer on March 27, 1988. He was survived by his companion, Charles G. Hulse.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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2017-03-26 12:08 pm

Cecil Rhodes (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902)

Cecil John Rhodes PC was a British businessman, mining magnate and politician in South Africa, who served as Prime Minister of the Cape Colony from 1890 to 1896.
Born: July 5, 1853, Bishop's Stortford, United Kingdom
Died: March 26, 1902, Muizenberg, South Africa
Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Brown's Hotel, 33 Albemarle Street, W1S
Rhodes Arts Complex, 1-3 South Rd, Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 3JG, UK (51.86355, 0.16377)
6 King Edward St, Oxford OX1 4HT, UK (51.75203, -1.25462)
Buried: World's View Lookout, Gwanda, Matabeleland South, Zimbabwe
Buried alongside: Leander Starr Jameson
Find A Grave Memorial# 2313
Books: The last will and testament of Cecil John Rhodes
Siblings: Frank Rhodes

In 1882, Cecil Rhodes drew up a will leaving his estate to Neville Pickering. Two years later, Pickering suffered a riding accident. Rhodes nursed him faithfully for six weeks, refusing even to answer telegrams concerning his business interests. Pickering died in Rhodes's arms, and at his funeral, Rhodes was said to have wept with fervor. Rhodes also remained close to Leander Starr Jameson. In 1896, Earl Grey came to give Rhodes bad news. Rhodes instantly jumped to the conclusion that Jameson, who was ill, had died. On learning that his house had burnt down, he commented, "Thank goodness. If Dr. Jim had died I should never have got over it." Jameson nursed Rhodes during his final illness, was a trustee of his estate and residuary beneficiary of his will, which allowed him to continue living in Rhodes' mansion after his death. Rhodes' secretary, Jourdan, who was present shortly after Rhodes' death said, "Jameson was fighting against his own grief ... No mother could have displayed more tenderness towards the remains of a loved son." Jameson died in England in 1917, but in 1920, his body was transferred to a grave beside that of Rhodes on Malindidzimu Hill or World's View.

Together from 1894 to 1902: 8 years.
Cecil John Rhodes DCL (July 5, 1853 –March 26, 1902)
Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet, KCMG, CB, PC (February 9, 1853 –November 26, 1917)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: The Rhodes Arts Complex & Bishop’s Stortford Museum is a museum and contemporary venue for arts, culture and conferences in Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire.

Address: 5 S Road, Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 3YR, UK (51.86355, 0.16377)
Phone: +44 1279 651746
Website: http://www.rhodesbishopsstortford.org.uk/
English Heritage Building ID: 160968 (Grade II, 1949)

Place
One of the buildings, Netteswell House, was the birthplace in 1853 of Cecil Rhodes, financier, statesman and founder of diamond company De Beers. The complex was refurbished in 2005 and has a 300-seat theatre, a multi-purpose studio space, a museum and an exhibition gallery. It provides a programme of arts events and hosts professional touring productions, dance groups, musicians and comedians. Films are also shown in its tiered auditorium. The Rhodes Arts Complex also contains an exhibition gallery for art and photography. The Bishop’s Stortford Museum houses the Rhodes Collection containing interactive displays, archives, photographs and artefacts about the life of Cecil Rhodes. The museum combines the collections of the former Rhodes Memorial Museum and the Bishop’s Stortford Local History Museum. The Rhodes Museum was established in 1938 in two listed Victorian buildings. The current museum opened in 2005. The original part of Rhodes’ home holds exhibits on the life of Cecil Rhodes, XIX century South African artefacts from his travels, and a reconstructed middle class Victorian drawing room with family memorabilia. The new building features exhibits about local history.

Life
Who: Cecil John Rhodes PC (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902)
Cecil Rhodes was a British colonial-era businessman, mining magnate, and politician in South Africa. An ardent believer in British colonialism, Rhodes was the founder of the southern African territory of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe and Zambia), which was named after him in 1895. South Africa’s Rhodes University is also named after Rhodes. He set up the provisions of the Rhodes Scholarship, which is funded by his estate. Rhodes never married, pleading, "I have too much work on my hands" and saying that he would not be a dutiful husband. Some writers and academics have suggested that Rhodes may have been homosexual. The scholar Richard Brown observed: "On the issue of Rhodes’ sexuality... there is, once again, simply not enough reliable evidence to reach firm, irrefutable conclusions. It is inferred, but not proven, that Rhodes was homosexual and it is assumed (but not proven) that his relationships with men were sometimes physical. Neville Pickering (died in 1886) is described as Rhodes’ lover in spite of the absence of decisive evidence." Rhodes was close to Pickering; he returned from negotiations for Pickering’s 25th birthday in 1882. On that occasion, Rhodes drew up a new will leaving his estate to Pickering. Two years later, Pickering suffered a riding accident. Rhodes nursed him faithfully for six weeks, refusing even to answer telegrams concerning his business interests. Pickering died in Rhodes’s arms, and at his funeral, Rhodes was said to have wept with fervour. Pickering’s successor was Henry Latham Currey (1863-1945), the son of an old friend, who had become Rhodes’s private secretary in 1884. When Currey was engaged in 1894, Rhodes was deeply mortified and their relationship split. Rhodes also remained close to Leander Starr Jameson (1853-1917) after the two had met in Kimberley, where they shared a bungalow. In 1896 Earl Grey came to give Rhodes bad news. Rhodes instantly jumped to the conclusion that Jameson, who was ill, had died. On learning that his house had burnt down he commented, "Thank goodness. If Dr Jim had died, I should never have got over it." Jameson nursed Rhodes during his final illness, was a trustee of his estate and residuary beneficiary of his will, which allowed him to continue living in Rhodes’ mansion after his death. Rhodes’s secretary, Jourdan, who was present shortly after Rhodes’s death said, "Jameson was fighting against his own grief... No mother could have displayed more tenderness towards the remains of a loved son.” Jameson died in England in 1917, but after the war in 1920 his body was transferred to a grave beside that of Rhodes on Malindidzimu Hill or World’s View, a granite hill in the Matopo National Park 40 km south of Bulawayo.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: King Edward Street is a street running between the High Street to the north and Oriel Square to the south in central Oxford.
Address: King Edward St, Oxford OX1 4HT, UK (51.75203, -1.25462)

Place
On the wall of the first floor of No. 6, there is a large metal plaque with a portrait of Cecil Rhodes; underneath is the inscription: “In this house, the Rt. Hon Cecil John Rhodes kept academical residence in the year 1881. This memorial is erected by Alfred Mosely in recognition of the great services rendered by Cecil Rhodes to his country.” In December 2015 Oriel College announced that the process to remove the plaque was about to start. To the east is the "Island" site of Oriel College, one of the colleges of Oxford University. To the west are shops, including Shepherd & Woodward, the leading University outfitters, fronting onto the High Street. King Edward Street is officially designated as part of the A420 road due to the blockage of the High Street to normal traffic. The street was only created in 1872–73 by Oriel College when 109 and 110 High Street were demolished, so it is much wider than other older streets off the High Street. The buildings were mostly designed by Frederick Codd. On No. 14 lived Felix Yusupov, one of the murderers of Grigori Rasputin.

Life
Who: Cecil John Rhodes PC (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902)
Cecil Rhodes was a student at Oxford, and a member of Oriel College, in the 1870s, and left money to the College on his death. On November 6, 2015, Oriel received a petition organised by the Rhodes Must Fall in Oxford movement, calling for the removal of the statue of Cecil Rhodes from the College’s High Street frontage. The petition said that its continued presence violates the University’s commitment to “fostering an inclusive culture which promotes equality, values diversity and maintains a working, learning and social environment in which the rights and dignity of all its staff and students are respected.” Cecil Rhodes’s historical legacy includes the Rhodes Scholarships programme, which he endowed and which has so far given nearly 8000 scholars from countries around the world the opportunity to study at Oxford. But Rhodes was also a XIX century colonialist whose values and world view stand in absolute contrast to the ethos of the Scholarship programme today, and to the values of a modern University.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Accomodation: Brown's Hotel (33 Albemarle St, Mayfair, London W1S 4BP) is a 5-star hotel in London. Founded in 1837 by James and Sarah Brown, it is one of London's most established hotels, celebrating its 175th anniversary in 2012. Brown's has been owned by Rocco Forte Hotels since 3 July 2003 and is a member of The Leading Hotels of the World. Historian John Lothrop Motley stayed at the hotel in 1874, as shown in a letter he wrote on the 17th of June of that year, to Dutch historian Groen van Prinsterer. Celebrated Victorian writers Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson, JM Barrie and Bram Stoker were also all regular visitors. The hotel has also hosted Alexander Graham Bell (who made the first phone call in Europe from the hotel), Theodore Roosevelt, Napoleon III, Empress Eugenie, Elizabeth, Queen of the Belgians, Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia, George II, King of the Hellenes, Cecil Rhodes, Rudyard Kipling and Agatha Christie.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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National Park: The Matobo National Park forms the core of the Matobo or Matopos Hills, an area of granite kopjes and wooded valleys commencing some 35 kilometres south of Bulawayo, southern Zimbabwe.

Address: Matopo National Park, Matobo, Zimbabwe, Africa (-20.55722, 28.5125)
Phone: +263 4 707 6249
Website: http://www.zimparks.org/

Place
Established in 1926.
The hills were formed over 2 billion years ago with granite being forced to the surface. The granite has eroded to produce smooth "whaleback dwalas" and broken kopjes, strewn with boulders and interspersed with thickets of vegetation. Mzilikazi, founder of the Ndebele nation, gave the area its name, meaning “Bald Heads.” The national park is the oldest in Zimbabwe, a bequest from Cecil Rhodes. The original park borders extended well to the south and east of the current park. These areas were redesignated for settlement as part of a compromise between the colonial authorities and the local people, creating the Khumalo and Matobo Communal Lands. The park area then increased with the acquisition of World’s View and Hazelside farms to the north. Cecil Rhodes, Leander Starr Jameson, and several other leading early white settlers, including Allan Wilson and all the members of the Shangani Patrol killed in the First Matabele War, are buried on the summit of Malindidzimu, the “hill of the spirits.” This is a great source of controversy in modern Zimbabwe as this is considered a sacred place by nationalists and indigenous groups. This mount is also referred to as the World’s View. The Hills cover an area of about 3100 km², of which 424 km² is National Park, the remainder being largely communal land and a small proportion of commercial farmland. The park extends along the Thuli, Mtshelele, Maleme and Mpopoma river valleys. Part of the national park is set aside as a 100 km² game park, which has been stocked with game including the white rhinoceros. The highest point in the hills is the promontory named Gulati (1549 m) just outside the north-eastern corner of the park. Administratively, Matobo National Park incorporates the Lake Matopos Recreational Park, being the area around Hazelside, Sandy Spruit and Lake Matopos.

Life
Who: Cecil John Rhodes PC (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902) and Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet (February 9, 1853 – November 26, 1917)
Sir Leander Starr Jameson was a British colonial politician who was best known for his involvement in the Jameson Raid. After acting as house physician, house surgeon and demonstrator of anatomy, and showing promise of a successful professional career in London, his health broke down from overwork in 1878, and he went out to South Africa and settled down in practice at Kimberley. There he rapidly acquired a great reputation as a medical man, and, besides numbering President Kruger and the Matabele chief Lobengula among his patients, came much into contact with Cecil Rhodes. Jameson died in England but is buried at Malindidzimu Hill, or World’s View, a granite hill in the Matobo National Park, 40 km south of Bulawayo. It was designated by Cecil Rhodes as the resting place for those who served Great Britain well in Africa. Rhodes is also buried there. Sir Leander Starr Jameson died on the afternoon of Monday, 26 November 1917, at his home, 2 Great Cumberland Place, Hyde Park, in London. His body was laid in a vault at Kensal Green Cemetery on 29 November 1917, where it remained until the end of the WWI. Ian Colvin (1923) writes that Jameson’s body was then: "carried to Rhodesia and on May 22, 1920, laid in a grave cut in the granite on the top of the mountain which Rhodes had called The View of the World, close beside the grave of his friend. “Thy firmness makes my circle just, And makes me end where I begun.” There on the summit those two lie together."

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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