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Jeanne Deckers, aka Jeannine Deckers, better known as Sœur Sourire, was a Belgian singer-songwriter and initially a member of the Dominican Order in Belgium as Sister Luc-Gabrielle.
Born: October 17, 1933, Laeken
Died: March 29, 1985, Wavre, Belgium
Education: Catholic University of Leuven
Buried: Cheremont Cemetery, Wavre, Arrondissement de Nivelles, Walloon Brabant, Belgium
Buried alongside: Annie Pécher
Find A Grave Memorial# 11350
Albums: Best of Sœur Sourire, Dominique, Chants d'enfants, more
Parents: Lucien Deckers, Gabrielle Deckers

Jeanine Deckers, better known as Sœur Sourire, was a Belgian singer-songwriter and initially a member of the Dominican Order in Belgium as Sister Luc Gabrielle. She acquired world fame in 1963 with the release of the French-language song Dominique. In 1963, she was sent by her order to take theology courses at the University
of Louvain. She reconnected with a friend from her youth, Annie Pécher, with whom she slowly developed a very close relationship. Pulled between two worlds and increasingly in disagreement with the Catholic Church, she left the convent in 1966. She still considered herself a nun, praying several times daily, and maintaining a simple and chaste lifestyle. In the late 1970s, the Belgian government claimed that she owed $63,000 in back taxes. As her former congregation refused to take any responsibility for the debt, Deckers ran into heavy financial problems. Citing their financial difficulties in a note, she and her companion, Annie Pécher, committed suicide by an overdose of barbiturates and alcohol in 1985. In their suicide note, Decker and Pécher stated they had not given up their faith and wished to be buried together after a church funeral.

Together from 1963 to 1985: 22 years.
Annie Pécher (1944 – 1985)
Jeanine Deckers aka Sœur Sourire (October 17, 1933 — March 29, 1985)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Cemetery: Jeanine Deckers (1933-1985), better known as Sœur Sourire, was a Belgian singer-songwriter and initially a member of the Dominican Order in Belgium as Sister Luc Gabrielle. She acquired world fame in 1963 with the release of the French-language song “Dominique.” In 1963, she was sent by her order to take theology courses at the University of Louvain (Grand-Place 23, 1348 Ottignies-Louvain-la-Neuve) where she reconnected with a friend from her youth, Annie Pécher, with whom she slowly developed a very close relationship. Pulled between two worlds and increasingly in disagreement with the Catholic Church, she left the convent in 1966. Citing their financial difficulties in a note, she and her companion, Annie Pécher, committed suicide by an overdose of barbiturates and alcohol in 1985. In their suicide note, Decker and Pécher stated they had not given up their faith and wished to be buried together after a church funeral. They are interred together at Cheremont Cemetery (Avenue de Chèremont, 1300 Wavre).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Buried: The Evergreens Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA
Buried Alongside: Yves François Lubin aka Assotto Saint
Find A Grave Memorial# 161933698

Assotto Saint (born Yves François Lubin) was a poet, dancer with the Martha Graham Company, and playwright. Jan Holmgren was a composer for theatrical works of Saint and his companion of 13 years. Saint was known for his acting up and acting out: at fellow black gay poet Donald W. Woods's funeral, Saint openly confronted the family for their hypocritical elision of Woods's gayness; outraged, especially since Woods had fought to end the repressive forms of silence that equal death for gay individuals and AIDS victims, Saint stood up and "testified" on his brother's behalf. In the preface to the anthology The Road before Us: 100 Gay Black Poets, Saint had requested that, in protest of the indifference of American society to those dying of AIDS, that the American flag be burned at his funeral and its ashes scattered on his grave. The Road before Us was a 1992 Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry. Here to Dare was nominee in 1993 for Gay Anthology, Wishing for Wings was a nominee in 1995 for Gay Poetry, Spells of a Voodoo Doll was a 1997 nominee for Gay Biography/Autobiography.

Together from 1980 to 1993: 13 years.
Assotto Saint (October 2, 1957 - June 29, 1994)
Jan Holmgren (April 25, 1939 - March 29, 1993)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Cemetery: At Cemetery of the Evergreens (1629 Bushwick Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11207) is buried Ella Wesner (1841-1917), the most celebrated male impersonator of the Gilded Age Vaudeville circuit. At the time of her death she was living at 431 Claremont Pkwy, Bronx, NY 10457. In the same cemetery are buried together Jan Holmgren (1939-1993) and Assotto Saint (1957-1994). When Assotto Saint delivered to the Names Project his quilt panel, he also enclosed a copy of Holmgren's funeral program and a moving note he had penned by hand, an intimate death notice of his partner and himself. "I made this quilt for my 13-year life-partner, Jan Urban Holmgren. He was my Jan & my man. Born in Alno, Sweden, on April 25, 1939, he died in my arms on March 29, 1993. We both found out in late 1987 that we were HIV-positive. Jan came down with full-blown AIDS in early 199o. I came down with full-blown AIDS in late 1991. Yes, it is a strange phenomenon when both life-partners in a relationship are fatally ill. Because of my disbelief in God & a spiritual after-life, it gives me great pleasure to know that at least we will be physically reunited in the same grave at The Evergreen Cemetery in Brooklyn, NY."

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Dora de Houghton Carrington, known generally as Carrington, was a British painter and decorative artist, remembered in part for her association with members of the Bloomsbury Group, especially the writer Lytton Strachey.
Born: March 29, 1893, Hereford, United Kingdom
Died: March 11, 1932, Newbury, United Kingdom
Education: Slade School of Fine Art
Bedford High School, Bedfordshire
Lived: The Mill, Tidmarsh, Reading, West Berkshire RG8, UK (51.46833, -1.08754)
Ham Spray House, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 3QZ, UK (51.3681, -1.50219)
Buried: under the laurels in the garden of the Ham Spray House, Wiltshire, England (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 2859
Artwork: Farm at Watendlath, Spanish Landscape with Mountains, more
Siblings: Noël Carrington

Giles Lytton Strachey was a British writer and critic. Dora Carrington was a British painter and decorative artist, remembered in part for her association with members
of the Bloomsbury Group, especially Lytton Strachey. Though Strachey spoke openly about his homosexuality with his Bloomsbury friends (he had a relationship with John Maynard Keynes, who also was part of the Bloomsbury group), it was not widely publicized until the late 1960s, in a biography by Michael Holroyd. In 1921, Carrington agreed to marry Ralph Partridge, not for love but to secure the 3-way relationship. Strachey himself had been much more sexually interested in Partridge, as well as in various other young men, including a secret sadomasochistic relationship with Roger Senhouse (later the head of publisher Secker & Warburg). Dora Carrington committed suicide out of grief in 1932, shortly after Lytton Strachey’s death. Ralph married Frances Marshall on March 2, 1933. They lived happily at Ham Spray until Ralph’s death in 1960.

Together from 1917 to 1932: 15 years.
Dora de Houghton Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)
Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 –January 21, 1932)
Ralph Partridge (1894 – November 30, 1960)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Bedford High School for Girls (Bromham Rd, Bedford MK40 2BS) was an independent school for pupils aged 7 to 18 in Bedford. It was one of a number of schools run by the Harpur Trust. The school was opened on May 8, 1882. It was built on the site of former Harpur Trust cottage almshouses. There were 43 girls on that first day. The school was located on its original site in Harpur ward, near the centre of Bedford, until its closure in 2012. In September 2010 the junior department of the school merged with the junior department of Dame Alice Harpur School. From September 2011 to September 2012 the senior schools also merged, the new school is known as Bedford Girls' School. The daughter of a Liverpool merchant, Dora Carrington (1893–1932) was born in Hereford, and attended the all-girls' Bedford High School which emphasized art. Her parents also paid for her to receive extra lessons in drawing.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1532906315
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School: The UCL Slade School of Fine Art (informally The Slade, University College London, Gower St, Kings Cross, London WC1E 6BT) is the art school of University College London (UCL) and is based in London. It is world-renowned and is consistently ranked as the UK's top art and design educational institution. The school is organised as a department of UCL's Faculty of Arts and Humanities. The school traces its roots back to 1868 when lawyer and philanthropist Felix Slade (1788–1868) bequeathed funds to establish three Chairs in Fine Art, to be based at Oxford University, Cambridge University and University College London, where six studentships were endowed. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Dora Carrington (1893-1932), Ralph Chubb (1892-1960), Dorothy Brett (1883-1977), Duncan Grant (1885-1978), Eileen Gray (1878–1976), Derek Jarman (1942-1994), Mary Josephine Bedford (1861–1955), Robert Medley (1905-1994), Oliver Messel (1904-1978), William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1881–1941); Roger Rees (born 1944), Alix Strachey (1892–1973), Henry Scott Tuke (1858–1929), William Dobell (1899-1970).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Once home to the Bloomsbury group, The Mill at Tidmarsh in Berkshire is still an inspiring abode. The Mill was last on the market in 2010 for £1.995.000.

Address: Sulham Hill, Tidmarsh, West Berkshire RG8 8ER, UK (51.46833, -1.08754)
English Heritage Building ID: 400899 (Grade II, 1984)

Place
"Sounds too good to be alright!" wrote Dora Carrington to Lytton Strachey on the morning of October 19, 1917. She was poring over the particulars of The Mill at Tidmarsh in Berkshire. There was electric light and "bath H & C.” It was romantic and lovely, and the rent was £52 a year for a three-year lease. Carrington first set up house with Lytton Strachey in November 1917, when they moved together to Tidmarsh Mill House, near Pangbourne, Berkshire. Carrington met Ralph Partridge, an Oxford friend of her younger brother Noel, in 1918. Strachey fell in love with Partridge and eventually, in 1921, Carrington agreed to marry him, not for love but to hold the menage a trois together with Lytton Strachey. Strachey paid for the wedding, and also accompanied the couple on their honeymoon in Venice.

Life
Who: Dora de Houghton Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)
Dora Carrington moved into the mill with Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) just as he was publishing “Eminent Victorians,” the book that made him famous. The pair were already prominent in the Bloomsbury circle, which included Clive and Vanessa Bell (1879-1961), whose highly decorated house, Charleston in Sussex, is open to the public. Lytton and Carrington were frequently seen at Lady Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938)’s parties at Garsington Manor. He was a spidery, bearded intellectual, widely known to be homosexual, she a Slade-trained artist with a pageboy haircut and no first name. Their decision to live together raised eyebrows inside and outside their group.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Love and literary retreat, a Wiltshire farmhouse was a bliss for a Bloomsbury threesome. Ham Spray House was last on the market in 2008 for £2.750.000.

Address: Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 3QZ, UK (51.3681, -1.50219)

Place
In 1924, Lytton Strachey and Ralph Partridge, members of the Bloomsbury group, bought Ham Spray House, and several of that group and other writers and artists spent time there from then until Ralph died in 1960, including Dora Carrington and Frances Partridge. Ham Spray, which cost Partridge and Strachey £2,300, suited their communal living and working arrangements. Surrounded by fields, and with a local shop selling Wellington boots, it was "a perfect English country house.” "We believed there was no view more beautiful, more inexhaustible in England, and no house more lovable than Ham Spray," wrote Frances in her diary. The rooms are of Georgian proportions, with high ceilings and cornices and pretty fireplaces. Carrington’s paintings hung on every wall, alongside works by Duncan Grant, Vanessa Bell and Augustus John. While Lytton Strachey wrote in his upstairs study, looking out across Ham Hill and Inkpen Beacon, Carrington painted in a studio above the former granary. In the evenings, they gathered in the music room, where there was a piano, gramophone and ping-pong table. In Strachey’s former study – now a bedroom - there are surviving works by Carrington, including a mural of an owl and a self-portrait of her riding across the Downs, painted on a tile. On a door in the corner of the room is a trompe d’oeil of a bookshelf, featuring titles such as “Deception” by Jane Austen and “The Empty Room” by Virginia Woolf.

Life
Who: Ralph Partridge (1894 – November 30, 1960)
Dora Carrington was in love with Lytton Strachey, who loved Ralph Partridge, an ex-army officer; Carrington loved Strachey, but married Partridge to stabilise their triangular relationship. In 1924, they set up home together at the XIX-century farmhouse outside the village of Ham, in Wiltshire, along with Ralph’s lover (and later wife) Frances Marshall (1900-2004.) Strachey died of stomach cancer at Ham Spray in January 1932. Carrington, who saw no purpose in a life without Strachey, committed suicide two months after his death by shooting herself with a gun borrowed from her friend, Hon. Bryan Guinness (later 2nd Baron Moyne.) Her body was cremated and the ashes buried under the laurels in the garden of Ham Spray House. Strachey's modest little brass plaque is in the family church at Chew Magna, Somerset. The Partridges had a son, Burgo, and continued to live at the house for almost 30 years, entertaining a roll-call of artists and writers, among them E.M. Forster and Patrick Leigh Fermor. Frances sold the house a year after Ralph’s death in 1961, insisting that it did not become a shrine to the Bloomsbury Group.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Maurice Denton Welch was an English writer and painter, admired for his vivid prose and precise descriptions.
Born: March 29, 1915, Shanghai, China
Died: December 30, 1948, Sevenoaks, United Kingdom
Education: Repton School
Lived: 34 Croom's Hill, Greenwich
Middle Orchard, Long Mill Lane, Crouch, Sevenoaks, Kent, TN15 8QB
33 The Little Boltons, Earls Court, SW10
Find A Grave Memorial# 161889966

Denton Welch started at the Goldsmith School of Art in New Cross in 1933, where he studied for 3 years; among his teachers was the printmaker and graphic designer Edward Bawden. He moved into a house near Greenwich Park where the landlady was Evelyn Sinclair, who became a close lifelong friend. Eric Oliver was introduced to Welch in November 1943 at a time when Oliver, a conscientious objector, was working on the land and Welch was living as a semi-invalid, following a road accident when he was 20, near Hadlow, in Kent. The intensity of Welch's emotions was not returned, for on his own admission Oliver was incapable of love ("You must never take me seriously," he wrote in the only letter of his to Welch which survives), but, once they had sorted out the imbalance in their relationship, Oliver moved in with him, and as Welch's physical condition deteriorated Oliver nursed him with practical expertise. When Welch died on December 30, 1948, in Oliver's arms, the manuscript of his third and finest novel, A Voice Through a Cloud, lay by the bed, and Oliver was instrumental in John Lehmann’s publishing it in 1950, with a foreword signed by Oliver but probably written by Lehmann.

Together from 1943 to 1948: 5 years.
Maurice Denton Welch (March 29, 1915 - December 30, 1948)
Eric Oliver (October 6, 1914 - April 1, 1995)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Repton School (The Lodge, Repton, Derby DE65 6FH) is a co-educational independent school for day and boarding pupils in Repton, Derbyshire. The school has around 660 pupils aged between 13 and 18, of whom 451 are boarders. Repton School taught only boys for its first 400 years; Repton started accepting girls in the sixth form early in the 1970s, and within 20 years became completely coeducational. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986), novelist and screenwriter; Basil Rathbone (1892-1967), actor most known for playing Sherlock Holmes in the Sherlock Holmes (1939 film series); Denton Welch (1915-1948), painter and poet.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Denton Welch (1915-1948) started at the Goldsmith School of Art in New Cross in 1933, where he studied for three years. At first he lived in a house where his brother Bill was also rooming, and then he moved into 34 Crooms Hill, London SE10 8ER, a house near Greenwich Park where the landlady was Evelyn Sinclair, who became a close, lifelong friend. The house belonged to Miss Sinclair’s brother, Braxton. It had an interesting combination of architectural styles; there was a lovely view across the park; the road was absolutely quiet.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Denton Welch (1915-1948), Chinese born (Shanghai) English writer and artist, stayed at 33 The Little Boltons, Kensington, London SW10 9LL, in 1931 with his cousin, when he ran away from school. He recorded his childhood in China in his fictionalised autobiography of his early years, “Maiden Voyage” (1943). With the help and patronage of Edith Sitwell and John Lehmann this became a small but lasting success and made for him a distinct and individual reputation.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: On June 7, 1935, Denton Welch (1915-1948) was traveling by bicycle to go visit his aunt when he was hit by a car. His spine was fractured, and for a few months he was paralyzed from the chest down. He was able to learn to walk again, but with difficulty. For the rest of his life he had kidney and bladder infections, which would cause frequent and severe headaches. After the accident, Welch first spent time at National Hospital, and then in the Southcourt Nursing Home in Broadstairs, Kent. When he left the nursing home July 1936, Welch rented an apartment with Evelyn Sinclair in Tonbridge in order that he could be close to his doctor, John Easton. Sinclair remained with Welch as his housekeeper at his different residences until May 1946, two months after Welch and his partner Eric Oliver moved to Middle Orchard (Long Mill Lane, Crouch, Sevenoaks, Kent, TN15 8QB), the country house of Noël and Bernard Adeney at Crouch, near Borough Green, Kent. However, Sinclair returned to Middle Orchard in July 1948 to assist Welch until his death. He died December 30, 1948, at Middle Orchard Cottage in Crouch, Kent.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Find A Grave Memorial# 92122944

By exploring a subject that had personal and societal implications, Andrew Mattison helped bring gay relationships into the media spotlight. Teaming with his life partner of 34 years, Dr. David McWhirter, Dr. Mattison wrote the groundbreaking book The Male Couple, an in-depth study evaluating the quality and stability of long-term homosexual relationships. Mattison died of stomach cancer at 57. McWhirter, who was 16 years older than Mattison, died of a stroke less than 7 months later. Published in 1984, before AIDS became a scourge in the gay community, the book gained international attention and landed Dr. Mattison and his partner on the TV and radio talk-show circuit. With McWhirter, Dr. Mattison wrote extensively on counseling gay couples and the effects of HIV on lesbians, gay men and their families. In his last years, Dr. Mattison researched the phenomenon of "circuit parties" among gays – large gatherings at which risky behaviors such as unsafe sex and drug use were suspected.

Together from 1971 to 2005: 34 years.
Andrew Michael “Drew” Mattison (August 5, 1948 - December 29, 2005)
David Paul McWhirter (March 29, 1932 - July 28, 2006)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Find A Grave Memorial# 161949879

Brian Shucker was an award-winning composer and lyricist who wrote the score
of Babes, a 1940s-style musical that opened in L.A. In the early 80s, at the Curtain Call Theater, Shucker met Bill Sawyer, his collaborator and companion. Sawyer wrote the book for Babes, and was in the process of completing what would have been their second full musical together when he died. Although visibly weakened, Shucker attended an audition session in March 1991 to select the cast for a production of Babes at the Matrix Theater in West Hollywood. From his hospital bed, using a portable keyboard, he rescored one of the play's pieces titled, Give It a Whirl. It was the second run for Babes in Los Angeles, and it opened on Friday, April 12, 1991, the day Shucker died. "He was never someone who would want to be the center of attention," said a longtime friend and colleague, Michael Michetti. "He always appreciated the little nuances of life. He never hits you over the head; he thought the audience was more intelligent than that.” William "Bill" Sawyer died exactly four months later, on August 12, 1991. They are listed side by side on the AIDS quilt.

Together from (around) 1980 to 1991: 11 years.
William “Bill” Sawyer (March 28, 1953 - August 12, 1991)
Brian John Shucker (May 29, 1958 - April 12, 1991)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Find A Grave Memorial# 161934894

Peter Lake Bellinger was a composer and painter. He attended San Francisco State University and a cooking school in Paris. Bellinger worked at the Mark Twain Hotel in downtown San Francisco for twelve years, starting as a bellhop and advancing to general manager. After leaving the hotel, he went back to college to study composition. Upon receiving his HIV diagnosis, he retired and began to pursue composition, and continued to write music for over ten years. He and his partner, Joe Grubb, were together for nearly twenty-three years. Peter Bellinger, born in Honolulu, died of liver cancer in San Francisco at the age of 54 on April 18, 2001. “My aim is to entertain people, not to educate them. Above all, I believe music should be reasonably accessible." --Peter Bellinger

Together from 1978 to 2001: 23 years.
Joe Grubb
Peter Bellinger (March 28, 1947 - April 18, 2001)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Married: June 21, 2013

“We met online in a chat room on New Year’s Eve.” Paul was looking for a party to crash, and Dennis was looking for meaningful conversation. Intrigued by Paul's bio, Dennis struck up a conversation. “We hit it off and made arrangements to meet the following week for dinner, followed by a viewing of the movie Sordid Lives. Although it was clear that we were very different people, we immediately recognized that we shared some commonalities, including a love for Cher, Dolly Parton, and art (Paul making it, Dennis buying it!). We also had an undeniable chemistry. After that first date, we were eager to see each other again, and we continued to explore our similarities and share our differences with each other as our relationship deepened in the weeks and months ahead. To this day, we strive to support and nurture each other in our individual commitments to self-growth--both personal and professional--while intentionally seeking meaningful ways to nurture our evolving identity as a couple. As more states have legalized marriage equality, we decided that an important step in committing ourselves to one another needed to include a legal wedding ceremony in a state that recognizes same-sex marriage. We were married June 21, 2013 in Washington DC with 24 other LGBT couples in front of the US Supreme Court building.”

Together since 2006: 9 years.
Dennis Niekro (born Dec. 29, 1968) & Paul Richmond (born March 28, 1980)
Married: June 21, 2013

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Katharine Lee Bates was an American songwriter. She is remembered as the author of the words to the anthem "America the Beautiful". She popularized "Mrs. Santa Claus" through her poem Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride.
Born: August 12, 1859, Falmouth, Massachusetts, United States
Died: March 28, 1929, Wellesley, Massachusetts, United States
Education: Wellesley College
Wellesley High School
Lived: 16 Main St, Falmouth, MA 02540, USA (41.55466, -70.61968)
Buried: Oak Grove Cemetery, Falmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 1579
Genre: Praise & worship
People also search for: Samuel A. Ward, Margaret Evans Price, more

Katharine Lee Bates was an American songwriter. She is remembered as the author
of the words to the anthem America the Beautiful. She popularized "Mrs. Santa Claus" through her poem Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride (1889). In 1887, while teaching at Wellesley, Bates met fellow teacher Katharine Coman. Bates lived in Wellesley with Coman, who was a history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department. The pair lived together for twenty-five years until Coman's death in 1915. In 1922, Bates published Yellow Clover: A Book
of Remembrance, a collection of poems written "to or about my Friend" Katharine Coman, some of which had been published in Coman's lifetime. Some describe the couple as intimate lesbian partners, citing as an example Bates' 1891 letter to Coman: "It was never very possible to leave Wellesley [for good], because so many love-anchors held me there, and it seemed least of all possible when I had just found the long-desired way to your dearest heart...Of course I want to come to you, very much as I want to come to Heaven." Others contest the use of the term lesbian to describe such a "Boston marriage".

Together from 1887 to 1915: 28 years.
Katharine Ellis Coman (November 23, 1857 - January 11, 1915)
Katharine Lee Bates (August 12, 1859 – March 28, 1929)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Private, women-focused school founded in 1870 and known for its humanities programs.

Address: 106 Central St, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA (42.29357, -71.30592)
Phone: +1 781-283-1000
Website: http://www.wellesley.edu/

Place
Vida Dutton Scudder taught English literature from 1887 at Wellesley College, where she became an associate professor in 1892 and full professor in 1910. Wellesley College is a private women’s liberal-arts college in the town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, west of Boston. Founded in 1870, Wellesley is a member of the original Seven Sisters Colleges. Wellesley is the highest ranking women’s college in the U.S., and one of the top liberal arts colleges, ranking 4th by U.S. News & World Report. The school is also the highest endowed women’s college. For the 2014–15 year admissions cycle, Wellesley admitted 29% of its applicants. The college is known for allowing its students to cross-register at MIT, Babson, Brandeis, and Olin College. It is also a member of a number of exchange programs with other small colleges, including opportunities for students to study a year at Amherst, Bowdoin, Connecticut College, Dartmouth, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Trinity, Vassar, Wesleyan, and Wheaton. Wellesley was founded by Pauline and Henry Fowle Durant, believers in educational opportunity for women. Wellesley was founded with the intention to prepare women for "great conflicts, for vast reforms in social life." Its charter was signed on March 17, 1870, by Massachusetts Governor William Claflin. The original name of the college was the Wellesley Female Seminary; its renaming to Wellesley College was approved by the Massachusetts legislature on March 7, 1873. Wellesley first opened its doors to students on September 8, 1875. The original architecture of the college consisted of one very large building, College Hall, which was approximately 150 metres (490 ft) in length and five stories in height. The architect was Hammatt Billings. From its completion in 1875 until its destruction by fire in 1914, it was both an academic building and residential building. A group of residence halls, known as the Tower Court complex, are located on top of the hill where the old College Hall once stood.

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Wellesley:
• Katharine Anthony (1877-1965), biographer best known for “The Lambs” (1945), a controversial study of the British writers Charles and Mary Lamb. She taught at Wellesley College in 1907.
• Katharine Lee Bates (1859-1929), full professor of English literature. Bates lived in Wellesley with Katharine Coman at 70 Curve St, Wellesley, MA 02482, historic home built in 1907 by Bates, while she was a professor at Wellesley College. Bates was born in Falmouth, Massachusetts, the daughter of Congregational pastor William Bates and his wife, Cornelia Frances Lee. She graduated from Wellesley High School in 1874 and from Wellesley College with a B.A. in 1880. Wellesley High School (50 Rice St, Wellesley Hills, MA 02481) is a public high school in the affluent town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, educating students on grades 9 through 12. In 2016 it was ranked the 21st best high school in Massachusetts and the 467th best public high school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, earning a Gold Medal. The old school building was originally built as a public works project in 1938 during the Great Depression, designed by Perry Shaw and Hepburn and built by M. Spinelli and Sons Co., Inc. The building has been modified with several additions throughout its existence, most recently with a new fitness center. The 1938 building was replaced in 2012 with a brand new state of the art building in the former parking lot.
• Katharine Coman (1857-1915), history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department.
• Florence Converse (1871-1967)
• Mary “Molly” Dewson (1874–1962), graduated as a social worker in 1897. She was senior class president and her classmates believed she might one day be elected president of the United States.
• Marion Dickerman (1890-1983), suffragist, educator, vice-principal of the Todhunter School and an intimate of Eleanor Roosevelt.
• Grace Frick (1903-1979), literary scholar and Marguerite Yourcenar’s intimate companion.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) attended the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics, which later developed as the Department of Hygiene of Wellesley College. After graduating, she and her father moved to Washington, D.C. to be with his brother Francis and family. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller.
• Lilian Wyckoff Johnson (1864-1956), after an early education in private schools, in 1878 was sent to Dayton, Ohio to take refuge during a yellow fever outbreak; while there, she attended the Cooper Academy. Her parents then sent the 15 year old Lilian and her sister to Wellesley College in 1879, with the first two years being spent in preparatory school. However, Lilian had to return home upon the death of her mother in 1883, and was unable to complete her studies.
• Esther Lape (1881-1981), a graduate of Wellesley College, taught English at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, the University of Arizona, and Barnard College in New York City. Her life-partner was the scholar and lawyer, Elizabeth Fisher Read, who was Eleanor Roosevelt's personal attorney and financial advisor.
• Jeannette Augustus Marks (1875-1964), English and Theater professor at Mount Holyoke until her retirement in 1941 and Mary Emma Woolley’s companion.
• Julia Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954).
• Charlotte Anita Whitney (1867–1955), American women's rights activist, political activist, suffragist, and early Communist Labor Party of America and Communist Party USA organizer in California.
• Mary Emma Woolley (1863–1947), educator, peace activist and women’s suffrage supporter. She was the first female student to attend Brown University and served as the 11th President of Mount Holyoke College from 1900-1937.

Life
Who: (Julia) Vida Dutton Scudder (December 15, 1861 – October 9, 1954)
Vida Dutton Scudder was an educator, writer, and welfare activist in the social gospel movement. In 1885 she and Clara French (1863-1888) were the first American women admitted to the graduate program at Oxford, where she was influenced by York Powell and John Ruskin. While in England she was also influenced by Leo Tolstoi and by George Bernard Shaw and Fabian Socialism. Scudder and French returned to Boston in 1886. French died in 1888 (from typhoid fever, buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Syracuse, NY), and from 1919 until her death, Scudder lived with Florence Converse (1871-1967.) Converse graduated from Wellesley College in 1893 and was a member of the editorial staff of the The Churchman from 1900 to 1908, when she joined the staff of the Atlantic Monthly. In Wellesley they resided at 45 Leighton Rd, Wellesley, MA 02482. A 6000 square foot single family home with 5 bedrooms built in 1912, it was last sold in 1987 for $460,000. Scudder retired from Wellesley in 1927 and received the title of professor emeritus. She became the first dean of the Summer School of Christian Ethics in 1930 at Wellesley. In 1931 she lectured weekly at the New School for Social Research in New York. She published an autobiography, “On Journey,” in London in 1937, and a collection of essays, “The Privilege of Age,” in New York in 1939. Vida Dutton Scudder died at Wellesley, Massachusetts, on October 10, 1954. Florence Converse and Vida Dutton Scudder are buried side by side at Newton Cemetery (791 Walnut St, Newton Centre, MA 02459).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1544066585 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544066589
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House: The historic home of Katharine Lee Bates, just off the village green has been lovingly restored and sparkles at the entrance to Falmouth’s downtown area.

Address: 16 Main St, Falmouth, MA 02540, USA (41.55466, -70.61968)

Place
Built in 1810
The birthplace of Katharine Lee Bates, author of "America the Beautiful," sold for $1,200,000 in 2013. Period detailing and colors bring this home to life and evoke a feeling of a bygone era with the comforts of a modern home. Step into the gracious foyer with turned staircase, original wood floors and elegant sitting rooms with fireplaces. To the rear of the first floor there is a spacious dining room with fireplace, office/bedroom and a reconstructed ell which houses the masterfully designed efficient kitchen and mud room. The second floor offers three additional bedrooms and access to a private roof top deck. Both the basement and attic rooms have been reconditioned to expose original stone, brick and timber components in excellent condition and mechanicals have all been updated. Katharine Lee Bates was born in this house in 1859, the daughter of the minister of the First Congregational Church. Her father died shortly after her birth, leaving the family in dire financial straits. Although the family moved from Falmouth when Katharine was 12, she always remembered the town fondly as “a friendly little village that practiced a neighborly socialism without having heard the term.” When she was in her sixties, she included “When Lincoln Died” in her “America the Beautiful” collection. It describes Falmouth as she remembered it as a five-year-old when the little whaling village learned of Lincoln’s assassination.

Life
Who: Katharine Lee Bates (August 12, 1859 – March 28, 1929)
Katharine Lee Bates was a songwriter. She is remembered as the author of the words to the anthem "America the Beautiful.” She popularized "Mrs. Santa Claus" through her poem “Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride” (1889.) She graduated from Wellesley High School in 1874 and from Wellesley College with a B.A. in 1880. She returned to Wellesley as an instructor, then an associate professor 1891–93 when she was awarded an M.A. and became full professor of English literature. She studied at Oxford University during 1890–91. While teaching at Wellesley, she was elected a member of the newly formed Pi Gamma Mu honor society for the social sciences because of her interest in history and politics. Bates lived in Wellesley with Katharine Coman (1857-1915), who was a history and political economy teacher and founder of the Wellesley College School Economics department. The pair lived together for twenty-five years until Coman’s death from breast cancer in 1915. In 1922, Bates published “Yellow Clover: A Book of Remembrance,” a collection of poems written "to or about my Friend" Katharine Coman, some of which had been published in Coman’s lifetime. Some describe the couple as intimate lesbian partners, citing as an example Bates’ 1891 letter to Coman: "It was never very possible to leave Wellesley [for good], because so many love-anchors held me there, and it seemed least of all possible when I had just found the long-desired way to your dearest heart... Of course I want to come to you, very much as I want to come to Heaven." Others contest the use of the term lesbian to describe such a "Boston marriage.” Bates died in Wellesley, Massachusetts, on September 28, 1929, and is buried at Oak Grove Cemetery (Falmouth, MA 02540).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction.
Born: March 28, 1931, Plainfield, New Jersey, United States
Died: November 27, 2007, Galiano Island, Canada
Education: Mills College
Buried: Galiano Island Cemetery, Galiano Island, Capital Regional District, British Columbia, Canada
Buried alongside: Helen Sonthoff
Find A Grave Memorial# 23188687
Movies: Desert Hearts
Parents: Arthur Richards Rule, Carlotta Jane

Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction. Rule studied at Mills College in California. She graduated in 1952, moved to England for a short while and entered in a relationship with critic John Hulcoop. She taught at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she met Helen Sonthoff and fell in love with her. Rule moved with Hulcoop to work at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver in 1956, but Sonthoff visited her and they began to live together until Sonthoff's death in 2000. Rule died in 2007 at her home on Galiano Island due to complications from liver cancer, refusing any treatment that would take her from the island, opting instead for the care and support that could be provided by her niece, her partner, her many Galiano friends and neighbors. The ashes of Jane Vance Rule were interred in the Galiano Island Cemetery next to those of her beloved Helen. In 1964, Rule published Desert of the Heart: the novel featured two women who fall in love with each other; Donna Deitch (1985) later made it into a movie, which quickly became a lesbian classic.

Together from 1954 to 2000: 46 years.
Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff (September 11, 1916 - January 3, 2000)
Jane Vance Rule (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Mills College (5000 MacArthur Blvd, Oakland, CA 94613) is a liberal arts and sciences college located in the San Francisco Bay Area. Mills was founded as the Young Ladies Seminary in 1852 in Benicia, California. The school was relocated to Oakland, California, in 1871, and became the first women's college west of the Rockies. Designed in 1869 by S. C. Bugbee & Son, Mills Hall became the College's new home when it moved from Benicia to Oakland in 1871 (National Register of Historic Places: 71000132, 1971). Mills Hall is "a long, four-story building with a high central observatory. The mansarded structure, which provided homes for faculty and students as well as classrooms and dining halls, long was considered the most beautiful educational building in the state". Notable queer alumni and faculty: Jane Rule (1931–2007); John Cage (1912–1992).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Cemetery: Jane Rule died at the age of 76 on November 28, 2007 at her home on Galiano Island due to complications from liver cancer, refusing any treatment that would take her from the island, opting instead for the care and support that could be provided by her niece, her partner, her many Galiano friends and neighbours. The ashes of Jane Vance Rule were interred in the Galiano Island Cemetery next to those of her beloved Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff.

Address: Galiano Island, BC V0N 1P0, Canada (48.92364, -123.44147)

Place
Unobviously located near the Mt. Galiano trailhead at the island’s south end, the atmospheric graveyard is set in a pretty waterfront wood overlooking Georgeson Bay, where seals lollop about in the shallows of Collinson Reef. It’s a serene location, where the silence is broken only by unobtrusive wind chimes, rustling branches or the occasional seal bark. The graves here differ greatly, from simple burial mounds marked by humble homemade tributes to the more traditional and decorative, many bearing personal effects laid down by family and friends. Like any cemetery it offers an intimate, moving and fascinating look into the past of the community it serves, so should be considered a must-see.

Life
Who: Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007) and Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff (September 11, 1916 – January 3, 2000)
Jane Rule was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction. Rule studied at Mills College in California. She graduated in 1952, moved to England for a short while and entered in a relationship with critic John Hulcoop. She taught at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she met Helen Sonthoff and fell in love with her. Rule moved with Hulcoop to work at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1956, but Sonthoff visited her and they began to live together. Rule and Sonthoff lived together until Sonthoff’s death in 2000. Rule surprised some in the gay community by declaring herself against gay marriage, writing, "To be forced back into the heterosexual cage of coupledom is not a step forward but a step back into state-imposed definitions of relationship. With all that we have learned, we should be helping our heterosexual brothers and sisters out of their state-defined prisons, not volunteering to join them there."

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Born: 1965, Granby, Missouri, United States
Nominations: Goodreads Choice Awards Best Humor
Anniversary: July 27, 1996
Married: March 28, 2014 

Wade Rouse is a bestselling author and humorist. Described as the lovechild of David Sedaris and Erma Bombeck, "wise, witty and wicked" by USA Today and the #2 Writer, Dead or Alive, “We'd Love to Have Drinks With” by Writer's Digest (between Hemingway and Hunter S. Thompson), Wade is the author of four memoirs, including America’s Boy (Dutton/2006), named to the American Library Association’s “Rainbow List” of the most important LGBT books; Confessions of A Prep School Mommy Handler (Harmony/2007), selected as a Breakout Book by Target; At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream (Harmony/2009), a Today show Must-Read; and It’s All Relative: 2 Families, 3 Dogs, 34 Holidays and 50 Boxes of Wine (Crown/2011), finalist for a 2011 Goodreads Choice Award in Humor (with Betty White, Mindy Kaling and Chelsea Handler). Wade earned his B.A. in communications, with honors, from Drury University and his master’s in journalism from Northwestern University. He is a contributing writer and essayist for People.com, Coastal Living, Metrosource and Michigan Radio as well as a popular lecturer and writing teacher. Gary Edwards is the marketing and event manager for Wade Rouse. Wade, Gary and their rescue mutts, Mabel and Doris, split their time between the beaches, woods and water of Saugatuck, Michigan, and the sun, desert and mountains of Palm Springs.

How We Met: Gary and I met, purely by chance, in a coffeehouse in St. Louis, before coffee was hot and technology was commonplace. Ironically, we might never have met had current technology been around back then. Gary was waiting catch up with a friend returning from vacation, a friend who could not call Gary to let him know his flight home had been delayed because no one had cell phones then, or laptops.
I had come to catch up with a friend over a latte, when – after an hour – Gary, who is more social than a rodeo clown, approached and asked if he could join us while he waited.
If you believe in love at first sight, then this was love at first glimpse. Gary was the handsomest man I had ever seen, all dark hair and skin and lashes.
"You have the prettiest eyes," he said to me, before covering his face with his hands. "Don't look at me! I just drove 14 hours home from a family vacation. I must look a mess. But at least I'm tan!”
"How can I tell?" I asked. "Your face is covered.”
We laughed. And we have not stopped since.
What would have happened had Gary’s friend called from his cell?
My life would be entirely different. It would not just be empty; it would never have fully started.

How We Married: I received the best birthday gift of my life in 2014: Gary and I were married.
As with most things in our lives, it happened with the shocking suddenness of a thunderbolt. And, as with most huge moments in my life, it happened while I was on a treadmill.
"We're getting married on Friday," Gary said when I picked up the phone, my legs churning beneath me.
"Who is this?" I asked.
"Screw Michigan!" he said. "I'm not waiting another second for anyone to decide when it's right for us to marry."
In the previous days, a judge had overturned Michigan's ban on gay marriage. Dear friends of ours had rushed out on a Saturday to marry. By Monday, the attorney general had challenged the ruling, and a stay had been put on marriage.
Our hearts were crushed. We had planned to marry on our anniversary date of July 27. We wanted to wed amidst Gary's beautiful gardens in front of our beautiful friends. Gary had already begun the planning.
But our dream had been taken away.
Momentarily.
"We're here now, in California," Gary said, knocking me back into the present. "I called the courthouse. They have a little chapel attached. They have an opening Friday ..."
He stopped. I could hear him softly crying.
I hit "stop" on the treadmill.
"Let's do it!" I said. "You're right. It's time."
Gary arranged for good friends to serve as witnesses, and another friend volunteered to photograph it. Gary made boutonnieres for us, color-coordinated them with our shirts and ties, and on the morning of March 28, we walked into a county clerk's office, signed a sheath of papers, attested we were who we were, paid our fees and waited to be married, along with a gaggle of other, very young, couples.
I could not help but think: This was not anything like the dream wedding we had dreamed of.
But then, magic began to unfold.
A beautiful woman, whose cousin had just gotten married before us, ran over when she saw us waiting.
"Are you getting married?" she screamed.
We nodded.
She dissolved into tears. "I'm so happy for you," she said, bawling, pulling us into her arms and holding us tightly. "How long have you been together?"
"18 years," we replied at the same time.
Her face melted, and she heaved with sobs. "My brother and his partner have been together nine years," she said, nodding over at a handsome couple. "I want him to marry next."
She stopped.
"It's love and commitment like yours, and his, that are my shining examples. I strive to have a relationship as beautiful as yours."
And now it was us who began to tear up.
What she gets that most people don't seem to realize, I thought as she walked away waving, was that the gay couples "rushing" to marry have been together five years, 10 years, 25 years, 50 years. We have already committed our lives to one another.
We were ushered into the "chapel," a sort of holding room filled with the type of furniture you might have seen on "Three's Company." A wooden, lattice-y altar filled a wall, some plastic ivy strewn through it, fake flowers sprinkled around the room. An empty Kleenex box sat atop a vent.
Gary winced. "Why don't they paint this white?" he asked, touching the altar. "And get some real plants? And ..."
He stopped. "It's perfect," I said. "It doesn't matter."
The woman who was to marry us bolted into the room and introduced herself. "How long have you been together?" she asked.
"18 years," we replied again at the same time.
She began to cry.
"When California approved gay marriage," she whispered, her voice heavy with emotion, "I sprinted here to volunteer. I wanted to be part of moments like this. Each is so historic. Each is so beautiful. I wanted to be part of a love that will forever change our world, for the better."
And then she took our hands, and then placed them in each others', and she began the ceremony.
It was then I knew this was a dream wedding, because I never dreamed this would ever be possible for me. I never dreamed I could marry, hear these vows, repeat these vows, have my relationship acknowledged by the government as the same as every other.
As the ceremony unfolded, I could not help but think of my life and relationship with Gary, similar in so many ways. Gary and I grew up in small towns in Middle America. Haunted by our sexuality, we relinquished our youth, unable to date, unable to share our true selves with our families and friends. Gary drank and I ate, until we finally found one another.
At the risk of sounding overly dramatic, we not only fought like hell to find one another – the perfect love – we fought like hell to survive until we did. Our love likely saved each other's lives.
Suddenly, my emotions overtook me: This was not only a dream, it was historic.
"Do you have vows you would like to read?" the judge asked.
"Yes," I said, pulling a sheet of paper from my pocket, shocking Gary.
"What are you doing?" he mouthed.
"Marrying you," I whispered.
And then I began to read:
"Gary, it's not that my life hadn't begun before I met you; it's as if it had never started. You brought my life to Wizard of Oz technicolor. You not only taught me how to love another unconditionally, you taught me how to love myself unconditionally.
You are my compass and my bridge, my shadow and mirror, gardener of flowers and my soul. I would not be here, literally and figuratively, without you.
I love you more than anything in this world, and I am so honored to take you as my husband.
Forever."
As she began to recite the vows, our voices went from quivery, to shaky, to unstable. Tears flowed.
And when we said, "I do," my life and my future flashed before my eyes.
I was married. To the man I loved.
As the judge pronounced us husband and husband, we kissed.
Gary slipped me the tongue, which was totally inappropriate.
And then he whispered, "You cannot go and get this annulled, either."
That evening, we gathered with friends for an unforgettable dinner. They even surprised us with a wedding cake ... topped with lots of buttercream frosting.
As we crawled into bed for the first night as a married couple, it felt like it always had. But different, too.
Better.
Realer.
Happier.
Rawer.
Dreamier.
After 18 years, we were married. It was no longer a dream, no longer a fantasy, no longer illegal.
Our wedding, like our friends' weddings in Michigan and California, are not just weddings; they are the fulfillment of lifelong dreams. They acknowledge the power of love.
They are not just weddings, I realized, they are exclamation points to our lives and our love, to all of our lives and love. -Wade Rouse

Together since 1996: 19 years
Gary Edwards (born July 6, 1966) & Wade Rouse (born March 30, 1965)
Anniversary: July 27, 1996 / Married: March 28, 2014 

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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Anniversary: July 27, 1996
Married: March 28, 2014 

Wade Rouse is a bestselling author and humorist. Described as the lovechild of David Sedaris and Erma Bombeck, "wise, witty and wicked" by USA Today and the #2 Writer, Dead or Alive, “We'd Love to Have Drinks With” by Writer's Digest (between Hemingway and Hunter S. Thompson), Wade is the author of four memoirs, including America’s Boy (Dutton/2006), named to the American Library Association’s “Rainbow List” of the most important LGBT books; Confessions of A Prep School Mommy Handler (Harmony/2007), selected as a Breakout Book by Target; At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream (Harmony/2009), a Today show Must-Read; and It’s All Relative: 2 Families, 3 Dogs, 34 Holidays and 50 Boxes of Wine (Crown/2011), finalist for a 2011 Goodreads Choice Award in Humor (with Betty White, Mindy Kaling and Chelsea Handler). Wade earned his B.A. in communications, with honors, from Drury University and his master’s in journalism from Northwestern University. He is a contributing writer and essayist for People.com, Coastal Living, Metrosource and Michigan Radio as well as a popular lecturer and writing teacher. Gary Edwards is the marketing and event manager for Wade Rouse. Wade, Gary and their rescue mutts, Mabel and Doris, split their time between the beaches, woods and water of Saugatuck, Michigan, and the sun, desert and mountains of Palm Springs.

How We Met: Gary and I met, purely by chance, in a coffeehouse in St. Louis, before coffee was hot and technology was commonplace. Ironically, we might never have met had current technology been around back then. Gary was waiting catch up with a friend returning from vacation, a friend who could not call Gary to let him know his flight home had been delayed because no one had cell phones then, or laptops.
I had come to catch up with a friend over a latte, when – after an hour – Gary, who is more social than a rodeo clown, approached and asked if he could join us while he waited.
If you believe in love at first sight, then this was love at first glimpse. Gary was the handsomest man I had ever seen, all dark hair and skin and lashes.
"You have the prettiest eyes," he said to me, before covering his face with his hands. "Don't look at me! I just drove 14 hours home from a family vacation. I must look a mess. But at least I'm tan!”
"How can I tell?" I asked. "Your face is covered.”
We laughed. And we have not stopped since.
What would have happened had Gary’s friend called from his cell?
My life would be entirely different. It would not just be empty; it would never have fully started.

How We Married: I received the best birthday gift of my life in 2014: Gary and I were married.
As with most things in our lives, it happened with the shocking suddenness of a thunderbolt. And, as with most huge moments in my life, it happened while I was on a treadmill.
"We're getting married on Friday," Gary said when I picked up the phone, my legs churning beneath me.
"Who is this?" I asked.
"Screw Michigan!" he said. "I'm not waiting another second for anyone to decide when it's right for us to marry."
In the previous days, a judge had overturned Michigan's ban on gay marriage. Dear friends of ours had rushed out on a Saturday to marry. By Monday, the attorney general had challenged the ruling, and a stay had been put on marriage.
Our hearts were crushed. We had planned to marry on our anniversary date of July 27. We wanted to wed amidst Gary's beautiful gardens in front of our beautiful friends. Gary had already begun the planning.
But our dream had been taken away.
Momentarily.
"We're here now, in California," Gary said, knocking me back into the present. "I called the courthouse. They have a little chapel attached. They have an opening Friday ..."
He stopped. I could hear him softly crying.
I hit "stop" on the treadmill.
"Let's do it!" I said. "You're right. It's time."
Gary arranged for good friends to serve as witnesses, and another friend volunteered to photograph it. Gary made boutonnieres for us, color-coordinated them with our shirts and ties, and on the morning of March 28, we walked into a county clerk's office, signed a sheath of papers, attested we were who we were, paid our fees and waited to be married, along with a gaggle of other, very young, couples.
I could not help but think: This was not anything like the dream wedding we had dreamed of.
But then, magic began to unfold.
A beautiful woman, whose cousin had just gotten married before us, ran over when she saw us waiting.
"Are you getting married?" she screamed.
We nodded.
She dissolved into tears. "I'm so happy for you," she said, bawling, pulling us into her arms and holding us tightly. "How long have you been together?"
"18 years," we replied at the same time.
Her face melted, and she heaved with sobs. "My brother and his partner have been together nine years," she said, nodding over at a handsome couple. "I want him to marry next."
She stopped.
"It's love and commitment like yours, and his, that are my shining examples. I strive to have a relationship as beautiful as yours."
And now it was us who began to tear up.
What she gets that most people don't seem to realize, I thought as she walked away waving, was that the gay couples "rushing" to marry have been together five years, 10 years, 25 years, 50 years. We have already committed our lives to one another.
We were ushered into the "chapel," a sort of holding room filled with the type of furniture you might have seen on "Three's Company." A wooden, lattice-y altar filled a wall, some plastic ivy strewn through it, fake flowers sprinkled around the room. An empty Kleenex box sat atop a vent.
Gary winced. "Why don't they paint this white?" he asked, touching the altar. "And get some real plants? And ..."
He stopped. "It's perfect," I said. "It doesn't matter."
The woman who was to marry us bolted into the room and introduced herself. "How long have you been together?" she asked.
"18 years," we replied again at the same time.
She began to cry.
"When California approved gay marriage," she whispered, her voice heavy with emotion, "I sprinted here to volunteer. I wanted to be part of moments like this. Each is so historic. Each is so beautiful. I wanted to be part of a love that will forever change our world, for the better."
And then she took our hands, and then placed them in each others', and she began the ceremony.
It was then I knew this was a dream wedding, because I never dreamed this would ever be possible for me. I never dreamed I could marry, hear these vows, repeat these vows, have my relationship acknowledged by the government as the same as every other.
As the ceremony unfolded, I could not help but think of my life and relationship with Gary, similar in so many ways. Gary and I grew up in small towns in Middle America. Haunted by our sexuality, we relinquished our youth, unable to date, unable to share our true selves with our families and friends. Gary drank and I ate, until we finally found one another.
At the risk of sounding overly dramatic, we not only fought like hell to find one another – the perfect love – we fought like hell to survive until we did. Our love likely saved each other's lives.
Suddenly, my emotions overtook me: This was not only a dream, it was historic.
"Do you have vows you would like to read?" the judge asked.
"Yes," I said, pulling a sheet of paper from my pocket, shocking Gary.
"What are you doing?" he mouthed.
"Marrying you," I whispered.
And then I began to read:
"Gary, it's not that my life hadn't begun before I met you; it's as if it had never started. You brought my life to Wizard of Oz technicolor. You not only taught me how to love another unconditionally, you taught me how to love myself unconditionally.
You are my compass and my bridge, my shadow and mirror, gardener of flowers and my soul. I would not be here, literally and figuratively, without you.
I love you more than anything in this world, and I am so honored to take you as my husband.
Forever."
As she began to recite the vows, our voices went from quivery, to shaky, to unstable. Tears flowed.
And when we said, "I do," my life and my future flashed before my eyes.
I was married. To the man I loved.
As the judge pronounced us husband and husband, we kissed.
Gary slipped me the tongue, which was totally inappropriate.
And then he whispered, "You cannot go and get this annulled, either."
That evening, we gathered with friends for an unforgettable dinner. They even surprised us with a wedding cake ... topped with lots of buttercream frosting.
As we crawled into bed for the first night as a married couple, it felt like it always had. But different, too.
Better.
Realer.
Happier.
Rawer.
Dreamier.
After 18 years, we were married. It was no longer a dream, no longer a fantasy, no longer illegal.
Our wedding, like our friends' weddings in Michigan and California, are not just weddings; they are the fulfillment of lifelong dreams. They acknowledge the power of love.
They are not just weddings, I realized, they are exclamation points to our lives and our love, to all of our lives and love. -Wade Rouse

Together since 1996: 19 years
Gary Edwards (born July 6, 1966) & Wade Rouse (born March 30, 1965)
Anniversary: July 27, 1996 / Married: March 28, 2014 

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1500563323
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Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde, known as Dirk Bogarde, was an English actor and writer. Initially a matinée idol in films such as Doctor in the House for the Rank Organisation, he later acted in art-house films.
Born: March 28, 1921, West Hampstead, London, United Kingdom
Died: May 8, 1999, Chelsea, London, United Kingdom
Education: Chelsea College of Arts
University College School
Lived: Cobblestone House, Hascombe, Godalming GU8 4BT, UK (51.14153, -0.54976)
Le Haut Clermont, Chemin Du Haut Clermont, 06740 Châteauneuf-Grasse (43.6696, 6.96981)
2 Cadogan Gardens, SW3
44 Chester Square, SW1W
Buried: at his former estate, Le Haut Clermont, Châteauneuf de Grasse (ashes)
Find A Grave Memorial# 19424
Books: A Postillion Struck by Lightning, UC An Orderly Man, more
Albums: Lyrics For Lovers
Siblings: Gareth Van Den Bogaerde, Elizabeth Goodings

Sir Dirk Bogarde was an English actor and novelist. Anthony Forwood was an English actor. Initially a matinee idol, Bogarde later acted in art-house films like Death in Venice. Forwood married, and later divorced, actress Glynis Johns. Their only child was actor Gareth Forwood (1945–2007). Forwood lived with Dirk Bogarde in Amersham, England; then in France until shortly before Forwood's death in London in 1988. The actor John Fraser said that "Dirk's life with Forwood had been so respectable, their love for each other so profound and so enduring, it would have been a glorious day for the pursuit of understanding and the promotion of tolerance if he had screwed up the courage ... to make one dignified allusion to his true nature. Self-love is no substitute for self-respect.” Bogarde suffered a minor stroke in November 1987, at a time when Forwood was dying of liver cancer and Parkinson's disease. Bogarde was most vocal, towards the end of his life, on the issue of voluntary euthanasia, of which he became a staunch proponent after witnessing the protracted death of his lifelong partner in 1988. Bogarde died in London on May 8, 1999, age 78.

Together from 1940 to 1988: 48 years.
Ernest Lytton aka Anthony Forwood (October 3, 1915 – May 18, 1988)
Dirk Bogarde (March 28, 1921 - May 8, 1999)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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ISBN-10: 1500563323
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University College School, generally known as UCS Hampstead (11 Holly Hill, London NW3 6QN), is an independent day school in Hampstead, northwest London. The school was founded in 1830 by University College London and inherited many of that institution's progressive and secular views. According to the Good Schools Guide, the school "Achieves impressive exam results with a relaxed atmosphere". UCS aims to combine the highest standards of academic achievement and pastoral care with outstanding facilities for all-round education with a distinctive liberal ethos. University College School moved to its current location in Hampstead in 1907. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), Frederic Leighton (1830–1896), Stephen Spender (1909–1995), Thom Gunn (1929-2004).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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School: Chelsea College of Arts (16 John Islip St, Westminster, London SW1P 4JU) is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London based in London, and is a leading British art and design institution with an international reputation. The School of Art merged with the Hammersmith School of Art, founded by Francis Hawke, to form the Chelsea School of Art in 1908. The newly formed school was taken over by the London County Council and a new building erected at Lime Grove, which opened with an extended curriculum. A trade school for girls was erected on the same site in 1914. The school acquired premises at Great Titchfield Street, and was jointly accommodated with Quintin Hogg's Polytechnic in Regent Street (a forerunner of the University of Westminster). The campus at Manresa Road introduced painting and graphic design in 1963, with both disciplines being particularly successful. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Barbara Ker-Seymer (1905-1993), Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), Edward Burra (1905-1976), William Chappell (1907-1994).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: Dirk Bogarde purchased the large farmhouse Cobblestone House (formerly Nore House) at Hascombe, near Godalming in 1962. He lived there with his partner and manager, Anthony Forwood, until 1971.

Address: Bramley, Surrey GU8 4BT, UK (51.14153, -0.54976)
English Heritage Building ID: 291246 (Grade II, 1960)

Place
Built in XVII century with XIX and XX century additions to right.
Timber framed, clad in whitewashed and rendered brick below, tile hung above, some in diamond pattern, with sandstone rubble and brick extensions to right, all under plain tiled roofs, some hipped and half-hipped. Two storeys with end stack to left and offset square end stack to right; square ridge stack to right of centre dated 1750 on top. Four leaded casements to first floor and three larger leaded casements to ground floor. Panelled door to right of centre. Wings at right angles to rear. Dormered extensions to right, once a barn converted in circa 1900 of no especial architectural interest, although it was formerly the home of Brian Howard. Dirk Bogarde entertained several of his Hollywood co-stars at Nore. Among them was Ingrid Bergman, who came to stay for six weeks in 1965 while she was playing “A Month in the Country,” the first production at the newly opened Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford. He wrote of her in his autobiography that she “was constantly amused by my evening walk down to the vegetable gardens to pick the mint for supper”. Screen legend Judy Garland also came to Nore, in 1963, to show Bogarde a script of her semi-autobiographical film “I Could Go On Singing.” After filming “Death in Venice” in 1971, Bogarde moved to West Sussex and then France; Nore estate was sold and subsequently divided up. Bogarde describes leaving Cobblestone House in his biography “Snakes and Ladders” (1978): “…The removal vans trundled slowly down the long drive in a flurry of sleet and snow-showers, leaving the house empty, bare and strangely silent after the long racketing week of packing and crating-up of one’s life.”…

Life
Who: Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde (March 28, 1921 – May 8, 1999) aka Dirk Bogarde
Of all Dirk Bogarde's houses in the fifties and sixties, Nore was the finest. Reached by a long private drive through woodland, and much more secluded than Drummers Yard had been, it was officially described as “a large, three-bay continuous jetty house of two storeys and attics”, a yeoman's house, dating in large part from the late XVI century. It stood in about ten acres, with breathtaking views across the Surrey countryside towards the South Downs. It had ten bedrooms, eight bathrooms and six reception rooms, two cottages, a separate studio, a tennis court, a garage block and four pools, “two for water-lilies, one for ducks and one for humans”. There was also a contractual right to a free daily supply of 500 gallons of water. Above all, there were extensive gardens. In the twenties and early thirties Nore had been home to the parents of Brian Howard, the American-born, Eton-educated poet, wit, aesthete, homosexual, “charismatic failure” and “the oddest aircraftman since T. E. Shaw”. He was dark and handsome, had a Machiavellian streak and was “quasi-sadistic mentally, quasi-masochistic physically”; he also had “pity and compassion for all human suffering, he loved the beauties of nature, literature and the arts”, and according to Evelyn Waugh was “mad, bad and dangerous to know”. A great platonic love of his was Daphne Fielding, and although she never saw him at Nore, when she went to stay with Dirk and Tony (Anthony Forwood), she “was conscious of Brian all the time, and his own very particular atmosphere seemed to dominate even Dirk's.” Which was indeed saying something. Howard's parents had rented Nore from Robert Godwin-Austen, a descendant of the topographer who “discovered” the Himalayan peak now known as K2, and whose travels yielded a miniature temple, with a “lion-dog” at each of the four corners, which Dirk found, buried in brambles, and with “a rather curious, and very detailed, phallic symbol standing erect in the very center! So I am not absolutely certain that it was only spirits who went there to worship.”

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: Sir Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999) was a matinee idol in over 60 films such as “Doctor in the House” (1954). After he lost his appetite for theatre and film he turned to writing and wrote seven candid volumes of autobiography and five novels. In 1947 at the start of his film career he signed a major deal with Rank paying him 35 a week retainer until he started work for them. The chap whose flat he was staying in returned after his tour folded early, so he had to move out. Dirk went to Willett's in Sloane Square and came out with the key to 44 Chester Square, SW1W 9EA, then a shabby 5 storey furnished georgian townhouse for 10 a week. The garden had 2 huge lime trees and a bomb crater. His friend Nannette Baildon from his RAF days in Calcutta came to live here and look after him. Dirk began to throw some wilder and wilder parties culminating in a massive New Year's Eve party for 1949/50 resulting in a massive row with Nannette. She moved out a year later, after 3 years and took the Bogarde’s cat with her.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: Cadogan Square is a residential square in Knightsbridge, west London, that was named after Earl Cadogan. Whilst it is mainly a residential area, some of the properties are used for diplomatic and educational purposes. The square is known for being one of the most expensive residential streets in the United Kingdom, with an average house price of around £5.75 million in 2013.

Address: Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RJ, UK

Place
The square was built between 1877 and 1888. The west side has the greatest variety of houses, all variations on the same Flemish-influenced theme. Numbers 54-58 were designed by William Young in 1877 for Lord Cadogan, and the architect J. J. Stevenson was largely responsible for the south side, built in 1879-85. The east side was built in 1879 by G. T. Robinson. Number 61 is an early example of high-class mansion flats, and number 61A was once a studio-house for a Mr F. W. Lawson. Cadogan Square is one of the most desirable residential addresses in London and is one of the most expensive in the United Kingdom. It is formed of a garden (restricted to residents) surrounded by red-brick houses, the majority of which have been converted into flats or apartments. The square is south of Pont Street, east of Lennox Gardens, and west of Sloane Street. An independent preparatory school for boys, Sussex House School, at number 68, was founded in 1953. The school is sited in a house by architect Norman Shaw. Apartments or flats tend to be available on short leases and are sold for several million pounds. There are three or so houses on the square that have not been converted into flats, and these may be valued at over £25 million each. The freeholder of most of the properties is Earl Cadogan, a multi-billionaire whose family has owned the land for several hundred years. Numbers 4 (by G.E Street), 52, 62 and 62b, 68 and 72 are all Grade II listed buildings. Writer Arnold Bennet lived at number 75 during the 1920s. On 2July 5, 1899, at Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, Cadogan Square, in London, Adolph de Meyer married Donna Olga Caracciolo, an Italian noblewoman who had been divorced earlier that year from Nobile Marino Brancaccio; she was a goddaughter of Edward VII.

Notable queer residents at Cadogan Gardens:
• Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972), US born one-time lover of Oscar Wilde’s niece, Dolly Wilde, and origin of the character Valerie Seymour in “The Well of Loneliness,” lived at 97 Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RE, in the 1920s.
• Edward Sackville-West (1901-1965) was born at 105 Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RF, the elder child and only son of Major-General Charles John Sackville-West, who later became the fourth Baron Sackville, and his first wife, Maud Cecilia, née Bell (1873–1920.)
• From 1898 to 1913 Adolph de Meyer (1868-1946) lived in fashionable 1 Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RJ, and between 1903 and 1907 his work was published in Alfred Stieglitz’s quarterly Camera Work.
• Sir Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999) lived from 1991 to 1999 and died at 2 Cadogan Gardens, Chelsea, London SW3 2RS.
• In 1907 at the Homburg spa in Germany, Radclyffe Hall (1880-1943) met Mabel Batten (1856-1916), a well-known amateur singer of lieder. Batten (nicknamed "Ladye") was 51 to Hall's 27, and was married with an adult daughter and grandchildren. They fell in love, and after Batten's husband died they set up residence together at 59 Cadogan Square, Chelsea, London SW1X 0HZ. Batten gave Hall the nickname John, which she used the rest of her life. In 1915 Hall fell in love with Mabel Batten's cousin Una Troubridge (1887–1963), a sculptor who was the wife of Vice-Admiral Ernest Troubridge, and the mother of a young daughter. Batten died the following year, and in 1917 Radclyffe Hall and Una Troubridge began living together at 22 Cadogan Court, Draycott Ave, Chelsea, London SW3 3AA, a move Radclyffe originally planned to do with Mabel Batten. The relationship would last until Hall's death.
• On April 5, 1895, Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was arrested in room 118 of the upscale Edwardian Cadogan Hotel (now Belmond Cadogan Hotel, 75 Sloane St, London SW1X 9SG) on a charge of "gross indecency" stemming from his homosexual relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas. Friends had urged Wilde to flee the country once word of his impending arrest leaked out, but Wilde was resolute, saying, "I shall stay and do my sentence, whatever it is." The poet-dramatist was sentenced to two years imprisonment with hard labor, a cruel punishment that was to signal the beginning of the end for Wilde's brightly shining star. The arrest was immortalized by English poet laureate, John Betjeman, in his poem "The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at the Cadogan Hotel."

Life
Who: Baron Adolph de Meyer (September 1, 1868 – January 6, 1946) and Olga, the Baroness de Meyer (August 8, 1871 – 1930/1931)
Baron Adolph de Meyer was a photographer famed for his elegant photographic portraits in the early XX century, many of which depicted celebrities such as Mary Pickford, Rita Lydig, Luisa Casati, Billie Burke, Irene Castle, John Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Ruth St. Denis, King George V of the United Kingdom, and Queen Mary. He was also the first official fashion photographer for the American magazine Vogue, appointed to that position in 1913. In 1899 he married Donna Olga Caracciolo. The couple reportedly met in 1897, at the home of a member of the Sassoon banking family, and Olga would be the subject of many of her husband’s photographs. The de Meyers’ marriage was one of marriage of convenience rather than romantic love, since the groom was homosexual and the bride was bisexual or lesbian. As Baron de Meyer wrote in an unpublished autobiographical novel, before they wed, he explained to Olga "the real meaning of love shorn of any kind of sensuality.” He continued by observing, "Marriage based too much on love and unrestrained passion has rarely a chance to be lasting, whilst perfect understanding and companionship, on the contrary, generally make the most durable union." The de Meyers were characterised by Violet Trefusis—who counted Olga among her lovers and whose mother, Alice Keppel, was Edward VII’s best known mistress—as "Pederaste and Médisante" because, as Trefusis observed, "He looked so queer and she had such a vicious tongue." Among Olga’s affairs was one with Winnaretta, Princess Edmond de Polignac, the Singer sewing machine heiress and arts patron, in the years 1901–05. Cecil Beaton dubbed Adolph de Maeye "the Debussy of photography.” In 1912 he photographed Nijinsky in Paris. After the death of his wife in 1930/31, Baron de Meyer became romantically involved with a young German, Ernest Frohlich (born circa 1914), whom he hired as his chauffeur and later adopted as his son. The latter went by the name Baron Ernest Frohlich de Meyer.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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House: After 18 years as Rank’s biggest in-house star, feeling that he was not fully appreciated as an actor, Dirk Bogarde first kicked against the traces by playing a homosexual in the watershed film “Victim,” before upping sticks and removing himself and his lifelong companion, Anthony Forwood, to Europe. They eventually bought Le Haut Clermont, a former farmhouse, in Chateauneuf de Grasse and Dirk spent his happiest years there before Forwood’s last illness dictated a return to England. To the new owners Dirk wrote: ‘Please don’t send me any more photographs. Every time I see Clermont it breaks my heart.’

Address: Chemin Du Haut Clermont, 06740 Châteauneuf-Grasse (43.6696, 6.96981)

Place
Châteauneuf-Grasse (also known as Châteauneuf de Grasse or simply Châteauneuf) is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. Châteauneuf is situated on the French Riviera, just over 4 km from Grasse and 21 km (13 mi) from Cannes and borders the villages of Plascassier and Opio. Châteauneuf extends across 895 hectares and has a population of just over 3,000 inhabitants. It is divided into two districts: Pré-du-Lac, where most of the commerce is found, and Le Vignal.

Life
Who: Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde (March 28, 1921 – May 8, 1999), aka Dirk Bogarde, and Ernest Lytton Forwood (October 3, 1915 – May 18, 1988), aka Anthony Forwood
Dirk Bogarde was an English actor and writer. Initially a matinée idol in films such as “Doctor in the House” (1954) for the Rank Organisation, he later acted in art-house films. In a second career, he wrote seven best-selling volumes of memoirs, six novels and a volume of collected journalism, mainly from articles in The Daily Telegraph. Bogarde was a lifelong bachelor. For many years he shared his homes, first in Amersham, Buckinghamshire, then in France, with his manager Anthony Forwood, who was the former husband of actress Glynis Johns and the father of their only child, actor Gareth Forwood. Bogarde repeatedly denied that their relationship was anything but platonic. Such denials were understandable, mainly because male homosexual acts were criminal during most of his career, and could lead to prosecution and imprisonment. Rank Studio contracts included morality clauses, which provided for termination of the contract in the event of 'immoral' conduct on the part of the actor. This would have included same-sex relationships, thus potentially putting the actor's career in jeopardy. It is possible that Bogarde's refusal to enter into a marriage of convenience was a major reason for his failure to become a star in Hollywood, together with the critical and commercial failure of “Song Without End.” His friend Helena Bonham Carter believed Bogarde would not have been able to come out during later life, since this might have demonstrated that he had been forced to camouflage his sexual orientation during his film career. The actor John Fraser, however, said that "Dirk's life with Forwood had been so respectable, their love for each other so profound and so enduring, it would have been a glorious day for the pursuit of understanding and the promotion of tolerance if he had screwed up the courage..." Bogarde suffered a minor stroke in November 1987, at a time when his partner, Anthony Forwood, was dying of liver cancer and Parkinson's disease. In September 1996, he underwent angioplasty to unblock arteries leading to his heart and suffered a massive stroke following the operation. Bogarde was paralysed on one side of his body, which affected his speech and left him in a wheelchair. He managed, however, to complete a final volume of his autobiography, which covered the stroke and its effects as well as an edition of his collected journalism, mainly for the Daily Telegraph. He spent some time the day before he died with his friend Lauren Bacall. Bogarde died at home in London from a heart attack on May 8, 1999, age 78. His ashes were scattered at his former estate in Grasse, Southern France.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John 'Pop' Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker.
Born: March 27, 1902, Scotland, United Kingdom
Died: 1971, Cetona
Lived: Villa Tuoro, Via Tuoro, 80073 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)
Villa Kenwin, 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Riant Chateau, Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161096858
Spouse: Bryher (m. 1927–1947)
Movies: Borderline, Dreams That Money Can Buy

Bryher was the pen name of the novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. In 1921, she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. The same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D. 's lover (H.D. was Bryher’s lover as well). In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin (Kenneth + Winifred). They formally adopted H.D.'s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson's child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, even if she continued to provide for him. Bryher and H.D. no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until H.D.’s death in 1961. Bryher, H.D., and Macpherson formed the film magazine Close Up, and the POOL Group. Only one POOL film, Borderline (1930), starring H.D. and Paul Roberson, survives in its entirety.

Together from 1927 to 1947: 20 years.
Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

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George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro", which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Coucy Lyons. Bryher, Macpherson’s wife, supported her husband and his friend on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the aging Douglas. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas's death in 1952, writing an epitaph for Douglas, from which the Latin inscription, on Douglas's gravestone, is derived (Omnes Eodem Cogimur = "We are all driven to the same end" (i.e., death)). Douglas’s last words apparently were: "Get those fucking nuns away from me." Macpherson was Douglas’s heir, and upon his death, everything went to Islay Lyons.

They met in 1931 and remained friends until Douglas’s death in 1952: 21 years.
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 – June 14, 1971)
Norman Douglas (December 8, 1868 - February 7, 1952)

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Islay Lyons was a notable Welsh photographer, novelist and linguist. During the WWII, he served in North Africa and then he was sent to the Far East to learn Japanese in 3 months. He did this with amongst others, Richard Mason, who was a lifelong friend and cousin by marriage. The character ‘Peter’ in Mason’s book The Wind Cannot Read portrays Lyons. Lyons had been the last lover of the filmmaker, Kenneth Macpherson, both of them living in the ‘Villa Tuoro’ on Capri. Norman Douglas was was their constant companion, there, during the last years of Douglas’s life. Both Macpherson and Lyons were at Norman Douglas’s bedside when he died. Douglas’s estate went to Macpherson, and at Macpherson’s death, to Islay Lyons. Another lover of Macpherson was New York cabaret singer, Jimmie Daniels. Macpherson’s wife, Bryher, financed Daniels and Macpherson’s life in New York. Before Kenneth Macpherson, in Daniels’s life there was the famed architect, Philip Johnson. They met around 1934 when Jimmie was first starting to get some real recognition as an entertainer.

Together from 1947 to 1971: 24 years.
Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Jimmie Daniels (1908 - June 29, 1984)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)

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House: In September 1931, Kenneth Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build on plans drawn up several years earlier by Alexander Ferenczy.

Address: 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)

Place
The home, which overlooked Lake Geneva, came to be known as Kenwin, derived from the names of its commissioners, Kenneth and Winifred, and would double as a film studio and home, not only for themselves, but also for an assortment of dogs, cats, and monkeys. Bryher gave her address, at the time, as Villa Kenwin, Chemin de Vallon, 1814 Burier-La-Tour, Vaud, Switzerland. During the war years, Bryher would use Kenwin as a staging post for the evacuation of refugees from Nazi Germany. Abandoned after the death of Bryher who will live there until 1983, it was bought in 1987 by the architect Giovanni Pezzoli who undertook a complete renovation. It is registered as a Swiss cultural object of national importance. In 1996, a documentary film entitled "Kenwin" and telling the story of the villa Kenwin was directed by Véronique Goël on the basis of archive footage.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. Her father was the shipowner and financier John Ellerman, who at the time of his death in 1933, was the richest Englishman who had ever lived. He lived with her mother Hannah Glover, but did not marry her until 1908. During the 1920s, Bryher was an unconventional figure in Paris. Among her circle of friends were Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach and Berenice Abbott. Her wealth enabled her to give financial support to struggling writers, including Joyce and Edith Sitwell. She also helped with finance for Sylvia Beach’s bookshop Shakespeare and Company and certain publishing ventures, and started a film company Pool Group. She also helped provide funds to purchase a flat in Paris for the destitute Dada artist and writer Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. In 1918 she met and became involved in a lesbian relationship with poet Hilda Doolittle “H.D.” The relationship was an open one, with both taking other partners. In 1921 she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. That same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D.’s lover. In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin. They formally adopted H.D.’s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson’s child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, she and Doolittle no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until Doolittle’s death in 1961.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Riant Chateau, Territet (1820)

House: Since 1921, H.D. had been a close friend of Bryher. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle.

Address: Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)

Place
Built in 1913, Design by Michel Polak (1885-1948)
The Riant Chateau was built for Belgian businessman Lucien Kaisin. This complex was built for a cosmopolitan clientele and was considered very advanced for its time. It had the most modern elevators and central heating of its time, and was furnished with luxurious fittings. In its heyday, it was the meeting place for avant-garde of the cinema; it was frequently visited by such notables as Eisenstein, Room and Pabst and housed the headquarters of the publishers of the magazine Pool. The redevelopment program has ensured that the spirit of the building has been retained, while all essential services have been replaced and modern technology added. The interior of the building reflects the extravagance and luxury of the Belle Époque, with high ceilings, elaborate cornices, inlaid mirrors, stained glass, heavy oak doors, and antique oak parquet floors. Bordering the Riant Chateau is Rose Park, a beautiful park which extends to the Anglican church. At present an underground parking space is being built beneath Rose Park which is being re-landscaped and replanted with more trees for added privacy. On the other side of the garden lies the Anglican church, and beyond that the terminus of the Mont Pelerin funicular. Rose Park was a favorite haunt of the Austrian Empress Sissi, whose statue serves as a reminder to today’s visitors.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971), Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983) and Hilda "H.D." Doolittle (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)
It was in 1927, from their base in Territet, that Kenneth Macpherson, Bryher and HD launched themselves as the Pool Group. Pool would veer away from the West’s commercial model of film production, and produce material which would promote cinematography as an “art form.” Their model would be based on the work coming out of Germany, particularly G W Pabst, and coming out of Russia, particularly Sergei Eisenstein. Their subject matter would be human behaviour, and its many facets, and their task would be representing this behaviour on screen, influenced by the work of Freud. Also at Territet, Macpherson founded the influential film journal, Close Up, dedicated to "independent cinema and cinema from around the world.” The first issue of Close Up, describing itself on the front cover as an "international magazine devoted to film art,” appeared in July 1927. Macpherson was editor, with Bryher as assistant editor, and Doolittle making regular contributions. Macpherson, who was particularly influenced by the Russian film-maker Sergei Eisenstein and whom he first met in 1929, "dictated the tone and direction of the publication, contributing articles that defined the role of the director and defended the integrity of cinema and its right to be considered as art.” Close Up published many of the first translations of Eisenstein’s ideas. Macpherson continued as the main editor until the magazine’s demise in 1933. Bryher is buried at Cimetière Saint-Martin (Boulevard Saint-Martin, 1800 Vevey).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Villa Tuoro is forever linked to the figure of Scots writer Norman Douglas, who lived here from the post-war period up until the time of his death in 1952. During those years, the house was the property of his great friend Kenneth McPherson. McPherson went on living there until 1957 together with Islay Bowe-Lyons, a cousin of the Queen Mother of England.

Address: Via Tuoro, 80076 Capri NA, Italy (40.54762, 14.2501)

Place
Kenneth Macpherson bought a home on Capri, "Villa Tuoro,” which he shared with his lover, the photographer, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons. Today Villa Tuoro is the residence of Semiramis Zola and her husband John Lee, who bought it directly from Kenneth McPherson. Bowe-Lyons personally attended to the landscaping of the garden. On the ground floor, in the room where Douglas used to work, his writing desk and books are still in place. The windows here all look onto the garden, while as one mounts the stairs to the main floor, a panorama appears that stretches from Marina Piccola to the Certosa, and from Monte Solaro all the way to Ischia.

Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons (March 7, 1922 – November 17, 1993)
Kenneth Macpherson was born in Scotland, the son of Scottish painter, John “Pop” Macpherson and Clara Macpherson. Descended from 6 generations of artists, Macpherson was a novelist, photographer, critic and film-maker. His 1930 film, “Borderline,” is now vey much part of the curriculum in the study of modern cinematography today. In his work with the Pool Group (1927–1933), which he co-founded with Bryher and HD, Macpherson also established the influential film journal, Close Up. Macpherson’s story began in 1927, when he married English writer, Annie Winifred Ellerman, (known as Bryher in the literary world), the daughter of a British shipping magnate. Bryher’s inherited fortune would help to finance Macpherson’s projects. Although Bryher’s and Macpherson’s marriage lasted for twenty years, for much of the marriage, both Macpherson and Bryher had extra-marital affairs. Bryher was lesbian but Macpherson was distinctly bi-sexual. A sexual partner, common to both Bryher and Macpherson, was the American poet, Hilda Doolittle (known in literary circles as "HD.”) Doolittle had been a close friend of Bryher’s since 1921. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle, who brought along her 9-year-old daughter, Perdita. (Perdita’s father was Cecil Gray, the Scottish music critic and composer.) In 1928, Doolittle had a sexual relationship with Macpherson, becoming pregnant by him. The pregnancy would be aborted later that year. In the same year, Macpherson and Bryher formally adopted Perdita, registering her name as Frances Perdita Macpherson. In September 1931, Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build. After spending a few months in New York in 1935, Macpherson eventually based himself there to focus on writing, photography and his art collection. In 1947, Macpherson returned from America, spending much of his time in Switzerland and Italy. Bryher supported her husband and his friend, Algernon Islay de Courcy Lyons, on Capri, requesting that they take into their home the ageing Norman Douglas, the Scottish novelist. Douglas had been friends of Bryher and Macpherson since 1931. Macpherson remained on Capri until Douglas’s death in 1952, writing an epitaph for his gravestone, “Omnes Eodem Cogimur,” “Where we all must gather.” Macpherson then moved to Rome, and then, in 1965, he “retired” to Tuscany and then Thailand. Macpherson died in Cetona on June 14, 1971, leaving everything, including his inheritance from Douglas, to De Courcy Lyons. Lyons died on 1November 7, 1993, in Chiang-Mai (Mueang Chiang Mai District, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand). Following Lyons’s death, his heir, Manop Charoensuk, arranged for publication of a volume of Lyons’s photographs.

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Henry Davis Sleeper was a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. He was born March 27, 1878, in Boston to Major Jacob Henry Sleeper, a distinguished Civil War veteran and Maria ...
Born: 1878, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Died: September 22, 1934, West End, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Lived: Beauport, 75 Eastern Point Blvd, Gloucester, MA 01930, USA (42.59114, -70.66009)
Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery
Find A Grave Memorial# 33029215

Henry Davis Sleeper was a noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. The Harvard economist A. Piatt Andrew who had built a handsome summer mansion, Red Roof, on a rock ledge above the harbor, introduced Henry Sleeper to the Eastern Point in Gloucester, Massachusetts in the spring of 1906. Sleeper was much taken by the location and immediately decided to build a little further along the ledge from Red Roof. Construction of Beauport, Sleeper's relatively modestly scaled Arts and Crafts-style house began in the fall of 1907 and was sufficiently finished to receive A. Piatt Andrew as a houseguest in May 1908. Abram Piatt Andrew Jr. was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. Also Sleeper became the U.S. Representative, and a major fundraiser for the American Field Service, an ambulance corps founded by Andrew early during World War I. Sleeper died in Massachusetts General Hospital of leukemia on September 22, 1934 and is buried in his family's plot in Mount Auburn Cemetery located in Watertown and Cambridge, Massachusetts. Andrew wrote the memorial tribute published in the Gloucester Daily Times. A gay man, some source say that Sleeper was in a relationship with Andrew. Others state that the two were just friends.

Together from 1906 to 1934: 28 years.
Abram Piatt Andrew Jr. (February 12, 1873 – June 3, 1936)
Henry Davis Sleeper (March 27, 1878 - September 22, 1934)

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House: Beauport, also known as Sleeper-McCann House, Little Beauport, or Henry Davis Sleeper House, is a historic house in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Address: 75 Eastern Point Blvd, Gloucester, MA 01930, USA (42.59114, -70.66009)
Hours: Tuesday to Saturday 10.00-17.00
Phone: +1 978-283-0800
Website: http://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/Beauport
National Register of Historic Places: 03000641, 2003 & 76000246, 1976. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
Built starting in 1907
Beauport was the summer home of interior decorator and antique collector Henry Davis Sleeper. Situated on the rocks overlooking Gloucester Harbor, the structure was repeatedly enlarged and modified by Sleeper, and filled with a large collection of fine art, folk art, architectural artifacts, and other collectible materials. Sleeper decorated the (ultimately 56) rooms to evoke different historical and literary themes. After his death, Charles and Helena Woolworth McCann acquired the house and its contents. They preserved much of the Sleeper’s designs and decorations, but made some modifications, including adding their porcelain collection to the house. Their heirs donated the property to the Society for the Protection of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England) in 1947, who operate the property as a house museum. Beauport served as Sleeper’s escape, a backdrop for summer parties, and as a showcase for his professional skills. The house has frequently been written about in books and magazines, with the first major article appearing in House Beautiful in 1916. It has been featured in such diverse publications as Architectural Digest, Country Living, and The Boston Globe, and as been showcased on televisions programs such as America’s Castles. In addition to the main house, the property also has a gate house, garage, and toolshed that were built by Sleeper. The gate house has been adapted by Historic New England as a visitor reception area, and the toolshed now houses restrooms. The garage is used for storage and as office space. There is a single non-contributing building on the property, a caretaker’s house, which is potentially of local historic interest as an example of a prefabricated post- WWII residential structure.

Life
Who: Henry Davis Sleeper (March 27, 1878 - September 22, 1934)
Henry Davis Sleeper was a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator. He was grandson of Jacob Sleeper, one of the founders of Boston University as well as a clothier and manager of a real estate trust. Henry Sleeper was introduced to the Eastern Point in Gloucester, Massachusetts in the spring of 1906 by the Harvard economist A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) who had built a handsome summer mansion, Red Roof, on a rock ledge above the harbor. Sleeper was much taken by the location and immediately decided to build a little further along the ledge from Red Roof. Eastern Point was an enclave occupied by a somewhat louche group of "Bohemian" artists and intellectuals with frequent visits from some of the more colorful and unconventional members of Boston Society, in particular Isabella Stewart Gardner, the legendary art collector and builder of Fenway Court in the Back Bay Fens, now the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Construction of Beauport, Sleeper’s relatively modestly scaled Arts and Crafts-style house began in the fall of 1907 and was sufficiently finished to receive A. Piatt Andrew as a house guest in May 1908. As property flanking Sleeper’s became available, Beauport was expanded several times until 1925, often in response to events or important experiences in his life. The house was now not only a home but a major showcase for Sleeper’s interior design and decoration business. Clients could choose wallpapers, window treatments, or entire rooms to have reproduced in their own houses. Sleeper had a specialty in "Puritan Revival,” the Jacobean-American architecture and decorative arts of the original American colonies, but his tastes and interests included French decor of several centuries and a great deal of orientalia. Isabella Stewart Gardner commissioned work from him; Henry Francis du Pont engaged his assistance with the big new wing of the family’s massive house, Winterthur (5105 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, DE 19735), now a famed museum of American decorative arts; he designed for Hollywood stars Joan Crawford and Fredric March. Henry Davis Sleeper died in Massachusetts General Hospital of leukemia on September 22, 1934, and is buried in his family’s plot in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Watertown and Cambridge, Massachusetts. Andrew wrote the memorial tribute published in the Gloucester Daily Times. Sleeper had never married and left no direct descendants. Beauport passed to his brother Stephen whose real estate income was unequal to Henry’s debts. Beauport was sold to Helena Woolworth McCann who was contacted by Henry Francis Du Pont urging that Sleeper’s rooms remain exactly as they were as the value of the house and its collection of art objects depended primarily on their being left unchanged. Mrs McCann preserved the house as it was; at her death, the house was inherited by her daughters from whose hands it passed into the care of Historic New England in 1942.

Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston.

Address: 580 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA (42.37479, -71.14449)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +1 617-547-7105
Website: http://mountauburn.org/
National Register of Historic Places: 75000254, 1975. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, Mount Auburn Cemetery marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery,” derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. It is Watertown’s largest contiguous open space and extends into Cambridge to the east, adjacent to the Cambridge City Cemetery and Sand Banks Cemetery.

Notable queer burials are at Mount Auburn Cemetery:
• Roger Brown (1925–1997) (Location: Willow Pond Knoll, Lot 11000), professor at Harvard University from 1952 until 1957 and from 1962 until 1994, and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 1957 until 1962. During his time at the University of Michigan, he met Albert Gilman, later a Shakespeare scholar and a professor of English at Boston University. Gilman and Brown were partners for over 40 years until Gilman's death from lung cancer in 1989. Brown's sexual orientation and his relationship with Gilman were known to a few of his closest friends, and he served on the editorial board of The Journal of Homosexuality from 1985, but he did not come out publicly until 1989. Brown chronicled his personal life with Gilman and after Gilman's death in his memoir. Brown died in 1997, and is buried next to Gilman (Location: Willow Pond Knoll, Lot 11000).
• Katharine Ellis Coman (1857-1915), author on economic subjects who lived with Katharine Lee Bates (Author of "America the Beautiful"), and died at her home, was cremated at Mount Auburn Cemetery but was buried with her parents at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Newark, Ohio.
• Charlotte Cushman (1816–1876) (Location: Palm Avenue, Lot 4236), actress, her last partner was lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins, who sculpted Angels of the Water on Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, New York City.
• Martha May Eliot (1891–1978), was a foremost pediatrician and specialist in public health, an assistant director for WHO, and an architect of New Deal and postwar programs for maternal and child health. She was a scion of the Eliot family, an influential American family that is regarded as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy and held sway over the American education system in the late XIX and early XX centuries. Her father, Christopher Rhodes Eliot, was a Unitarian minister, and her grandfather, William G. Eliot, was the first chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis. The poet, playwright, critic, and Nobel laureate T.S. Eliot was her first cousin. During undergraduate study at Bryn Mawr College she met Ethel Collins Dunham, who was to become her life partner. She was cremated at Mount Auburn but buried elsewhere.
• Mary Katherine Keemle "Kate" Field (1838-1896), American journalist, lecturer, and actress, of eccentric talent. She was the daughter of actors Joseph M. Field and Eliza Riddle. Kate Field never married. In October 1860, while visiting his mother's home in Florence, she met the celebrated British novelist Anthony Trollope. She became one of his closest friends and was the subject of Trollope's high esteem. Trollope scholars have speculated on the nature of their warm friendship. Twenty-four of his letters to Kate survive, at the Boston Public Library; hers to Trollope do not.
• Annie Adams Fields (1834–1915) (Location: Elder Path, Lot 2700), author and hostess; wife of James Thomas Fields, later companion to Sarah Orne Jewett.
• Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924) (Location: Oxalis Path, Lot 2900) was a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. She founded the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.
• Charles Hammond Gibson, Jr. (1874–1954) (Location: Sweetbrier Path, Lot 472), Boston writer and bachelor bon vivant, best known for having preserved his family's Beacon Street home as a museum of Victorian style and taste. “The Wounded Eros,” a short documentary film by Todd Gernes, explores the aesthetic relationship between Gibson's literary production and the material culture contexts of his museum and library, set within the social history of turn-of-the-century gay Boston. He had an enduring relationship with the eccentric self-styled "Count" Maurice de Mauny Talvande.
• Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908) (Location: Hemlock Path, Lot 3747), sculptor. She was devoted for 25 years to Lady Ashburton, widow of Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton (died 1864). Lady Ashburton was born Louisa Caroline Stewart-Mackenzie, youngest daughter of James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie. Hosmer was good friend with Charlotte Cushman and Matilda Hays, Cushman’s partner, left Charlotte for her.
• Alice James (1848-1892) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American diarist. The only daughter of Henry James, Sr. and sister of psychologist and philosopher William James and novelist Henry James, she is known mainly for the posthumously published diary that she kept in her final years. Her companion was Katherine Peabody Loring and from their relationship it was conied the term “Boston Marriage”.
• Henry James (1843-1916) (in the nearby Cambridge Cemetery), American writer. He is regarded as one of the key figures of XIX century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James.
• Amy Lowell (1874–1925) (Location: Bellwort Path, Lot 3401), poet of the imagist school from Brookline, Massachusetts, who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.
• Abby Adeline Manning (1836-1906) (Location: Thistle Path, Lot 709), painter, and her partner, Anne Whitney (1821-1915), poet and sculptor, together.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) (Location: Walnut Avenue, Lot 7108) was an American poet, editor, and professor of English literature. Along with Gilbert Seldes, Mitchell’s editorship of The Dial magazine signaled a pivotal shift in content from political articles to aesthetics in art and literature. In 1929 he became the editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Richard Cowan (1909-1939)’s diary, which he started while he was a student at Cornell, chronicles the life of a young gay man in Boston in the 1930s. Cowan committed suicide at the age of thirty. His forty-seven-year old mentor and long-term lover, Stewart Mitchell, was devastated. Mitchell resigned as president of the Massachusetts Historical Society on account of a “personal misfortune,” and wrote a friend, “There is no running away from a broken heart.” According to the Boston Herald Nov. 9, 1957: “Mitchell directed that the urn containing his mortal remains be buried, “but not in winter,” in the lot “where my dear friends Georgine Holmes Thomas and Richard David Cowan now repose”.”
• Francis Williams Sargent (1848-1920) (Location: Pilgrim Path, Lot 4141) and Jane Welles Hunnewell Sargent (1851-1936), Margarett Williams Sargent’s parents. Margarett Sargent (1892-1978) was born into the privileged world of old Boston money; she was a distant relative of John Singer Sargent.
• Henry Davis Sleeper (1878-1934) (Location: Willow Avenue, Lot 453), a nationally-noted antiquarian, collector, and interior decorator, who had a long lasting friendship with A. Piatt Andrew, an economist, an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, the founder and director of the American Ambulance Field Service during WWI, and a United States Representative from Massachusetts.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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William Gordon Merrick was a Broadway actor, best-selling author of gay-themed novels and one of the first authors to write about homosexual themes for a mass audience.
Born: August 3, 1916, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: March 27, 1988, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Education: Princeton University
Lived: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)
25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)
Buried: Greenwood Cemetery, Brielle, Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 92151384

Gordon Merrick was a Broadway actor, a best-selling author of gay-themed novels, and one of the first authors to write about homosexual themes for a mass audience. Merrick wrote stories, which depicted well-adjusted gay men engaged in romantic relationships. Each of his books had a happy ending. Merrick's best-known book is The Lord Won't Mind. The first in a trilogy, Merrick followed it up with One for the Gods in 1971 and Forth into Light in 1974. Merrick enrolled at Princeton University in 1936. He quit in the middle of his junior year and moved to New York City, where he became an actor. He landed the role of Richard Stanley in George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's The Man Who Came to Dinner and became Hart's lover for a time. In 1980 he moved to Ceylon (now known as Sri Lanka), having bought property there in 1974. He returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville. For the rest of his life, he divided his time between the two countries. Charles Gerald Hulse, a dancer turned actor turned novelist (In Tall Cotton, 1987), was his partner
of 32 years, until Merrick's death in 1988, in Sri Lanka where they moved together.

Together from 1956 to 1988: 32 years.
Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, NJ 08544. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was the fourth chartered institution of higher education in the Thirteen Colonies and thus one of the nine colonial colleges established before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, where it was renamed Princeton University in 1896. Mathematician, computer and artificial intelligence pioneer, and code-breaker Alan Turing attended Princeton University for his PhD from 1936-1938. He studied in Fine Hall (now Jones Hall) and the Palmer Physical Laboratory. Fine Hall has not change significantly since Turing's time there. In the 1950s, Turing was charged with gross indecency, and avoided prison by agreeing to drug treatments (essentially medical castration). He died of cyanide poisoning in 1954. Queen Elizabeth II granted him a posthumous pardon in 2013. Notable queer alumni and faculty at Princeton University: A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936), James Biddle (1929–2005), Lem Billings (1916-1981), George Henry Boker (1823-1890), Richard Halliburton (1900-1939), John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), William Morris Meredith (1919-2007), Gordon Merrick (1916–1988), Alan Turing (1912-1954), Thornton Wilder (1897–1975), Russel Wright (1904–1976).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1532901909
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Historic District: Gordon Merrick left France to avoid the unrest which accompanied the Algerian War of Independence. Merrick and his partner Charles Hulse moved to Greece and took up residence on the island of Hydra.

Address: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)

Place
Hydra is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Saronic Gulf and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by a narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea (Υδρέα, derived from the Greek word for "water"), a reference to the springs on the island. The municipality of Hydra consists of the islands Hydra (area 52 km2 (20.1 sq mi)), Dokos (pop. 18, area 13.5 km2 (5.2 sq mi)), and a few uninhabited islets. The province of Hydra was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality. It was abolished in 2006. There is one main town, known simply as "Hydra port" (pop. 1,900 in 2011.) It consists of a crescent-shaped harbor, around which is centered a strand of restaurants, shops, markets, and galleries that cater to tourists and locals (Hydriots.) Steep stone streets lead up and outward from the harbor area. Most of the local residences, as well as the hostelries on the island, are located on these streets. Other small villages or hamlets on the island include Mandraki (pop. 11), Kamini, Vlychos (19), Palamidas, Episkopi, and Molos. Since 1960, the Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen has owned a house on the island.
Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In the 1950s Hydra became home to Charles Hulse and Gordon Merrick. Merrick was an American author who wrote more than a dozen novels, which were known for their gay themes. His most successful, “The Lord Won’t Mind,” was written on Hydra. While on vacation visiting the Greek island of Hydra in 1956, Merrick and Hulse bought a house on the island which was to become their home for the next twenty years. At the time, Merrick was working on his fifth novel, and Hulse and Merrick spent the years between 1960 and 1980 travelling mainly between Paris, Hydra and Galle in Sri Lanka. While on Hydra, Hulse and Merrick were hosts to socialites, intellectuals and artists from all over the world. During their theatre career, and here, Hulse and Merrick came to know people, such as Charles Laughton, Jules Dassin, Melina Mercouri, Jacqueline Onassis, Leonard Cohen and others. Hulse restored and furnished the house on Hydra, which was admired by and photographed extensively for various international magazines. In 1974 the couple bought land in Sri Lanka. Six years later they quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Merrick and Hulse also returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville, Normandy. For the rest of their life, they divided their time between the two countries.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: In 1974 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse bought land in Sri Lanka.

Address: 25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)

Place
Galle is a major city in Sri Lanka, situated on the southwestern tip, 119 km from Colombo. Galle is the administrative capital of Southern Province, Sri Lanka and is the district capital of Galle District. Galle is the fifth largest city in Sri Lanka after the capital Colombo, Kandy, Jaffna and Negombo. According to James Emerson Tennent, Galle was the ancient seaport of Tarshish, from which King Solomon drew ivory, peacocks and other valuables. Cinnamon was exported from Sri Lanka as early as 1400 BC and the root of the word itself is Hebrew, so Galle may have been a main entrepot for the spice. Galle had been a prominent seaport long before western rule in the country. Persians, Arabs, Greeks, Romans, Malays, Indians, and Chinese were doing business through Galle port. In 1411, the Galle Trilingual Inscription, a stone tablet inscription in three languages, Chinese, Tamil and Persian, was erected in Galle to commemorate the second visit to Sri Lanka by the Chinese admiral Zheng He. The "modern" history of Galle starts in 1502, when a small fleet of Portuguese ships, under the command of Lourenço de Almeida, on their way to the Maldives, were blown off course by a storm. Realising that the king resided in Kotte close to Colombo, Lourenço proceeded there after a brief stop in Galle. In 1640, the Portuguese had to surrender to the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch built the present fort in the year 1663. They built a fortified wall, using solid granite, and built three bastions, known as "Sun,” "Moon" and "Star.” After the British took over the country from the Dutch in the year 1796, they preserved the Fort unchanged, and used it as the administrative centre of the district.

Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In 1980 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Hulse and Merrick bought a house at 25 Rampart Street within the precinct of Galle’s XVII century fortress. Here, Hulse worked on interior design, and began to write. By this time, Merrick had already published several books and was a celebrity. Hulse helped Merrick to prepare manuscripts for publication and the two travelled together frequently during this period. Gordon Merrick died in Colombo, Sri Lanka, of lung cancer on March 27, 1988. He was survived by his companion, Charles G. Hulse.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Cemetery: At Greenwood Cemetery (707 Schoolhouse Rd, Brielle, NJ 08730) are buried Roy Strickland (1918-2003) and William Wynkoop (1916-2003): they both died in 2003, 2 months apart, William 87 and Roy 85, after living together for more than 53 years. Moreover also Gordon Merrick (1916–1988), author best-known for his “The Lord Won't Mind” trilogy, is buried here.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Freda Beatrice Stark was a New Zealand dancer, and a prosecution witness after the prescription drug overdose of her lover, Thelma Mareo, in 1935.
Born: March 27, 1910, New Zealand
Died: March 19, 1999, Massey, New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand
Buried: Waikumete Cemetery & Crematorium, Glen Eden, Auckland Council, Auckland, New Zealand, Plot: 95 Row 2 Div G Anglcan
Buried alongside: Thelma Mareo
Find A Grave Memorial# 72268236

Freda Stark was a New Zealand dancer. In 1933, Stark joined Ernest Rolls' revue, and met a young dancer named Thelma Trott, and the two women fell in love. In 1934, Stark was in the chorus of the Duchess of Danitz, while Trott starred. At this time, Trott married Eric Mareo, their conductor. The relationship was cut short in 1935 when Trott took a fatal overdose of the prescription drug Veronal in unexplained circumstances, leading to Mareo being charged with her murder. During the Second World War, Freda was a famed exotic dancer at Auckland's Wintergarden cabaret and nightclub, and a favorite of American troops stationed there, where she earned the title "Fever of the Fleet." Freda Stark longed to be reunited with her long dead lover Thelma Mareo and her friends made sure that wish was granted after her death in 1999: Freda, who died at 88 in a West Auckland rest home, was cremated and her ashes were buried at the foot of Thelma's grave in Waikumete Cemetery, under the words she put there long before: “Waiting till we meet again… Freda.”

Together from 1933 to 1935: 2 years.
Freda Stark (March 27, 1910 – March 19, 1999)
Thelma Clarice Trott (1906 – April 15, 1935)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Cemetery: Freda Stark (1910-1999) was a New Zealand dancer. In 1933, Stark joined Ernest Rolls' revue, and met a young dancer named Thelma Trott (1906-1935), and the two women fell in love. Trott married Eric Mareo. The relationship was cut short in 1935 when Trott took a fatal overdose of the prescription drug Veronal in unexplained circumstances, leading to Mareo being charged with her murder. Freda Stark longed to be reunited with her long dead lover Thelma Mareo and her friends made sure that wish was granted after her death in 1999: Freda, who died at 88 in a West Auckland rest home, was cremated and her ashes were buried at the foot of Thelma's grave in Waikumete Cemetery (4128 Great North Rd, Glen Eden, Waitakere 0602), under the words she put there long before: “Waiting till we meet again… Freda.”

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Farley Earle Granger, Jr. was an American actor, best known for his two collaborations with director Alfred Hitchcock; Rope in 1948 and Strangers on a Train in 1951.
Born: July 1, 1925, San Jose, California, United States
Died: March 27, 2011, New York City, New York, United States
Education: North Hollywood High School
Find A Grave Memorial# 67599447
Books: Include Me Out: My Life from Goldwyn to Broadway
Parents: Farley Earle Granger I, Eva Hopkins
Anniversary: November 22, 1963

Farley Earle Granger was an American actor, best known for his collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock, Rope and Strangers on a Train. Despite his three unsuccessful Broadway experiences, Granger continued to focus on theater in the early 1960s. He accepted an invitation from Eva Le Gallienne to join her National Repertory Theatre. During their first season, while the company was in Philadelphia, John Fitzgerald Kennedy was assassinated. The President had attended NRT's opening night and post-performance gala in the nation's capital, so the news hit everyone in the company especially hard. Granger had become close friends with production supervisor Robert Calhoun, and although both had felt a mutual attraction, they never had discussed it. That night they became lovers.

Together from 1963 to 2008: 45 years.
Farley Granger (July 1, 1925 – March 27, 2011)
Robert Calhoun (1931 - May 24, 2008)
Anniversary: November 22, 1963

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: North Hollywood High School (5231 Colfax Ave, North Hollywood, CA 91601) is a public high school in Valley Village in Los Angeles, California. NHHS is located in the San Fernando Valley and enrolls approximately 3,000 students each year. It is located in District 2 of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Built in 1927, Lankershim High School was named for the town of Lankershim (first called Toluca, now North Hollywood) and its founding family. It opened with only a main building, auditorium, gymnaisum, and a shop & mechanics building, with 800 students, graduating its first class in 1928. The Board of Education was asked to employ teachers who were already residents of North Hollywood, creating jobs and education opportunities right in the area. Lankershim High School was renamed North Hollywood High School in 1929. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Farley Granger (1925–2011), Susan Sontag (1933-2004).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Theatre: Helen Arthur was a theatre manager, known for managing the Neighborhood Playhouse for thirteen seasons (1915-1927). Arthur was the manager of several notable actors, including Ruth Draper.

Address: 340 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75658, -73.96529)

Place
The Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre is a full-time professional conservatory for actors located at 340 E 54th St, New York, NY 10022, and is known as the home of the Meisner technique. Neighborhood Playhouse had originally been founded as an off-Broadway theatre by philanthropists Alice Lewisohn and Irene Lewisohn in 1915, but closed in 1927. The following year, it re-opened as the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre with the addition of Rita Wallach Morgenthau. Sanford Meisner joined the faculty in 1935 from the Group Theatre. Meisner used his study of Russian theatre and acting innovator, Konstantin Stanislavski's System to develop his own technique, as an alternative to Lee Strasberg's Method acting. In 1955, Farley Granger (1925-2011) moved to New York and began studying with Bob Fosse, Gloria Vanderbilt, James Kirkwood and Tom Tryon in a class taught by Sandy Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse.

Life
Who: Helen Jean Arthur (March 29, 1879 – December 9, 1939) and Agnes Morgan (October 31, 1879 - May 25, 1976)
Helen Arthur was born in Lancaster, Wisconsin to Lemuel John Arthur (a lawyer) and Mary Emma Ziegler Arthur. She attended Evanston Township High School, followed by a year at Northwestern University (1897-1898), and received a Bachelor of Law degree from New York University in 1901. She was the first woman to try a criminal case in New York State. During her time in law practice she co-authored the handbook "Domestic Employment: A Handbook" which sought to explain applicable laws to an area which was subject to abuse. Helen Arthur's legal work brought her into contact with Lillian Wald of the Henry Street Settlement. Arthur was in residence at the Settlement during 1906, and was one of two people known to have had romantic relationships with Wald. The two vacationed together during August-September 1906. While practicing law Arthur began writing theatre reviews for a small publication. She soon gave up her law practice and became the agent for actress Grace George. She performed secretarial work for the theatrical managers, the Shubert brothers Lee and Jacob J. Shubert. A 1915 notice in Variety announced her leaving the Shuberts brothers "after seven or eight years." The notice also mentioned that Arthur, an "occasional authoress," had written a skit based on the Shuberts featuring characters Jake and Lee and that Arthur had taken the "Jake" part. By 1915, Alice Lewisohn (later Alice Crowley) and her sister Irene Lewisohn were in need of legal help for their nascent theatrical project, the Neighborhood Playhouse. Alice called upon Arthur to assist her, becoming part of the staff, despite Sarah Cowell Le Moyne's (the head teacher) distaste for "all feminists who invade the profession of men." A 1916 article in Variety described Arthur as publicity director. Arthur was responsible for introducing Agnes Morgan (by that time her partner) to Lewisohn, who went on to become one of the Playhouse's most significant directors. In her memoir of the Playhouse, Lewisohn (now Crowley) described Arthur as "lithe, shirt-waisted, and stiff-colored Helen Arthur, dapper, bright-eyed, keen; and her friend the quiet, serious, watchful Agnes Morgan." A Playhouse performer described her as "quite a pixie, bright as a whistle, and a little devilish too." Of the relationship between Arthur and Agnes Morgan, another Playhouse performer said they "were a lesbian couple; just everyone knew." Helen Arthur also engaged in pursuits outside of the Playhouse. In 1916 she was the manager for actress Doris Keane. In 1918 Arthur managed the Over There Theatre League in which a number of actors sailed for France and England to perform for the troops stationed there. She was director of the Casino Theatre in Newport, Rhode Island from 1935-1939 during its summer seasons. The plays she produced there included “At Marian's” (with Laurette Taylor), “Night in the House” and two plays written by Morgan, “If Love Were All” and “Grandpa” (written under the pseudonym Cutler Hatch). In 1936 she and Morgan joined the Popular Price Unit of the Federal Theatre Project where they presented “American Holiday,” “Thirteenth Chair” and “Class of '29.” In 1938-1939 she was appointed executive director of the Ann Arbor Dramatic Season for 1938. After the Neighborhood Playhouse closed in 1927, Helen Arthur and Agnes Morgan formed their own company, Actor-Managers, Inc. Arthur continued to manage notable actresses including Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Florence Roberts as well as the singer Marion Kirby and dancer Angna Enters. She managed Ruth Draper for ten years, from 1929 until her death in 1939. Helen Arthur died of cerebral thrombosis at the Neurological Institute of New York. Her obituary stated that she had homes in New York City and Pleasantville, New York. Agnes Morgan was a director, playwright, actress and theatrical producer. She is most known for her association with the Neighborhood Playhouse where she was a director and functioned in numerous other roles. Morgan was born in Le Roy, New York to Frank H. Morgan, an editor, and Sarah L. Cutler Morgan, a teacher. Lewisohn described Morgan as "quiet, serious, watchful." In speaking the Lewisohn sister, founders of the Playhouse joining with Morgan and Helen Arthur, Lewisohn added "...never had five people cast in such different molds joined forces with more congeniality." In speaking of two comedies, “Great Catherine: Whom Glory Still Adores” by Shaw and “The Queen's Enemies” by Lord Dunsany, Crowley recalled that "the spirited quality in both productions was largely due to Agnes Morgan's skillful direction. Perhaps Great Catherine was paving the way to her gift in handling burlesque, which was later to create an infectious vogue on Grand Street and Broadway through the [Grand Street Follies].” Crowley described Morgan as an essential part of the Playhouse: “Agnes Morgan's apprentices were the stage crew, a neighborhood corps of assistant property boys, scene shifters, and painters But her technical facility was such that she was everywhere in the theatre, combining a collection of functions the mere mention of which would drive any "self-respecting" member of the theatre union of today into a decline. Skilled as an actor, she played an occasional role; she developed the technical side of lighting, and had an instinctive gift for direction, as for the function of stage manager. As an amateur she responded to any production need while pursuing her professional career as playwright.” Grand St. Follies: Neighborhood Playhouse had an in-house burlesque. While searching for an experimental play (promised to subscribers), Lewisohn suggested that the in-house burlesque be open to the subscribers. It had been the inspiration and creation of Agnes Morgan and Helen Arthur. The following season, staff were concerned as to whether they could equal the success of the first Grand Street Follies. "...it was clear that her genius for brilliant satire had flowered overnight. Morgan directed thirty-one out of forty-four dramas mounted at the Neighborhood Playhouse between 1915 and its closing in 1927, as well as dance and festival shows. After the Playhouse closed she formed her own company, originally sharing the name of the annual Grand Street Follies and later called Actor-Managers, Inc. which existed until 1939. She directed eight plays on Broadway between 1927 and 1935 as well as three plays for the Federal Theatre Project. In 1931 she wrote the play “If Love Were All” under the pseudonym Cutler Hatch and staged it as well. In 1940 Morgan became associate director of the Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey, a position she held until 1972. Morgan died in 1976 in San Bernardino, California.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England.
Born: December 9, 1869, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 1947, Tenterden, United Kingdom
Education: Royal Academy of Music
Lived: Priest’s House, Small Hythe Rd, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, UK (51.51107, -0.12449)
Fallows Green, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
7 Smith Square, SW1P
Burleigh Mansions, 96 St Martin’s Lane, WC2N
22 Barkston Gardens, SW5
221 Camden Road, NW1
44 Finborough Road, SW10
33 Longridge Road, SW5
20 Taviton Street, WC1H
Buried: St John the Baptist, Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN307NG (memorial)
Buried alongside: Christabel Marshall and Clare Atwood
Find A Grave Memorial# 161166985
Movies: Victory and Peace, Her Greatest Performance, God and the Man, The Impossible Woman
Parents: Edward William Godwin, Ellen Terry
Siblings: Edward Gordon Craig

Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter
of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive English architect-designer Edward William Godwin. Her marriage to Martin Shaw in 1903 was prevented by Ellen Terry, out of jealousy for her daughter's affection, and by Christabel Marshall, with whom she lived from 1899 until they were joined in 1916 by the artist Clare Atwood, living in a ménage à trois until Craig's death in 1947. Her family looked down her lesbian lifestyle. Her brother Edward said Edith's sexuality was a result of her "hatred of men, initiated by the hatred of her father". Craig became involved in several books about her mother and George Bernard Shaw, which created a rift with her brother, who asked Craig not to write about their mother. In 1932, Craig adopted Ruby Chelta Craig. Craig was reconciled with her brother some time before her death.

Together from 1899 to 1947: 48 years.
Christabel Gertrude Marshall aka Christopher Marie St John (October 24, 1871 – October 20, 1960)
Clare “Tony” Atwood (May 11, 1866 – August 2, 1962)
Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)

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School: The Royal Academy of Music (Marylebone Rd, Marylebone, London NW1 5HT) is a conservatoire in London, a constituent college of the University of London and is one of the top conservatoires in the world. It was founded in 1822 and is Britain's oldest degree-granting music school. It received a Royal Charter in 1830. Edith Craig (1869–1947) attended the Royal Academy of Music and held a certificate in piano from Trinity College. In her later years, after the death of her mother, Craig dictated her memoirs to her friend Vera Holme, known as Jacko. Jacko wrote them down in a quarto notebook that was "lost in an attic" for decades and then sold to Ann Rachlin in 1978. They included Craig's reminiscences of her childhood and life with her mother, Edward Gordon Craig and Henry Irving. Rachlin published them in her book “Edy was a Lady” in 2011.

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House: Edith “Edy” Craig (1869-1947), like her younger brother Edward, was illegitimate, as her mother, Ellen Terry, was still married to her first husband George Frederic Watts when she eloped with architect-designer Edward William Godwin in 1868. Edith Craig was born the following year at Gusterwoods Common in Hertfordshire, and was given the surname “Craig” to avoid the stigma of illegitimacy. The family lived in Fallows Green, Harpenden AL5 4HD, designed by Godwin, until 1874. The couple separated in 1875.

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House: In 1916 Clare Atwood moved into the flat at 31 Bedford Street, Covent Garden, that Edith Craig shared with Christabel Marshall, forming a permanent ménage à trois.

Address: 31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, UK (51.51107, -0.12449)

Place
Christabel Marshall lived with Ellen Terry’s daughter Edith Craig from 1899 to Craig’s death in 1947. They lived together at 7 Smith Square, Westminster, London SW1P 3HT, from 1899 to 1907, and then 31 Bedford St, London WC2E 9ED, from 1910 to 1940, as well as Priest’s House, Tenterden, Kent. Ellen Terry’s physical and mental health deteriorated slowly over a number of years. By the 1920s her eyesight was very poor and she had become increasingly confused. For financial reasons she was obliged to sell her Chelsea house in 1921 and took up residence in a smaller flat in Burleigh Mansions, 96 St Martin's Ln, London WC2N 4AX. In her diary for April 26, she reflects upon the move: “I am unhinged (not unhappy) and comfortable. I wonder where everything is. Cannot remember new things. All is changed. Change at 73 puzzles the will. I live in puzzledom.” She retained her country home at Smallhythe, however, and it was there she spent her last years, gradually “drifting away into a strange vague world where nothing is real and people bear no names.” She died early in the morning on 21 July 1928, following a paralysing stroke. The writer Christopher St John (née Christabel Marshall), present at Ellen’s bedside with her daughter Edith Craig, described her final hours: “The face had not been much changed by that cruel blow from Nature. But the breath of life had changed. It came more and more painfully as the dawn approached. The hand, gripping Edy’s, moved from finger to finger, and with a last effort of the voice, not miraculously clear and loud now, but thick and indistinct, spelt out on those fingers the word ‘Happy’, ‘H-a-p-p-y’ over and over again.” Their friends Radclyffe Hall (1880-1943) and Una Troubridge lived from 1933 to 1935 in nearby 17 Talbot House, 98 St Martin's Ln, London WC2N 4AX. At the same address, 31 Bedford Street, lived Margaret Webster (1905-1972), American-British theater actress, producer and director, when she was a child with her parents. Margaret Webster was born in New York City, the daughter of two famous actors, Ben Webster and Dame May Whitty. In the summer of 1906, the family sailed back to England, where Margaret was baptized on October 29, 1907, in St. Paul’s Church (known as the “Actors’ Church”) in Covent Garden. The Websters lived in an upstairs flat in a multistory, redbrick Victorian building. When she was two years old in November 1907, the family returned to the United States and settled in New York City. When the family returned to London a year later, they settled again into the flat on Bedford Street where they remained until the WWII.

Life
Who: Christabel Gertrude Marshall (October 24, 1871 – October 20, 1960), aka Christopher Marie St John
Christabel Marshall was a British campaigner for women’s suffrage, a playwright and author. Marshall lived in a ménage à trois with the artist Clare Atwood and the actress, theatre director, producer and costume designer Edith Craig from 1916 until Craig’s death in 1947. She, Edith Craig and Clare Atwood were friends with many artists and writers including lesbian novelist Radclyffe Hall, who lived near Tenterden in Rye. As Christopher St John in 1915, she published her autobiographical novel “Hungerheart,” which she had started in 1899, and which she based on her relationship with Edith Craig and her own involvement in the women’s suffrage movement. St John was contracted by Ellen Terry to assist on various publications. After Terry’s death in 1928, St John published the “Shaw–Terry Correspondence” (1931) and “Terry’s Four Lectures on Shakespeare” (1932.) St John and Craig revised and edited “Terry’s Memoirs” (1933.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Some of St John’s papers have survived in the National Trust’s Ellen Terry and Edith Craig Archive. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960.

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House: The home of Victorian actress Ellen Terry, where you can explore the house, cottage garden and even attend a show at the XVII century thatched Barn Theatre.

Address: B2082, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 11.00-17.00 (managed by the National Trust)
Phone:+44 1580 762334
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/smallhythe-place
English Heritage Building ID: 179818 (Grade II, 1950)

Place
Built in the late XV or early XVI century
Smallhythe Place in Small Hythe, near Tenterden in Kent, is a half-timbered house and since 1947 is cared for by the National Trust. The house was originally called “Port House” and before the River Rother and the sea receded it served a thriving shipyard: in Old English hythe means "landing place.” It was the home of the Victorian actress Ellen Terry from 1899 to her death in the house in 1928. The house contains Ellen Terry’s theatre collection, while the cottage grounds include her rose garden, orchard, nuttery and the working Barn Theatre. Terry first saw the house in the company of Henry Irving, the manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London’s Covent Garden, with whom she shared a famous theatrical partnership for nearly 24 years. The house was opened to the public by Terry’s daughter Edith Craig in 1929, as a memorial to her mother. The National Trust supported Craig in her running of the museum from 1939, and took over the property when she died in 1947. There are several paintings by the artist Clare Atwood, one of the romantic companions of Edith Craig. In an adjoining room is a letter from Oscar Wilde begging Terry to accept a copy of his first play. There is also a selection of sumptuous costumes dating from Terry’s time at the Lyceum Theatre. In 1929, Craig set up the Barn Theatre in the house’s grounds, where the plays of William Shakespeare were performed every year on the anniversary of her mother’s death. This tradition continues to this day.

Life
Who: Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)
Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women’s suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive architect-designer Edward William Godwin, and the sister of theatre practitioner Edward Gordon Craig. As a lesbian, an active campaigner for women’s suffrage, and a woman working as a theatre director and producer, Edith Craig has been recovered by feminist scholars as well as theatre historians. Craig lived in a ménage à trois with the dramatist Christabel Marshall (Christopher Marie St John, 1871-1960) and the artist Clare “Tony” Atwood (1866-1962) from 1916 until her death. Virginia Woolf is said to have used Edith Craig as a model for the character of Miss LaTrobe in her novel “Between the Acts” (1941.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960. Atwood suffered a fractured femur, senile myocarditis and heart failure, and died at Kench Hill Nursing Home, Tenterden, Kent, on August 2, 1962. When Edith Craig died she left a request that her ashes be buried with her two lesbian partners. By the time they passed away in the 1960s, Edy’s ashes were mislaid. Dismayed at the loss of her ashes, her two friend opted for burial and they lie side by side next to the gate of the tiny churchyard at St John the Baptist (Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN30 7NG), leading to the Priest’s House where they had lived with Edy. A memorial stone to Edith Craig is in the same cemetery.

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Adrienne Cecile Rich was an American poet, essayist and radical feminist. She was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century", and was credited with ...
Born: May 16, 1929, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: March 27, 2012, Santa Cruz, California, United States
Education: Harvard University
Find A Grave Memorial# 87498497
Spouse: Alfred H. Conrad (m. 1953–1970)
Children: David Conrad, Jacob Conrad, Pablo Conrad
Employer: Brandeis University

Adrienne Rich was a poet, essayist and feminist. She was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century", credited with bringing "the oppression of women and lesbians to the forefront of poetic discourse." The senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award selected her first collection of poetry, A Change of World; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1976, Rich began her lifelong partnership with Jamaican-born novelist and editor Michelle Cliff. From 1976 to 1979, Rich taught at City College as well as Rutgers University as an English Professor. In 1979, she received an honorary doctorate from Smith College and moved with Cliff to Montague, MA. Ultimately, they moved to Santa Cruz, where Rich continued her career as a professor, lecturer, poet, and essayist. Rich and Cliff took over editorship of the lesbian arts journal Sinister Wisdom (1981–1983). Rich taught and lectured at Scripps College, San Jose State University, and Stanford University during the 1980s and 1990s. From 1981 to 1987, Rich served as an A.D. White Professor-At-Large for Cornell University.

Together from 1976 to 2012: 36 years.
Adrienne Rich (May 16, 1929 - March 27, 2012)
Michelle Cliff (born November 2, 1946)

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Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Marshall Kirk (1957-2005) was valedictorian of his high school class and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980, majoring in psychology, and writing his honors thesis on the testing of gifted children. In 1987 Kirk partnered with Hunter Madsen (writing under the pen-name "Erastes Pill") to write an essay, "The Overhauling of Straight America." The pair developed their argument in the 1989 book "After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ’90s." The book outlined a public relations strategy for the LGBT movement.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Agnes Morgan (1879-1976) attended Radcliffe College and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1901 and her Master of Arts in 1903. In 1904 she attended George Pierce Baker's 47 Workshop at Harvard University.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Harry Elkins Widener (1885-1912) was the son of George and Eleanor Widener. He lived in Elkins Park, PA. Harry studied at Hill School, a private establishment in Pottstown, PA; graduating in 1903 he left to study at Harvard (graduated 1907). Harry was a noted collector of rare books, included in his collection was a Shakespeare Folio and a Gutenberg Bible. Harry developed his bibliophilic interests while in college, when he did research among early books with coloured plates illustrating costumes for a Hasty Pudding Theatrical. In the spring of 1912, he went to England to buy books (including the second edition of Bacon's Essais, 1598) and it was while returning from this visit that he lost his life along with many of the books purchased. Harry boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg with his father and mother, George Widener's valet Edwin Keeping and Mrs Widener's maid Emily Geiger. The Widener's occupied cabins C-80-82. On the night of April 14th Harry and his parents threw a party in honour of Captain Smith which was attended by some of the most wealthy passengers on board the Titanic. Later that night Harry helped his mother into boat 4 and then stood back to await his fate, at one point he was joined by William Ernest Carter who advised him to try for a boat but Harry "I'll think I'll stick to the big ship, Billy, and take a chance." A story, never confirmed by Mrs Widener, romanticizes the death of her son. He was about to step into a lifeboat that would have saved his life when he remembered a newly acquired and unique copy of Bacon's Essais and ran back to get it. After his death the librarians turned to Mrs Widener for a donation in memory of her bibliophile son. His mother gave $2,000,000 for the construction of the building that would also house her son's collection and in 1915 the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library was dedicated. Horace Trumbauer (hon. A.M. 1915) of Philadelphia designed the library building. Harvard still pays for fresh flowers to be placed under a portrait of Widener in the chapel.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.

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School: Brandeis University (415 South St, Waltham, MA 02453) is an American private research university in Waltham, Massachusetts, 9 miles (14 km) west of Boston. Founded in 1948 as a non-sectarian, coeducational institution sponsored by the Jewish community, Brandeis was established on the site of the former Middlesex University. The university is named after Louis Brandeis, the first Jewish Justice of the U.S Supreme Court. Notable queer alumni and faculty: poet Olga Broumas (born 1949); Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), composer and conductor; author Stephen McCauley (born 1955); Michael McDowell (1950-1999), novelist and script writer; Pauli Murray (1910-1985), feminist, civil rights advocate, lawyer, and ordained priest; Adrienne Rich (1929-1955), poet, essayist and feminist; Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), First Lady of the United States.

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Walter "Walt" Whitman was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works.
Born: May 31, 1819, West Hills, New York, United States
Died: March 26, 1892, Camden, New Jersey, United States
Lived: 99 Ryerson St, Brooklyn, NY 11205
330 Mickle Boulevard, Camden, NJ 08103, USA (39.94246, -75.12353)
431 Stevens Street, Camden
246 Old Walt Whitman Rd, Huntington Station, NY 11746
Buried: Harleigh Cemetery, Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 1098
Poems: Song of Myself, O Captain! My Captain!, more
Awards: Golden Kite Award for Picture Book Illustration

Walt Whitman was an American poet, essayist and journalist. He was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality. Peter Doyle may be the most likely candidate for the love of Whitman's life, according to biographer David S. Reynolds. Doyle was a 21 years old bus conductor whom Whitman met around 1866, when he was 45, and the two were inseparable for several years. Interviewed in 1895, Doyle said: "We were familiar at once—I put my hand on his knee—we understood. He did not get out at the end of the trip—in fact went all the way back with me.” Oscar Wilde met Whitman in America in 1882 and wrote to the homosexual rights activist George Cecil Ives that there was "no doubt" about the great American poet's sexual orientation—"I have the kiss of Walt Whitman still on my lips", he boasted. In 1924 Edward Carpenter, then an old man, described an erotic encounter he had had in his youth with Whitman to Gavin Arthur, who recorded it in detail in his journal.

Together from 1866 to 1892: 26 years.
Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 - March 26, 1892)
Peter Doyle (June 3, 1843 - April 19, 1907)

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House: Walt Whitman (1819-1892) was born in West Hills, Town of Huntington, Long Island (246 Old Walt Whitman Rd, Huntington Station, NY 11746), to parents with interests in Quaker thought, Walter and Louisa Van Velsor Whitman. The second of nine children, he was immediately nicknamed "Walt" to distinguish him from his father. Walter Whitman, Sr. named three of his seven sons after American leaders: Andrew Jackson, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson. The oldest was named Jesse and another boy died unnamed at the age of six months. The couple's sixth son, the youngest, was named Edward. At age four, Whitman moved with his family from West Hills to Brooklyn, living in a series of homes, in part due to bad investments. Whitman looked back on his childhood as generally restless and unhappy, given his family's difficult economic status. One happy moment that he later recalled was when he was lifted in the air and kissed on the cheek by the Marquis de Lafayette during a celebration in Brooklyn on July 4, 1825.

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House: Walt Whitman (1819-1892) lived at 99 Ryerson St (Brooklyn, NY 11205) in 1855, the year he published his poetry collection “Leaves of Grass.” When this collection was published, it is said many reviewers labeled it as “obscene” and one reviewer allegedly came close to calling him gay, saying “he is guilty of that horrible sin that is not to be named among Christians.”

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House: The Walt Whitman House is a historic building in Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, which was the last residence of poet Walt Whitman, in his declining years before his death. It is located at 330 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, known as Mickle St. during Whitman’s time there.

Address: 330 Mickle Boulevard, Camden, NJ 08103, USA (39.94246, -75.12353)
Hours: Wednesday through Saturday 10.00-12.00, 13.00-16.00, Sunday 13.00-16.00
Phone: +1 856-964-5383
Website: http://www.nj.gov/dep/parksandforests/historic/whitman/
National Register of Historic Places: 66000461, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.

Address: Harleigh Cemetery, 1640 Haddon Ave, Camden, NJ 08103, USA (39.92614, -75.09425)
Hours: Monday through Saturday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 856-963-3500
Website: http://www.harleighcemetery.org/

Place
When Whitman was 65 he bought the Mickle Street House and it was the first home he owned. Whitman called it his "shanty" or "coop,” emphasizing its shabbiness. His brother George did not approve of the purchase and the decision strained their relationship. Others questioned Whitman’s judgment as well. A friend called it "the worst house and the worst situated.” Another friend noted it "was the last place one would expect a poet to select for a home."

Life
Who: Walter "Walt" Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892)
In 1873, Walt Whitman suffered a paralytic stroke and in May the same year, his mother Louisa Whitman died; both events left him depressed. Louisa was in Camden, New Jersey at the time and Whitman arrived three days before her death. He returned to Washington, D. C., where he had been living, only briefly before returning to Camden to live with his brother George, paying room and board. The brothers lived on 431 Stevens St, Camden, NJ 08103 (burned in 1994) and Walt lived there for the next eleven years. Whitman spent the Christmas of 1883 with friends in Germantown, Pennsylvania while his brother was building a farmhouse in Burlington, New Jersey that included accommodations for the poet. Instead of moving with his brother, however, Whitman purchased the Mickle Street House in Camden in the spring of 1884. The lot on which the home was standing was purchased in 1847 by a clerk named Adam Hare for $350. It was likely Hare who built the house. By the time Whitman bought it, it was a two-story row house with six rooms and no furnace. Its recent occupant was Alfred Lay, the grandfather of a young friend of Whitman. When Lay couldn’t pay the rent for March, Whitman loaned him the $16 he needed. Whitman soon after purchased the home for $1,750, which he earned from sales of a recent edition of “Leaves of Grass” and through a loan from publisher George William Childs. Lay continued to live there with his wife, cooking to cover part of their rent and paying $2 a week; the Lays moved out on January 20, 1885. Whitman later invited Mary Davis, a sailor’s widow living a few blocks away, to serve as his housekeeper in exchange for free rent in the house. She moved in February 24, 1885, bringing with her a cat, a dog, two turtledoves, a canary, and other assorted animals. While living in the home, Whitman completed several poems, many focused on public events. One was a sonnet published in the February 22, 1885, issue of the Philadelphia Press called "Ah, Not This Granite Dead and Cold" which commemorated the completion of the Washington Monument. Some of Whitman’s writing was done in his bedroom, which visitors noted was similar to a newspaper office, piled with stacks of paper. During his years in the house, however, Whitman only earned an estimated $1,300, of which only $20 came from royalties from “Leaves of Grass” and about $350 came from new works. The majority of his earnings were donations from admirers and well-wishers. Whitman’s health had been failing since before he moved into the home and he began making preparations for his death. For $4,000, he commissioned a granite house-shaped mausoleum which he visited often during its construction. In the last week of his life, too weak to lift a knife or fork, he wrote: "I suffer all the time: I have no relief, no escape: it is monotony — monotony — monotony — in pain." He spent his last years preparing a final edition of “Leaves of Grass”. At the end of 1891, he wrote to a friend: "L. of G. at last complete—after 33 y’rs of hackling at it, all times & moods of my life, fair weather & foul, all parts of the land, and peace & war, young & old.” In January 1892, an announcement was published in the New York Herald in which Whitman asked that "this new 1892 edition... absolutely supersede all previous ones. Faulty as it is, he decides it as by far his special and entire self-chosen poetic utterance." The final edition of “Leaves of Grass” was published in 1892 and is referred to as the "deathbed edition.” Whitman died at 6:43 p.m. on March 26, 1892, a few days before his 73rd birthday. His autopsy was performed at the home and revealed that the left lung had collapsed and the right was at one-eighth its breathing capacity. A public viewing of Whitman’s body was also held at the Camden home; over one thousand people visited in three hours. In his final years, Whitman had noted his appreciation for the house and for Camden. He wrote, "Camden was originally an accident—but I shall never be sorry. I was left over in Camden. It has brought me blessed returns." Four days after his death, he was buried in his tomb at Harleigh Cemetery (1640 Haddon Ave, Camden, NJ 08103). After Whitman’s death, the majority of the home’s contents remained at the house. His heirs sold it to the city of Camden in 1921 and it was opened to the public five years later. In 1947, ownership was passed to the state of New Jersey. The Walt Whitman House is operated as a museum by the New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry. The home is now open to the public. It is operated with help from the Walt Whitman Association. Included in the collection is the bed in which the poet died and the death notice that was taped to his front door.

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Sarah Bernhardt was a French stage and early film actress. She was referred to as "the most famous actress the world has ever known", and is regarded as one of the finest actors of all time.
Born: October 22, 1844, Paris, France
Died: March 26, 1923, 17th arrondissement, Paris, France
Education: Conservatoire de Paris
Lived: Omni Parker House, 60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
Musée Sarah Bernhardt, Pointe des Poulains, 56360 Sauzon, France (47.38575, -3.24933)
The Savoy Hotel, Strand, WC2R
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 44, #6, GPS (lat/lon): 48.86119, 2.39489
Find A Grave Memorial# 1333
Movies: Hamlet, Les Amours de la reine Élisabeth, Jeanne Doré, more

Louise Abbema was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Epoque. She first received recognition when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly lover. Bernhardt was a French stage and early film actress, and has been referred to as "the most famous actress the world has ever known." In 1990, a painting by Abbema, depicting the two on a boat ride on the lake in the Bois de Boulogne, was donated to the Comedie-Francaise. The enclosed letter stated that the painting was "Peint par Louise Abbéma, le jour anniversaire de leur liaison amoureuse (Painted by Louise Abbema on the anniversary of their love affair)." Abbéma was among the female artists whose works were exhibited in the Women's Building at the 1893 World Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Sarah Bernhardt died "peacefully, without suffering, in the arms of her son” in 1923. Abbéma died in Paris in 1927. At the end of the 20th century, as contributions by women to the arts in past centuries received more critical and historical attention, her works have been enjoying a renewed popularity.

Together from 1875 to 1923: 48 years.
Louise Abbéma (October 30, 1853 – July 10, 1927)
Sarah Bernhardt (October 22, 1844 - March 26, 1923)

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School: The Conservatoire de Paris (209 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 75019) is a college of music and dance founded in 1795, now situated in the avenue Jean Jaurès in the 19th arrondissement of Paris, France. The Conservatoire offers instruction in music, dance, and drama, drawing on the traditions of the "French School". Notable queer alumni and faculty: Camille Saint-Saëns (1835–1921); Germaine Tailleferre (1892–1983); Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829–1869); Raymond Roussel (1877–1933); Reynaldo Hahn (1874–1947); Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923); Virgil Thomson (1896–1989).

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House: In August 1894, at the age of 50, Sarah Bernhardt discovered the delights of Belle-Île with her friend, the painter Georges Clairin. Succumbing to the charms of the landscape, she immediately bougth a former military fort on the Pointe des Poulains.

Address: Musée Sarah Bernhardt, Pointe des Poulains, 56360 Sauzon, France (47.38575, -3.24933)
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 10.30-17.30
Phone: +33 2 97 31 61 29
Website: http://www.belleileenmer.com/

Place
Built in 1897
In order to accommodate her family every summer for three months, Sarah Bernhardt built at Belle-Île, opposite the fort, a new villa called the “Les cinq Parties du Monde” (Five Parties of the World.) "The first time I saw Belle Isle, I saw it as a haven, a paradise, a shelter. I discovered at the windiest end a safe place, especially inaccessible, especially uninhabitable, especially uncomfortable and therefore enchanted me." Sarah Bernhardt. Each room in “Les cinq Parties du Monde” is named after a continent ("My nurse and I lived in Asia and Africa, my father and my mother in America, my sister in Europe and Oceania.”) The construction of the villa "Lysiane" (the first name of her granddaughter), a hundred meters further south, will allow to accommodate her many friends, like the painter Georges Clairin. Sarah Bernhardt deviated from a romantic vision of nature to create from scratch a more "urban" place with villas, a park, gazebo, and expanded trails that lead to the beach. Great sportwoman, she had a tennis court built. She regularly organized parties, where prestigious guests like Edouard VII, the King of the United Kingdom were invited. The actress will become the sole owner of Pointe des Poulains after buying the mansion Penhoët (Sarah Bernhardt feared that the building was to be converted into a hotel by a new owner) and the property built in the eastern part of the site by Baron Meunier du Houssoy in 1898. The tourist office of Belle-Île (created in 1911) and tour guides of the 1930s were living between the wars with the memory of the actress and her imprint on the place, using it as a "selling point" to maintain the attractiveness of the site and more broadly the island, and they built a "tourist resort" in 1927: "The tourist who excursionne in the region must visit Belle-Ile-en-Mer. They will first appreciate the charm of the voyage often deemed too short, and will be amazed by the grandiose and impressive sites of the world famous Belle-Ile, aptly named, and of which our great actress Sarah Bernhardt, who had chosen as a resting resident, said: "I like to come every year in this wonderful island in the middle of its simple and friendly people, taste the charm of its wild and imposing beauty and invigorating under its sky new artistic sources"(The Rougery Blondel, 1928.)

Life
Who: Sarah Bernhardt (c. October 22/23, 1844 – March 26, 1923)
Sarah Bernhardt’s friendship with Louise Abbéma (1853-1927), a French impressionist painter, some nine years her junior, was so close and passionate that the two women were rumored to be lovers. In 1990, a painting by Abbéma, depicting the two on a boat ride on the lake in the bois de Boulogne, was donated to the Comédie-Française. The accompanying letter stated that the painting was "Peint par Louise Abbéma, le jour anniversaire de leur liaison amoureuse" (loosely translated: "Painted by Louise Abbéma on the anniversary of their love affair.”) In 1922, the actress who wanted to end her days in what she called “her paradise” was forced to sell her house at Belle-Île. She died in March 1923, few months after her last holidays in her fort. The actress is buried in the Père Lachaise cemetery.

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Accomodation: The Savoy Hotel (Strand, London WC2R 0EU) is a luxury hotel in central London. Built by the impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte with profits from his Gilbert and Sullivan opera productions, it opened on August 6, 1889. It was the first in the Savoy group of hotels and restaurants owned by Carte's family for over a century. The Savoy was the first luxury hotel in Britain, introducing electric lights throughout the building, electric lifts, bathrooms in most of the lavishly furnished rooms, constant hot and cold running water and many other innovations. Carte hired César Ritz as manager and Auguste Escoffier as chef de cuisine; they established an unprecedented standard of quality in hotel service, entertainment and elegant dining, attracting royalty and other rich and powerful guests and diners. Notable queer residents: Sarah Bernhardt in 1913, Marlon Brando in 1967, Dorothy Caruso in 1902, Noël Coward from 1941 to 1943, Sergei Diaghilev in 1919, Marlene Dietrich from 1924 to 1925, Cary Grant in 1966, Katharine Hepburn, Vaslav Nijinsky in 1911, Oscar Wilde.

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Accomodation: With its close proximity to Boston’s Theater District, the Omni Parker House (60 School St, Boston, MA 02108) played an important role for thespians. Many of the XIX century’s finest actors made the Parker House a home away from home, including Charlotte Cushman, Sarah Bernhardt, Edwin Booth, and the latter’s handsome, matinee-idol brother, John Wilkes. Charlotte Cushman (1816-1876) died of pneumonia in her hotel room on the third floor in 1876, aged 59. During the XX century, that list expanded to include stars of stage, screen, and television—including Joan Crawford, Judy Garland, Ann Magret, and Marlow Thomas.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Cemetery: Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.

Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Website: www.parisinfo.com

Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on 2May 1, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”

Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) (Plot: Division 44, #6) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942) (Plot: Division 74, row 2.), buried together.
• Jean Börlin (1893-1930) was a Swedish dancer and choreographer born in Härnösand. He worked with Michel Fokine, who was his teacher in Stockholm. Jean Borlin was a principal dancer of the Royal Swedish Ballet when Rolf de Mare brought him to Paris in in 1920 as first dancer and choreographer of the Ballets Suedois at the Theatre de Champs-Elysees. According to Paul Colin, de Mare “was very rich” and he had brought the Swedish Ballet to Paris “especially to show his young lover, Jean Borlin.” The Stockholm press derided de Mare's sexual orientation. In contrast, open-minded Paris welcomed the Ballets Suedois. One wonders what might have happened if de Mare had not disbanded the company in 1925, reportedly because its recent performances had disappointed him. But he had a new lover. Borlin's last years were melancholy. By 1925, he was exhausted: he had choreographed all 23 ballets in his company's repertory and danced in each of its 900 performances -- a grueling schedule that led him to alcohol and drugs. In 1930, he opened a school in New York but died of heart failure shortly thereafter. He was only 37. He was buried at his own wish in the cemetery of Pére Lachaise in Paris in January l931. A stricken de Mare founded Les Archives Internationales de Danse, in his memory.
• Jean Jacques Régis de Cambacérès (1753-1824) 1st Duke of Parma, later 1st Duke of Cambacérès, was a French lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire, best remembered as the author of the Napoleonic Code, which still forms the basis of French civil law and inspired civil law in many countries. The common belief that Cambacérès is responsible for decriminalizing homosexuality in France is in error. Cambacérès was not responsible for ending the legal prosecution of homosexuals. He did play a key role in drafting the Code Napoléon, but this was a civil law code. He had nothing to do with the Penal Code of 1810, which covered sexual crimes. Before the French Revolution, sodomy had been a capital crime under royal legislation. The penalty was burning at the stake. Very few men, however, were ever actually prosecuted and executed for consensual sodomy (no more than five in the entire XVIII century). Sodomites arrested by the police were more usually released with a warning or held in prison for (at most) a few weeks or months. The National Constituent Assembly abolished the law against sodomy when it revised French criminal law in 1791 and got rid of a variety of offenses inspired by religion, including blasphemy. Cambacérès was a homosexual, his sexual orientation was well-known, and he does not seem to have made any effort to conceal it. He remained unmarried, and kept to the company of other bachelors. Napoleon is recorded as making a number of jokes on the subject. Robert Badinter once mentioned in a speech to the French National Assembly, during debates on reforming the homosexual age of consent, that Cambacérès was known in the gardens of the Palais-Royal as "tante Turlurette".
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) (Plot: Division 4, #6) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) (Plot: Division 26) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Elsie de Wolfe, Lady Mendl (1859/1865–1950) died in Versailles, at 84. Cremated, her ashes were placed in a common grave, the lease expired, in Pere Lachaise Cemetery.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) (Plot: Division 87 (columbarium), urn 6796) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Loie Fuller (1862–1928) (Plot: Division 87 (columbarium), urn 5382) was an American dancer who was a pioneer of both modern dance and theatrical lighting techniques. Fuller supported other pioneering performers, such as fellow United States-born dancer Isadora Duncan. Fuller helped Duncan ignite her European career in 1902 by sponsoring independent concerts in Vienna and Budapest. She was cremated and her ashes are interred in the columbarium at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Her sister, Mollie Fuller, had a long career as an actress and vaudeville performer.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Eileen Gray (1878–1976) was an Irish furniture designer and architect and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture. Gray was bisexual. She mixed in the lesbian circles of the time, being associated with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller, the singer Damia and Natalie Barney. Gray's intermittent relationship with Damia (or Marie-Louise Damien, 1889-1978) ended in 1938, after which they never saw each other again, although both lived into their nineties in the same city. Damia died at La Celle-Saint-Cloud, a western suburb of Paris, and was interred in the Cimetière de Pantin (163 Avenue Jean Jaurès, 93500 Aubervilliers). Today, she is considered to be the third greatest singer of chansons réalistes, after Edith Piaf and Barbara.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) (Plot: Division 85) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Guy Hocquenghem (1946–1988) (Plot: Division 87 (columbarium), urn 407) was a French writer, philosopher, and queer theorist. Hocquenghem was the first gay man to be a member of the Front Homosexuel d'Action Révolutionnaire (FHAR), originally formed by lesbian separatists who split from the Mouvement Homophile de France in 1971. Hocquenghem died of AIDS related complications on 28 August 1988, aged 41.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990) (Plot: Division 16), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Marie Laurencin (1883-1956) (Plot: Division 88) was a French painter and printmaker. She became an important figure in the Parisian avant-garde as a member of the Cubists associated with the Section d'Or. She became romantically involved with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire, and has often been identified as his muse. In addition, Laurencin had important connections to the salon of the American expatriate and famed lesbian writer Natalie Clifford Barney. She had heterosexual and lesbian affairs. During WWI, Laurencin left France for exile in Spain with her German-born husband, Baron Otto von Waëtjen, since through her marriage she had automatically lost her French citizenship. The couple subsequently lived together briefly in Düsseldorf. After they divorced in 1920, she returned to Paris, where she achieved financial success as an artist until the economic depression of the 1930s. During the 1930s she worked as an art instructor at a private school. She lived in Paris until her death.
• Jean Le Bitoux (1948-2010) was a French journalist and gay activist. He was the founder of “Gai pied,” the first mainstream gay magazine in France (its name was found by philosopher Michel Foucault). He was a campaigner for Holocaust remembrance of homosexual victims. By 1978, he ran for the National Assembly as a "homosexual candidate" alongside Guy Hocquenghem; they lost the election. In 1994, Le Bitoux co-authored the memoir of Pierre Seel, a French homosexual who was deported by the Nazis for being gay.
• Mary Elizabeth Clarke Mohl (1793–1883) was a British writer who was known as a salon hostess in Paris. She was known by her nickname of "Clarkey". She was admired for her independence and conversation. She eventually married the orientalist Julius von Mohl. She was an ardent Francophile, a feminist, and a close friend of Florence Nightingale. She wrote about her interest in the history of women's rights. She was buried with her husband, Julius von Mohl, at Père Lachaise Cemetery (56th division).
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Anna, Comtesse Mathieu de Noailles (1876–1933) (Plot: Division 28), Romanian-French writer. She died in 1933 in Paris, aged 56, and was interred in the Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) (Plot: Division 5) was a French composer and pianist. The biographer Richard D. E. Burton comments that, in the late 1920s, Poulenc might have seemed to be in an enviable position: professionally successful and independently well-off, having inherited a substantial fortune from his father. He bought a large country house, Le Grande Coteau (Chemin Francis Poulenc, 37210 Noizay), 140 miles (230 km) south-west of Paris, where he retreated to compose in peaceful surroundings. Yet he was troubled, struggling to come to terms with his sexuality, which was predominantly gay. His first serious affair was with the painter Richard Chanlaire, to whom he sent a copy of the Concert champêtre score inscribed, "You have changed my life, you are the sunshine of my thirty years, a reason for living and working". Nevertheless, while this affair was in progress Poulenc proposed marriage to his friend Raymonde Linossier. As she was not only well aware of his homosexuality but was also romantically attached elsewhere, she refused him, and their relationship became strained. He suffered the first of many periods of depression, which affected his ability to compose, and he was devastated in January 1930, when Linossier died suddenly at the age of 32. On her death he wrote, "All my youth departs with her, all that part of my life that belonged only to her. I sob ... I am now twenty years older". His affair with Chanlaire petered out in 1931, though they remained lifelong friends. On January 30, 1963, at his flat opposite the Jardin du Luxembourg, Poulenc suffered a fatal heart attack. His funeral was at the nearby church of Saint-Sulpice. In compliance with his wishes, none of his music was performed; Marcel Dupré played works by Bach on the grand organ of the church. Poulenc was buried at Père Lachaise Cemetery, alongside his family.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) (Plot: Division 85) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Raymond Radiguet (1903–1923) (Plot: Division 56) was a French novelist and poet whose two novels were noted for their explicit themes, and unique style and tone. In early 1923, Radiguet published his first and most famous novel, “Le Diable au corps” (The Devil in the Flesh). The story of a young married woman who has an affair with a sixteen-year-old boy while her husband is away fighting at the front provoked scandal in a country that had just been through WWI. Though Radiguet denied it, it was established later that the story was in large part autobiographical. He associated himself with the Modernist set, befriending Picasso, Max Jacob, Jean Hugo, Juan Gris and especially Jean Cocteau, who became his mentor. Radiguet also had several well-documented relationships with women. An anecdote told by Ernest Hemingway has an enraged Cocteau charging Radiguet (known in the Parisian literary circles as "Monsieur Bébé" – Mister Baby) with decadence for his tryst with a model: "Bébé est vicieuse. Il aime les femmes." ("Baby is depraved. He likes women.") Radiguet, Hemingway implies, employed his sexuality to advance his career, being a writer "who knew how to make his career not only with his pen but with his pencil." Aldous Huxley is quoted as declaring that Radiguet had attained the literary control that others required a long career to reach. On December 12, 1923, Radiguet died at age 20 in Paris of typhoid fever, which he contracted after a trip he took with Cocteau. Cocteau, in an interview with The Paris Review stated that Radiguet had told him three days prior to his death that, "In three days, I am going to be shot by the soldiers of God." In reaction to this death Francis Poulenc wrote, "For two days I was unable to do anything, I was so stunned". In her 1932 memoir, “Laughing Torso,” British artist Nina Hamnett describes Radiguet's funeral: "The church was crowded with people. In the pew in front of us was the negro band from the Boeuf sur le Toit. Picasso was there, Brâncuși and so many celebrated people that I cannot remember their names. Radiguet's death was a terrible shock to everyone. Coco Chanel, the celebrated dressmaker, arranged the funeral. It was most wonderfully done. Cocteau was too ill to come." ... "Cocteau was terribly upset and could not see anyone for weeks afterwards.”
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) (Plot: Division 20) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robbie Ross (1869-1918) (Plot: Division 89, Ross's remains are buried in Wilde's tomb), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) (Plot: Division 89) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) (Plot: Division 94) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) (Plot: Division 94) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. She is buried together with Gertrude Stein.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) (Plot: Division 89) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Married: December 1, 1978

Richard Summerbell is a Canadian mycologist, author and award-winning songwriter. He was editor in chief of an international scientific journal in mycology from 2000 to 2004. In the 1970s and 80s, he was a gay activist and an early commentator on (then) controversial topics such as AIDS and promiscuity and attitudes to homosexuality in organized religion. Summerbell trained as a botanist, receiving his master's degree from the University of British Columbia and his doctorate degree from the University of Toronto. He has lived with his partner, Ross Fraser, since 1978 and currently resides in Toronto, Canada. In 1985, he published a humorous look at gay life and culture entitled Abnormally Happy: A Gay Dictionary that satirizes stereotypical views
of gays and lesbians. As a songwriter and musician, Summerbell released an independent CD, Light Carries On, in 2004. One song from the CD, Thank you for being My Dog, won the 7th Annual Great American Song Contest in the Special Music category and won Summerbell a place in the Great American Song Hall of Fame.

Together since 1978: 37 years.
Richard Summerbell (born June 29, 1956)
Ross Fraser (born March 26)
Married: December 1, 1978

The anniversary of our self-annealed union is December 1. That's in memory of December 1, 1978. We'd first met in October, when he came to a house party I'd organized, with friends, for the new school year's members of what was then called Gay People of UBC, in Vancouver. I noticed a remarkably attractive and intelligent boy talking to one of our resident geniuses, librarianship student Bill Richardson - later to become a CBC host and well known writer of humour. Ross Fraser, the boy was called. I was busy being a host that night, but at a later event, a downtown gay club tour for students, I danced with him. He was sure I'd ask him home, but I went into a sort of courtship mode and didn't press. So at our third social encounter, the gay club's Christmas dance, he took the initiative and invited me to his '28th Floor Apartment' (The title of the most popular song I ever released). He shocked me by ordering a cab and taking me all the way from UBC on Point Grey to the West End - what a gesture for a student! That was December 1. Then he went home and spent Christmas with his mom in Nova Scotia, and, while there, drew a pencil sketch of a beautiful young man who had a distinct, idealized resemblance to me. I'm not a visual artist, but in some way, a similar sketch of him has remained in my heart to this day.-- Richard Summerbell 

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Sir Noël Peirce Coward was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise".
Born: December 16, 1899, Teddington, United Kingdom
Died: March 26, 1973, Port Maria, Jamaica
Education: Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts
Lived: 404 E 55th St
Firefly Estate, Firefly Hill Rd., Ocho Rios, Jamaica (18.4035, -76.9384)
Les Avants, 1833, Switzerland (46.4533, 6.9429)
131 Waldegrave Road, Teddington
Lord Milner Hotel, 111 Ebury Street, SW1W
56 Lenham Road, Suttton
37 Chesham Place, SW1X
Algonquin Hotel, 59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036
Hotel Café Royal, 68 Regent Street, W1B
Hotel and Café des Artistes, 1 W 67th St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77341, -73.97892)
17 Gerald Rd, Belgravia, London SW1W 9EH, UK (51.49326, -0.15181)
Prince of Wales Mansions, 70 Prince of Wales Drive, Battersea
The Ritz, London, 150 Piccadilly, W1J
The Savoy Hotel, Strand, WC2R
The Langham, London, 1C Portland Pl, Regent St, W1B
Buried: Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA (memorial)
Firefly Estate, Montego Bay, Saint James, Jamaica
St Paul Churchyard, Covent Garden, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England (memorial)
Find A Grave Memorial# 4389
Movies: In Which We Serve, Brief Encounter, Blithe Spirit, more

Sir Noël Coward was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise". Coward's most important relationship, which began in the mid-1940s and lasted until his death, was with South African-born English actor and singer Graham Payn. Coward did not publicly acknowledge his homosexuality, but it was discussed candidly after his death by biographers, including Payn, and in Coward's diaries and letters, published posthumously. On 28 March 1984, the Queen Mother unveiled a memorial stone in Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey. Thanked by Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend.” Coward had a 19-year friendship with Prince George, Duke of Kent. Coward reportedly admitted to the historian Michael Thornton that there had been "a little dalliance". Coward said, on the duke's death, "I suddenly find that I loved him more than I knew."

Together from 1945 to 1973: 28 years.
Graham Payn (April 25, 1918 - November 4, 2005)
Sir Noel Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: The Italia Conti Academy is a co-educational independent school for pupils aged from 10 to 19 years, and a theatre arts training school, based in London, England. It was founded in 1911 by the actress Italia Conti. The academy grew out of the first production of the play Where the Rainbow Ends. Italia Conti, an established actress with a reputation for her success working with young people, was asked to take over the job of training the cast. The play was a triumph and the school was born in basement studios in London’s Great Portland Street. The school moved to a church building at 14 Lamb's Conduit St, London WC1N 3LE. During WWII, the school was bombed, destroying all early records of the school. In 1972 the school moved to a building in Landor Road. It was the home to all full-time Italia Conti pupils for 9 years. In 1981 the school moved again for the final time to Goswell Road. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Gertrude Lawrence (1898–1952), Noël Coward (1899–1973).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 131 Waldegrave Rd, Teddington TW11 8LL, Sir Noël Coward (1899–1973), “Actor, Playwright and Songwriter born here." There is a bust of Coward, sculpted by Avril Vellacott, in Teddington Library, which is only a short distance away.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Sir Noël Coward (1899-1973), dramatist, actor and composer lived for a few years of his childhood (1906-1909) at 56 Lenham Rd, Sutton SM1 4BG. His first public appearance on stage was on July 23rd 1907 in a concert at Sutton Public Hall when he was about 8 years old.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Sir Noël Coward (1899-1973), English playwright, actor, director and singer. Most notable works include “Hayfever” (1925), “Blithe Spirit” (1941), his films, “In Which We Serve” (1942, Director, Actor, Screenwriter), “Our Man In Havana” (1959, Actor), “The Italian Job” (1969, Actor). Childhood and adolescent address was 70 Prince of Wales Mansions (Prince of Wales Dr, London SW11 4BG).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Nellie Burton kept a lodging house at 40 Half Moon St, Mayfair, London W1J 7BH, before, during, and after the Great War. She let out rooms to single gentlemen who were mostly “so,” and as the house was convenient to the hunting grounds along Piccadilly and in Green Park she acquired a flourishing clientele. Among her distinguished lodgers was Robbie Ross (1869-1918), Oscar Wilde’s literary executor, who spent his declining years here. He brought in his friend Siegfried Sassoon (‘ St. Siegfried’ Burton called him.) Sassoon lodged here during the war and sang her praises in numerous diary entries. Osbert Sitwell would drop by for tea, on one occasion accompanied by Anthony Powell. Sir Roderick Meiklejohn was a regular. The dour Scotsman was private secretary to Herbert Asquith, the prime minister. “He was a homosexual,” Max Egremont, Sassoon’s biographer, reported, “sustained by food, wine, bridge, the classics and obscene poetry.” His curious habit of mumbling and gesticulating wildly at the young men who attracted him made him an object of their mirth. One of these was the young actor Noël Coward, whom he introduced to 40 Half Moon Street. Even the composer Lord Berners, “short, swarthy, bald, dumpy, and simian,” his friend Beverley Nichols called him, was known to take the occasional room.

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House: Ebury Street was built mostly in the period 1815 to 1860, though the houses near 180 were called Fivefields Row when Mozart lived there in 1764. An area around here called "Eia" is mentioned in the Domesday Book and is the origin of the word "Ebury.”

Address: 182 Ebury St, Belgravia, London SW1W, UK (51.49131, -0.15245)

Place
Ebury Street is a street in Belgravia, City of Westminster, London. It runs from the Grosvenor Gardens junction south-westwards to Pimlico Road. The odd numbers run from 1 to 231 on the east side and even numbers 2 to 230 on the west side. There is a blue plaque at 22b to indicate that Ian Fleming lived here from 1934 to 1945. This building was constructed in 1830 as a Baptist church but is now divided into several flats. In 1847 Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson lived at number 42. During the period immediately following WWI, Number 42 was the workplace or head office of the "Soldiers’ Embroidery Industry.” Textile bags and workboxes were labelled thus, including the words "Made by the Totally Disabled,” i.e. disabled veterans doing rehabilitation work. An early photographer, William Downey (1829 - 1881), had studios at 57 and 61. He made some of the most famous photographs of celebrities of his day--Sarah Bernhardt, Oscar Wilde and the then Princess of Wales. At 65-69 is "Ken Lo’s Memories of China" a celebrated restaurant established in 1981 by Ken Lo (1920 - 2001.) At 109/11 is a blue plaque commemorating the actress Edith Evans. At 121 another plaque celebrates George Moore (novelist.) He spent his last years here and wrote “Conversations in Ebury Street” (1924.) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart lived at Fivefields Row from 5 August to September 24, 1764. The street is now called Mozart Terrace, but numbered in such a way that it is continuous with Ebury Street. At 231 Ebury Street is "La Poule au Pot" an expensive, celebrated restaurant. In 2006 it was voted number one in "Best for business" and "Best for romance" in Harden’s guide. Where Ebury Street meets Pimlico Road is a triangular area with seating and a bronze statue of Mozart (aged 8) by Philip Jackson. The area is unofficially called Mozart Square. The actor Terence Stamp shared a flat on this street with Michael Caine in 1963. Several houses on Ebury Street have been converted to hotels. Lygon Place is a terrace of Grade II listed buildings located off Ebury Street. The terrace dates from about 1900 and is an Arts and Crafts influenced design, by Eustace Balfour and Hugh Thackeray Turner. Notable former residents include Freeman Freeman-Thomas, 1st Marquess of Willingdon. Number 5 was an official residence of the Italian Air Attache. Institutions based here included the Margarine and Shortening Manufacturers’ Association; the Lion Services Club; and the Institution of Highways and Transportation.

Notable queer residents at Ebury Street:
• Playwright and all-round talented man Noël Coward (1899-1973) lived at number 111 Ebury Street, SW1W 9QU, from 1917. His parents ran it as a lodging house. This is where he wrote “The Vortex,” his first significant success. From 1922 onwards Coward travelled extensively, but kept a room at number 111 for whenever he was back in London. For a few years until fairly recently this was named the Noël Coward Hotel in his honour. Today it is the Lord Milner Hotel.
• Godfrey Winn (1906–1971) was an English journalist known as a columnist, and also a writer and actor. His career as a theatre actor began as a boy at the Haymarket Theatre and he appeared in many plays and films. He went on to write a number of novels and biographical works, and became a star columnist for the Daily Mirror and the Sunday Express newspapers, where he wrote "Dear Abby" articles for lovelorn women. Journalists nicknamed him “Winifred God” because of his popularity with women readers. Winn was homosexual, and never married. He lived at 115 Ebury Street, SW1W 9QU.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 182 Ebury Street, SW1W 8UP, Harold Nicholson (1886–1968) and Vita Sackville-West (1892–1962), "Writers and Gardeners lived here"

Life
Who: The Hon. Victoria Mary Sackville-West, Lady Nicolson, CH (March 9, 1892 – June 2, 1962), aka Vita Sackville-West, and Sir Harold George Nicolson KCVO CMG (November 21, 1886 – May 1, 1968)
Vita Sackville-West’s first close friend was Rosamund Grosvenor (1888-1944), who was four years her senior. She was the daughter of Algernon Henry Grosvenor (1864–1907), and the granddaughter of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Baron Ebury. Vita met Rosamund at Miss Woolf’s school in 1899, when Rosamund had been invited to cheer Vita up while her father was fighting in the Second Boer War. Rosamund and Vita later shared a governess for their morning lessons. As they grew up together, Vita fell in love with Rosamund, whom she called “Roddie” or “Rose” or “the Rubens lady.” Rosamund, in turn, was besotted with Vita. "Oh, I dare say I realized vaguely that I had no business to sleep with Rosamund, and I should certainly never have allowed anyone to find it out," she admits in her journal, but she saw no real conflict: "I really was innocent." Lady Sackville, Vita’s mother, invited Rosamund to visit the family at their villa in Monte Carlo; Rosamund also stayed with Vita at Knole House, at Rue Lafitte in Paris, and at Sluie, Scotland. During the Monte Carlo visit, Vita wrote in her diary, "I love her so much." Upon Rosamund’s departure, Vita wrote, "Strange how little I minded [her leaving]; she has no personality, that’s why." Their secret relationship ended in 1913 when Vita married Sir Harold Nicolson. Rosamund died in London in 1944 during a German V1 rocket raid. Vita Sackville-West and Sir Harold Nicolson had two children: Nigel (1917–2004), who became a well-known editor, politician, and writer, and Benedict (1914–1978), an art historian. In the 1930s, the family acquired and moved to Sissinghurst Castle, near Cranbrook, Kent. Sissinghurst had once been owned by Vita’s ancestors, which gave it a dynastic attraction to her after the loss of Knole.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: This unique property was the home of the renowned English actor and playwright Noël Coward from 1930 to 1956. He used to sit in his studio overlooking the grand reception room writing his famous plays including “Design for Living” and songs like “Mad Dogs and Englishmen.”

Address: 17 Gerald Rd, Burton Mews, Westminster, London SW1W 9 SW1W 9EH, UK (51.49326, -0.15181)
English Heritage Building ID: 471102 (Grade II, 1998)

Place
Former coach house and hayloft, concealed behind Nos.13 and 15 Gerald Road. Late XIX century, converted into flats early XX century. No. 17 much remodelled in 1930-56 when occupied by Sir Noël Coward. Stock brick with red brick dressings, painted at ground floor level; slate roofs. Small paned windows with opening casements under gauged brick heads. The ground floor has an elaborate early XX century doorcase in Queen Anne style which has been inserted and some elaborate ironwork over the entrance and to adjoining window with the initials JT. There is a large early XX century casement to the left side elevation and mid-XX century French windows to one side. Interior: a well staircase embellished with finials of carved wooden urns with fruit decoration leads via a corridor with panelled walls and ceiling to the first floor former hayloft which Coward converted into a room with stage at one end, which is said to have had dining alcove below and sleeping arrangements above. The original four wooden bays of the hayloft with iron ties remain but some more elaborate wrought ironwork has been added. There is a bolection-moulded fireplace and two elaborate pairs of double doors. At gallery level there is a purpose-built corner desk with built-in bookcases which overlooks the rest of the hayloft. Separate rooms at first-floor level are his former library which has a bolection-moulded fireplace. A further bedroom has a bolection-moulded fireplace and early XVIII century style panelling. A guest bedroom has a low flight of steps and oak handrail to bathroom.

Life
Who: Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973)
17 Gerald Road was the principal residence of Noël Coward from 1930 until 1956, the most important years of his fame and where he wrote his most popular works. Coward came to prominence in 1924 with “The Vortex,” a controversial play about drug addiction, but it was his nine-year collaboration with C.B. Cochran (from 1925) which established his ascendency in the world of musical comedy and revue. “Private Lives” in 1930 was followed by “Cavalcade” in 1931 and “Design for Living” in 1932, and a string of hits continued with only a brief pause in the early war years. “Blithe Spirit” in 1941 and “In Which We Serve” in 1942 further established his position as the leading popular playwright and songsmith of his generation, his work encapsulating the fine manners and social mores of upper-class England through these years. In the post-war era his personal performances became so successful that in 1956 he left England for tax exile in Bermuda, Switzerland and Jamaica. No. 17 Gerald Road, with its early Georgian fixtures and touches of frivolity, and in particular with its built-in stage and writing desk, perfectly captures the blend of style, wit and tradition that was the key to his success. It is his very personal signature on the building in which he lived for his crucial middle years that make it of special historical interest for listing. Lord Louis Mountbatten gave a defining description of Noël at his 70th birthday celebration in 1969: “There are probably greater painters than Noel, greater novelists than Noel, greater librettists, greater composers of music, greater singers, greater dancers, greater comedians, greater tragedians, greater stage producers, greater film directors, greater cabaret artists, greater TV stars. If there are, they are fourteen different people. Only one man combined all fourteen different labels – “The Master.”

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Noël Coward (1899-1973) stayed at 37 Chesham Place, SW1X 8HB, whilst giving his last stage performacnes in “Suite for Three Keys.”

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: 450 East 52nd, The Campanile, is a 14-story brick cooperative apartment building overlooking the East River. It was home to celebrities such as Greta Garbo and John Lennon.

Address: The Campanile, 450 E 52nd St, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75405, -73.96328)

Place
In October 1953, Greta purchased a seven-room apartment here. It is located on the fifth floor of the Campanile at 450 East Fifty-second Street. Greta said that she had a hard time getting this apartment. She told a friend that they didn’t like actresses in this building. Her friends George and Valentina Schlee lived on the ninth floor. They may have helped her to get the apartment. The flat was located ideally for Garbo. Situated at the end of a rare Manhattan cul-de-sac, with and unobstructed view up and down the East River. The building had a list of colourful residents, long before Garbo arrived in 1953. The 14-story, brown-brick building is a cooperative and has only 16 apartments and a pool. Garbo was in the middle of Manhattan, any place was near and reachable by foot. Lexington and Madison were just a few blocks away. The Museum of Modern Art was very close and Central Park in easy reach. A cul-de-sac must have given her an additional feel of protection. Any person, following her from her many walks, would have been easily spotted by her when she turned into her street. The Campanile’s newest tenant would take great pleasure in watching the river traffic from her living room window. The quiet cul-de-sac is dotted with high-priced cooperative buildings. Greta’s investment of $38,000 in 1953 was worth well over $1 million in the mid 1990s. Also Noël Coward resided at The Campanile while in New York City.

Life
Who: Greta Lovisa Gustafsson (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) aka Greta Garbo
Greta Garbo died while resident at the Campanile, on April 15, 1990, aged 84, in the hospital, as a result of pneumonia and renal failure. She was cremated in Manhattan, and her ashes were interred in 1999 at Skogskyrkogården Cemetery just south of her native Stockholm.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: 360 E. 55th Street, 404 E. 55th Street and 405 E. 54th Street are known as The Sutton Collection. Located in the heart of Sutton Place, the Sutton Collection is made up of three unique buildings, each building is filled with exceptional architectural details and true New York style that can only be found in the rarest of pre-war properties. At 404 E 55th St, 10022 resided Noël Coward (1899-1973), this was the playwright’s last Manhattan residence.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Restaurant/Bar: Café des Artistes was a fine restaurant at One West 67th Street in Manhattan and was owned by George Lang. He closed the restaurant for vacation at the beginning of August 2009 and, while away, decided to keep it closed permanently. He announced the closure on August 28, 2009. His wife, Jenifer Lang, had been the managing director of the restaurant since 1990.

Address: 1 W 67th St, New York, NY 10023, USA (40.77341, -73.97892)
Phone: +1 212-877-6263
National Register of Historic Places: West 67th Street Artists' Colony Historic District (1--39 and 40--50 W. 67th St.), 85001522, 1985

Place
The restaurant first opened in 1917. Café des Artistes was designed for the residents of the Hotel des Artistes, since the apartments lacked kitchens. Artists such as Marcel Duchamp, Norman Rockwell, Isadora Duncan and Rudolph Valentino were patrons. In early September 2009, two years into the Great Recession, Lang announced that the café was closing; shortly thereafter, Lang filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection, claiming debts of nearly $500,000, some of which was owed to a union benefit trust. At the time, he also faced a lawsuit from the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union Welfare Fund. In 2011, a new restaurant, The Leopard at des Artistes, opened in the location. Like its forerunner, it caters to the upper echelon of New York society. The restaurant’s famous murals, retained in the new restaurant’s 2011 renovation, were painted by Howard Chandler Christy, famous artist who also painted Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States that hangs in the US Capitol. Christy was a tenant of the building, Hotel des Artistes, until his death in 1952. There are six panels of wood nymphs - the first of which were completed in 1934. Other Christy works on display include paintings such as The Parrot Girl, The Swing Girl, Ponce De Leon, Fall, Spring, and the Fountain of Youth. Harry Crosby, a tortured poet of the 1920s, killed himself and his girlfriend, Josephine Bigelow, here on December 10, 1929. These luxurious studio apartments have been home to Rudolph Valentino, Norman Rockwell, Isadora Duncan, Fannie Hurst, and Berenice Abbott.

Life
Who: Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973)
While in New York, Noël Coward resided at: Hotel des Artistes (1 W 67th St), The Campanile (450 E 52nd St), and Sutton Place (404 E 55th St, this was the playwright’s last Manhattan residence.)

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Accomodation: In 1919, the Algonquin Hotel (59 W 44th St, 10036) hosted the Algonquin Round Table, a lunch-time gathering of wits. Members included drama critic Alexander Woollcott and writer Dorothy Parker, Talullah Bankhead, Estelle Winwood, Eva LaGallienne, and Blythe Daly. Overnight guests included Noël Coward, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Gertrude Stein, and Alice B. Toklas.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Historic District: Regent Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was built under the direction of the architect John Nash. The street runs from Waterloo Place in St James's at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Circus, to All Soul's Church. From there Langham Place and Portland Place continue the route to Regent's Park.

Address: Regent Street, London W1B, UK

Place
• The Langham, London (1C Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1JA) is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium. Since the XIX century the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as “A Scandal in Bohemia” and “The Sign of Four” partly at the Langham. The Langham continued throughout the XX century to be a favoured spot with members of the royal family, such as Diana, Princess of Wales, and many high-profile politicians including Winston Churchill and Charles de Gaulle. Other guests included Noël Coward, Wallis Simpson, Don Bradman, Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, W. Somerset Maugham and Ayumi Hamasaki. Guy Burgess (1911-1963), one of the “Cambridge Five”, a spying ring who fed official secrets to the Soviets during the Cold War, stayed at the Langham while working for the BBC.
• Horace Walpole (1717-1797) lived in 1743 at 5 Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1PW.
• Edward FitzGerald (1809-1883), English writer and translator, lived at 39 Portland Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 1QQ, in his childhood. He married Lucy, the daughter of the Quaker poet Bernard Barton in Chichester on 4 November 1856, following a death bed promise to Bernard made in 1849 to look after her. The newly married pair went to Brighton, and then settled for a time at 31 Great Portland St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 8QG. A few days of married life were enough to disillusionise FitzGerald. The marriage was evidently unhappy, for the couple separated after only a few months, despite having known each other for many years, including collaborating on a book about her father's works in 1849.
• Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) was evicted by his landlords as they had heared that he planned to exhibt "erotic" paintings at 2 All Souls' Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 3DA.
• While Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932) was at Charterhouse, his family moved from Hanwell to a house behind All Souls Church in Langham Place (1 All Souls' Pl, Marylebone, London W1B 3DA).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Accomodation: The Hotel Café Royal is a five-star hotel at 68 Regent St, Soho, London W1B 4DY. Before its conversion in 2008-2012 it was a restaurant and meeting place. By the 1890s the Café Royal had become the place to see and be seen at. Its patrons have included Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, Winston Churchill, Noël Coward, Brigitte Bardot, Max Beerbohm, George Bernard Shaw, Jacob Epstein, Mick Jagger, Elizabeth Taylor, Muhammad Ali and Diana, Princess of Wales. The café was the scene of a famous meeting on 24 March 1895, when Frank Harris advised Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) to drop his charge of criminal libel against the Marquess of Queensberry, father of Alfred Douglas. Queensberry was acquitted, and Wilde was subsequently tried, convicted and imprisoned.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Accomodation: The Ritz, London (150 Piccadilly, St. James's, London W1J 9BR) is a Grade II listed 5-star hotel located in Piccadilly. A symbol of high society and luxury, the hotel is one of the world's most prestigious and best known hotels. It is a member of the international consortium, The Leading Hotels of the World. The hotel was opened by Swiss hotelier César Ritz in May 1906, eight years after he established the Hôtel Ritz Paris. After a weak beginning, the hotel began to gain popularity towards the end of WWI, and became popular with politicians, socialites, writers and actors of the day. Noël Coward (1899-1973) was a notable diner at the Ritz in the 1920s and 1930s. Another notable queer resident was Tallulah Bankhead in 1957.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Accomodation: The Savoy Hotel (Strand, London WC2R 0EU) is a luxury hotel in central London. Built by the impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte with profits from his Gilbert and Sullivan opera productions, it opened on August 6, 1889. It was the first in the Savoy group of hotels and restaurants owned by Carte's family for over a century. The Savoy was the first luxury hotel in Britain, introducing electric lights throughout the building, electric lifts, bathrooms in most of the lavishly furnished rooms, constant hot and cold running water and many other innovations. Carte hired César Ritz as manager and Auguste Escoffier as chef de cuisine; they established an unprecedented standard of quality in hotel service, entertainment and elegant dining, attracting royalty and other rich and powerful guests and diners. Notable queer residents: Sarah Bernhardt in 1913, Marlon Brando in 1967, Dorothy Caruso in 1902, Noël Coward from 1941 to 1943, Sergei Diaghilev in 1919, Marlene Dietrich from 1924 to 1925, Cary Grant in 1966, Katharine Hepburn, Vaslav Nijinsky in 1911, Oscar Wilde.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: In the 1950s, Noël Coward left the UK for tax reasons, receiving harsh criticism in the press. He first settled in Bermuda but later bought houses in Jamaica and Switzerland (in the village of Les Avants, near Montreux), which remained his homes for the rest of his life. His expatriate neighbours and friends included Joan Sutherland, David Niven, Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, and Julie Andrews and Blake Edwards in Switzerland and Ian Fleming and his wife Ann in Jamaica. Coward was a witness at the Flemings’ wedding, but his diaries record his exasperation with their constant bickering.

Address: Les Avants, 1833, Switzerland (46.4533, 6.9429)

Place
In 1958, Noël Coward went to Switzerland and settled in Les Avants in upper Montreux. He bought a spacious chalet with a lush vegetable garden, set in a large estate surrounded by forests. The property had belonged to an English family called the Petries, and Noel Coward had seen the ad in the London Daily Telegraph. The actor renovated the residence and welcomed many artists and friends such as Vivian Leigh, Peter Ustinov and Graham Greene. When Coward died peacefully at his home in Jamaica in March 1973, both Graham Payn and Cole Lesley were with him. Much of his Jamaican property was handed over to the Jamaican Government but Payn and Lesley returned to his Swiss chalet from where Lesley administered the Coward Estate with his customary efficiency. When Lesley died in 1980, Payn took on the role of Executor, a role he had never anticipated and always felt himself ill-qualified to play. It was a role that would gain him no column inches in the newspapers but for the next twenty five years he quietly succeeded in managing a complex estate with charm, tact, firmness and an unwavering sense of “what Noël would have wanted.”

Life
Who: Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) and Graham Payn (April 25, 1918 – November 4, 2005)
Graham Payn was brought to England as a young boy by his opera singer mother. There, he found early success as a boy soprano. It was at an audition for Coward’s 1932 revue, “Words and Music” where he first met the man himself. Even the world-weary Coward had never before seen a 13-year old sing “Nearer My God To Thee” while doing a tap dance and his stunned reaction was reported to be simply, “We’ve got to have that kid in the show!.” It would be the first of his many Coward shows. During the war years Payn, who was by now a professional singer and dancer specialising in West End revues, was signed by Coward for his own post-war revue, “Sigh No More,” where he achieved great success with “Matelot,” a song that was associated with him for the rest of his life. The show had another lasting legacy, as Coward’s nickname for his new found friend, “Little Lad” was derived from another song which featured in the same revue. Following his personal success in “Words and Music,” Payn was welcomed into the Coward “family,” which included Cole Lesley, who was Coward’s personal assistant, Lorne Loraine, his secretary, the designer Gladys Calthrop and actress Joyce Carey. Payn was to survive his friends by many years. Noël Coward lived in upper Montreux from 1958 until his death. Born in 1899 in the poor London suburb of Teddington, he embarked in the theater at a very young age, making his stage debut in 1909. At the age of 15, he was already a well-known actor and began writing plays and composing songs and operettas. The actor was in fact a piano virtuoso. After WWII, Noel Coward pursued acting, both comedy and tragedy, and wrote novels and poetry. The actor and composer worked a lot and also devoted time to his hobby of painting, which is why he was not often seen in the village. In 1970, Noel Coward was knighted by Queen Elizabeth. His reputation only continued to grow and many people considered him to be the English Sacha Guitry. Noel Coward died in his second home in Jamaica at the age of 73. Part of his collection of books has been donated to the Musée du Vieux-Montreux. Graham Payn, lifelong friend of Noël Coward, and sole remaining Executor of Coward’s Estate, died in Les Avants near Montreux, Switzerland on 2nd November 2005 at the age of 87 and his buried at Cimetière de Clarens-Montreux (1815 Montreux).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544068435 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544068433
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Church: In the chapel of St John the Baptist in Westminster Abbey there is the tomb of Mary Kendall (died March 13, 1709/1710) dating from 1710 with an inscription recording: "That close Union and Friendship, In which she lived, with the Lady Catharine Jones (died April 23, 1740); And in testimony of which she desir’d That even their Ashes, after Death, Might not be divided.”

Address: 20 Dean’s Yard, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK (51.49929, -0.1273)
Hours: Monday and Tuesday 9.30-15.30, Wednesday 9.30-18.00, Thursday and Friday 9.30-15.30, Saturday 9.30-13.30
Phone: +44 20 7222 5152
Website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/

Place
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church. According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the VII century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III. Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held there. There have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey since 1100. Two were of reigning monarchs (Henry I and Richard II), although, before 1919, there had been none for some 500 years.

Notable queer burials at Westminster Abbey:
• Anne, Queen of Great Britain (1665-1714). Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, became close to the young Princess Anne in about 1675, and the friendship grew stronger as the two grew older. Correspondence between the Duchess and the Queen reveals that the two women enjoyed a royally passionate romance. They called each other pet names: Sarah was “Mrs. Freeman” and Anne was “Mrs. Morley.” When Anne came to the throne in 1702, she named Sarah “Lady of the Bedchamber.” Anne and Sarah were virtually inseparable; no king’s mistress had ever wielded the power granted to the Duchess. Over time, Sarah became overconfident in her position and developed an arrogant attitude toward Anne, even going to far as to insult the queen in public. A cousin of Sarah’s, Abigail Hill, caught the Queen’s eye during Sarah’s frequent absences from Court, and eventually replaced her in Anne’s affections. After her final break with Anne in 1711, Sarah and her husband were dismissed from the court. Sarah enjoyed a "long and devoted" relationship with her husband of more than 40 years, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. The money she inherited from the Marlborough trust left her one of the richest women in Europe.
• Sir Frederick Ashton (1904–1988), ballet dancer and choreographer, Memorial in Poet’s Corner (buried St Mary the Virgin Churchyard, Yaxley)
• W. H. Auden (1907-1973), poet and essayist. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey in 1974, adjoining the grave of John Masefield. Another memorial is at Christ College Cathedral, Oxford, where he graduated (buried Kirchstetten, Austria) (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Robert Baden-Powell (1857–1941) was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for Boys which was an inspiration for the Scout Movement, founder and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association and founder of the Girl Guides. In the south aisle of the nave of Westminster Abbey, against the screen of St George’s chapel, there is a memorial stone to Lord and Lady Baden-Powell, by W.Soukop. Both are buried in Kenya and each had a memorial service held at the Abbey (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), Prime Minister, memorial. A memorial to Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, was unveiled in the nave of Westminster Abbey in 1997. Designed by Donald Buttress and cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was a dramatist in the English Renaissance theatre, most famous for his collaborations with John Fletcher (1579–1625.) According to a mid-century anecdote related by John Aubrey, they lived in the same house on the Bankside in Southwark, "sharing everything in the closest intimacy." About 1613 Beaumont married Ursula Isley, daughter and co-heiress of Henry Isley of Sundridge in Kent, by whom he had two daughters, one posthumous. Francis Beaumont and his brother Sir John Beaumont are both buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, at the entrance to St Benedict's chapel near Chaucer's monument. Fletcher died in 1625 and is buried inside the Southwark Cathedral, London Bridge, London SE1 9DA. On 1November 6, 1996 the cathedral became a focus of controversy when it hosted a twentieth-anniversary service for the Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement. In 1997 openly gay cleric, Jeffrey John became Canon Chancellor and Theologian of the Cathedral (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. Behn’s close association with royalty, especially her friendship with the King’s mistress, Nell Gwyn, and her long-standing liaison with John Hoyle (died 1692), whose affairs with other men were notorious, made Behn a prime subject for court and theater gossip. Just as Behn was notorious for presenting sensational subjects on stage despite societal taboos, she achieved a reputation for unusually explicit accounts of erotic and sexual episodes in her poems. Many of these celebrated gay male and lesbian relationships. She was buried in the east cloister of Westminster Abbey, near the steps up into the church. The inscription on her tombstone, written by John Hoyle, reads: "Here lies a Proof that Wit can never be Defence enough against Mortality." John Hoyle was stabbed to death on May 1692 and is buried in the vault of the Inner Temple church, Temple, London EC4Y 7BB) (Location in the Abbey: Cloisters; East Cloister).
• William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709) and King William III of England (1650-1702), are buried next to Queen Mary II. King William III is buried in great simplicity in the South Aisle of the Chapel of Henry VI, and his companion William Bentinck is buried in a vault nearby. Several members of the Bentinck family are buried in the Ormond vault at the eastern end of Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey. None have monuments but their names and dates of death were added to the vaultstone in the late XIX century (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915) died at 4:46 pm on April 23, 1915 in a French hospital ship moored in a bay off the island of Skyros in the Aegean on his way to the landing at Gallipoli. As the expeditionary force had orders to depart immediately, he was buried at 11 pm in an olive grove on Skyros, Greece. His grave remains there today. On 11 November 1985, Brooke was among 16 WWI poets commemorated on a slate monument unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey.
• Benjamin Britten (1913-1976), musician and composer. In the north choir (or Musicians) aisle in Westminster Abbey there is a memorial stone. Britten refused a formal burial since he wanted to be buried beside his partner Peter Pears (Location in the Abbey: North Quire Aisle).
• Robert Browning (1812-1889), poet, is buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. He was born on 7 May 1812 in London, a son of Robert Browning (1782-1866) and Sarah (Wiedemann). He married Elizabeth Barrett, a famous poet in her own right, in September 1846 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• George, 6th Baron Byron (1788-1824). The memorial stone in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey was given by the Poetry Society and unveiled on May 8, 1969 (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), composer and playwright. A memorial was unveiled in 1984 in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. The black marble stone was cut by Ralph Beyer. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend" (Location in the Abbey: South Quire Aisle).
• Major-General Sir Herbert Edwardes (1819–1868) was an administrator, soldier, and statesman active in the Punjab, India. He is buried in Highgate Cemetery. A memorial by sculptor William Theed junior, is on the wall of the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. He is also commemorated by a stained glass window in the chapel of King’s College London. Brigadier-General John Nicholson (1822–1857) was a Victorian era military officer known for his role in British India. Nicholson never married, the most significant people in his life being his brother Punjab administrators Sir Henry Lawrence and Herbert Edwardes. At Bannu, Nicholson used to ride one hundred and twenty miles every weekend to spend a few hours with Edwardes, and lived in his beloved friend’s house for some time when Edwardes’ wife Emma was in England. At his deathbed he dictated a message to Edwardes saying, "Tell him that, if at this moment a good fairy were to grant me a wish, my wish would be to have him here next to my mother." The love between him and Edwardes made them, as Edwardes’ wife latter described it "more than brothers in the tenderness of their whole lives.” In the retaking of Delhi, India, Nicholson led 2,000 men (mostly British, Pathan, and Punjabi troops) through the Kashmiri Gate in Delhi. Mortally wounded he died at the hour of British victory and is buried at New Delhi (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Eliot (1819-1880) was not buried in Westminster Abbey because of her denial of the Christian faith and her "irregular" though monogamous life with Lewes. She was buried in Highgate Cemetery (East), Highgate, London, in the area reserved for religious dissenters and agnostics, beside the love of her life, George Henry Lewes. On 2June 1, 1980 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. Stone by John Skelton (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771)’s biographer William Mason erected a memorial to him, designed by John Bacon the Elder, in the east aisle of Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey in 1778. (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner)
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889), Poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in 1975 in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. By sculptor David Peace (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936), poet, has a memorial panel in the window above Chaucer's monument in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner). he has a memorial also at St Laurence (College Street, Ludlow, Shropshire, SY8 1AN).
• Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon (1661-1723), was the only son of Henry and his first wife Theodosia, daughter of Lord Capel. As Viscount Cornbury was governor of New York from 1702 to 1708. He had a very bad reputation and "his character and conduct were equally abhorred in both hemispheres". He secretly married Catherine O'Brien in 1688 and died in obscurity and debt. His only surviving son Edward as Lord Clifton took his seat in the House of Lords but died unmarried of a fever after a drinking bout. His daughter Theodosia married John Bligh, later Earl of Darnley, and both were buried in the vault (Location in the Abbey: North ambulatory)
• Henry James (1843-1916), American born novelist. On June 17, 1976 a memorial stone was unveiled in Poets’ Corner Westminster Abbey by his great grand-nephew. Cut by Will Carter (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• James Kendall, politician and governor of Barbados, is buried in the south choir aisle of Westminster Abbey. James’s niece Mary Kendall was buried in the chapel of St John the Baptist in the Abbey and has a monument there with a kneeling alabaster figure of herself. The inscription, written by the Dean of Westminster Francis Atterbury, reads: "Mrs Mary Kendall daughter of Thomas Kendall Esqr. and of Mrs Mary Hallet, his wife, of Killigarth in Cornwall, was born at Westminster Nov.8 1677 and dy’d at Epsome March 4 1709/10, having reach’d the full term of her blessed Saviour’s life; and study’d to imitate his spotless example. She had great virtues, and as great a desire of concealing them: was of a severe life, but of an easy conversation; courteous to all, yet strictly sincere; humble, without meanness; beneficient, without ostentation; devout, without superstition. These admirable qualitys, in which she was equall’d by few of her sex, surpass’d by none, render’d her every way worthy of that close uion and friendship in which she liv’d with the Lady Catherine Jones; and in testimony of which she desir’d that even their ashes, after death, might not be divided: and, therefore, order’d her selfe here to be interr’d where, she knew, that excellent Lady design’d one day to rest, near the grave of her belov’d and religious mother, Elizabeth, Countess of Ranelagh. This monument was erected by Capt. Charles Kendall." Her name was inscribed on the vault stone in front of the monument in the late XIX century. Mary’s father Thomas Kendall, son of a merchant, died in 1684 and Mary lived with the Earl of Ranelagh’s family while James was in the West Indies. Lady Catherine Jones (d.1740) was the Earl’s daughter. Charles was Mary’s cousin and was in the Royal Navy. Her estates were left to her cousin Canon Nicholas Kendall. The coats of arms show those for Kendall and also "or, a chief gules overall on a bend engrailed sable three bezants" for Hallet.
• Herbert, 1st Earl Kitchener (1850-1916), Sirdar of the Egyptian army (Commander in Chief), is remembered on the altar in the south aisle of the Lady Chapel (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel)
• D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930), novelist and poet. A memorial stone was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey on 1November 6, 1985. By David Parsley (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).
• In July 2002, a memorial window to Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) – a gift of the Marlowe Society – was unveiled in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey. Controversially, a question mark was added to the generally accepted date of death. On 2October 5, 2011 a letter from Paul Edmondson and Stanley Wells was published by The Times newspaper, in which they called on the Dean and Chapter to remove the question mark on the grounds that it "flew in the face of a mass of unimpugnable evidence.” In 2012, they renewed this call in their e-book Shakespeare Bites Back, adding that it "denies history,” and again the following year in their book Shakespeare Beyond Doubt. (Buried St Nicholas Churchyard, Deptford)
• Just inside the west door of Westminster Abbey there is a memorial brass, by Christopher Ironside, to Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900-1979) and his wife, Countess Mountbatten of Burma. He was Admiral of the Fleet (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• It has been said that the greatest love of Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727)’s life was with a fellow mathematician, Fatio de Duillier. They collaborated for several years, and when they broke up over an argument in 1693, Newton suffered symptoms of a nervous breakdown. Fatio assisted John Conduitt (Newton’s nephew) in planning the design, and writing the inscription for Newton’s monument in Westminster Abbey. His large monument is by William Kent and J.M.Rysbrack. Newton has also a Memorial at Trinity College, Cambridge. Fatio died in 1753 and was buried at the church of St. Nicholas, Worcester (Location in the Abbey: Nave).
• After being ill for the last twenty-two years of his life, Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) died of renal failure on 11 July 1989 at his home near Steyning, West Sussex. His cremation was held three days later. The ashes of the greatest actor of his generation, are buried in the south transept of Westminster Abbey. His stone was cut by I.Rees (Location in the Abbey: South Transept).
• Wilfred Owen (1893-1918), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. The inscription on the stone is taken from Owen’s "Preface" to his poems; "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." (Buried Ors Communal Cemetery, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)
• Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902). A small tablet was unveiled in Henry VII's chapel in Westminster Abbey in 1953 (Location in the Abbey: Lady Chapel).
• Seigfried Sassoon (1886-1967), poet. Memorial in the Poet’s Corner. (Buried St Andrew Churchyard, Mells, Somerset)
• Henry John Alexander Seely (1899-1963), 2nd Lord Mottistone, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. A statue by Edwin Russell remembers him (Location in the Abbey: St Catherine's Chapel Garden; Little Cloister).
• Robert Stewart (1769-1822), Viscount Castlereagh and 2nd Marquis of Londonderry, politician, was buried in the centre of the north transept of Westminster Abbey. His statue is by sculptor John Evan Thomas (Location in the Abbey: North Transept).
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628) and King James I of England (1566-1625) are buried in the Henry VII Chapel. King James I’s tomb was lost and not rediscovered until 1869. On His Majesty’s left is the magnificent tomb of his lover George Villiers. On his right is the tomb (with huge bronze figures representing Hope, Truth, Charity and Faith) of Ludovic Stuart, Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1574-1624), son of one of his earliest lovers, Esme Stuart.
• On 14 February 1995 a small stained glass memorial was unveiled in Poets' Corner Westminster Abbey for Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wilde (1854-1900), playwright and aesthete (Location in the Abbey: South Transept; Poets' Corner).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Noël Coward died at his home, Firefly Estate, in Jamaica on March 26, 1973 of heart failure and was buried three days later on the brow of Firefly Hill, overlooking the north coast of the island.

Address: Firefly Hill Rd., Ocho Rios, Jamaica (18.4035, -76.9384)
Hours: Monday through Thursday 9.00-17.00, Saturday 9.00-17.00
Phone: 997-7201 or 994-0920

Place
Built in 1956
Firefly Estate, located 10 km (6 mi) east of Oracabessa, Jamaica, is the burial place of Sir Noël Coward and his former vacation home. It is now listed as a National Heritage Site by the Jamaica National Heritage Trust. Although the setting is Edenic, the house is surprisingly spartan, considering that he often entertained jet-setters and royalty. The building has been transformed into a writer’s house museum. Noël Coward’s mountaintop Jamaican home and burial site was originally owned by the infamous pirate and one-time governor of Jamaica, Sir Henry Morgan (1635-1688.) The property offered a commanding view of the St. Mary harbour, and Morgan used it as a lookout. As part of the hideaway, Morgan had caused a secret escape tunnel to be dug, opening at Port Maria. Named for the luminous insects seen in the warm evenings, Firefly estate has entertained a wide range of guests, including both the Queen Mother and Queen Elizabeth II, Sir Winston Churchill, Sir Laurence Olivier, Sophia Loren, Elizabeth Taylor, Sir Alec Guinness, Peter O’Toole, Richard Burton, and neighbours Errol Flynn, Ruth Bryan Owen and Ian Fleming. "An Englishman has an inalienable right to live wherever he chooses,” said Winston Churchill, who instructed Coward in oil-painting technique while visiting at Firefly. The Firefly art studio holds Coward’s paintings and photographs of his coterie of famous friends, including Laurence Olivier, Errol Flynn and Marlene Dietrich. Of his time at the Firefly estate, Coward wrote in his diary: "Firefly has given me the most valuable benison of all: time to read and write and think and get my mind in order . . . I love this place, it deeply enchants me. Whatever happens to this silly world, nothing much is likely to happen here." Writing, he believed, came easier when he was here, "the sentences seemed to construct themselves, the right adjectives appeared discretely at the right moment. Firefly has magic for me. . . ." Coward died of myocardial infarction at Firefly on March 26, 1973, aged 73 and is buried in a marble tomb in the garden near the spot where he would sit at dusk watching the sun set as he sipped his brandy with ginger ale chaser and looked out to sea and along the lush green coast spread out beneath him. A statue of him gazing out over the blue harbour graces the lawn. The stone hut on the lawn that was once a lookout for Henry Morgan, then converted to a bar by Sir Noël, is now a gift shop and restaurant. On one of Firefly’s walls is written his last poem. It begins:
When I have fears, as Keats had fears,
Of the moment I’ll cease to be,
I console myself with vanished years,
Remembered laughter, remembered tears,
And the peace of the changing sea.

Life
Who: Sir Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) and Graham Payn (April 25, 1918 – November 4, 2005)
Sir Noël Coward was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise.” Coward did not publicly acknowledge his homosexuality, but it was discussed candidly after his death by biographers including Payn, his long-time partner, and in Coward’s diaries and letters, published posthumously. Coward’s most important relationship, which began in the mid-1940s and lasted until his death, was with South African stage and film actor Graham Payn. Coward featured Payn in several of his London productions. Payn later co-edited with Sheridan Morley a collection of Coward’s diaries, published in 1982. Coward’s other relationships included the playwright Keith Winter, actors Louis Hayward and Alan Webb, his manager John (Jack) C. Wilson (1899–1961) and the composer Ned Rorem, who published details of their relationship in his diaries. Coward had a 19-year friendship with Prince George, Duke of Kent, but biographers differ on whether it was platonic. Payn believed that it was, though Coward reportedly admitted to the historian Michael Thornton that there had been "a little dalliance.” Coward said, on the duke’s death, "I suddenly find that I loved him more than I knew." On March 28, 1984 a memorial stone was unveiled by the Queen Mother in Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey. Thanked by Coward’s partner, Graham Payn, for attending, the Queen Mother replied, "I came because he was my friend." After Coward died in 1973, Payn’s career for the rest of his life became the administration of the Coward estate. Barry Day wrote, "It was not a job he ever wanted or expected but he brought to it a dedication and focus that Noël would have been surprised and pleased to see. He was thrust into his biggest role and played it as he knew Noël would have wanted him to. It was a fitting farewell performance." Coward’s biographer, Philip Hoare, wrote, "Graham disproved his partner’s assessment of himself as “an illiterate little sod” by publishing his memoir and by managing the Coward estate. He was a generous, uncomplicated man, and he will be missed by his many friends." In 1988, 15 years after Coward’s death, Payn, who "hadn’t the heart to use it again,” gave their Jamaican home, the Firefly Estate, to the Jamaica National Heritage Trust. He retained their other home in Switzerland, where he died in 2005, aged 87.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Gerald Clery Murphy and Sara Sherman Wiborg were wealthy, expatriate Americans who moved to the French Riviera in the early 20th century and who, with their generous hospitality and flair for parties, ...
Education: Yale University
Lived: 50 West 11th Street, New York City
Wiborg Beach, Hwy Behind the Pond, East Hampton, NY 11937, USA (40.94874, -72.17874)
Villa America, 112 Chemin des Mougins, 06160 Antibes, France (43.55932, 7.12715)
23 Quai des Grands Augustins, 75006 Paris, France (48.85427, 2.34317)
Buried: South End Cemetery, East Hampton, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 20643895

Gerald Clery Murphy and Sara Sherman Wiborg were wealthy, expatriate Americans who moved to the French Riviera in the early 20th century and who, with their generous hospitality and flair for parties, created a vibrant social circle, particularly in the 1920s, that included a great number of artists and writers of the Lost Generation. Gerald had a brief but significant career as a painter. Gerald Murphy was born in Boston to the family that owned the Mark Cross Company, sellers of fine leather goods. He failed the entrance exams at Yale three times before matriculating, although he performed respectably there. He joined DKE and the Skull and Bones society. He befriended a young freshman named Cole Porter (Yale class of 1913) and brought him into DKE. Sara Sherman Wiborg was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, into the wealthy Wiborg family, owners of the printing ink and varnish company Frank Bestow Wiborg. In East Hampton Sara Wiborg and Gerald Murphy met when they were both adolescents. Gerald was five years younger than Sara was, and for many years they were more familiar companions than romantically attached; they became engaged in 1915, when Sara was 32 years old. Gerald's primary orientation was homosexual; but Sara had always been the most important thing in his life. Gerald died in 1964 in East Hampton, two days after his friend Cole Porter.

Together from 1915 to 1964: 49 years.
Gerald Clery Murphy (March 25, 1888 – October 17, 1964)
Sara Sherman Wiborg (November 7, 1883 – October 10, 1975)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: Yale University is an American private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut.

Address: New Haven, CT 06520 (41.31632, -72.92234)
Phone: +1 203-432-4771
Website: www.yale.edu

Place
Founded in 1701 in Saybrook Colony as the Collegiate School, the University is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. The school was renamed Yale College in 1718 in recognition of a gift from Elihu Yale, who was governor of the British East India Company. Established to train Congregationalist ministers in theology and sacred languages, by 1777 the school's curriculum began to incorporate humanities and sciences. In the XIX century the school incorporated graduate and professional instruction, awarding the first Ph.D. in the United States in 1861 and organizing as a university in 1887. Skull and Bones is an undergraduate senior secret society at Yale University. It is the oldest senior class landed society at Yale. The society's alumni organization, the Russell Trust Association, owns the society's real estate and oversees the organization. The society is known informally as "Bones", and members are known as "Bonesmen". Hendrick Hall at Yale University (165 Elm St., New Haven, CT) housed a variety of LGBTQ organizations in the late 1970s: Yalesbians, the New Haven Gay Alliance, the New Haven Gay Coffeehouse, and the New Haven Gay Switchboard.

Notable Queer Alumni and Faculty at Yale University:
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University, where he contributed to campus humor magazine The Yale Record.
• John Boswell (1947-1994), prominent historian and professor.
• Russell Cheney (1881-1945) graduated in 1904, member of the Skull and Bones.
• Anderson Cooper (born 1967), resided in Trumbull College, inducted into the Manuscript Society, majoring in political science and graduated with a B.A. in 1989.
• Tom Dolby (born 1975) graduated from The Hotchkiss School in 1994 and Yale University.
• Rick Elice (born 1956) earned a BA from Cornell University, an MFA from the Yale Drama School and is a Teaching Fellow at Harvard. He was the salutatorian graduate of Francis Lewis High School in Queens, New York (class of 1973).
• John Safford Fiske (1838-1907), graduated in 1863. He was nominated by President Andrew Johnson U. S. consul in Leith, Scotland, in 1868. While abroad he fell deeply in love with Thomas Ernest Boulton aka “Stella”. Fiske’s steamy letters to Stella became evidence at the Boulton and Park trial. Fiske was acquitted along with Boulton and Park, but his diplomatic career was ruined. He resigned his post, traveled to Constantinople, Germany, and France, rented a house near Paris with an English friend, and in 1882 moved permanently to Alassio. Late in life he lectured at Hobart College, was rewarded with an honorary degree, and left the college his library of 4,000 books.
• James Whitney Fosburgh (1910-1978)
• Henry Geldzahler (1935-1994) graduated in 1957, member of Manuscript Society
• John Glines (born 1933) graduated from Yale in 1955 with a BA in drama.
• Leonard C. Hanna, Jr (1889-1957), a philanthropist who, after graduation from Yale, he worked in the iron and steel industry to gain experience.
• Roger Dennis Hansen (1936-1991), “Denny”, was tops in his class, magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, a varsity swimmer, Rhodes scholar and a member of the best clubs and societies. His classmates believed he would be elected president of the United States. He was found dead at the home of a friend in Rehoboth Beach. Hansen took his life by inhaling carbon monoxide from his car.
• Lord Nicholas Hervey (1961–1998) took a degree in the History of Art and studied Economics in depth. In 1981 he founded the Rockingham Club, a Yale social club for descendants of royalty and aristocracy, which was later modified to allow membership to the children of the "super-wealthy". The Club and Nicholas Hervey were profiled in Andy Warhol's Interview magazine but was dissolved shortly thereafter in 1986. Nicholas' older half-brother John was posthumously reported to be a friend of Andy Warhol.
• Richard Isay (1934–2012), Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry 1962-1965.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) carried out post-doctoral research at Yale University, the Getty Center in Los Angeles, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Since entering private practice in 1990 Longstaffe-Gowan has advised on a number of public and private historic landscapes. He has developed and implemented long-term landscape management plans for the National Trust, English Heritage and a wide range of private owners in the UK and abroad. He has similarly had extensive input in the conservation and redevelopment of a variety of historic landscapes including The Tower of London, Hampton Court Palace, Kensington Palace Gardens and The Crown Estate (Central London).
• George Platt Lynes (1907–1955) was sent to Paris in 1925 with the idea of better preparing him for college. His life was forever changed by the circle of friends that he would meet there including Gertrude Stein, Glenway Wescott, Monroe Wheeler. He attended Yale University in 1926, but dropped out after a year to move to New York City.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950), graduated in 1923, managing editor of the Yale Daily News, editor of the Yale Literary Magazine and member of Skull and Bones
• James McCourt (born 1941) has been with his life partner, novelist Vincent Virga (born 1942), since 1964 after they met as graduate students in the Yale School of Drama. McCourt's and Virga's papers are held at Yale's Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library.
• Paul Monette (1945-1995) graduated in 1967
• Gerald Clery Murphy (1888–1964) failed the entrance exams three times before matriculating. He joined DKE and the Skull and Bones society.
• Richard Thomas Nolan (born 1937) received his master's in Religion from the Yale University Divinity School in 1967; during his studies, he was also an instructor in math and religion, and associate chaplain at the Cheshire Academy from 1965 to 1967.
• Jamie Pedersen (born 1968) graduated summa cum laude in American Studies from Yale and received his law degree from Yale Law School. Pedersen was an active member of the Yale Russian Chorus while an undergraduate and law student, and remains active in the alumni of the Yale Russian Chorus. He clerked for Judge Stephen Williams on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) majored in English, minored in music, and also studied French. He was a member of Scroll and Key and Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, and contributed to campus humor magazine The Yale Record. He was an early member of the Whiffenpoofs a cappella singing group and participated in several other music clubs; in his senior year, he was elected president of the Yale Glee Club and was its principal soloist.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) was the Chair of Yale University's Department of Architecture for six years (1958-1964). His most famous work is the Yale Art and Architecture Building (A&A Building), a spatially complex brutalist concrete structure.
• Thomas Schippers (1930–1977) went on to Yale University, where he had some lessons in composition with Paul Hindemith.
• Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) obtained a PhD degree from the University of London and a JSD degree from Yale University. He was a fellowship at Yale Law School (1958).
• John William Sterling (1844–1918) graduated with a B.A. in 1864 and was a member of Skull and Bones and president of Brothers in Unity during his senior year. He graduated from Columbia Law School as the valedictorian of the class of 1867 and was admitted to the bar in that year. He obtained an M.A. degree in 1874. He became a corporate lawyer in New York City, and helped found the law firm of Shearman & Sterling in 1871, a firm that represented Jay Gould, Henry Ford, the Rockefeller family, and Standard Oil. On his death in 1918, Sterling left a residuary estate of $15 million to Yale, at the time the "largest sum of money ever donated to an institution of higher learning in history"—equivalent to about $200 million in 2011 dollars. Sterling never married. In 2003, historian Jonathan Ned Katz uncovered evidence that Sterling lived for nearly fifty years in a same-sex intimate partnership with cotton broker James O. Bloss, who was 3 years younger and also a Yale man, class of 1875.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Harvard professor and gardner designer, was drafted into the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1943 and after the war took a job teaching city planning at Yale. Enjoying the work, he did little further garden design, and reached the post of professor and chairman of the department of city planning. His publications in this area include articles such as America's super-cities and a number of books on city design in the U.S. Despite a previous long-term same-sex relationship with Gerald Schlesinger with whom he lived in England, Tunnard married Lydia Evans of Boston, Massachusetts in 1945. They had a son, Christopher. Tunnard died in New Haven in 1979. Tunnard and his wife are buried at Oak Grove Cemetery (Summer St, Plymouth, MA 02360), Plot: Oak Grove, Plot 562. In the nearby Vine Hills Cemetery (102 Samoset St, Plymouth, MA 02360) is buried Joseph Everett Chandler (1863–1946), Colonial Revival architect and pioneering designer of queer space.
• Donald Vining (1917–1998) was a student at West Chester University in Pennsylvania between 1937 and 1939, where he was active in local theater groups, before to his admission to the Yale School of Drama as a playwrighting major. Before World War II, a number of his plays were produced for the stage and for the WICC Radio "Listeners' Theatre", broadcast on the Yankee Network. His plays were subsequently published in such volumes as Yale Radio Plays and Plays For Players.
• Paula Vogel (born 1951) was Chair of the playwriting department at the Yale School of Drama.
• Thornton Wilder (1897–1975) earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1920, was member of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, a literary society.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: The Greenwich Village townhouse explosion occurred on March 6, 1970, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It was caused by the premature detonation of a bomb that was being assembled by members of the Weather Underground, an American radical left group. The bomb was under construction in the basement of 18 West 11th Street, when it accidentally exploded; the blast reduced the four-story townhouse to a burning, rubble-strewn ruin.

Address: W 11th St, New York, NY 10011, USA

Place
11th Street is in two parts. It is interrupted by the block containing Grace Church between Broadway and Fourth Avenue. East 11th streets runs from Fourth Avenue to Avenue C and runs past Webster Hall. West 11th Street runs from Broadway to West Street. 11th Street and 6th Avenue was the location of the Old Grapevine tavern from the 1700s to its demolition in the early XX century.

Notable queer residents at West 11th Street:
• No. 18, 10011: James Merrill (1926-1995) was born in New York City to Charles E. Merrill (1885-1956), the founding partner of the Merrill Lynch investment firm, and Hellen Ingram Merrill (1898-2000), a society reporter and publisher from Jacksonville, Florida. He was born at a residence which would become the site of the Greenwich Village townhouse explosion. The Greek Revival townhouse at 18 West 11th Street, located between Fifth Avenue and the Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), was originally built in 1845. In the 1920s the home belonged to Charles E. Merrill. In 1930 Merrill wrote a note to its subsequent owner, Broadway librettist Howard Dietz, wishing him joy in "the little house on heaven street." James Merrill, who spent his infancy and first few years in the house, lamented the bombing in a 1972 poem titled "18 West 11th Street":
“In what at least
Seemed anger the Aquarians in the basement
Had been perfecting a device
For making sense to us
If only briefly and on pain
Of incommunication ever after.
Now look who’s here. Our prodigal
Sunset. Just passing through from Isfahan.
Filled by him the glass
Disorients.”
Actor Dustin Hoffman and his wife Anne Byrne were living in the townhouse next door at the time of the explosion. He can be seen in the documentary “The Weather Underground” (2002), standing on the street during the aftermath of the explosion. After considerable debate by New York City’s Landmarks Preservation Commission, the home was rebuilt in 1978 in an angular, modernist style by renowned architect Hugh Hardy. (“It was this whole idea that a new building should express something new,” Hardy has said, adding, “we were deeper into diagonals at that point.”) The home was sold for $9,250,000 in December 2012. The new owner was revealed in 2014 to be Justin Korsant of Long Light Capital, who renovated the town house using the architecture firm H3, the successor to Hardy’s firm.
• No. 50, 10011: After marrying, Gerald Murphy (1888-1964) and Sara Wiborg (1883-1975) lived at 50 West 11th Street in New York City, where they had three children.
• No. 307, 10014: Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) revised “On the Road” here at his girlfriend Helen Weaver’s courtyard apartment. He also wrote part of “Desolation Angels,” which mentions this building and its "Dickensian windows." Felice Picano lived here from 1977-1993: “Pretty gay building. There was a courtyard in the front with a big English Plane tree in the middle. Across the street is another literary landmark, The White Horse Tavern. That is the building I wrote about in “True Stories Too, The Federalist”.” --Felice Picano. Now owned by photographer Annie Leibowitz (born 1949), her renovation is creating controversy.
• No. 360, 10014: Julian Schnabel (born 1951) resides at 360 West 11th Street, in a former West Village horse stable that he purchased and converted for residential use, adding five luxury condominiums in the style of a Northern Italian palazzo. It is named the Palazzo Chupi and it’s easy to spot because it is painted pink. The building is controversial in its Greenwich Village neighborhood because it was built taller than a rezoning, happening at the same time as the construction began, allowed. Neighbors also alleged illegal work done on the site. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and allies called on the city for stricter enforcement, but Schnabel’s home eventually rose to the 167 feet he desired, rather than the new 75-foot limit imposed by the Far West Village downzoning of 2005. Until his death, Lou Reed lived across the street from Schnabel, who considered him his best friend. Schnabel is the director of “Basquiat” (1996), biopic of queer artist Jean‑Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) and of “Before Night Falls” (2000), biopic of queer Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright Reinaldo Arenas (1943-1990)

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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House: The Murphys purchased a villa in Cap d’Antibes and named it Villa America; they resided there for many years. When the Murphys arrived on the Riviera, lying on the beach merely to enjoy the sun was not a common activity. Occasionally, someone would go swimming, but the joys of being at the beach just for sun were still unknown at the time. The Murphys, with their long forays and picnics at La Garoupe, introduced sunbathing on the beach as a fashionable activity.

Address: 112 Chemin des Mougins, 06160 Antibes, France (43.55932, 7.12715)

Place
After vacationing with Cole Porter at Château de la Garoupe the glamorous and wealthy American expats Gerald Murphy, scion of the family owned leather goods empire Mark Cross, and his wife Sara ensconced themselves in their own vacation home, Villa America, in 1922. Famous for their unique brand of style and sophistication they became famous for entertaining modern artists, such as Pablo Picasso and Jean Cocteau, and the literary world of Dorothy Parker, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, creating the French Riviera’s first artists’ enclave. Gerald Murphy modified a modest chalet with a pitched roof into an Art Deco variation on a Mediterranean theme incorporating a flat roof for sunning – perhaps the first of its kind on the Riviera. Gerald, an artist in his own right, created a gouache for Villa America. The interiors were strikingly spare and crisp, with waxed black tile floors, white walls, black satin slip covers, fireplaces framed in mirror, and shots of pink and purple. Not the sort of decor one usually associates with beach-side living. The French Riviera was, and is, a completely different scene, with its own set of traditions and aesthetics.

Life
Who: Gerald Clery Murphy (March 25, 1888 – October 17, 1964) and Sara Sherman Wiborg (November 7, 1883 – October 10, 1975)
Prior to the arrival on the French Riviera of the Murphys, the region was experiencing a period when the fashionable only wintered there, abandoning the region during the high summer months. However, the activities of the Murphys fueled the same renaissance in arts and letters as did the excitement of Paris, especially among the cafés of Montparnasse. In 1923 the Murphys convinced the Hotel du Cap to stay open for the summer so that they might entertain their friends, sparking a new era for the French Riviera as a summer haven.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Rue des Grands Augustins is a street in Saint-Germain-des-Prés in the 6th arrondissement of Paris, France.

Address: 23 Quai des Grands Augustins, 75006 Paris, France (48.85427, 2.34317)
Place
In 1921, Alice De Lamar bought a ground-floor apartment in Paris from Gerald and Sarah Murphy at 23 Quai des Grands Augustins (or 1 rue Git-le-Cœur), along the Left Bank of the Seine. Alice De Lamar knew Gerald’s sister, Esther, at the Spence School and remained close to her.

Life
Who: Gerald Clery Murphy (March 25, 1888 – October 17, 1964) and Sara Sherman Wiborg (November 7, 1883 – October 10, 1975)
Gerald and Sara Murphy are often referred to as the “Golden Couple” of the Lost Generation of American ex-patriates in France in the 1920s. Both were rich, talented, and good-looking. They fled the stuffy confines of New York City society and reinvented themselves in France, becoming legendary party givers, friends of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Picasso, and many others. Fitzgerald based the Dick and Nicole Diver characters in “Tender is the Night” on the Murphys.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: Frank Bestow Wiborg, was a self-made millionaire by the age of 40. The family spent most of their time in New York City and, later, East Hampton, where they built the 30-room mansion "The Dunes" on 600 acres just west of the Maidstone Club in 1912. It was the largest estate in East Hampton up to that time. Wiborg Beach in East Hampton is named for the family.

Address: Hwy Behind the Pond, East Hampton, NY 11937, USA (40.94874, -72.17874)
Phone: +1 631-324-4150
Website: www.easthamptonvillage.org

Place
Gerald and Sara Murphy’s romance started and ended in the Hamptons, where her self-made-millionaire father owned 600 acres—property that would be worth well over $1 billion today. At the beginning of the XX century, 16-year-old Gerald Murphy met beautiful 20-year-old Sara Wiborg at a party in East Hampton. Sara’s father, Frank B. Wiborg, who’d made his fortune selling printing ink in Cincinnati, built the Dunes, the largest house in East Hampton at the time, with 30 rooms and grounds that included Italianate sunken gardens, stables, a working dairy, and separate servants’ quarters. By the time the Dunes was finished in 1910, he was down to the mere 80 acres, a parcel that’s now covered by multimillion-dollar mansions, golf courses and other markers of Hamptons status crammed onto some of the world’s most valuable real estate. Gerald and Sara married in 1915, eleven years after that party, and became the kind of couple that seems invented for fiction: worldly, artistic, bohemian, glamorous. Years later, their friend F. Scott Fitzgerald would use them as the model for Dick and Nicole Driver in “Tender Is the Night.” They spent the twenties living on the French Riviera with their three children. They bought a house in Cap d’Antibes, remodeled it, and named it Villa America. Gerald painted and exhibited in Paris at the Salon des Independents in 1925, and had a posthumous retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 1974, and the couple entertained their luminary friends: Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Jean Cocteau, Cole Porter. But in 1933, when Europe began to roil and their son Patrick was diagnosed with tuberculosis, they came back to the U.S. and Gerald ran the leather-goods company Mark Cross, which his father had founded. Though it seemed golden-hued, the Murphys’ life was far from perfect. Both their sons died before adulthood: Baoth, the elder, in 1935, from meningitis, then Patrick, two years later, to tuberculosis. After their deaths, their daughter, Honoria, became their sole heir. The legendary 600 acres had already shrunk by 1910, and when Gerald and Sara moved there in the thirties, they began to sell off parcels. The enormous, financially burdensome Dunes was demolished in 1941 when the Murphys couldn’t find a buyer or renter. Sara and Gerald took up residence in the dairy barn, renovated it and named it Swan Cove. “I remember home movies where Grandma and Grandpa were bundled up in coats and Dos Passos and Bob Benchley were popping out of the big urns at Swan Cove,” recalls their granddaughter Laura Donnelly. In 1959, Sara and Gerald built a house they called the Little Hut next to the servants’ quarters and garage, which Honoria renovated and dubbed the Pink House; it was where her children spent their summers. “I remember seeing the Léger in the living room,” Donnelly says of the many treasures on the walls of the Little Hut. There were other, more down-to-earth charms, like the antique hand-carved farm tools that Gerald collected and displayed, or the mirror that he framed with rope and hung in the front hallway. Gerald died in the Little Hut in 1964, courtly to the last; his final words to his wife and daughter were “Smelling salts for the ladies.” Today, the Murphy legacy lives on with his grandchildren, who still own the last remnants of the great Wiborg property.

Life
Who: Gerald Clery Murphy (March 25, 1888 – October 17, 1964) and Sara Sherman Wiborg (November 7, 1883 – October 10, 1975)
Gerald Clery Murphy and Sara Sherman Wiborg were wealthy, expatriate Americans who moved to the French Riviera in the early XX century and who, with their generous hospitality and flair for parties, created a vibrant social circle, particularly in the 1920s, that included a great number of artists and writers of the Lost Generation. Gerald had a brief but significant career as a painter. In 1921 the Murphys moved to Paris to escape the strictures of New York and their families’ mutual dissatisfaction with their marriage. In Paris Gerald took up painting, and they began to make the acquaintances for which they became famous. Eventually they moved to the French Riviera, where they became the center of a large circle of artists and writers of later fame, especially Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, Fernand Léger, Jean Cocteau, Pablo Picasso, Archibald MacLeish, John O’Hara, Cole Porter, Dorothy Parker and Robert Benchley. Gerald died October 17, 1964 in East Hampton, two days after his friend Cole Porter. Sara died on October 10, 1975 in Arlington, Virginia. Gerald and Sara are both buried at South End Cemetery (34 James Ln, East Hampton, NY 11937).

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Lived: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)
25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)

Gordon Merrick was a Broadway actor, a best-selling author of gay-themed novels, and one of the first authors to write about homosexual themes for a mass audience. Merrick wrote stories, which depicted well-adjusted gay men engaged in romantic relationships. Each of his books had a happy ending. Merrick's best-known book is The Lord Won't Mind. The first in a trilogy, Merrick followed it up with One for the Gods in 1971 and Forth into Light in 1974. Merrick enrolled at Princeton University in 1936. He quit in the middle of his junior year and moved to New York City, where he became an actor. He landed the role of Richard Stanley in George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's The Man Who Came to Dinner and became Hart's lover for a time. In 1980 he moved to Ceylon (now known as Sri Lanka), having bought property there in 1974. He returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville. For the rest of his life, he divided his time between the two countries. Charles Gerald Hulse, a dancer turned actor turned novelist (In Tall Cotton, 1987), was his partner
of 32 years, until Merrick's death in 1988, in Sri Lanka where they moved together.

Together from 1956 to 1988: 32 years.
Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988)

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Historic District: Gordon Merrick left France to avoid the unrest which accompanied the Algerian War of Independence. Merrick and his partner Charles Hulse moved to Greece and took up residence on the island of Hydra.

Address: Ikonomou, Idra 180 40, Greece (37.32878, 23.47165)

Place
Hydra is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Saronic Gulf and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by a narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea (Υδρέα, derived from the Greek word for "water"), a reference to the springs on the island. The municipality of Hydra consists of the islands Hydra (area 52 km2 (20.1 sq mi)), Dokos (pop. 18, area 13.5 km2 (5.2 sq mi)), and a few uninhabited islets. The province of Hydra was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality. It was abolished in 2006. There is one main town, known simply as "Hydra port" (pop. 1,900 in 2011.) It consists of a crescent-shaped harbor, around which is centered a strand of restaurants, shops, markets, and galleries that cater to tourists and locals (Hydriots.) Steep stone streets lead up and outward from the harbor area. Most of the local residences, as well as the hostelries on the island, are located on these streets. Other small villages or hamlets on the island include Mandraki (pop. 11), Kamini, Vlychos (19), Palamidas, Episkopi, and Molos. Since 1960, the Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen has owned a house on the island.
Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In the 1950s Hydra became home to Charles Hulse and Gordon Merrick. Merrick was an American author who wrote more than a dozen novels, which were known for their gay themes. His most successful, “The Lord Won’t Mind,” was written on Hydra. While on vacation visiting the Greek island of Hydra in 1956, Merrick and Hulse bought a house on the island which was to become their home for the next twenty years. At the time, Merrick was working on his fifth novel, and Hulse and Merrick spent the years between 1960 and 1980 travelling mainly between Paris, Hydra and Galle in Sri Lanka. While on Hydra, Hulse and Merrick were hosts to socialites, intellectuals and artists from all over the world. During their theatre career, and here, Hulse and Merrick came to know people, such as Charles Laughton, Jules Dassin, Melina Mercouri, Jacqueline Onassis, Leonard Cohen and others. Hulse restored and furnished the house on Hydra, which was admired by and photographed extensively for various international magazines. In 1974 the couple bought land in Sri Lanka. Six years later they quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Merrick and Hulse also returned to France occasionally, eventually purchasing a home in Tricqueville, Normandy. For the rest of their life, they divided their time between the two countries.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: In 1974 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse bought land in Sri Lanka.

Address: 25 Rampart St, Galle 80000, Sri Lanka (6.02583, 80.21563)

Place
Galle is a major city in Sri Lanka, situated on the southwestern tip, 119 km from Colombo. Galle is the administrative capital of Southern Province, Sri Lanka and is the district capital of Galle District. Galle is the fifth largest city in Sri Lanka after the capital Colombo, Kandy, Jaffna and Negombo. According to James Emerson Tennent, Galle was the ancient seaport of Tarshish, from which King Solomon drew ivory, peacocks and other valuables. Cinnamon was exported from Sri Lanka as early as 1400 BC and the root of the word itself is Hebrew, so Galle may have been a main entrepot for the spice. Galle had been a prominent seaport long before western rule in the country. Persians, Arabs, Greeks, Romans, Malays, Indians, and Chinese were doing business through Galle port. In 1411, the Galle Trilingual Inscription, a stone tablet inscription in three languages, Chinese, Tamil and Persian, was erected in Galle to commemorate the second visit to Sri Lanka by the Chinese admiral Zheng He. The "modern" history of Galle starts in 1502, when a small fleet of Portuguese ships, under the command of Lourenço de Almeida, on their way to the Maldives, were blown off course by a storm. Realising that the king resided in Kotte close to Colombo, Lourenço proceeded there after a brief stop in Galle. In 1640, the Portuguese had to surrender to the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch built the present fort in the year 1663. They built a fortified wall, using solid granite, and built three bastions, known as "Sun,” "Moon" and "Star.” After the British took over the country from the Dutch in the year 1796, they preserved the Fort unchanged, and used it as the administrative centre of the district.

Life
Who: Gordon Merrick (August 3, 1916 – March 27, 1988) and Charles Gerald Hulse (born March 26, 1929)
In 1980 Gordon Merrick and Charles Hulse quit Greece permanently and moved to Galle, a town in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka, as the local tourism industry on Hydra had made the island too crowded for their tastes. Hulse and Merrick bought a house at 25 Rampart Street within the precinct of Galle’s XVII century fortress. Here, Hulse worked on interior design, and began to write. By this time, Merrick had already published several books and was a celebrity. Hulse helped Merrick to prepare manuscripts for publication and the two travelled together frequently during this period. Gordon Merrick died in Colombo, Sri Lanka, of lung cancer on March 27, 1988. He was survived by his companion, Charles G. Hulse.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Cecil John Rhodes PC was a British businessman, mining magnate and politician in South Africa, who served as Prime Minister of the Cape Colony from 1890 to 1896.
Born: July 5, 1853, Bishop's Stortford, United Kingdom
Died: March 26, 1902, Muizenberg, South Africa
Education: University of Oxford
Lived: Brown's Hotel, 33 Albemarle Street, W1S
Rhodes Arts Complex, 1-3 South Rd, Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 3JG, UK (51.86355, 0.16377)
6 King Edward St, Oxford OX1 4HT, UK (51.75203, -1.25462)
Buried: World's View Lookout, Gwanda, Matabeleland South, Zimbabwe
Buried alongside: Leander Starr Jameson
Find A Grave Memorial# 2313
Books: The last will and testament of Cecil John Rhodes
Siblings: Frank Rhodes

In 1882, Cecil Rhodes drew up a will leaving his estate to Neville Pickering. Two years later, Pickering suffered a riding accident. Rhodes nursed him faithfully for six weeks, refusing even to answer telegrams concerning his business interests. Pickering died in Rhodes's arms, and at his funeral, Rhodes was said to have wept with fervor. Rhodes also remained close to Leander Starr Jameson. In 1896, Earl Grey came to give Rhodes bad news. Rhodes instantly jumped to the conclusion that Jameson, who was ill, had died. On learning that his house had burnt down, he commented, "Thank goodness. If Dr. Jim had died I should never have got over it." Jameson nursed Rhodes during his final illness, was a trustee of his estate and residuary beneficiary of his will, which allowed him to continue living in Rhodes' mansion after his death. Rhodes' secretary, Jourdan, who was present shortly after Rhodes' death said, "Jameson was fighting against his own grief ... No mother could have displayed more tenderness towards the remains of a loved son." Jameson died in England in 1917, but in 1920, his body was transferred to a grave beside that of Rhodes on Malindidzimu Hill or World's View.

Together from 1894 to 1902: 8 years.
Cecil John Rhodes DCL (July 5, 1853 –March 26, 1902)
Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet, KCMG, CB, PC (February 9, 1853 –November 26, 1917)

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House: The Rhodes Arts Complex & Bishop’s Stortford Museum is a museum and contemporary venue for arts, culture and conferences in Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire.

Address: 5 S Road, Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 3YR, UK (51.86355, 0.16377)
Phone: +44 1279 651746
Website: http://www.rhodesbishopsstortford.org.uk/
English Heritage Building ID: 160968 (Grade II, 1949)

Place
One of the buildings, Netteswell House, was the birthplace in 1853 of Cecil Rhodes, financier, statesman and founder of diamond company De Beers. The complex was refurbished in 2005 and has a 300-seat theatre, a multi-purpose studio space, a museum and an exhibition gallery. It provides a programme of arts events and hosts professional touring productions, dance groups, musicians and comedians. Films are also shown in its tiered auditorium. The Rhodes Arts Complex also contains an exhibition gallery for art and photography. The Bishop’s Stortford Museum houses the Rhodes Collection containing interactive displays, archives, photographs and artefacts about the life of Cecil Rhodes. The museum combines the collections of the former Rhodes Memorial Museum and the Bishop’s Stortford Local History Museum. The Rhodes Museum was established in 1938 in two listed Victorian buildings. The current museum opened in 2005. The original part of Rhodes’ home holds exhibits on the life of Cecil Rhodes, XIX century South African artefacts from his travels, and a reconstructed middle class Victorian drawing room with family memorabilia. The new building features exhibits about local history.

Life
Who: Cecil John Rhodes PC (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902)
Cecil Rhodes was a British colonial-era businessman, mining magnate, and politician in South Africa. An ardent believer in British colonialism, Rhodes was the founder of the southern African territory of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe and Zambia), which was named after him in 1895. South Africa’s Rhodes University is also named after Rhodes. He set up the provisions of the Rhodes Scholarship, which is funded by his estate. Rhodes never married, pleading, "I have too much work on my hands" and saying that he would not be a dutiful husband. Some writers and academics have suggested that Rhodes may have been homosexual. The scholar Richard Brown observed: "On the issue of Rhodes’ sexuality... there is, once again, simply not enough reliable evidence to reach firm, irrefutable conclusions. It is inferred, but not proven, that Rhodes was homosexual and it is assumed (but not proven) that his relationships with men were sometimes physical. Neville Pickering (died in 1886) is described as Rhodes’ lover in spite of the absence of decisive evidence." Rhodes was close to Pickering; he returned from negotiations for Pickering’s 25th birthday in 1882. On that occasion, Rhodes drew up a new will leaving his estate to Pickering. Two years later, Pickering suffered a riding accident. Rhodes nursed him faithfully for six weeks, refusing even to answer telegrams concerning his business interests. Pickering died in Rhodes’s arms, and at his funeral, Rhodes was said to have wept with fervour. Pickering’s successor was Henry Latham Currey (1863-1945), the son of an old friend, who had become Rhodes’s private secretary in 1884. When Currey was engaged in 1894, Rhodes was deeply mortified and their relationship split. Rhodes also remained close to Leander Starr Jameson (1853-1917) after the two had met in Kimberley, where they shared a bungalow. In 1896 Earl Grey came to give Rhodes bad news. Rhodes instantly jumped to the conclusion that Jameson, who was ill, had died. On learning that his house had burnt down he commented, "Thank goodness. If Dr Jim had died, I should never have got over it." Jameson nursed Rhodes during his final illness, was a trustee of his estate and residuary beneficiary of his will, which allowed him to continue living in Rhodes’ mansion after his death. Rhodes’s secretary, Jourdan, who was present shortly after Rhodes’s death said, "Jameson was fighting against his own grief... No mother could have displayed more tenderness towards the remains of a loved son.” Jameson died in England in 1917, but after the war in 1920 his body was transferred to a grave beside that of Rhodes on Malindidzimu Hill or World’s View, a granite hill in the Matopo National Park 40 km south of Bulawayo.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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House: King Edward Street is a street running between the High Street to the north and Oriel Square to the south in central Oxford.
Address: King Edward St, Oxford OX1 4HT, UK (51.75203, -1.25462)

Place
On the wall of the first floor of No. 6, there is a large metal plaque with a portrait of Cecil Rhodes; underneath is the inscription: “In this house, the Rt. Hon Cecil John Rhodes kept academical residence in the year 1881. This memorial is erected by Alfred Mosely in recognition of the great services rendered by Cecil Rhodes to his country.” In December 2015 Oriel College announced that the process to remove the plaque was about to start. To the east is the "Island" site of Oriel College, one of the colleges of Oxford University. To the west are shops, including Shepherd & Woodward, the leading University outfitters, fronting onto the High Street. King Edward Street is officially designated as part of the A420 road due to the blockage of the High Street to normal traffic. The street was only created in 1872–73 by Oriel College when 109 and 110 High Street were demolished, so it is much wider than other older streets off the High Street. The buildings were mostly designed by Frederick Codd. On No. 14 lived Felix Yusupov, one of the murderers of Grigori Rasputin.

Life
Who: Cecil John Rhodes PC (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902)
Cecil Rhodes was a student at Oxford, and a member of Oriel College, in the 1870s, and left money to the College on his death. On November 6, 2015, Oriel received a petition organised by the Rhodes Must Fall in Oxford movement, calling for the removal of the statue of Cecil Rhodes from the College’s High Street frontage. The petition said that its continued presence violates the University’s commitment to “fostering an inclusive culture which promotes equality, values diversity and maintains a working, learning and social environment in which the rights and dignity of all its staff and students are respected.” Cecil Rhodes’s historical legacy includes the Rhodes Scholarships programme, which he endowed and which has so far given nearly 8000 scholars from countries around the world the opportunity to study at Oxford. But Rhodes was also a XIX century colonialist whose values and world view stand in absolute contrast to the ethos of the Scholarship programme today, and to the values of a modern University.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Accomodation: Brown's Hotel (33 Albemarle St, Mayfair, London W1S 4BP) is a 5-star hotel in London. Founded in 1837 by James and Sarah Brown, it is one of London's most established hotels, celebrating its 175th anniversary in 2012. Brown's has been owned by Rocco Forte Hotels since 3 July 2003 and is a member of The Leading Hotels of the World. Historian John Lothrop Motley stayed at the hotel in 1874, as shown in a letter he wrote on the 17th of June of that year, to Dutch historian Groen van Prinsterer. Celebrated Victorian writers Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson, JM Barrie and Bram Stoker were also all regular visitors. The hotel has also hosted Alexander Graham Bell (who made the first phone call in Europe from the hotel), Theodore Roosevelt, Napoleon III, Empress Eugenie, Elizabeth, Queen of the Belgians, Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia, George II, King of the Hellenes, Cecil Rhodes, Rudyard Kipling and Agatha Christie.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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National Park: The Matobo National Park forms the core of the Matobo or Matopos Hills, an area of granite kopjes and wooded valleys commencing some 35 kilometres south of Bulawayo, southern Zimbabwe.

Address: Matopo National Park, Matobo, Zimbabwe, Africa (-20.55722, 28.5125)
Phone: +263 4 707 6249
Website: http://www.zimparks.org/

Place
Established in 1926.
The hills were formed over 2 billion years ago with granite being forced to the surface. The granite has eroded to produce smooth "whaleback dwalas" and broken kopjes, strewn with boulders and interspersed with thickets of vegetation. Mzilikazi, founder of the Ndebele nation, gave the area its name, meaning “Bald Heads.” The national park is the oldest in Zimbabwe, a bequest from Cecil Rhodes. The original park borders extended well to the south and east of the current park. These areas were redesignated for settlement as part of a compromise between the colonial authorities and the local people, creating the Khumalo and Matobo Communal Lands. The park area then increased with the acquisition of World’s View and Hazelside farms to the north. Cecil Rhodes, Leander Starr Jameson, and several other leading early white settlers, including Allan Wilson and all the members of the Shangani Patrol killed in the First Matabele War, are buried on the summit of Malindidzimu, the “hill of the spirits.” This is a great source of controversy in modern Zimbabwe as this is considered a sacred place by nationalists and indigenous groups. This mount is also referred to as the World’s View. The Hills cover an area of about 3100 km², of which 424 km² is National Park, the remainder being largely communal land and a small proportion of commercial farmland. The park extends along the Thuli, Mtshelele, Maleme and Mpopoma river valleys. Part of the national park is set aside as a 100 km² game park, which has been stocked with game including the white rhinoceros. The highest point in the hills is the promontory named Gulati (1549 m) just outside the north-eastern corner of the park. Administratively, Matobo National Park incorporates the Lake Matopos Recreational Park, being the area around Hazelside, Sandy Spruit and Lake Matopos.

Life
Who: Cecil John Rhodes PC (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902) and Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet (February 9, 1853 – November 26, 1917)
Sir Leander Starr Jameson was a British colonial politician who was best known for his involvement in the Jameson Raid. After acting as house physician, house surgeon and demonstrator of anatomy, and showing promise of a successful professional career in London, his health broke down from overwork in 1878, and he went out to South Africa and settled down in practice at Kimberley. There he rapidly acquired a great reputation as a medical man, and, besides numbering President Kruger and the Matabele chief Lobengula among his patients, came much into contact with Cecil Rhodes. Jameson died in England but is buried at Malindidzimu Hill, or World’s View, a granite hill in the Matobo National Park, 40 km south of Bulawayo. It was designated by Cecil Rhodes as the resting place for those who served Great Britain well in Africa. Rhodes is also buried there. Sir Leander Starr Jameson died on the afternoon of Monday, 26 November 1917, at his home, 2 Great Cumberland Place, Hyde Park, in London. His body was laid in a vault at Kensal Green Cemetery on 29 November 1917, where it remained until the end of the WWI. Ian Colvin (1923) writes that Jameson’s body was then: "carried to Rhodesia and on May 22, 1920, laid in a grave cut in the granite on the top of the mountain which Rhodes had called The View of the World, close beside the grave of his friend. “Thy firmness makes my circle just, And makes me end where I begun.” There on the summit those two lie together."

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Alfred Edward Housman, usually known as A. E. Housman, was an English classical scholar and poet, best known to the general public for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad.
Born: March 26, 1859, Bromsgrove, United Kingdom
Died: April 30, 1936, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Education: University of Oxford
Bromsgrove School
Lived: 82 Talbot Road, Westbourne Park, W2
39 Northumberland Place, W2
15 Northumberland Place, W2
Housman’s & The Clock House, Valley Rd, Bournheath, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire B61 9HY, UK (52.35841, -2.07569)
Perry Hall, Kidderminster Rd, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire B61 7JZ, UK (52.33594, -2.07239)
Byron Cottage, 17 North Rd, London N6 4BD, UK (51.57232, -0.14985)
Buried: St Laurence, College Street, Ludlow, Shropshire, SY8 1AN
Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, SW1P 3PA (memorial)
Trinity College, Cambridge, City of Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England (memorial)
Find A Grave Memorial# 9193
Siblings: Laurence Housman

A.E. Housman was an English classical scholar and poet, best known to the public for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. At St John's College, Oxford, Housman formed strong friendships with two roommates, Moses Jackson and A. W. Pollard. Jackson became the great love of Housman's life, though the latter's feelings were not reciprocated, as Jackson was heterosexual. After Oxford, Jackson got a job as a clerk in the Patent Office in London and arranged a job there for Housman as well. They shared a flat with Jackson's brother Adalbert until 1885 when Housman moved to lodgings of his own. Moses Jackson moved to India in 1887. He remained in India his entire career, returning to England only briefly to marry Rosa Chambers and for various trips home. In 1900, he asked Housman to stand as the godfather to his fourth son, Gerald Christopher Arden Jackson. When he retired, he moved to British Columbia with his family and settled in as a farmer. He died in 1923. Jackson’s last visit to England in 1921 was also the last time Housman saw him. Mo’s last letter was preserved by A.E., who retraced the shaky pencil with ink and kept it in a desk drawer, where his brother Laurence, found it after Housman’s death in 1936. In 1942, Laurence Housman deposited an essay entitled A.E. Housman's De Amicitia in the British Library, with the proviso that it was not to be published for 25 years. The essay discussed A.E.'s homosexuality and his love for Moses.

They met in 1877 and remained friends until Jackson’s death in 1923: 46 years.
Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936)
Moses John Jackson (1858 – January 14, 1923)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university located in Oxford.

Address: Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 3PA, UK (51.75663, -1.2547)
Phone: +44 1865 270000
Website: www.ox.ac.uk

Place
While having no known date of foundation, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest surviving university. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled northeast to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two "ancient universities" are frequently jointly referred to as "Oxbridge". The university is made up of a variety of institutions, including 38 constituent colleges and a full range of academic departments which are organised into four divisions.

Notable Queer Alumni and Faculties at University of Oxford:
• Harold Acton (1904-1994) went up to Oxford in October 1923 to read Modern Greats at Christ Church, and while there he co-founded the avant garde magazine The Oxford Broom, and published his first book of poems, “Aquarium” (1923). In this phase of life and following it, Acton moved in the circles of, was influenced by, and he himself influenced many intellectual and literary figures of pre-war Britain; Acton is noted by Evelyn Waugh for having inspired, in part, the character of Anthony Blanche “Brideshead Revisited” (1945).
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977) was educated at home before attending Hertford College, to study Law but went down after just 18 months. He then became interested in music.
• W.H. Auden (1907-1973) went up to Christ Church in 1925, with a scholarship in biology; he switched to English by his second year. Friends he met at Oxford include Cecil Day-Lewis, Louis MacNeice, and Stephen Spender; these four were commonly though misleadingly identified in the 1930s as the "Auden Group" for their shared (but not identical) left-wing views. Auden left Oxford in 1928 with a third-class degree. In 1956–61 he was Professor of Poetry at Oxford; his lectures were popular with students and faculty and served as the basis of his 1962 prose collection “The Dyer's Hand.” In 1972, Auden moved his winter home from New York to Oxford, where his old college, Christ Church, offered him a cottage, while he continued to summer in Austria.
• Sir Edmund Trelawny Backhouse, 2nd Baronet (1873–1944) attended Winchester College and Merton College. While at Oxford he suffered a nervous breakdown in 1894, and although he returned to the university in 1895, he never completed his degree, instead fleeing the country due to the massive debts he had accumulated.
• Katharine Lee Bates (1859-1929) studied at Oxford University during 1890–91.
• Francis Beaumont (1584–1616) was educated at Broadgates Hall (now Pembroke College) at age thirteen. Following the death of his father in 1598, he left university without a degree and followed in his father's footsteps by entering the Inner Temple in London in 1600.
• George Benson (1613–1692) matriculated at Queen's College, on November 21, 1628, aged 15; BA, on May 10, 1631; MA from St Edmund's Hall, on February 11, 1633 or 1634; DD from Queen's College, on August 2, 1660. Prebendary of Chichester. Rector of Chetton (Sallop), 1638. Canon and archdeacon of Hereford, 1660; canon of Worcester, 1671; Dean of Hereford, from September 10, 1672 to August 24, 1692. He married Katherine Fell, daughter of Samuel Fell, at Christ Church, Oxford. He died aged 78 years and is buried beside his friend Bishop Croft underneath the throne in the Choir of Hereford Cathedral.
• Lennox Berkeley (1903-1989) was born in Oxford, and educated at the Dragon School, Gresham's School and Merton College.
• Robert Boothby, Baron Boothby (1900-1986) was educated at St Aubyns School, Eton College, and Magdalen College. Before going up to Oxford, near the end of WWI, he trained as an officer and was commissioned into the Brigade of Guards, but was too young to see active service. After Oxford he became a partner in a firm of stockbrokers. While an undergraduate at Magdalen College, Oxford, Boothby earned the nickname "the Palladium", because "he was twice nightly".
• Maurice Bowra (1898-1971) was an English classical scholar and academic, known for his wit. He was Warden of Wadham College, from 1938 to 1970, and served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford from 1951 to 1954. In his long career as an Oxford don Bowra had contact with a considerable portion of the English literary world, either as students or as colleagues. The character of Mr Samgrass in Evelyn Waugh's “Brideshead Revisited” is said to have been modelled on Bowra. Cyril Connolly, Henry Green, Anthony Powell and Kenneth Clark knew Bowra quite well when they were undergraduates. Clark called Bowra "the strongest influence in my life". Waugh marked his friend's election as Warden of Wadham by presenting him with a monkey-puzzle tree for his garden. As an undergraduate in Oxford in the 1920s Bowra was fashionably homosexual and was known to cruise for sex. He used the term "the Homintern" and privately referred to his leading position in it, also calling it "the Immoral Front" or "the 69th International". Bowra retired in 1970, but continued to live in rooms in the college that had been granted to him in exchange for a house he owned. He became an honorary fellow of Wadham and was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Law. He died of a sudden heart attack in 1971 and was buried in Holywell Cemetery (St Cross Church, St.Cross Rd, City Centre, Oxford OX1 3TP).
• Edwin Emmanuel Bradford (1860–1944) was an English clergyman and Uranian poet and novelist. He attended Exeter College, received his B.A. in 1884, and was awarded a D.D. He was vicar of Nordelph, Downham Market, Norfolk, from 1909 to 1944.
• Sir John Bramston (1832–1921), was a politician in Queensland (now part of Australia) and a British colonial government administrator in Queensland and Hong Kong. Bramston was the second son of Thomas William Bramston (later MP for South Essex), of Skreens, Essex and his wife Eliza, daughter of Admiral Sir Eliab Harvey. He was educated at Winchester College and at Balliol College, where he graduated B.A. in 1854, becoming Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford in the following year, and D.C.L. in 1863. He entered the Middle Temple in November 1854 and was called to the bar in June 1857.
• Beau Brummell (1778-1840) attended Oxford University, where, by his own example, he made cotton stockings and dingy cravats a thing of the past. While an undergraduate at Oriel College in 1793, he competed for the Chancellor's Prize for Latin Verse, coming second to Edward Copleston, who was later to become provost of his college. He left the university after only a year at the age of sixteen.
• Peter Burra (1909-1937) attended Christ Church College and edited Farrago, founded by Simon Nowell-Smith as a rival to Oxford Poetry. Farrago ran for six issues, from February 1930 to June 1931, and quickly established a reputation a long way from Oxford; The Times was soon calling it “that very excellent undergraduate literary review,” while the London Mercury hailed it as “the best undergraduate journal published since the War.” Burra was occasionally successful in attracting contributions from figures such as Evelyn Waugh, Robert Bridges, the artist Edward Burra (Peter’s cousin) and Max Beerbohm, but the magazine was identified closely with the group of poets, artists and musicians around the Oxford University Orchestral Society.
• Richard Francis Burton (1821-1890) matriculated at Trinity College, on November 19, 1840. Before getting a room at the college, he lived for a short time in the house of Dr. William Alexander Greenhill, then physician to the Radcliffe Infirmary. Here, he met John Henry Newman, whose churchwarden was Dr. Greenhill. Despite his intelligence and ability, Burton was antagonised by his teachers and peers. During his first term, he is said to have challenged another student to a duel after the latter mocked Burton's moustache. Burton continued to gratify his love of languages by studying Arabic; he also spent his time learning falconry and fencing. In April 1842, he attended a steeplechase in deliberate violation of college rules and subsequently dared to tell the college authorities that students should be allowed to attend such events. Hoping to be merely "rusticated" – that is, suspended with the possibility of reinstatement, the punishment received by some less provocative students who had also visited the steeplechase – he was instead permanently expelled from Trinity College.
• Rupert Buxton (1900-1921) won a scholarship to Harrow School in London, where he was appointed Head Boy. He was an exceptionally kind young man and found interest in supporting causes like the London Association for the Blind. After he left Harrow School, he studied at Cambridge University and Christ Church. There he befriended Michael Llewelyn Davies, one of J.M. Barrie's young friends. Both boys were interested in poetry and theater, and their friendship blossomed quickly. Rupert and Michael became nearly inseparable.
• Robert Byron (1905–1941) was educated at Eton and Merton College, from which he was expelled for his hedonistic and rebellious manner. He was best known at Oxford for his impersonation of Queen Victoria. He died in 1941, during WWII, when the ship on which he was travelling was torpedoed by a U-Boat off Cape Wrath, Scotland, en route to Egypt. His body was never found. Nancy Mitford hoped at one stage that Byron would propose marriage to her, and was later astonished as well as shocked to discover his homosexual tastes, complaining: "This wretched pederasty falsifies all feelings and yet one is supposed to revere it." Byron's great, though unreciprocated, passion was for Desmond Parsons, younger brother of the 6th Earl of Rosse, who was regarded as one of the most magnetic men of his generation. They lived together in Peking, in 1934, where Desmond developed Hodgkin's Disease, of which he died in Zurich, in 1937, when only 26 years old. Byron was left utterly devastated. It has been said that Parsons was also the only man Harold Acton has ever loved.
• Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset, (1587–1645), was a politician, and favourite of King James VI and I. His alma mater was Queen's College.
• Lord David Cecil (1902–1986), was a British biographer, historian and academic. He held the style of "Lord" by courtesy, as a younger son of a marquess. David Cecil was the youngest of the four children of James Gascoyne-Cecil, 4th Marquess of Salisbury, and the former Lady Cicely Gore (second daughter of Arthur Gore, 5th Earl of Arran). After Eton he went on to Christ Church, as an undergraduate. Cecil read Modern History at Oxford and in 1924 obtained first-class honours. From 1924 to 1930 he was a Fellow of Wadham College. With his first publication, “The Stricken Deer” (1929), a sympathetic study of the poet Cowper, he made an immediate impact as a literary historian. Studies followed on Walter Scott, early Victorian novelists and Jane Austen. In 1939 he became a Fellow of New College, where he remained a Fellow until 1969, when he became an Honorary Fellow. In 1947 he became Professor of Rhetoric at Gresham College, London, for a year; but in 1948 he returned to the University of Oxford and remained a Professor of English Literature there until 1970. Joyce Grenfell mentions that Lord David Cecil was bisexual.
• Cyril Connolly (1903-1974) achieved academic success in 1922 winning the Rosebery History Prize, and followed this up with the Brackenbury History scholarship to Balliol College. After his cloistered existence as a King's Scholar at Eton, Connolly felt uncomfortable with the hearty beer-drinking rugby and rowing types at Oxford. His own circle included his Eton friends Mynors and Dannruthers, who were at Balliol with him, and Kenneth Clark, whom he met through Bobbie Longden at Kings. He wrote: "The only exercise we took was running up bills." His intellectual mentors were the Dean of Balliol, "Sligger" Urquhart, who organised reading parties on the continent, and the Dean of Wadham, Maurice Bowra.
• Antony Copley (1937–2016) was a British historian. He was an honorary professor at the University of Kent at Canterbury, and specialised in XIX century French history and modern Indian history. At the time of his death he was looking forward to a general pardon for gay men who like himself, had been convicted of homosexual acts. He was born on 1 July 1937 in Hertfordshire, the son of Alan, a solicitor, and Iris Copley, and educated at Gresham's School and Worcester College.
• Michael Llewelyn Davies (1900-1921) attended Christ Church, where he continued to correspond regularly with J.M. Barrie. He briefly decided to study art at the University of Paris, but returned to Oxford. Several friends from Eton joined him there, but he also became very close to Rupert Buxton, the son of Sir Thomas Fowell Victor Buxton, 4th Baronet and a former pupil of Harrow School. The two became inseparable friends, spending time both at the university and on holiday together. Buxton was also a poet, and had an interest in acting. Buxton was one of the few friends of Davies whom Barrie reported getting along with. In an interview taped in 1976, Conservative politician Robert Boothby, who had been a close friend of Davies at Eton and Oxford, spoke about Davies' relationships during this time. When asked if Davies were homosexual, Boothby replied it was "a phase... I think he might have come out of it." Boothby also said, "I don't think Michael had any girlfriends, but our friendship wasn't homosexual. I believe it was – fleetingly – between him and Senhouse". (Roger Senhouse was a friend of Davies at both Eton and Oxford.) Boothby reported that he had discouraged Davies' relationship with Buxton, warning of "a feeling of doom" he had about him. Although Boothby criticised the relationship between Davies and his surrogate father Barrie as "morbid" and "unhealthy", he dismissed the notion that there was a sexual aspect to it. But he volunteered that there had been a sexual relationship between Davies and Buxton. Shortly before Davies's 21st birthday, he and Buxton drowned together in Sandford Lasher, a pool of water downstream of a weir near Sandford Lock on the River Thames, a few miles from Oxford.
• Paul Dehn (1912-1976) was educated at Shrewsbury School, and attended Brasenose College. While at Oxford, he contributed film reviews to weekly undergraduate papers.
• Alfred Douglas (1870-1945) was educated at Wixenford School, Winchester College (1884–88) and Magdalen College (1889–93), which he left without obtaining a degree. At Oxford, he edited an undergraduate journal, The Spirit Lamp (1892–3), an activity that intensified the constant conflict between him and his father.
• Edward Douglas-Scott-Montagu (1926-2015) attended St Peter's Court, a prep school at Broadstairs in Kent, then Ridley College in Canada, Eton College and finally New College. He read Modern History at Oxford, but during his second year an altercation between the Bullingdon Club, of which he was a member, and the Oxford University Dramatic Society led to his room being wrecked, and he felt obliged to leave.
• Tom Driberg (1905-1976) won a classics scholarship to Christ Church. Oxford in 1924 featured an avant-garde aesthetic movement in which personalities such as Harold Acton, Brian Howard, Cyril Connolly and, a little later, W. H. Auden were leading lights. Driberg was soon immersed in a world of art, politics, poetry and parties: "There was just no time for any academic work", he wrote later. A poem of Driberg's in the style of Edith Sitwell was published in Oxford Poetry 1926; when Sitwell came to Oxford to deliver a lecture, Driberg invited her to have tea with him, and she accepted. After her lecture he found an opportunity to recite one of his own poems, and was rewarded when Sitwell declared him "the hope of English poetry." The consequence of his various extracurricular involvements was neglect of his academic work; failure in his final examinations was inevitable, and in the summer of 1927 he left Oxford without a degree.
• Robert Flemyng (1912–1995) was an English film and stage actor. Flemyng was married to Carmen Sugars, who died in 1994, and they had one daughter. According to “Alec Guinness: The Authorised Biography,” a biography of Alec Guinness by Piers Paul Read, he "[fell] in love with a younger man in [his] middle age." He could not act upon his repressed feelings because male homosexuality was illegal in the United Kingdom (until 1967) and because he was married. Therefore, "he had a nervous breakdown and then a stroke and had a really terrible time."
• Peter Glenville (1913-1996) was the son of Sean Glenville and Dorothy Ward, a highly successful double act in the pantomime. Dorothy Ward, with famously beautiful legs, played the principal “boy” and Sean Glenville the “dame”. It was hardly surprising, Glenville used to say, that he was queer. Since Dorothy Ward was Roman Catholic, she provided the funds to send Peter to Stonyhurst, the public school run by the Jesuits in Lancashire. From there Glenville went to Christ Church, where he joined OUDS. The OUDS at that time was a distinctly homosexual society with some very good-looking young men, among them Peter Glenville, Robert Flemyng and Terence Rattigan, all of whom were keen to cluster around the visiting star. The “visiting star” was John Gielgud who, in 1932, came to direct “Romeo and Juliet”. In 1934, Glenville was elected president of OUDS, and after graduation made his first professional stage appearance at the Manchester Repertory Company in Louis Jourdan’s role as the tutor, Dr. Agi, in Ferenc Molnar’s “The Swan”.
• Alastair Graham (1904-1982), one of the three Oxford lovers of Evelyn Waugh (in order Richard Pares, Alistair Graham and Hugh Lygon.) Paula Byrne said that while he was "candid" about the relationships with Pares and the well-heeled Graham in his autobiography, Waugh refrained from explicitly describing them as homosexual.
• Robert Graves (1895-1985) won a classical exhibition to St John's College, but did not take his place there until after the war. His most notable Oxford companion was T. E. Lawrence, then a Fellow of All Souls', with whom he discussed contemporary poetry and shared in the planning of elaborate pranks. In 1961 he became Professor of Poetry at Oxford, a post he held until 1966.
• Henry William Greville (1801–1872) was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, where he graduated B.A. on 4 June 1823.
• Bryan Guinness, 2nd Baron Moyne (1905-1992) attended Christ Church and was called to the bar in 1931.
• Sheridan Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 5th Marquess of Dufferin and Ava (1938-1988), after Eton, attended Christ Church. A keen shot and sportsman, he played championship tennis at the Queen's Club, but it was at Oxford that he developed a passion for the arts.
• Leslie Poles Hartley (1895–1972), known as L. P. Hartley, was a British novelist and short story writer. Hartley was born in Whittlesey, Cambridgeshire, the son of Bessie and Harry Hartley. While he was young, the family moved to a small country estate near Peterborough. Hartley was educated in Cliftonville, Thanet, then briefly at Clifton College, where he first met Clifford Henry Benn Kitchin, then at Harrow. In 1915, during WWI, he went up to Balliol College, to read modern history, and there he befriended Aldous Huxley. In 1916, with the arrival of conscription, Hartley joined the army, and in February 1917 he was commissioned as an officer in the Norfolk Regiment, but for health reasons he was never posted overseas for active duties. Invalided out of the army after the war, he returned to Oxford in 1919, where he gathered a number of literary friends, including Lord David Cecil, the platonic ‘love of his life’ according to Francis King. He was introduced by Huxley to Lady Ottoline Morrell. Kitchin, who was also then at Oxford, introduced him to the family of H. H. Asquith, and Cynthia Asquith became a lifelong friend. Despite being named after Leslie Stephen, Hartley always belonged to the Asquith set and was rebuffed by the Bloomsbury group. Hartley was homosexual but not open about his sexuality until toward the end of his life. Hartley regarded his 1971 novel “The Harness Room” as his "homosexual novel" and feared the public reaction to it.
• Gavin Henderson, 2nd Baron Faringdon (1902-1977), was sent to Eton College, then attended McGill University in Montreal, before graduating from Christ Church, in 1924.
• Robert Herbert (1831-1905) was the first Premier of Queensland, Australia. He was educated at Eton and Balliol College. He won a Balliol scholarship in 1849 and subsequently the Hertford and Ireland scholarships. He took a first class in classical moderations, won the Latin verse prize in 1852, and obtained second-class final honours in the classical school. He was elected Fellow of All Souls in 1854 and was Eldon law scholar. In 1855 he was private secretary to William Ewart Gladstone and was called to the bar of the Inner Temple in 1858. Robert Herbert met his companion, John Bramston, in the early 1850s at Balliol College. The pair shared rooms at Oxford, and also in London. When Herbert was Premier of Queensland, and Bramston his Attorney-General, the two created a farm on what is now the site of the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. They named the farmhouse in which they both lived "Herston", a combination of their names. It also became the name of the modern-day Brisbane suburb of Herston, in the same location.
• Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) studied classics at Balliol College (1863–67). Hopkins was an unusually sensitive and shy student and poet, as witnessed by his class-notes and early poetic pieces. At Oxford he forged a lifelong friendship with Robert Bridges (eventual Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom) which would be of importance in his development as a poet and in his posthumous acclaim. Hopkins was deeply impressed with the work of Christina Rossetti and she became one of his greatest contemporary influences, meeting him in 1864. During this time he studied with the prestigious writer and critic Walter Pater, who tutored him in 1866 and who remained a friend until Hopkins left Oxford in September 1879. In July 1866, he decided to become a Roman Catholic, and he traveled to Birmingham in September to consult the leader of the Oxford converts, John Henry Newman. Newman received him into the Roman Catholic Church on 21 October 1866.
• A. E. Housman (1859-1936) won an open scholarship to St John's College, where he studied classics. Although introverted by nature, Housman formed strong friendships with two roommates, Moses Jackson and A. W. Pollard. Jackson became the great love of Housman's life, but he was heterosexual and did not reciprocate Housman's feelings.
• Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) graduated from Balliol College, with a first in English literature. In 1916 he edited Oxford Poetry and in June of that year graduated BA with First Class honours.
• Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon (1661-1723) studied at Oxford, matriculating in 1675, a month after his father succeeded as 2nd Earl of Clarendon, whereby he became styled Viscount Cornbury. He joined the Royal Regiment of Dragoons before being elected as a Tory Member of Parliament for Wiltshire from 1685–1696 and for Christchurch 1695–1701. He was Master of the Horse to Prince George of Denmark, and a Page of Honour to King James II at his Coronation. He was one of the first commanders to desert the King in 1688, taking with him as many troops as he could.
• H. Montgomery Hyde (1907-1989) was a barrister, politician (Ulster Unionist MP for Belfast North), prolific author and biographer. He was deselected in 1959, losing his seat in the House of Commons, as a result of campaigning for homosexual law reform. He attended Queen's University Belfast where he gained a first-class history degree, and then Magdalen College, and a second-class law degree. He was an extension lecturer in History at the University of Oxford in 1934, and Professor of History and Political Science at the University of Lahore from 1959 to 1962.
• Evelyn Irons (1900-2000) graduated from Somerville College.
• Edward James (1907-1984) was the only son of William James (who had inherited a fortune from his father, merchant Daniel James) and Evelyn Forbes, a Scots socialite. He was reputedly fathered by the Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) and in his anecdotal reminiscences, recorded in “Swans Reflecting Elephants – My Early Years,” Edward James also puts forward this hypothesis. However, there was also popular belief that Forbes may have been one of the Prince of Wales's mistresses and there was a much-quoted ballad by Hilaire Belloc intimating this at the time. Edward James had four older sisters: Audrey, Millicent, Xandra, and Silvia. He was educated at Lockers Park School, then briefly at Eton, then at Le Rosey in Switzerland, and finally at Christ Church, where he was a contemporary of Evelyn Waugh (Waugh attended Hertford College) and Harold Acton, a fellow student at Christ Church. When his father died in 1912 he inherited the 8,000-acre (32 km2) West Dean House estate in Sussex, held in trust until he came of age. He was also left a large sum in trust when his uncle John Arthur James died in 1917. James's first sponsorship of note was in publishing John Betjeman's first book of poems when at Oxford.
• Robert King, 4th Earl of Kingston (1796-1867) was the second but eldest surviving son of George King, 3rd Earl of Kingston, and Lady Helena, daughter of Stephen Morre, 1st Earl of Mount Cashell. He was educated at Exeter College.
• C. H. B. Kitchin (1895-1967) was a British novelist of the early XX century. He was one of Francis King's two mentors, the other being J. R. Ackerley. Kitchin attended Exeter College and became a barrister. Kitchin led a varied and colourful life. He was born into wealth and increased his wealth through investment in the stock market. He used his wealth to take part in many different fields, including the breeding and racing of greyhounds, in which he was briefly an important figure. He was homosexual, and was living with his lover Clive Preen until Preen's death in 1944. 1886: Clive Bertram Preen (1886-1944) was born at George St, Kidderminster. He was the son of Harvey Edwin Preen, a chartered accountant, and his wife Ann (formerly Harper). In 1891 he was visiting Hastings with his parents and in 1901 he was at school in Marlborough. In 1911 he was living in Belsize Park, Hampstead with his parents and working as a chartered accountant. In April 1914 he and his father Harvey sailed to New York and he went by himself in both July 1914 and January 1836. He never married and since 1930 was living with Kitchin. He died in 1944.
• (Edward) Eardley Knollys (1902-1991) was an English artist of the Bloomsbury School of artists, art critic, art dealer and collector, active from the 1920s to 1950s. He was educated at Winchester and Christ Church.
• T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935) studied History at Jesus College from 1907 to 1910. In 1910 Lawrence was offered the opportunity to become a practising archaeologist in the Middle East, at Carchemish, in the expedition that D. G. Hogarth was setting up on behalf of the British Museum. Hogarth arranged a "Senior Demyship", a form of scholarship, for Lawrence at Magdalen College in order to fund Lawrence's work at £100/year. In 1919, he was elected to a seven-year research fellowship at All Souls College, providing him with support while he worked on “Seven Pillars of Wisdom.”
• James Lees-Milne (1908-1997) attended Lockers Park School in Hertfordshire, Eton, and Oxford University from which he graduated with a Third Class in History in 1931.
• Alan Lennox-Boyd, 1st Viscount Boyd of Merton (1904-1983) was educated at Sherborne School, Dorset, and graduated from Christ Church, with a Master of Arts.
• Matthew Lewis (1775-1818), like his father, entered Christ Church, on April 27, 1790 at the age of fifteen. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1794 and earned a master's degree from the same college in 1797.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) was denied admission to several colleges, and several Rhodes Scholars from the American South refused to live in the same college or attend events with Locke. He was finally admitted to Hertford College, where he studied literature, philosophy, Greek, and Latin, from 1907–1910. In 1910, he attended the University of Berlin, where he studied philosophy. Locke wrote from Oxford in 1910 that the "primary aim and obligation" of a Rhodes Scholar "is to acquire at Oxford and abroad generally a liberal education, and to continue subsequently the Rhodes mission [of international understanding] throughout life and in his own country. If once more it should prove impossible for nations to understand one another as nations, then, as Goethe said, they must learn to tolerate each other as individuals".
• Hugh Patrick Lygon (1904-1936) was educated at Eton and Pembroke College. He was a friend of Evelyn Waugh's at Oxford (A. L. Rowse believed the two to be lovers), where both were members of the Hypocrites' Club, along with their contemporary Murray Andrew McLean.
• William Lygon (1872-1938) was educated at Eton and Christ Church, where he showed an interest in evangelism, joining the Christian Social Union.
• Compton Mackenzie (1883-1972) was educated at St Paul's School, London, and Magdalen College, where he graduated with a degree in modern history.
• Christabel Marshall (1871-1960) took a BA in Modern History at Somerville College.
• Hilda Matheson, OBE (1888–1940) was a pioneering radio talks producer at the BBC and served as the first Director of Talks. Matheson was born in Putney, in south-west London, England to Scottish parents, Margaret (née Orr) and Donald Matheson. She was a boarding student at Saint Felix School in Southwold for four years. Matheson wanted to continue the study of history at Cambridge, but left school at eighteen, when her father's health forced the family to move to Europe. Returning to England in 1908, her father was appointed as the Presbyterian chaplain for Oxford University undergraduates and Matheson enrolled as a history student in Society of Oxford Home Students. She briefly worked for Philip Kerr (later Lord Lothian), who introduced her to Britain's first female parliamentarian, Lady Nancy Astor. Around the same time that she began working for the BBC, Matheson began an affair with Vita Sackville-West. In January, 1932, Matheson left the BBC and began working as the radio critic at The Observer, which was owned at the time by the Astor family. Around the same time, she ended her relationship with Sackville-West and began a long-term relationship with the poet, Dorothy Wellesley, Duchess of Wellington, moving to Penns in the Rocks farm on the Wellesley estate in Withyham, East Sussex. She died of Graves' disease at 52 years old following a thyroidectomy surgery performed at Kettlewell Hill Nursing Home in Horsell, Surrey.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) studied at Oxford University, as a Rhodes Scholar earning a B.Litt. in 1925.
• Michael Montague, Baron Montague of Oxford (1932-1999) was the son of David and Eleanor Montague. He attended the Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe, and Magdalen College School.
• Evan Morgan, 2nd Viscount Tredegar (1893-1949), was educated at Eton College and Christ Church.
• Raymond Mortimer (1895–1980) was educated at Malvern College, and Balliol College, which he entered in 1913 to read history. His studies were interrupted by service in a hospital in France from 1915; and then work in the Foreign Office. He did not complete his degree.
• John Henry Newman (1801-1890), originally an evangelical Oxford University academic and priest in the Church of England, then became drawn to the high-church tradition of Anglicanism. He became known as a leader of, and an able polemicist for, the Oxford Movement, an influential and controversial grouping of Anglicans who wished to return to the Church of England many Catholic beliefs and liturgical rituals from before the English Reformation. However, in 1845 Newman, joined by some but not all of his followers, left the Church of England and his teaching post at Oxford University and was received into the Catholic Church. He was quickly ordained as a priest and continued as an influential religious leader, based in Birmingham. In 1879, he was created a cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in recognition of his services to the cause of the Catholic Church in England. He was instrumental in the founding of the Catholic University of Ireland, which evolved into University College Dublin, today the largest university in Ireland.
• Beverley Nichols (1898–1983) went to school at Marlborough College then Balliol College, and was President of the Oxford Union and editor of Isis.
• Harold Nicolson (1886–1968) was educated at Wellington College and Balliol College.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951) won a scholarship to Magdalen College School, where he was a solo treble in the college choir.
• Brian Paddick, Baron Paddick (born 1958) was born in Balham in London, England, and spent his early years in Mitcham and Tooting Bec. He was educated at Bec Grammar School in Tooting Bec, and at Sutton Manor High School (now Sutton Grammar School), in Sutton. He went on to take a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Philosophy, Politics and Economics at The Queen's College. When he was at Oxford, he was Captain of the University Swimming Team and Vice-Captain of his college's rugby team.
• Richard Pares (1902–1958) won scholarships at Winchester College and at Balliol College, where he took a first-class degree in literae humaniores in 1924. On obtaining his Oxford degree, he was elected to a fellowship of All Souls College, which he retained until 1945.
• Hon. Desmond Edward Parsons (1910-1937) was the son of William Edward Parsons, 5th Earl of Rosse and Frances Lois Lister-Kaye. He died on 4 July 1937 at age 26. He was the unrequited love of both Robert Byron and Harold Acton.
• Ralph Partridge (1894-1960) rowed with Noël Carrington while at the University of Oxford. In 1918 Noël introduced him to his sister, Dora Carrington, who was on holiday in Scotland. After surviving the WWI, Partridge returned to Oxford, and became a regular visitor to Tidmarsh. He soon fell in love with Carrington - whilst Strachey fell in love with him, rechristening him “Ralph,” as he would thereafter be known.
• Walter Pater (1839-1894) went to Queen's College in 1858. After graduating, Pater remained in Oxford and taught Classics and Philosophy to private students. His years of study and reading now paid dividends: he was offered a classical fellowship in 1864 at Brasenose on the strength of his ability to teach modern German philosophy, and he settled down to a university career. Pater was at the centre of a small but gifted circle in Oxford – he had tutored Gerard Manley Hopkins in 1866 and the two remained friends till September 1879 when Hopkins left Oxford – and he gained respect in the London literary world and beyond, numbering some of the Pre-Raphaelites among his friends. He is buried at Holywell Cemetery (St Cross Church, St.Cross Rd, City Centre, Oxford OX1 3TP).
• Peter Pears (1910–1986) went to Keble College in 1928, to study music. He was not at this stage sure whether his musical future was as a singer or as player; during his brief time at the university he was appointed temporary assistant organist at Hertford College, which was useful practical experience. Headington comments that a musical conservatoire such as the Royal College of Music would have suited Pears better than the Oxford course, but at the time it was seen as a natural progression for an English public school boy to continue his education at Oxford or Cambridge. In the event Pears did not take to Oxford's academic regime, which required him to study a range of subjects before specialising in music. He failed the first-year examinations (Moderations) and though he was entitled to resit them he decided against doing so, and went down from Oxford.
• John Pope-Hennessy (1913-1994) was educated at Downside School, a Roman Catholic boarding independent school for boys, in the village of Stratton-on-the-Fosse in Somerset, followed by Balliol College, where he read modern history. At Oxford, he was introduced by Logan Pearsall Smith (a family friend from the United States) to Kenneth Clark, who became a mentor to the young Pope-Hennessy.
• Terence Rattigan (1911-1977) was educated at Sandroyd School from 1920 to 1925, at the time based in Cobham, Surrey (and now the home of Reed's School), and Harrow School. Rattigan played cricket for the Harrow First XI and scored 29 in the Eton–Harrow match in 1929. He was a member of the Officer Training Corps and organised a mutiny, informing the Daily Express. Even more annoying to his headmaster, Cyril Norwood, was the telegram from the Eton OTC, "offering to march to his assistance". He then went to Trinity College. A troubled homosexual, who saw himself as an outsider, his plays "confronted issues of sexual frustration, failed relationships and adultery", and a world of repression and reticence. Rattigan had numerous lovers but no long-term partners, a possible exception being his "congenial companion ... and occasional friend" Michael Franklin.
• Mary Renault (1905-1983) was educated at St Hugh's College, then an all-women's college, receiving an undergraduate degree in English in 1928. In 1933 she began training as a nurse at the Radcliffe Infirmary in Oxford. During her training she met Julie Mullard, a fellow nurse with whom she established a lifelong romantic relationship.
• Cecil Rhodes (1853-1902) was admitted to Oriel College, but stayed for only one term in 1873. He returned to South Africa and did not return for his second term at Oxford until 1876. He was greatly influenced by John Ruskin's inaugural lecture at Oxford, which reinforced his own attachment to the cause of British imperialism. Among his Oxford associates were James Rochfort Maguire, later a fellow of All Souls College and a director of the British South Africa Company, and Charles Metcalfe. Due to his university career, Rhodes admired the Oxford "system". Eventually he was inspired to develop his scholarship scheme: "Wherever you turn your eye—except in science—an Oxford man is at the top of the tree".
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), following her graduation at Radcliffe College, received a Guggenheim Fellowship to study at Oxford for a year. Following a visit to Florence, she chose not to return to Oxford, and spent her remaining time in Europe writing and exploring Italy.
• Philip Sassoon (1888-1939) was educated at Farnborough Prep school, Eton before going up to Oxford. Old Etonian Arthur Balfour recommended the Debating Society to him. His father was also friendly with Frances Horner, wife of Sir John Horner, a longtime friend of Gladstone who lived at Mells Manor in Somerset. His house master was a member of the secret society of liberals the Young Apostles. And a near contemporary was Osbert Sitwell, the Yorkshireman and author (Sitwell’s long-time companion was David Horner, from the Horner’s family at Mells Manor). A French scholar, he learnt the language doing classes at Windsor Castle. Sassoon was taught aesthetics by Henry Luxmoore giving an insight into philosophy and social realism. However he chose to read Modern History at Christ Church. He was one of only 25 Jewish undergraduates, but was invited to join the Bullingdon Club. He joined the East Kent Yeomanry while still at Oxford and commissioned a second lieutenant.
• John Schlesinger (1926-2003), after St Edmund's School, Hindhead, Uppingham School and Balliol College, where he was involved in the Oxford University Dramatic Society, he worked as an actor.
• Vida Dutton Scudder (1861-1954) and Clara French (1863-1888) were the first American women admitted to the graduate program at Oxford in 1885, where Scudder was influenced by York Powell and John Ruskin.
• Roger Senhouse (1899–1970) attended both Eton College and Oxford University, where he was friends with Michael Llewelyn Davies, one of the boys upon whom Peter Pan was based, and foster son of J. M. Barrie. Lord Robert Boothby, who was a friend of Senhouse and Davies during that period – and himself bisexual – said in a 1976 interview that the relationship between Senhouse and Davies was "fleetingly" homosexual in nature.
• Desmond Shawe-Taylor (1907-1995) was sent to be educated in England, at Shrewsbury School and Oriel College, where he graduated in 1930 with a first class degree in English
• Philip Sidney (1554-1586) was educated at Shrewsbury School and Christ Church.
• Sacheverell Sitwell (1897-1988) was educated at Eton College and Balliol College.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) was awarded an American Association of University Women's fellowship for the 1957–1958 academic year to St Anne's College, where she traveled without her husband, Philip Rieff, and son. There, she had classes with Iris Murdoch, Stuart Hampshire, A. J. Ayer and H. L. A. Hart while also attending the B. Phil seminars of J. L. Austin and the lectures of Isaiah Berlin. Oxford did not appeal to her, however, and she transferred after Michaelmas term of 1957 to the University of Paris.
• Stephen Spender (1909-1995) came up to University College in 1927. His autobiography "World within World" (1951) suggests that he did not have a very happy time at Oxford, and he never took a degree, but in 1973 he was elected an Honorary Fellow of the College, and stayed in contact with it until his death.
• Major Honorable James “Hamish” Alexander Wedderburn St. Clair-Erskine (1909-1973), second son of James Francis Harry St. Clair-Erskine, 5th Earl of Rosslyn and Vera Mary Bayley. He was educated at Eton College, and New College. He gained the rank of Major in the service of the Coldstream Guards. He fought in the WWII between 1939 and 1942, where he was wounded, mentioned in despatches twice and became a POW. He was decorated with the award of the Military Cross (M.C.) in 1943. Nancy Mitford fell in love with him. He was the least suitable partner of all, "the most shimmering and narcissistic of all the beautiful butterflies". The pair met in 1928 and became unofficially engaged, despite his homosexuality (of which Nancy may not have been aware). Against a backdrop of negativity from family and friends—Waugh advised her to "dress better and catch a better man"— the affair endured sporadically for about 5 years. He eventually converted to homosexuality and called the wedding off. He died unmarried in December 1973
• Ambrose St. John (1815-1875) was educated at Westminster School, and Christ Church, where he graduated M.A., forming a lifelong friendship with Cardinal Newman.
• Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) studied at Oxford University, where he gained a Second in the examination for the BCL degree at Christ Church and was the Secretary of the Oxford Union. He obtained a PhD degree from the University of London and a JSD degree from Yale University. He was called to the Bar at the Middle Temple in 1952. St John-Stevas was appointed as a Lecturer at Southampton University (1952–1953) and King's College London (1953–1956). He then went to Oxford University to tutor in Jurisprudence at Christ Church (1953–1955) and Merton College (1955–1957). He also lectured in the United States and held a visiting professorship at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He met his partner of over fifty years, Adrian Stanford, in 1956 at Oxford
• Eric Stenbock (1860-1895) attended Balliol College but never completed his studies. While at Oxford, Eric was deeply influenced by the homosexual Pre-Raphaelite artist and illustrator Simeon Solomon. He is also said to have had a relationship with the composer and conductor Norman O'Neill and with other "young men". In Oxford, Stenbock also converted to Roman Catholicism taking for himself the name Stanislaus. Some years later Eric also admitted to having tried a different religion every week in Oxford. At the end of his life, he seemed to have developed a syncretist religion containing elements of Catholicism, Buddhism and idolatry.
• Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909) attended Balliol College (1856–60) with a brief hiatus when he was rusticated from the university in 1859 for having publicly supported the attempted assassination of Napoleon III by Felice Orsini. He returned in May 1860, though he never received a degree.
• John Addington Symonds (1840-1893) studied classics under Benjamin Jowett at Balliol College, and later worked with Jowett on an English translation of Plato's Symposium. Jowett was critical of Symonds' opinions on sexuality, but when Symonds was falsely accused of corrupting choirboys, Jowett supported him, despite his own equivocal views of the relation of Hellenism to contemporary legal and social issues that affected homosexuals.
• Wilfred Thesiger (1910-2003) was educated at Eton College followed by Magdalen College, where he took a Third in History. Between 1930 and 1933, Thesiger represented Oxford at boxing and later (in 1933) became captain of the Oxford boxing team. He was awarded a boxing Blue for each of the four years that he was at Oxford. Whilst at Oxford, Thesiger was also elected Treasurer of the Oxford University Exploration Club (1931–32).
• Colin Turnbull (1924-1994) was educated at Westminster School and Magdalen College, where he studied politics and philosophy. Joseph Allen Towles moved to New York City in 1957 to pursue a career as an actor and writer. He met Turnbull in 1959 and they exchanged marriage vows the following year. From 1965 to 1967, Turnbull and Towles conducted fieldwork among the Ik of Northern Uganda in Africa. Towles' health declined slowly from 1983. He died from complications of AIDS in 1988. Colin Turnbull asked his name to be added to Joe's gravestone since, basically, his soul died when his partner died too. He died in Virginia in 1994, aged 69.
• Edward Perry Warren (1860-1928) received his B.A. from Harvard College in 1883 and later studied at New College, earning his M.S. in Classics. His academic interest was classical archeology. At Oxford he met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907, much to Warren's dismay.
• Peter Watson (1908-1956), wealthy English art collector and benefactor, was the son of William George Watson, later Sir George Watson. He was educated at Lockers Park School, Eton College and St John's College.
• Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966) was educated at Lancing College and then at Hertford College. During his first two terms, he generally followed convention; he smoked a pipe, bought a bicycle, and gave his maiden speech at the Oxford Union, opposing the motion that "This House would welcome Prohibition". The arrival in Oxford in October 1922 of the sophisticated Etonians Harold Acton and Brian Howard changed Waugh's Oxford life. Acton and Howard rapidly became the centre of an avant-garde circle known as the Hypocrites, whose artistic, social and homosexual values Waugh adopted enthusiastically; he later wrote: "It was the stamping ground of half my Oxford life". He began drinking heavily, and embarked on the first of several homosexual relationships, the most lasting of which were with Richard Pares and Alastair Graham.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) proved himself to be an outstanding classicist, first at Dublin, then at Magdalen College. He became known for his involvement in the rising philosophy of aestheticism, led by two of his tutors, Walter Pater and John Ruskin.
• Peter Wildeblood (1923–1999) won a scholarship to Radley College and then went up to Trinity College, in 1941, but dropped out after ten days because of ill health.
• William II of the Netherlands (1792-1849) was born in The Hague. He was the eldest son of King William I of the Netherlands and Wilhelmine of Prussia. His maternal grandparents were King Frederick William II of Prussia and his second wife Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt. When William was two, he and his family fled to England after allied British-Hanoverian troops left the Republic and entering French troops defeated the army of the United Provinces, claiming liberation by joining the anti-Orangist Patriots. William spent his youth in Berlin at the Prussian court, where he followed a military education and served in the Prussian Army. After this, he studied at the University of Oxford and had a splendid military career close to Wellington. William II had a string of relationships with both men and women.
• Emlyn Williams (1905-1987), aged 11, won a scholarship to Holywell Grammar School. At the end of his time at the grammar school he won a scholarship to Christ Church, where he read French and Italian and joined the Oxford University Dramatic Society (OUDS). His first full-length play, Full Moon, was premiered at the original Oxford Playhouse in 1927, the year he joined a repertory company and began his stage career.
• Angus Wilson (1913-1991) was educated at Westminster School and Merton College, and in 1937 became a librarian in the British Museum's Department of Printed Books, working on the new General Catalogue.
• Carl Winter (1906-1966) was educated at Xavier College and Newman College, University of Melbourne. He came to England in 1928 and attended Exeter College.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
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House: Housman’s was the home of A.E. Housman, the poet, during childhood. Very simple but attractive XVIII century, 2 storey brick farmhouse with roof of old tiles. Sashes in cased frames.

Address: Valley Road, Bournheath, Worcestershire B61 9HY, UK (52.35841, -2.07569)
English Heritage Building ID: 155679 (Grade II, 1972)

Place
Housman’s is a private home, originally The Valley House, an early Georgian farmhouse, part of the Clock House estate. Here in 1859, A.E. Housman was born, just before the family moved to Perry Hall. The Clock House once stood where there are now several modern houses, behind a long brick wall. Originally XVII century, it was at different times home to three generations of Housmans. A.E. Housmans lived there in his teens and with his brothers and sisters enjoyed the large garden (now private), country life and long walks. The high ground a few hundreds yards from the Clock House was known to the Housman childrens as Mount Pisgah. It commands extensive views including Bredon Hill, the Malverns, the Abberley Hills and to the west the Shropshire Clees which were to Housmans the “blue remembered hills” behind which the sun set. He romanticised about the land beyond them and it became the setting for “A Shropshire Lad.” It also overlooks Bromsgrove and the spire of St. Johns is a marker for where Housmans enjoyed his early years at Perry Hall and to where he walked daily to school.

Life
Who: Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936), aka A. E. Housman
A. E. Housman was a classical scholar and poet, best known to the general public for his cycle of poems “A Shropshire Lad.” Lyrical and almost epigrammatic in form, the poems wistfully evoke the dooms and disappointments of youth in the countryside. Their beauty, simplicity and distinctive imagery appealed strongly to late Victorian and Edwardian taste, and to many early XX century English composers (beginning with Arthur Somervell) both before and after WWI. Through their song-settings, the poems became closely associated with that era, and with Shropshire itself. The eldest of seven children, Housman was born at Valley House in Fockbury, a hamlet on the outskirts of Bromsgrove in Worcestershire, to Sarah Jane (née Williams, married 1June 7, 1858 in Woodchester, Gloucester) and Edward Housman (whose family came from Lancaster), and was baptised on 24 April 1859 at Christ Church, in Catshill. “I was born in a house called The Little Valley (to distinguish it from The Valley Farm on the other side of the road) about two miles north west of Bromsgrove in Worcestershire, in the parish of Catshill, near the hamlet of Bourneheath.” Naiditch demonstrates from census results that A.E. Housman is mistaken, and that he was born at the Valley House, near the Clock House, in Fockbury. “The one (house) I liked best (Fockbury House, known as The Clock House), and lived from 1873 to 1877, has been utterly ruined.”

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
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School: The former home of Old Bromsgrovian A.E. Housman, the only mixed boarding house, the only exclusively Sixth Form boarding house and the only house in Bromsgrove town itself; Housman Hall houses one hundred girl and boy boarders aged between sixteen and eighteen.

Address: Kidderminster Road, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire B61 7JZ, UK (52.33594, -2.07239)
Website: http://www.bromsgrove-school.co.uk/housman-hall.aspx
English Heritage Building ID: 155719 (Grade II, 1952)

Place
The house is possibly of XVII century origin but present building is of XVIII century red brick - work with sandstone plinth and two semi-circular arched doorways having (probably XVII century) studded boarded doors with strap hinges. 2 storeys, 3 windows left hand portion has XIX century Gothic headed lights in painted woodwork, and hipped roof of old tiles. Right hand lower portion is of similar brick- work but has square headed casements and gabled end facing the road. Part old tiles and part machine tiles. Now a residential hall belonging to Bromsgrove School, it was built in 1828 as a house for John Adam’s, a distant relative of A.E. Housman. The poet’s father, Edward, set up office there as a solicitor and it was the family home where Housman lived until he was 18. With his brothers and sisters Housman enjoyed its extensive gardens and had a perfect childhood. But the idyll was shattered when his mother died on his birthday in 1871 and in increasing financial difficulties, Edward moved his family to the Clock House. For most of the XX century Perry Hall was an hotel.

Life
Who: Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936), aka A. E. Housman
“From 1860 to 1873, and again from 1877 to 1882, I lived at Perry Hall in Bromsgrove, at the foot of the church hill.” A.E. Housman was educated at Bromsgrove School (Worcester Rd, Bromsgrove B61 7DU), where he revealed his academic promise and won prizes for his poems. A.E. Housman’s poem "Oh who is that young sinner with the handcuffs on his wrists?,” written after the trial of Oscar Wilde, addressed more general injustice towards homosexuals. In the poem the prisoner is suffering "for the colour of his hair,” a natural quality that, in a coded reference to homosexuality, is reviled as "nameless and abominable" (recalling the legal phrase peccatum illud horribile, inter Christianos non-nominandum, "the sin so horrible, not to be named amongst Christians.”) Despite acclaim as both a scholar and poet in his lifetime, Housman lived as a recluse, rejecting honours and avoiding the public eye. He travelled frequently to France where he enjoyed reading “books which were banned in Britain as pornographic.” A fellow described him as being “descendend from a long line of maiden aunts.” He died in 1936 in Cambridge and is buried as St. Laurence’s Church (Ludlow, Shropshire SY8).
Source: Perry Hall Hotel, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire. A Short History of the Hotel and Its Association with A.E. Housman

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
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House: At St John's College, Oxford, A.E. Housman (1859-1936) formed strong friendships with two roommates, Moses Jackson and A.W. Pollard. Jackson became the great love of Housman's life, though the latter's feelings were not reciprocated, as Jackson was heterosexual. After Oxford, Jackson got a job as a clerk in the Patent Office in London and arranged a job there for Housman as well. They shared a flat at 82 Talbot Rd, London W2 5LF, from 1882 with Jackson's brother Adalbert until 1885 when Housman moved to lodgings of his own at nearby 39 Northumberland Pl, London W2 5AS, from 1885 to 1886. He had also lived at number 15 Northumberland Pl, London W2 5BS, from 1881 to 1882.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: English Heritage Blue Plaque: 17 North Road, A. E. Housman (1859–1936), “Poet and scholar wrote "A Shropshire Lad" while living here"

Address: 17 N Road, Tottenham, Greater London N6 4BD, UK (51.57232, -0.14985)
English Heritage Building ID: 201458 (Grade II, 1951)

Place
“From 1886 to 1905 I lodged at Byron Cottage, North Road (no. 17 I think), Highgate; and the whole A Shropshire Lad except no. XIV was written there. It is, or was, very pretty, and well worth photographing.” A.E. Housman. Byron Cottage has no connection to the poet, but it still boasts the prestige of a blue plaque. This stately five-bed Georgian home was where A.E. Housman wrote his collection of poems “A Shropshire Lad.” On the market in 2009 for £2.1m, the property features elegant sashes, wooden floors and beams and a narrow but bright country-style kitchen backing on to the (sadly) paved back garden. In 1770 one of two new brick houses on the eastern side of North End, later called Hollybush Hill, was occupied by a wine merchant. In 1781, with another house to the south called Myrtle, later Byron, Cottage or Lodge, it was bought by John Bland (d. 1788), a City banker. In 1787 the eastern portion of Dingley’s estate, where a cottage had been demolished in 1786, passed to Bland by bequest. Most of Dingley’s estate, including Pitt House, was bought in 1787 by Abraham Robarts, another banker, who sold it in 1807 to John Vivian, solicitor to the Excise. Robarts and Vivian apparently occupied Pitt House. Byron Cottage was occupied by the judge Sir Robert Dallas (1756-1824) ca. 1810, by the Quaker philanthropist Sir Thomas Buxton (1786- 1845) and his wife Hannah, sister-in-law of Samuel Hoare the younger, before 1820, and by the marchioness of Lansdowne in 1823. Hope Cottage, a weatherboarded cottage near the Bull and Bush, housed the painter John Linnell in 1822 and, after he had moved to Wyldes, his friend the painter, William Collins. Both were visited by fellow artists, including Blake, Varley, Morland, and Palmer, attracted, according to William Collins’s son Wilkie, the novelist, “by some of the prettiest and most varied inland scenery.” On the east side of North End Avenue a second North End House had been built by 1913 and in 1923 Brandon House and Wyldeways were built north of it. Myrtle Lodge, farther north again, had been renamed Byron Cottage after Fanny Lucy, Lady Byron and later Lady Houston (1857-1936), the thrice married ex-chorus girl and patriot, who went to live there in 1908. One small block of flats, the Limes, was built between the two inns in 1935. Pitt House, in 1869 a two-storyed building with a central doorway and a side bay, was later enlarged by the addition of a billiard room and in 1899 Sir Harold Harmsworth, later Viscount Rothermere, bought it and added a storey, also moving the Georgian doorcase to the side bay. He sold it in 1908 and it was occupied during WWI by Valentine Fleming, M.P., and his sons the writers Ian (d. 1964) and Peter (d. 1971), and from 1924 to 1939 by the earl of Clarendon. Much of North End was destroyed or damaged by a parachute mine during WWII. The Hare and Hounds was rebuilt in 1968. Pitt House, used by the army and then left empty, was sold in 1948 to an investment company, which demolished it in 1952 and replaced it with a house of the same name; the L.C.C. acquired 3 a. of the garden in 1954. Building after 1945 was discreet and North End kept its quiet village atmosphere in the 1980s. The Old Bull and Bush, although largely rebuilt in the 1920s, retained two XVIII century bay windows and one venetian window. Behind it, an early XVIII century pair, nos. 1 and 3 North End, remained, as did Wildwood, dating from the XVIII century and tile-hung in the late XIX century. Byron Cottage and the Gothic Wildwood Lodge also survived. Michael Ventris (1922-56), the architect and decipherer of Linear B, built no. 19 North End Avenue in the 1950s. Sir Nikolaus Pevsner (d. 1983), the architectural historian, lived at no. 2 Wildwood Terrace from 1936, next to Geoffrey Grigson the poet at no. 3 in 1938. Sir Donald Wolfit (1902-68), the actor manager, lived at no. 5 Wildwood Grove in the 1950s.

Life
Who: Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936), aka A. E. Housman
At St. John’s College, Oxford, A.E. Housman formed strong frienships with two roommates, Moses Jackson and A.W. Pollard. Jackson became the great, unrequited love of Housman’s life. Housman, Jackson, and Jackson’s brother shared a flat until 1885 when Housman moved to Byron Cottage and in 1887, Jackon moved to India. Jackson died in 1923; his last visit to England was in 1921, also the last time Housman saw him. Jackson’s last letter was preserved by A.E. Housman, who retraced the shaky pencil with ink and kept it in a desk drawer, where his brother Laurence found it after Housman’s death in 1936. In 1942, Laurence Housman deposited an essay entitled “A.E. Housman’s De Amicitia” in the British Library, with the provisio that it was not to be published for 25 years. The essay discussed A.E.’s homosexuality and his love for Moses Jackson. Housman remembered his love for Jackson in a poem that could only be published after the poet’s death.
“Because I liked you better
Than suits a man to say
It irked you, and I promised
To throw the thought away . . . .
Halt by the headstone naming
The heart no longer stirred,
And say the lad that loved you
Was one that kept his word.”

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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School: The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University or simply Cambridge, 4 Mill Ln, Cambridge CB2 1RZ) is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and given royal charter status by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university. The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford after a dispute with the townspeople. The two ancient universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge".

Notable queer alumni and faculty at University of Cambridge:
• Charles Robert Ashbee (1863–1942) was born in 1863 in Isleworth, the son of businessman and erotic bibliophile Henry Spencer Ashbee. His Jewish mother developed suffragette views, and his well-educated sisters were progressive as well. Ashbee went to Wellington College and read history at King's College, from 1883 to 1886, and studied under the architect George Frederick Bodley. His papers and journals are at King's College.
• Anthony Bacon (1558–1601) and Francis Bacon (1561-1626) enrolled in Trinity College in April 1573, where they lived in the household of the Master of Trinity College, John Whitgift.
• Philip Bainbridge (1891-1918), a graduate of Eton and Trinity College, was killed in action at the Battle of Épehy on September 18, 1918, six weeks before his friend Wilfred Owen.
• Thomas Baines (1622–1680) studied at Christ's College, under the tuition of Henry More, and took the degree of B.A. in 1642, and M.A. in 1649. An accident brought him under the notice of John Finch, then at the same college, and from this time they became inseparable friends.
• William John Bankes (1786–1855) was educated at Westminster School and continued his studies at Trinity College, where he received his BA in 1808 and his MA in 1811. Lord Byron, a fellow student at Trinity College, became Bankes' lifelong friend.
• Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) attended Harrow School, and then, despite having little or no interest in academia, moved on to St John's College, and studied history, art and architecture. Beaton continued his photography, and through his university contacts managed to get a portrait depicting the Duchess of Malfi published in Vogue. It was actually George "Dadie" Rylands – "a slightly out-of-focus snapshot of him as Webster's Duchess of Malfi standing in the sub-aqueous light outside the men's lavatory of the ADC Theatre at Cambridge." Beaton left Cambridge without a degree in 1925.
• A.C. Benson (1862-1925) was educated at Temple Grove School, Eton, and King's College. From 1885 to 1903 he taught at Eton, returning to Cambridge to lecture in English literature for Magdalene College. From 1915 to 1925, he was the 28th Master of Magdalene. From 1906, he was a governor of Gresham's School. He is buried at the Ascension Burial Ground (Cambridge CB3 0EA). His cousin James Bethune-Baker is also buried there.
• Anthony Blunt (1907-1983) won a scholarship in mathematics to Trinity College. At that time, scholars in Cambridge University could not earn a degree in less than three years, and hence Blunt spent four years at Trinity and switched to Modern Languages, eventually graduating in 1930 with a first class degree. He taught French at Cambridge and became a Fellow of Trinity College in 1932. Like Guy Burgess, Blunt was known to be homosexual, which was a criminal activity at that time in Britain. Both were members of the Cambridge Apostles (also known as the Conversazione Society), a clandestine Cambridge discussion group of 12 undergraduates, mostly from Trinity and King's Colleges who considered themselves to be the brightest minds in the university. Many were homosexual and Marxist at that time. Amongst other members, also later accused of being part of the Cambridge spy ring, were the American Michael Whitney Straight and Victor Rothschild who later worked for MI5. Rothschild gave Blunt £100 to purchase “Eliezar and Rebecca” by Nicolas Poussin. The painting was sold by Blunt's executors in 1985 for £100,000 and is now in the Fitzwilliam Museum.
• Philip Brett (1937-2002) received his academic degrees from King's College. He was a distinguished professor of musicology, accomplished keyboard player, author and authority on music of the Elizabethan period. He spent his entire teaching career in the University of California system: at Berkeley from 1966 to 1991, at Riverside from 1991 to 2001, and at UCLA for one year. From 1976 onward, Philip produced a steady series of influential articles and books exploring the implications of gay and lesbian sexuality in music. Some of these works included, “Queering the Pitch: The New Gay and Lesbian Musicology” (1994), “Cruising the Performative: Interventions into the Representation of Ethnicity, Nationality, and Sexuality” (1995), and “Decomposition: Post-Disciplinary Performance” (2000). In appreciation of his extraordinary achievement as scholar, teacher and organizer, the Gay and Lesbian Study Group of the American Musicology Society, created the Philip Brett Award in 1996. They give the award each year to honor exceptional musicological work in the field of GLBT studies. For his specialization of early music he received the Noah Greenberg Award in 1980 and a Grammy nomination in 1991. He died of cancer just one day shy of his 65th birthday. He is survived by his registered domestic/life partner of 28 years, Professor George Haggerty, Chair of the Department of English at University of California, Riverside. Professor Brett is buried at St Faith’s Crematorium (75 Manor Rd, Horsham St Faith, Norwich NR10 3LF), Plot: Memorial Garden at Horsham.
• Reginald Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher (1852-1930), known as Regy, was the son of William Baliol Brett, 1st Viscount Esher and Eugénie Mayer. Born in London, Esher remembered sitting on the lap of an old man who had played violin for Marie Antoinette, and was educated at Eton and Trinity College. At Cambridge, Brett was profoundly influenced by William Harcourt the radical lawyer, politician and Professor of International Law. Harcourt controlled Brett's rooms, and lifestyle at Cambridge. Brett was admitted to the Society of Apostles, dedicated to emergent philosophies of European atheism; their number included the aristocratic literati of liberalism Frank, Gerald and Eustace Balfour, Frederick and Arthur Myers, Hallam and Lionel Tennyson, Edmund Gurney, S H and J G Butcher.
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), while travelling in Europe, prepared a thesis, entitled "John Webster and the Elizabethan Drama", which won him a scholarship to King's College, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles, was elected as President of the Cambridge University Fabian Society, helped found the Marlowe Society drama club and acted in plays including the Cambridge Greek Play. Brooke made friends among the Bloomsbury group of writers, some of whom admired his talent while others were more impressed by his good looks. Virginia Woolf boasted to Vita Sackville-West of once going skinny-dipping with Brooke in a moonlit pool when they were in Cambridge together.
• Oscar Browning (1837-1923) was educated at King's College, where he became fellow and tutor, graduating fourth in the classical tripos of 1860, and where he was inducted into the exclusive Cambridge Apostles, a debating society for the Cambridge elite. After being a master at Eton College for 15 years until he was dismissed in 1857, Browning returned to King's College, where he took up a life fellowship and achieved a reputation as a wit, becoming universally known as "O.B.". He travelled to India at George Curzon's invitation after the latter had become Viceroy. In 1876 he resumed residence at Cambridge, where he became university lecturer in history. He soon became a prominent figure in college and university life, encouraging especially the study of political science and modern political history, the extension of university teaching and the movement for the training of teachers. Browning served as principal of the Cambridge University Day Training College (1891–1909), treasurer of the Cambridge Union Society (1881–1902), founding treasurer of the Cambridge University Liberal Club (1885–1908), and president of the Cambridge Footlights (1890–1895).
• Guy Burgess (1911-1963) attended Trinity College. He joined the conservative Pitt Club but was also recruited into the Cambridge Apostles, a secret, elite debating society at the University, whose members at the time were largely Marxist and included Anthony Blunt. Burgess, together with Blunt, Maclean and Philby, was recruited by the Comintern.
• Samuel Butler (1835-1902) went up to St John's College in 1854, where he obtained a first in Classics in 1858. Tthe graduate society of St John's is named the Samuel Butler Room (SBR) in his honour.
• George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (1788–1824) went up to Trinity College, where he met and formed a close friendship with the younger John Edleston. About his "protégé" he wrote, "He has been my almost constant associate since October, 1805, when I entered Trinity College. His voice first attracted my attention, his countenance fixed it, and his manners attached me to him for ever." In his memory Byron composed “Thyrza,” a series of elegies. Edleston gave Byron a ring which Byron was wearing when he died. In later years he described the affair as "a violent, though pure love and passion". Also while at Cambridge he formed lifelong friendships with men such as John Cam Hobhouse and Francis Hodgson, a Fellow at King's College, with whom he corresponded on literary and other matters until the end of his life.
• Edward Carpenter (1844-1929)’s academic ability appeared relatively late in his youth, but was sufficient enough to earn him a place at Trinity Hall. Whilst there he began to explore his feelings for men. One of the most notable examples of this is his close friendship with Edward Anthony Beck (later Master of Trinity Hall), which, according to Carpenter, had "a touch of romance". Beck eventually ended their friendship, causing Carpenter great emotional heartache. Carpenter graduated as 10th Wrangler in 1868.
• Graham Chapman (1941-1989) began to study medicine at Emmanuel College in 1959. He joined the Cambridge Footlights, where he first began writing with John Cleese. Following graduation, Chapman joined the Footlights show "Cambridge Circus" and toured New Zealand, deferring his medical studies for a year. After the tour, he continued his studies at St Bartholomew's Medical College, but became torn between whether to pursue a career in medicine or acting. His brother John later said, "He wasn't ever driven to go into medicine ... it wasn't his life's ambition."
• Ralph Chubb (1892-1960) was born in Harpenden, Hertfordshire. His family moved to the historic town of St Albans before his first birthday. Chubb attended St Albans School and Selwyn College before becoming an officer in the WWI. He served with distinction but developed neurasthenia, and he was invalided out in 1918.
• William Johnson Cory (1823-1892) studied at King's College, where he gained the chancellor's medal for an English poem on Plato in 1843, and the Craven Scholarship in 1844.
• Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) began a three-year course at Trinity College, in October, 1895 where he was entered for the Moral Science Tripos studying philosophy. With approval from his personal tutor, he changed to English literature, which was not then part of the curriculum offered. Crowley spent much of his time at university engaged in his pastimes, becoming president of the chess club and practising the game for two hours a day; he briefly considered a professional career as a chess player. Crowley also embraced his love of literature and poetry, particularly the works of Richard Francis Burton and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Many of his own poems appeared in student publications such as The Granta, Cambridge Magazine, and Cantab. At Cambridge, Crowley maintained a vigorous sex life, largely with female prostitutes, from one of whom he caught syphilis, but eventually he took part in same-sex activities, despite their illegality. In October, 1897, Crowley met Herbert Charles Pollitt, president of the Cambridge University Footlights Dramatic Club, and the two entered into a relationship. They broke apart because Pollitt did not share Crowley's increasing interest in Western esotericism, a breakup that Crowley would regret for many years. In Julym 1898, he left Cambridge, not having taken any degree at all despite a "first class" showing in his 1897 exams and consistent "second class honours" results before that.
• Edward Joseph Dent (1876–1957) was educated at Eton and King's College, where he sat the Classical Tripos in 1898. He was elected a Fellow of the college in March 1902 having distinguished himself in music both as researcher and a composer. Dent was Professor of Music at Cambridge University from 1926 to 1941.
• A.E. “Tony” Dyson (1928–2002) was a British literary critic, university lecturer, educational activist and gay rights campaigner. Educated at Pembroke College, his academic career began in 1955 when he was appointed Assistant Lecturer in English Literature at the University of North Wales, Bangor. From there, he went to the University of East Anglia where he was later appointed Reader. He took early retirement in the 1980s. Dyson single-handedly took the initiative in forming the Homosexual Law Reform Society (HLRS) in May 1958.
• John Finch (1626–1682) studied with Henry More at Christ's College, and there met his lifelong companion Sir Thomas Baines. Sir John Finch died of pleurisy in Florence, Italy in 1682, is buried in Christ's College and commemorated with Baines, who had died in Constantinople, with an elaborate monument. Their portraits by Florentine artist Carlo Dolci hang in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.
• Ronald Firbank (1886-1926) was an innovative British novelist. His eight short novels, partly inspired by the London aesthetes of the 1890s, especially Oscar Wilde, consist largely of dialogue, with references to religion, social-climbing, and sexuality. At the age of ten Firbank went briefly to Uppingham School (September, 1900 to April, 1901) and then on to Trinity Hall. His rooms were the most aesthetic and elegant in the college. In 1909 he left Cambridge without taking a degree.
• John Fletcher (1579–1625) appeared to have entered Corpus Christi College, in 1591, at the age of eleven. It is not certain that he took a degree, but evidence suggests that he was preparing for a career in the church. Little is known about his time at college, but he evidently followed the same path previously trodden by the University wits before him, from Cambridge to the burgeoning commercial theatre of London.
• Dr Charles Edward Foister FRSE (1903-1989) was a British botanist and plant pathologist. He was Director of Scottish Agricultural Scientific Services in Edinburgh from 1957. He was born in Cambridge, the son of Frederick W Foister and his wife Esther Elizabeth Smith. He was educated locally and won a place at Cambridge University graduating BA in 1925. He continued as a postgraduate taking a Diploma in Agricultural Science (1927). He later received a doctorate (PhD) from Edinburgh University. He never married and was presumed homosexual.
• E.M. Forster (1879–1970)
• Roger Fry (1866-1934) was educated at Clifton College and King's College, where he was a member of the Cambridge Apostles. In 1933, he was appointed the Slade Professor at Cambridge, a position that Fry had much desired. Fry died very unexpectedly after a fall at his home in London. His death caused great sorrow among the members of the Bloomsbury Group, who loved him for his generosity and warmth. Vanessa Bell decorated his casket before his ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel in Cambridge.
• Stephen Fry (born 1957) secured a place at Queens' College. At Cambridge, Fry joined the Cambridge Footlights, appeared on University Challenge, and read for a degree in English literature, graduating with upper second-class honours. Fry also met his future comedy collaborator Hugh Laurie at Cambridge and starred alongside him in the Footlights Club.
• Geoffrey Gorer (1905–1985) was educated at Charterhouse and at Jesus College.
• John Gostlin (c. 1566–1626)
• Ronald Gower (1845-1916) was educated at Eton and at Trinity College.
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771) went up to Peterhouse in 1734. Gray began seriously writing poems in 1742, mainly after his close friend Richard West died. He moved to Cambridge and began a self-imposed programme of literary study, becoming one of the most learned men of his time, though he claimed to be lazy by inclination. Gray was a brilliant bookworm, a quiet, abstracted, dreaming scholar, often afraid of the shadows of his own fame. He became a Fellow first of Peterhouse, and later of Pembroke College. Gray moved to Pembroke after the students at Peterhouse played a prank on him. Gray spent most of his life as a scholar in Cambridge, and only later in his life did he begin traveling again.
• Fulke Greville (1554-1628) enrolled at Jesus College, in 1568.
• Antony Grey (1927-2010), after attending Norwood College in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, and Millfield School in Somerset, read history at Magdalene College.
• Thom Gunn (1929-2004) attended University College School in Hampstead, London, then spent two years in the British national service and six months in Paris. Later, he studied English literature at Trinity College, graduated in 1953, and published his first collection of verse, “Fighting Terms,” the following year. Among several critics who praised the work, John Press wrote, "This is one of the few volumes of postwar verse that all serious readers of poetry need to possess and to study." He met his future lifelong live-in American lover Mike Kitay in Cambridge in 1952, and followed him to America in 1954 and to San Francisco a few years later. The domestic arrangements were hardly disturbed when Bill Schuessler, a friend of Thom’s, fell in love with Mike, moved in with them, and stayed 35 years. In 2004, he died of acute polysubstance abuse, including methamphetamine, at his home in the Haight Ashbury neighbourhood in San Francisco, where he had lived since 1960.
• G.H. Hardy (1877–1947) was awarded a scholarship to Winchester College for his mathematical work. In 1896 he entered Trinity College. After only two years of preparation under his coach, Robert Alfred Herman, Hardy was fourth in the Mathematics Tripos examination. Years later, he sought to abolish the Tripos system, as he felt that it was becoming more an end in itself than a means to an end. While at university, Hardy joined the Cambridge Apostles, an elite, intellectual secret society. In 1919 he left Cambridge to take the Savilian Chair of Geometry (and thus become a Fellow of New College) at Oxford in the aftermath of the Bertrand Russell affair during WWI. Hardy spent the academic year 1928–1929 at Princeton in an academic exchange with Oswald Veblen, who spent the year at Oxford. Hardy gave the Josiah Willards Gibbs lecture for 1928. Hardy left Oxford and returned to Cambridge in 1931, where he was Sadleirian Professor until 1942. Hardy is a major character in David Leavitt's fictive biography, “The Indian Clerk” (2007), which depicts his Cambridge years and his relationship with John Edensor Littlewood and Ramanujan.
• Walter Burton Harris (1866-1933) was educated at Harrow School and (briefly) at Cambridge University and had already managed to travel around the world by the age of 18.
• Gerald Heard (1889-1971) found respite from bullying he endured at Sherborne School when he matriculated at Gonville and Caius College, in 1908, where he graduated with a Second-Class B.A. in History in 1911. Heard entered university expecting to become a clergyman like his grandfather, father, and eldest brother Alexander, but changed his mind along the way. He studied history under the Caius medievalist Z.N. Brooke (1883–1946), who used a “scientific” or critical approach to sources, and he later described himself as having a “German-Cambridge mind,” though he also regarded himself as an academic failure. Heard acquired an Idealist outlook, and sought to integrate history, religion, and the social, physical, and biological sciences. This Idealism came at least in part from Heard’s politics tutor, the Platonist Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862–1932), who viewed the scientific spirit as threatening. Dickinson’s Platonism embodied the intellectual and social atmosphere of Edwardian Cambridge with its mysticism and its high esteem for “passionate friendship between men.”
• Norman Hartnell (1901-1979), educated at Mill Hill School, became an undergraduate of Magdalene College and read Modern Languages.
• Arthur Hobhouse (1886-1965) was educated at Eton College, St Andrews University and Trinity College, where he graduated in Natural Sciences. At Cambridge, he was a Cambridge Apostle and a member of the Cambridge University Liberal Club, becoming Secretary in 1906 and was also the lover of John Maynard Keynes and Duncan Grant.
• A.E. Housman (1859-1936) took the Kennedy Professorship of Latin at Trinity College in 1911, and remained for the rest of his life.
• Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986) deliberately failed his tripos and left Corpus Christi College without a degree in 1925.
• George Cecil Ives (1867-1950) was educated at home and at Magdalene College, where he started to amass 45 volumes of scrapbooks (between 1892 and 1949). These scrapbooks consist of clippings on topics such as murders, punishments, freaks, theories of crime and punishment, transvestism, psychology of gender, homosexuality, cricket scores, and letters he wrote to newspapers. His interest in cricket led him to play a single first-class cricket match for the Marylebone Cricket Club in 1902.
• Henry Festing Jones (1851-1928), English lawyer, author and composer. After graduating from Cambridge with a B.A. in 1873, he was articled to a solicitor, and qualified fully in 1876. On January 10, 1876, he made the acquaintance of Samuel Butler through another Cambridge man, and thereafter their friendship became close.
• John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) left Eton for King's College in 1902, after receiving a scholarship to read mathematics. Alfred Marshall begged Keynes to become an economist, although Keynes's own inclinations drew him towards philosophy – especially the ethical system of G. E. Moore. Keynes joined the Pitt Club and was an active member of the semi-secretive Cambridge Apostles society, a debating club largely reserved for the brightest students. Like many members, Keynes retained a bond to the club after graduating and continued to attend occasional meetings throughout his life. Before leaving Cambridge, Keynes became the President of the Cambridge Union Society and Cambridge University Liberal Club.
• Thomas Legge (1535–1607)
• John Lehmann (1907-1987) studied history and modern languages at Trinity College. There his close friendship with Julian Bell, nephew of Virginia Woolf, plunged him into the Bloomsbury circle. By 1931 he was working at the Hogarth Press, owned by Woolf and her husband, Leonard. Hogarth Press published his first volume of poems, “A Garden Revisited” (1931).
• Amy Levy (1861-1889) was sent to Brighton and Hove High School in 1876 and later studied at Newnham College. Levy was the first Jewish student at Newnham when she arrived in 1879 but left before her final year without taking her exams. She was a British essayist, poet, and novelist best remembered for her literary gifts; her experience as the first Jewish woman at Cambridge University and as a pioneering woman student at Newnham College; her feminist positions; her friendships with others living what came later to be called a "new woman" life, some of whom were lesbians; and her relationships with both women and men in literary and politically activist circles in London during the 1880s.
• Christopher Lloyd (1921–2006) attended King's College, where he read modern languages before entering the Army during WWII.
• Donald Maclean (1913-1983) won a place at Trinity Hall, arriving in 1931 to read modern languages. Even before the end of his first year he began to throw off parental restraints and engage openly in communist agitprop. He also played rugby for his college through the winter of 1932-33. Eventually his ambitions would lead to him joining the Communist Party. In his final years Maclean had become a campus figure with most knowing he was a communist. In the winter of 1933-34 he wrote a book review for Cambridge Left, to which other leading communists contributed, such as John Cornford, Charles Madge and the Irish scientist, J.D. Bernal. In 1934 he became the editor of the Silver Crescent, the Trinity Hall students' magazine. In his last year, 1934, he became an agent of the NKVD, being recruited by Theodore "Teddy" Maly. He graduated with a First in Modern Languages and slowly abandoned his earlier ideas of teaching English in the Soviet Union. After spending a year preparing for the Civil Service Examinations, Maclean passed with first class honors.
• George Mallory (1886-1924) entered Magdalene College in October 1905, to study history. There he became good friends with members of the future Bloomsbury Group including James Strachey, Lytton Strachey, Rupert Brooke, John Maynard Keynes, and Duncan Grant, who took several portraits of Mallory. Mallory was a keen oarsman, rowing for his college while at Cambridge. In 1923, he took a job as lecturer with the Cambridge University Extramural Studies Department. He was given temporary leave so that he could join the 1924 Everest attempt.
• Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) attended The King's School in Canterbury and Corpus Christi College, where he studied on a scholarship and received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1584. Marlowe is often alleged to have been a government spy (Park Honan's 2005 biography even had "Spy" in its title). The author Charles Nicholl speculates this was the case and suggests that Marlowe's recruitment took place when he was at Cambridge.
• Edward Marsh (1872-1953) was educated at Westminster School, London, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied classics under Arthur Woollgar Verrall. He was a Cambridge Apostle.
• Ian McKellen (born 1939) won a scholarship to St Catharine's College when he was 18 years old, where he read English literature. While at Cambridge McKellen was a member of the Marlowe Society, appearing in “Henry IV” (as Shallow) alongside Trevor Nunn and Derek Jacobi (March 1959), “Cymbeline” (as Posthumus, opposite Margaret Drabble as Imogen) and “Doctor Faustus.” McKellen was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Letters by Cambridge University on June 18, 2014.
• Louis Mountbatten (1900-1979) attended Christ's College for two terms, starting in October 1919, where he studied engineering in a programme that was specially designed for ex-servicemen. He was elected for a term to the Standing Committee of the Cambridge Union Society, and was suspected of sympathy for the Labour Party, then emerging as a potential party of government for the first time.
• Isaac Newton (1642–1727) was a fellow of Trinity College and the second Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He was a devout but unorthodox Christian, and, unusually for a member of the Cambridge faculty of the day, he refused to take holy orders in the Church of England, perhaps because he privately rejected the doctrine of the Trinity.
• Brian Paddick, Baron Paddick (born 1958) went on to take a Master of Business Administration (MBA) at Warwick Business School, University of Warwick (1989–1990) on police scholarships and a postgraduate Diploma in Policing and Applied Criminology at Fitzwilliam College.
• Frances Partridge (1900–2004) was educated at Bedales School and Newnham College.
• Kim Philby (1912-1988) won a scholarship to Trinity College, where he read History and Economics. He graduated in 1933 with a 2:1 degree in Economics. Upon Philby's graduation, Maurice Dobb, a fellow of King's College, and tutor in Economics, introduced him to the World Federation for the Relief of the Victims of German Fascism in Paris. The organization was one of several fronts operated by German Communist Willi Münzenberg, a member of the Reichstag who had fled to France in 1933.
• Herbert Pollitt (1871-1942) studied at Trinity College, from 1889, graduating with a BA in 1892 and a MA in 1896. He failed to qualify as a doctor.
• Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887–1920) departed from Madras aboard the S.S. Nevasa on 17 March 1914.[82] When he disembarked in London on 14 April, E.H. Neville was waiting for him with a car. Four days later, Neville took him to his house on Chesterton Road in Cambridge. Ramanujan immediately began his work with Littlewood and Hardy. After six weeks, Ramanujan moved out of Neville's house and took up residence on Whewell's Court, a five-minute walk from G.H. Hardy's room.
• Michael Redgrave (1908-1985) studied at Clifton College and Magdalene College.
• Robbie Ross (1869–1918) was accepted at King's College in 1888, where he became a victim of bullying, probably because of his sexuality, which he made no secret of, and perhaps also his outspoken journalism in the university paper. Ross caught pneumonia after a dunking in a fountain by a number of students who had, according to Ross, the full support of a professor, Arthur Augustus Tilley. After recovering, he fought for an apology from his fellow students, which he received, but he also sought the dismissal of Tilley. The college refused to punish Tilley and Ross dropped out. Soon after that, he chose to "come out" to his family. Ross found work as a journalist and critic, but he did not escape scandal. He is believed to have become Oscar Wilde's first male lover in 1886, even before he went to Cambridge.
• Victor Rothschild, 3rd Baron Rothschild (1910-1990) read Physiology, French and English at Trinity College. While at Cambridge Rothschild was said to have a playboy lifestyle, enjoying waterskiing in Monaco, driving fast cars, collecting art and rare books and playing first-class cricket for the University and Northamptonshire. Rothschild joined the Cambridge Apostles, a secret intellectual society at the University. The society was essentially a discussion group. Meetings were held once a week, traditionally on Saturday evenings, during which one member gave a prepared talk on a topic, which was later thrown open for discussion. The society was at that time predominantly Marxist, though Rothschild stated that he "was mildly left-wing but never a Marxist". He became friends with Guy Burgess, Anthony Blunt and Kim Philby; later exposed as members of the Cambridge Spy Ring.
• George “Dadie” Rylands (1902–1999) was a British literary scholar and theatre director. Educated at Eton College and King's College, he was a Fellow of King's from 1927 until his death. As well as being one of the world's leading Shakespeare scholars, he was actively involved in the theatre. He directed and acted in many productions for the Marlowe Society, and was Chairman of the Cambridge Arts Theatre from 1946 to 1982. Rylands' 1939 Shakespeare anthology “Ages of Man” was the basis of John Gielgud's one-man show of the same title. Though Rylands specialised in directing university productions at Cambridge, he also directed Gielgud in professional productions of “The Duchess of Malfi” and “Hamlet” in London in 1945. Parodying a popular song, Maurice Bowra described the situation of many King’s men as being that of “Yes, sir, that’s my Dadie. I’m your Dadie now.” Rylands became a friend for life. Two years before his death, Bowra received a letter from Rylands “This is really a farewell in case I am stabbed during the Rio carnival, and to say I love you very much, and shall be for ever and ever grateful for all you have done to educate me."
• George Santayana (1863-1952) studied at King's College from 1896 to 1897.
• Siegfried Sassoon (1886–1967) was educated at the New Beacon School, Sevenoaks, Kent; at Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wiltshire (where he was a member of Cotton House), and at Clare College, where from 1905 to 1907 he read history. He went down from Cambridge without a degree and spent the next few years hunting, playing cricket and writing verse: some he published privately.
• Michael Schofield (1919-2014) obtained a degree in Psychology at Cambridge University, spent the war years as a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force, and then studied at Harvard Business School. During this time, he identified as homosexual and decided to make an original study of the social aspects of homosexuality.
• Sir John Tresidder Sheppard, MBE (1881–1968) was an eminent classicist and the first non-Etonian to become the Provost of King's College. John Sheppard was educated at Dulwich College. He went up to King's College, where he studied Classics and won the Porson Prize. He was a lecturer in classics at King's College from 1908–1933 and was provost from 1933–1954. During WWII he performed intelligence work, for which he was appointed MBE; he was knighted in 1950 for his services to Greek. During his long career he translated many famous Greek classics, and published several books on the subject. He was openly homosexual.
• Francis Skinner (1912–1941) was a friend, collaborator, and lover of the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. While studying mathematics at Cambridge in 1930, Skinner fell under Wittgenstein's influence and "became utterly, uncritically, and almost obsessively devoted to Wittgenstein.". Their relationship was characterized by Skinner's eagerness to please Wittgenstein and conform to his opinions. In 1934, the two made plans to emigrate to the Soviet Union and become manual labourers, but Wittgenstein visited the country briefly and realised the plan was not feasible - the Soviet Union might have allowed Wittgenstein to immigrate as a teacher, but not as a manual labourer. Skinner graduated with a degree in Mathematics from Cambridge in 1933 and was awarded a postgraduate fellowship. For three years he used his fellowship assisting Wittgenstein in preparing a book on philosophy and mathematics (never published). During the academic year 1934-5 Wittgenstein dictated to Skinner and Alice Ambrose the text of the Brown Book. However, Wittgenstein's hostility towards academia resulted in Skinner's withdrawal from university, first to become a gardener, and later a mechanic (much to the dismay of Skinner's family). In the late 1930s though, Wittgenstein grew increasingly distant, until Skinner's death from polio in 1941.
• Walter John Herbert Sprott, known to friends as ‘Sebastian’ Sprott, and also known as Jack Sprott (1897–1971), was a British psychologist and writer. He was educated at Felsted School and Clare College, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles. He was romantically involved with the economist John Maynard Keynes, who was at the time also seeing the ballerina Lydia Lopokova. Sprott's affair with Keynes ended after Keynes married Lopokova. After a job as a demonstrator at the Psychological Laboratory in Cambridge, he moved to the University of Nottingham, where he eventually became professor of philosophy.
• Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) was educated at St Joseph's Salesian School, Burwash, East Sussex, and then at the Catholic school, Ratcliffe College, Leicester. Afterwards he was for six months enrolled at the English College, Rome, a seminary for the Roman Catholic priesthood but found he had no vocation. He remained a lifelong Catholic, however. He then read law at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. As an undergraduate, he lived at St Edmund's House (now St Edmund's College) and served as President of the Cambridge Union in 1950. He graduated with first class honours and won the Whitlock Prize. He was Master of Emmanuel College from 1991 to 1996.
• Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh (1769-1822) attended St. John's College (1786–87), where he applied himself with greater diligence than expected from an aristocrat and obtained first class in his last examinations. He left Cambridge due to an extended illness, and after returning to Ireland did not pursue further formal education.
• Victor Stiebel (1907-1976) arrived in Britain in 1924 to study architecture at Jesus College.
• Mervyn Stockwood (1913-1995) was the Anglican Bishop of Southwark from 1959 to 1980. He was educated at The Downs School and Kelly College; in 1931 he entered Christ's College, and graduated in 1934. Having studied for the Anglican ministry at Westcott House theological college in Cambridge, he was ordained deacon in 1936, priest in 1937. In 1955 he was appointed Vicar of Great St Mary's, Cambridge where his preaching drew large congregations of undergraduates, gaining him a national reputation. In 1959, at the suggestion of Geoffrey Fisher, Harold Macmillan appointed Stockwood to the diocese of Southwark. He was liberal in his view of the morality of homosexual relationships, favoured homosexual law reform, and included homosexual couples among the guests at his dinner parties. On at least one occasion he blessed a homosexual relationship, but Stockwood himself was celibate.
• Alix Strachey (1892–1973) was educated in England at Bedales School, the Slade School of Fine Art, and Newnham College, where she read modern languages. In 1915 she moved in with her brother in his flat in Bloomsbury and became a member of the Bloomsbury Group, where she met James Strachey, then the assistant editor of The Spectator. They moved in together in 1919 and married in 1920. Soon afterwards they moved to Vienna, where James, an admirer of Freud, began a psychoanalysis with him.
• James Strachey (1887–1967) was educated at Hillbrow preparatory school in Rugby and at Trinity College, where he took over the rooms used by his older brother Lytton Strachey, and was known as "the Little Strachey"; Lytton was now "the Great Strachey". At Cambridge, Strachey fell deeply in love with the poet Rupert Brooke, who did not return his affections. He was himself pursued by mountaineer George Mallory—conceding to his sexual advances—by Harry Norton, and by economist John Maynard Keynes, with whom he also had an affair. His love of Brooke was a constant, however, until the latter's death in 1915, which left Strachey "shattered".
• Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) was admitted as a Pensioner at Trinity College, on September 30, 1899. He became an Exhibitioner in 1900 and a Scholar in 1902. He won the Chancellor's Medal for English Verse in 1902 and was given a B.A. degree after he had won a second class in the History Tripos in June 1903. He did not, however, take leave of Trinity, but remained until October 1905, to work on a thesis that he hoped would gain him a Fellowship. Strachey's years at Cambridge were happy and productive. Among the freshmen at Trinity there were three with whom Strachey soon became closely associated: Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf and Saxon Sydney-Turner. With another undergraduate, A. J. Robertson, these students formed a group called the Midnight Society, which, in the opinion of Clive Bell, was the source of the Bloomsbury Group. Other close friends at Cambridge were Thoby Stephen and his sisters Vanessa and Virginia Stephen. Strachey also belonged to the Conversazione Society, the Cambridge Apostles to which Tennyson, Hallam, Maurice, and Sterling had once belonged. Strachey also became acquainted with other men who greatly influenced him, including G. Lowes Dickinson, John Maynard Keynes, Walter Lamb (brother of the painter Henry Lamb), George Mallory, Bertrand Russell and G. E. Moore.
• Michael Whitney Straight (1916–2004) became a Communist Party member while a student at the University of Cambridge in the mid-1930s, and a part of an intellectual secret society known as the Cambridge Apostles. Straight worked for the Soviet Union as part of a spy ring whose members included Donald Maclean, Guy Burgess, Kim Philby and KGB recruiter Anthony Blunt, who had briefly been Straight's lover. A document from Soviet archives of a report that Blunt made in 1943 to the KGB states, "As you already know the actual recruits whom I took were Michael Straight".
• Howard Sturgis (1855-1920) was born in London to a rich and well-connected New England merchant family. Russell Sturgis, Howard’s father, was a partner at Barings Bank in London, where he and his wife, Julia, were noted figures in society, entertaining such guests as Henry Adams, William Makepeace Thackeray, and Henry James, who became an intimate friend and mentor to Howard. Sturgis was a delicate child, closely attached to his mother, and fond of such girlish hobbies as needlepoint and knitting, which he continued to practice throughout his life. He attended Eton and Cambridge, and, after the death of his parents, purchased a house in the country, Queen’s Acre, called Qu’acre, where Howdie (as Sturgis was known to his intimates) and his presumed lover William Haynes-Smith (called “the Babe”) frequently and happily entertained a wide circle of friends, among them James and Edith Wharton.
• Alan Turing (1912-1954) studied as an undergraduate from 1931 to 1934 at King's College, whence he gained first-class honours in mathematics. In 1935, at the age of 22, he was elected a fellow of King's. The computer room at King's College, Alan Turing's alma mater, is called the Turing Room.
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592–1628). During his short tenure as Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, he had initiated the purchase of Thomas van Erpe's collection of oriental books and manuscripts on its behalf, although his widow only transferred it to Cambridge University Library after his death. With it came the first book in Chinese to be added to the Library's collections.
• Horace Walpole (1717-1797) received early education in Bexley. He was also educated at Eton College and King's College. At Cambridge Walpole came under the influence of Conyers Middleton, an unorthodox theologian. Walpole came to accept the sceptical nature of Middleton's attitude to some essential Christian doctrines for the rest of his life, including a hatred of superstition and bigotry. Walpole ceased to reside at Cambridge at the end of 1738 and left without taking a degree.
• Hugh Walpole (1884–1941) studied history at Emmanuel College from 1903 to 1906. While there he had his first work published, the critical essay "Two Meredithian Heroes", which was printed in the college magazine in autumn 1905. As an undergraduate he met and fell under the spell of A.C. Benson, formerly a greatly loved master at Eton, and by this time a don at Magdalene College. On graduation from Cambridge in 1906 he took a post as a lay missioner at the Mersey Mission to Seamen in Liverpool.
• Anthony Watson-Gandy (1919-1952) was the son of Major William Donald Paul Watson-Gandy and Annis Vere Gandy. He died at age 32, unmarried. He was educated at Westminster School, King's College and Sorbonne University. He fought in the WWII and gained the rank of Flying Officer in the service of the Royal Air Force.
• Patrick White (1912-1990) lived in England from 1932 to 1935, studying French and German literature at King's College. His homosexuality took a toll on his first term academic performance, in part because he developed a romantic attraction to a young man who had come to King's College to become an Anglican priest. White dared not speak of his feelings for fear of losing the friendship and, like many other gay men of that period, he feared that his sexuality would doom him to a lonely life. Then, one night, the student priest, after an awkward liaison with two women, admitted to White that women meant nothing to him sexually. That became White's first love affair. During White's time at Cambridge he published a collection of poetry entitled “The Ploughman and Other Poems,” and wrote a play named “Bread and Butter Women,” which was later performed by an amateur group (which included his sister Suzanne) at the tiny Bryant's Playhouse in Sydney.
• Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) moved to Cambridge in 1911, met Bertrand Russell, and became the Master’s most favored student. He was admitted as a member of Trinity College and elected, somewhat reluctantly, an Apostle. It amused Lytton Strachey to call him behind his back “Herr Sinckel-Winckel” and the “Witter-Gitter Man.” He taught at the University of Cambridge from 1929 to 1947. He had romantic relations with both men and women. He is generally believed to have fallen in love with at least three men: David Hume Pinsent in 1912, Francis Skinner in 1930, and Ben Richards in the late 1940s. He later revealed that, as a teenager in Vienna, he had had an affair with a woman. Additionally, in the 1920s Wittgenstein became infatuated with a young Swiss woman, Marguerite Respinger, modelling a sculpture of her and proposing marriage, albeit on condition that they did not have children. Ben Richards was at Wittgenstein’s bedside when he died. He is buried at the Ascension Burial Ground (Cambridge CB3 0EA), formerly the burial ground for the parish of St Giles and St Peter's. It includes the graves and memorials of many University of Cambridge academics and non-conformists of the XIX and early XX century. The cemetery encapsulates a century-and-a-half of the University's modern history, with 83 people with Oxford Dictionary of National Biography biographies.
• Christopher Wood (1900-1976) attended Cambridge but never graduated. He was the loved of Gerald Heard. Heard’s personal interest in psychology received encouragement from W.J.H. “Jack” Sprott, a lecturer in the subject at Nottingham University and a Cambridge friend of Christopher Wood’s. Sprott, also known as “Sebastian,” read and commented on most of his early manuscripts.
• Leonard Woolf (1880-1969) won a classical scholarship to Trinity College in 1899, where he was elected to the Cambridge Apostles. Other members included Lytton Strachey, John Maynard Keynes, GE Moore and EM Forster. Thoby Stephen, Virginia Stephen's brother, was friendly with the Apostles, though not a member himself. Woolf was awarded his BA in 1902, but stayed for another year to study for the Civil Service examinations.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Robert Joffrey was an American dancer, teacher, producer, choreographer, and co-founder of the Joffrey Ballet, known for his highly imaginative modern ballets.
Born: December 24, 1930, Seattle, WA
Died: March 25, 1988, Manhattan, New York City, NY
Buried: Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, Manhattan, New York County (Manhattan), New York, USA
Find A Grave Memorial# 6274808
Current group: Joffrey Ballet
Organizations founded: Joffrey Ballet, Joffrey Ballet School

Robert Joffrey (born Abdullah Jaffa Bey Khan) was an American dancer, teacher, producer, choreographer, and co-founder of the Joffrey Ballet with Gerald Arpino in 1956. He is known for his highly imaginative modern ballets. The company grew from a small touring group to become one of the most prominent dance troupes in US. Gerald Arpino studied ballet with Mary Ann Wells, while stationed with the Coast Guard in Seattle, Washington. Arpino first met Robert Joffrey at Wells' school. After the death of Robert Joffrey in 1988, Arpino became the Artistic Director of the Joffrey Ballet. Joffrey was inducted into the National Museum of Dance's Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Hall of Fame in 2000. Malcolm McDowell plays a character loosely based on Arpino in the Robert Altman film The Company.

Together from (before) 1956 to 1988: 32 years.
Gerald Arpino (January 14, 1923 - October 29, 2008)
Robert Joffrey (December 24, 1930 – March 25, 1988)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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School: The School of American Ballet (SAB, 70 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY 10023) is an American classical ballet school and is the associate school of the New York City Ballet, a ballet company based at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. The school trains students from the age of six, with professional vocational ballet training for students aged 11–18. The school was founded by the renowned Russo-Georgian-born choreographer George Balanchine, and philanthropists Lincoln Kirstein and Edward Warburg in 1934. Gerald Arpino (1923-2008) studied ballet with Mary Ann Wells, while stationed with the Coast Guard in Seattle, Washington. Arpino first met Robert Joffrey at Wells's school. He studied modern dance with May O'Donnell in whose company he appeared in the 1950s. In 1956, Arpino was a founding member of the Robert Joffrey Theatre Ballet with Robert Joffrey.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Church: At the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine (1047 Amsterdam Ave, 10025) is buried Robert Joffrey (1930-1988), American dancer, teacher, producer, choreographer, and co-founder of the Joffrey Ballet, known for his highly imaginative modern ballets. The Cathedral is a design of Ralph Adams Cram (1863-1942). “Reigning Christ, Triumphant,” the Great Cross above the High Alter, is by Cornelia Van Auken Chapin. Marion Sanford (February 9, 1904 - 1987) and Cornelia Chapin (August 7, 1893 - 1972) were sculptors from Lakeville, Connecticut and New York, New York. Sanford was known for bronze portraits, bas-reliefs, and figures of women doing farm work or household chores. She was an active exhibitor at the National Academy of Design. Chapin was a direct carver specializing in animals. She worked in Paris during the 1930s. In the late 1930s, Chapin and Sanford became companions, and shared the former studio of Gutzon Borglum on 32nd street.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Anniversary: November 5

Carl Blando is Vice President of Sales at the San Francisco based textile company Luna. Owen Keehnen is a fiction writer and historian with several books to his credit including the novels Young Digby Swank, The Sand Bar, and Doorway unto Darkness. Many of Owen’s nonfiction books, such as Leatherman: The Legend of Chuck Renslow, Jim Flint: The Boy from Peoria and Vernita Gray: From Woodstock to the White House, deal with the LGBT history of his native Chicago.

Together since 2005: 10 years.
Carl Blando (born Nov. 19, 1963) & Owen Keehnen (born Mar. 25, 1960)
Anniversary: November 5

Owen and Carl had known one another for some time before they started dating. Carl thought Owen was attractive and as a result, he became extremely shy whenever Owen was around; Owen interpreted Carl’s shyness as simple dislike and never knew why “that guy just didn’t like me.” Things may never had changed if it were not for match.com when their paths/profiles crossed on the online dating site. Owen explained, “I think I nodded or winked at him or whatever you did on that site. Carl nodded or winked back. I know I ended up messaging him my phone number and afterwards I regretted it. I was on the tail end of a bad boyfriend streak and I wasn’t really interested in dating anyone for a while.” Carl called Owen the next day and over the course of a half hour proved himself to be an extremely skilled salesman by talking Owen into a date. Carl says, “We went for Mexican food and it was nice. We casually dated for a few months and it was great, very comfortable right from the start. Then when Owen’s birthday came around I decided to take him to San Francisco.” Owen continued, “We always had a good time together and during that trip we sort of got married. Anyway, it certainly qualifies a legit union in my mind. We were down at the waterfront at a farmer’s market and there was a man who had a booth selling jewelry and rings. We stopped in front of his stand and just decided to do it. We bought rings and walked out on the pier and exchanged the bands with only a pelican as a witness.” Carl and Owen ended up moving in together soon after their return to Chicago. That was a decade ago and despite their brief courtship, the two are still together. Moving in together took some adjustments. Owen explained, “We both were single men and in our forties and somewhat set in our ways, so coming together to make a home required a conscious effort by both of us to just let the smaller stuff go and have fun. That has been sort of been our M.O.” Both say the companionship and laughter are the cement that holds them together. “We have so much fun. And we also have two very spoiled dogs,” added Carl. Flannery and Fitzgerald joined the household several years ago. “At the end of the day we are best friends,” says Owen, “and we have a great time enjoying the adventure of life together.” -Owen Keehnen

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Anniversary: October 1, 1987
Married: November 23, 2013

Nick Nolan is an American author known for his series “Tales from Ballena Beach,” which transforms traditional fairy tales into contemporary gay thrillers. Nolan was originally self-published and garnered three Book of the Year awards for Gay/Lesbian Fiction: one for Strings Attached and two for Double Bound. After signing with Amazon Publishing in 2009 (now making him Amazon Publishing’s most senior author) his novel Black as Snow hit #1 on Amazon’s Kindle list in the United Kingdom; Nick’s current novel Wide Asleep was released by Amazon in 2014. Jaime “J” Flores is an award winning graphic designer and currently serves as Creative Services Manager for a nationally ranked architectural firm. A first generation Mexican-American, Flores studied in Los Angeles, Paris, and Tokyo, and he holds both a Bachelor of Arts degree in Visual Communication and an Associative Arts degree in Fashion Design. J is fluent in English, Spanish, and French; he craves traveling and has toured South America, Mexico, Europe, and Asia. J is also an avid skier of the Canadian and the American Rockies. The couple maintains a midcentury modern home in the San Fernando Valley and a cabin in the mountains, where J paints in oils and Nick writes. Nick and Jaime were both born in 1961, exactly 40 weeks apart to the day…, which means Jaime was conceived on the day Nick was born.

“In 1986 I was managing a furniture store, and J came in looking for a bookcase. That night I attended a party on the other side of town and J walked in the door! At the time, we were dating others, so we only chatted but did not connect. A year later J walked into another store I was tending, we enjoyed Thai food soon after, and we have been together ever since. For 27 years we’ve savored a relationship seasoned with love, friendship (and betrayal), hard work, college and grad school, coming out, the AIDS crisis, heartbreak, earthquakes, home remodeling, thrift store furniture, wacky automobiles, rescued dogs, cocktails, and esoteric jokes." Nolan is a believer in reincarnation and feels they have been together before. “During one hypnotic regression,” Nick reports, “I saw J and myself—not looking like ourselves but recognizable—in a Spanish monastery. We were young and in love, but after the dictatorial abbot surmised the depth of our relationship he had J shipped off to another cloister and I never saw him again. I came out of the regression sobbing, my face drenched.” Happily, this lifetime continues to progress more smoothly. -Nick Nolan

Together since 1987: 28 years.
Jaime Flores (born 1961)
Nick Nolan (born 1961)
Anniversary: October 1, 1987 / Married: November 23, 2013 

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Anna Seward was a long-eighteenth-century English Romantic poet, often called the Swan of Lichfield.
Born: December 12, 1742, Eyam, United Kingdom
Died: March 25, 1809, Lichfield, United Kingdom
Lived: Bishop’s Palace, 19A The Close, Lichfield, Staffordshire WS13 7LD, UK (52.68548, -1.83032)
Buried: Lichfield Cathedral, Lichfield, Lichfield District, Staffordshire, England, Plot: choir
Find A Grave Memorial# 29322674
Parents: Thomas Seward
Home town: Lichfield

Dubbed the "Swan of Lichfield," Anna Seward was eldest daughter of Thomas Seward, canon residentiary of Lichfield Cathedral. Encouraged to write by Erasmus Darwin, Seward became one of the best-known English women poets of her time. Widely connected to writers and clergy, Seward lived her entire life at Lichfield and never married. Biographers have noted Seward's passion for her foster sister Honora Sneyd. Seward expressed her passionate devotion through her involvement in Honora's romantic life as well as in poetry dedicated to her. She was devastated and outraged by Honora's marriage to Richard Lovell Edgeworth in 1773 and literally went into mourning. Even after her death in 1780, Honora remained an important figure in Seward's interior life. There is a plaque to Anna Seward (spelled "Anne", which is the spelling she used in her will) in Lichfield Cathedral. “In an era when women had to tread carefully in society's orbit, Seward struck a middle ground.”s

They met in 1760 and remained friends until Sneyd’s marriage in 1773: 13 years.
Anna Seward (December 12, 1747 – March 25, 1809)
Honora Sneyd (1753-1780)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Church: Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires.

Address: 19A The Close, Lichfield, Staffordshire WS13 7LD, UK (52.68548, -1.83032)
Hours: Monday through Saturday 8.30-18.15, Sunday 7.30-18.30
Phone: +44 1543 306100
Website: http://www.lichfield-cathedral.org/
English Heritage Building ID: 382775 (Grade II, 1952)

Place
Anna Seward lived at the Bishop’s Palace all her life, caring for her father during the last ten years of his life, after he had suffered a stroke. When he died in 1790, he left her financially independent with an income of ₤400 per annum. She spent the rest of her life at the Palace, till her death in 1809. The Diocese of Lichfield covers all of Staffordshire, much of Shropshire and part of the Black Country and West Midlands. The present bishop is the Right Reverend Jonathan Gledhill, the 98th Lord Bishop of Lichfield. There is a plaque to Anna Seward (spelled “Anne,” which is the spelling she used in her will) in Lichfield Cathedral. “Anne Seward died March 25th, 1809, aged 66. By her order this monument is erected: To the memory of her Father, the Rev. Thomas Seward, M.A. Canon Residentiary of this Cathedral, who died March 4th, 1790, aged 81: of her Mother, Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of the Rev. John Hunter, who died July 31st, 1780, aged 66: and of her sister, Sarah, their younger daughter, who died June 13th, 1763, aged 20. On a lower marble plaque, from a poem written for the occasion by Sir Walter Scott, Anna Seward’s friend and literary executor:
Amid these aisles, where once his precepts shew’d
The heavenward pathway, which in life he trod,
This simple tablet marks a Father’s bier,
And those he lov’d in life, in death are near;
For him, for them, a Daughter bade it rise,
Memorial of domestic Charities,
Still would you know – why o’er the marble spread,
In female grace the willow drops her head?
Why on her branches, silent and unstrung,
The minstrel harp is emblematic hung?
What Poet’s voice lies smother’d here in dust,
Till wak’d to join the chorus of the just?
Lo! One brief line an answer sad supplies,
Honour’d, belov’d, and mourn’d, here Seward lies;
Her worth, her warmth of heart, our sorrows say,
Go seek her Genius in her living lay.”
A full-length figure of a bare-brested woman draped in classical robes sits upon a low stool, carrying a scroll in her right hand and with her head in her left hand in a gesture of grief and despair. Her left elbow rests on the coffin containing the body of the deceased person for whom she is grieving. Behind her is a willow tree, often associated with weeping and sorrow, and from it hangs a harp, the traditional attribute of a poet. The monument originally stood in the aisle of the north transept, but was moved to its present position during Sir Gilbert Scott’s XIX century restoration of the cathedral.

Life
Who: Anna Seward (December 12, 1742 – March 25, 1809)
Anna Seward was a XVIII century English Romantic poet, often called the Swan of Lichfield. Seward was the eldest of two surviving daughters of Thomas Seward (1708–1790), prebendary of Lichfield and Salisbury, and author, and his wife Elizabeth. In 1749 her father was appointed to a position as Canon-Residentiary at Lichfield Cathedral and the family moved to that city, where her father educated her entirely at home. They lived in the Bishop’s Palace in the Cathedral Close. When a family friend, Mrs. Edward Sneyd, died in 1756, the Sewards took in one of her daughters, Honora Sneyd (1751-1780), who became an “adopted” foster sister to Anna. Honora was nine years younger than Anna. Anna Seward describes how she and her sister first met Honora, on returning from a walk, in her poem “The Anniversary” (1769.) Sarah (known as “Sally”) died suddenly at the age of nineteen of typhus (1764.) Sarah was said to be of admirable character, but less talented than her sister. Anna consoled herself with her affection for Honora Sneyd, as she describes in “Visions,” written a few days after her sister’s death. In the poem she expresses the hope that Honora (“this transplanted flower”) will replace her sister (whom she refers to as “Alinda”) in her and her parents affections. She was devastated and outraged by Honora’s marriage to Richard Lowell Edgeworth in 1773 and literally went into mourning. Even after Honora’s death in 1780, Honora remained an important figure in Seward’s interior life. Honora Sneyd Edgeworth (1751-1780) is buried at St Andrew (by the lake, near Weston Hall, Weston-under-Lizard, Staffordshire, ST19 9PD).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Born: November 7, 1903
Died: March 24, 1992
Find A Grave Memorial# 161848975

Henriëtte Hilda Bosmans was a Dutch composer. Bosmans was born in Amsterdam, the daughter of Henri Bosmans, principal cellist of the Concertgebouw Orchestra, and the pianist Sara Benedicts, piano teacher at the Amsterdam Conservatory. A significant personality in the life of the composer was the violinist Francis Koene. Bosmans was head over heels in love with her duet partner. They were engaged; and Koene’s playing was the inspiration for the 1934 Concertstuk (concert piece) for violin and orchestra. Koene never played it as he died in 1934 as the result of a brain tumor. Bosmans fell into a deep depression. "Part of me died at that time," she wrote to her friend Matthijs Vermeulen. For years, she wrote not a single note. Just as before the war the cello of Frieda Belinfante played a key role in her life, now the voice took over. Bosmans’ muse was the French singer Noemie Perugia; she sang in 1949 in Amsterdam, and Bosmans heard the last part of her recital. She was overwhelmed. It took a while before Perugia responded to Bosmans’ musical and amorous advances, but eventually the pair developed a relationship that may be compared to that between Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears. The creative relationship did not last long. Bosmans wrote a series of inspired songs for her beloved, but died in 1952 of stomach cancer.

Together from 1949 to 1952: 3 years.
Henriëtte Hilda Bosmans (December 6, 1895 – July 2, 1952)
Noémie Pérugia (November 7, 1903 – April 1992)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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Henriette Bosmans’ muse, French singer Noémie Pérugia (1903-1992), is buried in Nice; she sang in 1949 in Amsterdam, and Bosmans heard the last part of her recital. She was overwhelmed. It took a while before Perugia responded to Bosmans’ musical and amorous advances, but eventually the pair developed a relationship that may be compared to that between Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears. The creative relationship did not last long. Bosmans wrote a series of inspired songs for her beloved, but died in 1952 of stomach cancer. Bosmans is buried in Amsterdam.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Lived: Bath Hotel, Charlestown, St. Kitts & Nevis (17.13244, -62.62588)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161870547

Peter Watson was a wealthy English art collector and benefactor. He funded the literary magazine, Horizon, edited by Cyril Connolly. "When I think of him then, I think of his clothes, which were beautiful, his general neatness and cleanness, which seemed almost those of a handsome young Bostonian." –Stephen Spender. In 1930, society photographer, artist and set designer Sir Cecil Beaton began a lifelong obsession with Watson, though the two never became lovers. One chapter from Hugo Vickers' authorized biography of Cecil Beaton is titled I Love You, Mr. Watson. One
of Watson's lovers was the American male prostitute and socialite Denham Fouts, whom he continued to support even after they separated because of Fouts's drug addiction. Norman Fowler was Watson's boyfriend from 1949 and heir to most
of Watson's estate. When Watson drowned in his bath, Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler bought a hotel, called The Bath Hotel, on Nevis, in the British Virgin Islands, and lived there until he himself drowned in the bath in 1971, within weeks of the fifteenth anniversary of Watson's death.

Together from 1949 to 1956: 7 years.
Norman Fowler (1927 - March 23, 1971)
Peter Watson (September 14, 1908 – May 3, 1956)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: The “White House,” as Sulhamstead is sometimes affectionately called, was sold by the Thoyts' to Sir George Watson in 1910.

Address: 1 North Dr, Sulhamstead, West Berkshire RG7 4DU, UK (51.41866, -1.08021)
English Heritage Building ID: 40018 (Grade II, 1951)

Place
Built in 1748, Rebuilt in the early XIX century with further alterations in 1852 and 1910.
The house is now a police training centre. Painted stucco with hipped slate roofs. Central 3 storey 3 bay block with set back 2 storey wings. Plinth, first floor cill band, cornice, coped parapet, and paired end stacks to central block and wings. Central 2 storey, 3 bay tetrastyle Ionic portico with triangular pediment. Lead downpipes and rainwater heads. 9 bays; glazing bar sashes with architraves and cornices. Central enclosed porch and two 3-panelled doors with bracketed cornice. Rear similar without portico. North-east front of 4 bays. Low early XIX century additions to south-west. Interior: largely 1910. Early XVIII century style panelled entrance hall with coupled Doric pilasters, screen of coupled Doric columns, and bifurcating staircase with balcony on to central landing. Other rooms with early XVIII century style panelling, fireplaces, and plaster ceilings.

Life
Who: Peter Watson (September 14, 1908 – May 3, 1956) and Norman Fowler (1927 – March 23, 1971)
The Watson family constructed the present swimming pool in 1935 but, on the 23rd October 1940, they left and the building became occupied by the War Office as the Commando Troop Headquarters. Late in 1941, it was entirely taken over by the Air Ministry for use as an RAF Elementary Flying Training School. The present large hard-standing garage housed a link trainer and was also used as an Officers Squash Court. Because of the lack of a purpose built landing field, the RAF utilised a nearby grass field. Peter Watson was a wealthy English art collector and benefactor. Norman Fowler was Watson's boyfriend from 1949. When Watson drowned in his bath, Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler bought a hotel, called The Bath Hotel, on Nevis, in the British Virgin Islands, and lived there until he himself drowned in the bath in 1971, within weeks of the fifteenth anniversary of Watson's death.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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National Park: The Bath Hotel in Nevis is considered to have been the first tourist hotel in the Caribbean.

Address: Charlestown, St. Kitts & Nevis (17.13244, -62.62588)

Place
Built in 1778
Bath Hotel was a rather grand “spa” hotel, and it rapidly became a very successful venture, attracting many wealthy European visitors who were hoping to treat their various ailments using the healing waters of the nearby volcanic hot spring, the Bath Spring, and perhaps more importantly, to enjoy the social scene at this tropical spa hotel on what was then the busy colonial island of Nevis. John Huggins, a merchant and aristocrat built the large, stone hotel at a cost of 43,000 “island” pounds, and surrounded it with lush landscaping, statuary, and goldfish ponds. The hotel was 200 feet long and 60 feet wide. Dignitaries such as Lord Nelson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Prince William Henry, who was the Duke of Clarence, visited the hotel in its heyday. With the downturn of the sugar industry, Nevis stepped into the world of tourism with this hotel, which flourished for about 60 years. Since then the hotel has had various uses, reopening as a hotel from 1912 until 1940. It was used as training center for the West Indian regiment during WWII, and most recently, the headquarters of the Nevis Island Administration.

Life
Who: Norman Fowler (1927 – March 23, 1971)
In 1968, Norman Fowler moved to St Kitts and Nevis, farther east in the Leeward Islands, where he was one of the few white people among the mostly black population. He settled on the island of Nevis, where he purchased the Bath Hotel, an elegant XVIII century pile in Charlestown with a two-storey bathhouse attached to it (from which it took its name). He set about restoring the hotel, and lived in one of its suites. His residency there lasted just over two years. On March 23, 1971, at the age of forty-four, Norman Fowler was found dead. He had lost consciousness while bathing in the hot bathhouse and drowned. Almost 15 years before, his lover Peter Watson had drowned in his bathroom as well. Fowler was in the flat; some have suggested that Fowler murdered him, but the police dismissed foul play, even if the death remained suspicious. Fowler’s death was front-page news in his local paper back on Tortola: “There is profound sympathy here over the sad news of his death.” The coroner's inquest returned an open verdict — simply “death by drowning in hot water bath.” There was suspicion locally that he had been murdered, and the case was investigated, but no evidence was ever found and the case was dropped.

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Joseph Christian Leyendecker was one of the preeminent American illustrators of the early 20th century.
Born: March 23, 1874, Montabaur, Germany
Died: July 25, 1951, New Rochelle, New York, United States
Education: Académie Julian
Lived: Mount Tom Day Camp, 48 Mt Tom Rd, New Rochelle, NY 10805, USA (40.89411, -73.78963)
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA, Plot: White Oak Plot, Section 18 Lot West 1925
Find A Grave Memorial# 11089743
Influenced: Norman Rockwell
Siblings: Frank Xavier Leyendecker
Influenced by: Alphonse Mucha, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jules Chéret

J.C. Leyendecker was one of the pre-eminent American illustrators of the early 20th century. Leyendecker lived for most of his life with Charles Beach, the Arrow Collar Man, on whom the stylish men in his artwork were modeled. In 1914, the Leyendeckers and Beach, moved into a large home and art studio in New Rochelle, New York, where J. C. would reside for the remainder of his life. While Beach often organized the famous gala-like social gatherings that Leyendecker was known for in the 1920s, he apparently also contributed largely to Leyendecker's social isolation in his later years. Beach reportedly forbade outside contact with the artist in the last months of his life. When commissions began to wane in the 1930s, Leyendecker was forced to curtail spending considerably. By the time of his death, Leyendecker had let all of the household staff at his New Rochelle estate go. Leyendecker left a tidy estate equally split between his sister and Beach. Leyendecker is buried alongside parents and brother Frank at Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx, New York. Charles Beach died a few months after Leyendecker, and his burial location is unknown.

Together from 1901 to 1951: 50 years.
Charles Beach (1886–1952)
Joseph Christian "J.C." Leyendecker (March 23, 1874 - July 25, 1951)

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time
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House: In 1914, J.C. Leyendecker, accompanied by Charles Beach, moved into a large home and art studio in New Rochelle, New York, where J.C. would reside for the remainder of his life.

Address: Mount Tom Day Camp, 48 Mt Tom Rd, New Rochelle, NY 10805, USA (40.89411, -73.78963)
Phone: +1 914-636-8130
Website: http://www.mounttomdaycamp.com/

Place
Built in 1914
A three-tiered estate, built by the renowned illustrator, J.C. Leyendecker, to provide space and intimacy. A magnificent 19-room mansion, it features comfortable rooms, covered outdoor lunch patios and a large kitchen. Today is the facility for the Mount Tom Day Camp.

Life
Who: Joseph Christian Leyendecker (March 23, 1874 – July 25, 1951)
J.C. Leyendecker was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century. He is best known for his poster, book and advertising illustrations, the trade character known as The Arrow Collar Man, and his numerous covers for The Saturday Evening Post. Between 1896 and 1950, Leyendecker painted more than 400 magazine covers. During the Golden Age of American Illustration, for The Saturday Evening Post alone, J.C. Leyendecker produced 322 covers, as well as many advertisement illustrations for its interior pages. No other artist, until the arrival of Norman Rockwell two decades later, was so solidly identified with one publication. Leyendecker "virtually invented the whole idea of modern magazine design." Leyendecker often used his favorite model and partner Charles Beach (1886–1952.) The 1920s were in many ways the apex of Leyendecker’s career, with some of his most recognizable work being completed during this time. Modern advertising had come into its own, with Leyendecker widely regarded as among the preeminent American commercial artists. This popularity extended beyond the commercial, and into Leyendecker’s personal life, where he and Charles Beach hosted large galas attended by people of consequence from all sectors. The parties they hosted at their New Rochelle home/studio were important social and celebrity making events. Leyendecker died on July 25, 1951, at his estate in New Rochelle of an acute coronary occlusion. By the time of his death, Leyendecker had let all of the household staff at his New Rochelle estate go, with he and Beach attempting to maintain the extensive estate themselves. Leyendecker left a tidy estate equally split between his sister and Beach. Leyendecker is buried alongside parents and brother Frank at Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York City. Charles Beach died a few months after Leyendecker, and his burial location is unknown.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Cemetery: Although located in Woodlawn, Bronx and one of the largest cemeteries in New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery.

Address: 517 E 233rd St, Bronx, NY 10470, USA (40.89006, -73.87425)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.30-16.30
Phone: +1 718-920-0500
Website: http://www.thewoodlawncemetery.org/
National Register of Historic Places: 11000563, 2011 Also National Historic Landmarks.

Place
Woodlawn Cemetery opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was later annexed to New York City in 1874. It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great figures in the American arts, such as authors Countee Cullen and Herman Melville, and musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, and Max Roach. “Memorial To A Marriage” has been erected by Patricia Cronin and her partner Deborah Kass. Sculptor Cronin did the original sculpture of Carrara marble in 2002, to address what she considered a Federal failure: not allowing gay Americans the right to marry. It has been replaced with a bronze casting, installed on the couple’s burial plot in 2011. Since 2002 when the marble was first installed, the memorial has become one of the most visited of Woodlawn. After 18 years together, Patricia Cronin and Deborah Kass went to City Hall on the morning of July 24, 2011, with nearly 900 other New York City couples, waiting for three hours in the heat to get legally married on the first day.

Notable queer burials at Woodlawn Cemetery:
• Diana Blanche Barrymore Blythe (1921-1960), known professionally as Diana Barrymore, was a film and stage actress. She was the daughter of renowned actor John Barrymore and his second wife, poet Blanche Oelrichs.
• Frances (Fannie) Evelyn Bostwick (died in 1921) was the mother of Marion “Joe” Carstairs. Bostwick was an American heiress who was the second child of Jabez Bostwick and his wife Helen. Joe Carstairs' legal father was Scottish army officer Captain Albert Carstairs. At least one biographer has suggested that the Captain may not have been Joe's biological father. Carstairs' mother, an alcoholic and drug addict, later married Captain Francis Francis. She divorced Captain Francis to marry French count Roger de Périgny in 1915, but eventually left him because of his infidelity. Her fourth and last husband, whom she married in 1920, was Serge Voronoff, a Russian–French surgeon who become famous in the 1920s and 1930s for his practice of transplanting monkey testicle tissue into male humans for the claimed purpose of rejuvenation. For some years Evelyn had believed in Voronoff's theories, and she funded his research and acted as his laboratory assistant at the Collège de France in Paris. Voronoff arrived in New York with his wife's body on the ship "S.S. France" in May 1921.
• Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947) was a women’s suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. She was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, New York alongside her longtime companion, Mary Garrett Hay, a fellow New York state suffragist, with whom she lived for over 20 years. Under a single monument inscribed in block letters: "Here lie two, united in friendship for 38 years through constant service to a great cause."
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) born as Countee Porter, was a poet, author and scholar who was a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. It is rumored that Cullen was a homosexual, and his relationship with Harold Jackman ("the handsomest man in Harlem"), was a significant factor in his divorce. The young, dashing Jackman was a school teacher and, thanks to his noted beauty, a prominent figure among Harlem’s gay elite. Van Vechten had used him as a character model in his novel “Nigger Heaven” (1926.)
• Joseph Raphael De Lamar (1843-1918), a prominent mine owner and operator in the western United States and Canada, as well as a financier and speculator, from the late 1870s until his death in 1918. De Lamar married Nellie Virginia Sands, a direct descendant of John Quincy Adams, on May 8, 1893, and they had one daughter together, Alice DeLamar.
• Marjory Lacey-Baker (died in 1971), actress, she was the long-time companion of Dr. Lena Madesin Phillips, founder of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. They met in 1919 and together until Ms Philipps’ death in 1955. Ms Phillips is buried at Maple Grove Cemetery (500 N Main St, Nicholasville, KY 40356).
• Joseph Christian “J.C.” Leyendecker (1874-1951) was one of the preeminent illustrators of the early XX century.
• George Platt Lynes (1907-1955) was a fashion and commercial photographer.
• Elisabeth "Bessie" Marbury (1856–1933) was a pioneering American theatrical and literary agent and producer who represented prominent theatrical performers and writers in the late XIX and early XX centuries and helped shape business methods of the modern commercial theater. She was the longtime companion of Elsie de Wolfe (later known as Lady Mendl), a prominent socialite and famous interior decorator.
• Herman Melville (1819-1891) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet from the American Renaissance period.
• Blanche Marie Louise Oelrichs (1890-1950) was a poet, playwright and theatre actress known by the pseudonym "Michael Strange.” Starting in the summer of 1940 until her death, Oelrichs was in a long-term relationship with Margaret Wise Brown, the author of many children’s books. The relationship began as something of a mentoring one, but became a romantic relationship including co-habitating at 10 Gracie Square beginning in 1943.
• Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) was a suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women’s rights movement.
• John William Sterling (1844–1918) was a founding partner of Shearman & Sterling LLP and major benefactor to Yale University. In Sterling's will, he directs: "no interment other than my own and that of my sister, Cordelia, shall ever take place" in his Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery. An exception is made, however, "in case my said friend, James O. Bloss (1847–1918), who has lived with me for more than forty years, should desire to be interred in the said Mausoleum and should die without ever having been married." Cordelia Sterling is burried with her brother. Bloss died less than six months after Sterling, according to his sister, of a broken heart, and is not buried with his friend, though the reason is unknown. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Rochester (same cemetery where are buried Susan B. Anthony and Lillian D. Wald). Sterling's obituary in the New York Times referred to "his lifelong friend, James O. Bloss, a retired cotton broker, who made his home with the testator for more than forty years." James Orville Bloss died suddenly in New York City, on December 15, 1918.
• Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875-1942) was an American sculptor, art patron and collector, and founder in 1931 of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. She was a prominent social figure and hostess, who was born into the wealthy Vanderbilt family and married into the Whitney family. At age 21, Gertrude married the extremely wealthy sportsman Harry Payne Whitney (1872–1930). In 1934, she was at the center of a highly publicized court battle with her sister-in-law, Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt, for custody of her ten-year-old niece, Gloria Vanderbilt. Gertrude Whitney died in 1942, at age 67, and was interred next to her husband.
• Bert Williams (1874-1922) was one of the pre-eminent entertainers of the Vaudeville era. He married Charlotte ("Lottie") Thompson, a singer with whom he had worked professionally, in a very private ceremony. Lottie was a widow eight years Bert's senior. The Williamses never had children biologically, but they adopted three of Lottie's nieces. In 1919 their niece Lottie Tyler met blues singer Alberta Hunter. In August 1927, Hunter sailed for France, accompanied by Lottie. Their relationship lasted until Ms. Tyler's death, many years later.

Queer Places, Vol. 1.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World Authored by Elisa Rolle
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Buried: Saint Paul Town Cemetery, Saint-Paul-de-Vence, Departement des Alpes-Maritimes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Buried alongside: Maud Hunt Squire
Find A Grave Memorial# 161717757

American artists and life partners for 60 years, Maud Hunt Squire and Ethel Mars met as students at the Cincinnati Art Academy in the 1890s. Mars and Squire forged distinguished careers in book illustration, painting, and woodblock printing. Émigrées to France, they frequented Gertrude Stein’s salons and, during World War I, were among the Provincetown artists working in new methods of printmaking, called the “Provincetown Print” or “White-Line Woodcut.” Squire and Mars were the subject
of Stein's whimsical word portrait Miss Furr and Miss Skeene (Squire's nickname was Skeene), written between 1909 and 1911. With characteristic playfulness, Stein in this piece spoofs young women who come to Paris to "cultivate something." Stein's incessant reiteration of the word "gay" at a time when its coded meaning was not in mainstream use is interpreted today as an in-group double entendre. While in their sixties, Ethel and Maud went into hiding at Grenoble during WWII, and returned to their French Riviera home afterwards. The two women are buried together in France.

Together from 1894 to 1954: 60 years.
Ethel Mars (September 19, 1876 - March 23, 1959)
Maud Hunt Squire (January 30, 1873 - October 25, 1954)

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Cemetery: Within the historic village, a medieval walled village, there are numerous interesting sights and monuments. The Peyra Gate was remodelled in 1810. The fountain was rebuilt in 1822 replacing an older one dating from 1578. Nearby is an oak, donated by François I and planted in 1538. The castle is today the Fondation Émile Hugues, a modern and contemporary art museum. The cathedral was built in the IV century on the site of a Roman temple. The stone of the western façade dates from 239. Another, on the right, was engraved in December 220. Other stones in the external walls represent funerary dedications. Also on the western side of the church, the Pierre du Tauroble evokes the cult of Cybele and also the Great mother of the Gods of Mount Ida. A chapel in the cathedral has a mosaic by Marc Chagall, dated 1911. The rue des Portiques is a section of the old Roman road. The town has a small chapel, the Cité Historique Chapelle du Rosaire (1948, completed in 1951), decorated with stained glass and other fittings by Henri Matisse, who owned a home in the village towards the end of his life. Vence is famous for its spring water, which can be collected from numerous fountains in the town. American artists and life partners for more than 50 years, Maud Hunt Squire (1873-1954) and Ethel Mars (1876-1959), forged distinguished careers in book illustration, painting, and woodblock printing. Émigrées to France, they frequented Gertrude Stein's salons and, during WWI, were among the Provincetown artists working in new methods of printmaking. Squire and Mars were the subject of Stein's whimsical word portrait "Miss Furr and Miss Skeene" (Squire's nickname was Skeene), written between 1909 and 1911. With characteristic playfulness, Stein in this piece spoofs young ladies who come to Paris to "cultivate something." Stein's incessant reiteration of the word "gay" at a time when its coded meaning was not in mainstream use is interpreted today as an in-group double entendre. At the beginning of WWI, Squire and Mars returned to the U.S. and eventually relocated to Provincetown, Massachusetts. The quaint fishing community at the tip of Cape Cod, with its old-world ambience and affordable rentals, had by this time become an artists' colony, and the international reputations of Squire and Mars attracted other artists to the town. In the 1920s Squire and Mars returned to Europe, eventually settling in Vence on the French Riviera. There Squire and Mars were active in an artists' community that included Marsden Hartley and Reginald Marsh. The couple continued to collaborate on children's book illustration and each again took up painting and drawing. Mars, who concentrated on modernist painting and gouache drawing, exhibited in Paris during the 1920s. Squire concentrated on large-scale watercolors of outdoor public scenes. The couple continued working until about 1930. During WWII, Squire and Mars, then in their sixties, went into hiding near Grenoble. After the war, they returned to their home, La Farigoule, in Vence. Squire died on October 25, 1954; Mars on March 23, 1959. The two women are buried together at Saint Paul de Vence Cemetery (Chemin de Saint-Paul, 06570 Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Born: August 8, 1967, Livonia, Michigan, United States
Education: Ohio State University
Spouse: Matthew Montgomery (m. 2015)
People also search for: Matthew Montgomery, Rob Williams, more
Anniversary: March 21, 2008
Married: March 21, 2015

After winning Best Supporting Actor at the Tampa International Gay Film Festival for the film Nine Lives, Steve Callahan has become a regular on the gay film circuit. He starred in East Side Story, winner of the 2009 GLAAD Award. Matthew Montgomery (born Matthew Robert Ramírez) is an American actor, producer and writer born in Corpus Christi, Texas. Since his début in Gone, But Not Forgotten, he has specialized in independent movies with LGBT themes. Steve Callahan and Matthew Montgomery met working as actors in the film Pornography: A Thriller. They had one scene together in the movie, but ending up talking all night on set. They went on their first date on March 21, 2008 and have been together since. They are currently engaged. Matt and Steve live in Los Angeles with their dog Dude.

Together since 2008: 7 years.
Matthew Montgomery (born March 16, 1978)
Steve Callahan (born August 8, 1967)
Anniversary: March 21, 2008 / Married: March 21, 2015

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Nancy Brooker Spain was a prominent English broadcaster and journalist. She was a columnist for the Daily Express, She magazine, and the News of the World in the 1950s and 1960s.
Born: September 13, 1917, Jesmond, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Died: March 21, 1964, Aintree, United Kingdom
Education: Roedean School
Lived: 35 Carlyle Square, SW3
7 Clareville Grove, SW7
Buried: Holy Trinity Church, Horsley, Northumberland Unitary Authority, Northumberland, England, Plot: Cremated remains
Find A Grave Memorial# 109735781
Parents: Norah Smiles
Partner: Joan Werner Laurie
Battles and wars: World War II
Books: Poison for Teacher: A New Entertainment, more


House: Nancy Spain (1917-1964), journalist, novelist, and television personality, shared a home with publisher Joan (Jonnie) Werner Laurie at 35 Carlyle Square, Chelsea, London SW3 6HA, from 1951 to 1953, and 7 Clareville Grove, Kensington, London SW7 5AU, from 1953 to 1955.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Cemetery: Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.

Address: 60 Hoop Ln, London NW11 7NL, UK (51.57687, -0.19413)
Phone: +44 20 8455 2374
English Heritage Building ID: 199262 (Grade II, 1993)

Place
The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson. The crematorium, the Philipson Family mausoleum, designed by Edwin Lutyens, the wall, along with memorials and gates, the Martin Smith Mausoleum, and Into The Silent Land statue are all Grade II listed buildings. The gardens are included in the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. Golders Green Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes’ walk from Golders Green tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery (Golders Green is an area with a large Jewish population.) The crematorium is secular, accepts all faiths and non-believers; clients may arrange their own type of service or remembrance event and choose whatever music they wish. A map of the Gardens of Remembrance and some information on persons cremated here is available from the office. The staff are very helpful in finding a specific location. The columbaria are now locked, although they can still be visited (if accompanied.) There is also a tea room.

Notable queer burials at Golders Green Crematorium:
• Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), was a British composer, best known for film music, primarily his Warsaw Concerto, composed for the 1941 film “Dangerous Moonlight” (also known under the later title “Suicide Squadron”). Addinsell retired from public life in the 1960s, gradually becoming estranged from his close friends. He was, for many years, the companion of the fashion designer Victor Stiebel, who died in 1976.
• Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862-1932), Scholar and advocate of a league of nations. He was the third of the five children of Lowes Cato Dickinson (1819-1908) and his wife, Margaret Ellen (d. 1882), daughter of William Smith Williams.
• Edith Ellis (1861-1916), psychologist. She was noted for her novels and memoirs.
• Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), psychologist. He and his wife, Edith Ellis, were psychologists and writers. He wrote the controversial "Studies in the Psychology of Sex," which was banned as obscene.
• Anna Freud (1895-1982) and Dorothy Burlingham (1891-1979), next to each other and to others in the Freud family, including Sigmund Freud.
• Kenneth Halliwell (1926-1967), British actor and writer. He was the mentor, partner, and the eventual murderer of playwright Joe Orton. Their ashes were mingled and scattered in the same garden.
• Leslie Poles Hartley (1895–1972), known as L. P. Hartley, was a British novelist and short story writer. Until his death in 1972, Hartley lived alone but for a household of servants, in London, Salisbury and at a home on the Avon, near Bath. Between the wars, Venice was a favoured and frequent destination.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), actor, writer and lyricist. His ashes are buried beneath a lilac tree which has a plaque enscribed "Ivor Novello 6th March 1951 ‘Till you are home once more’.” He has also a memorial inside the St. Paul's Cathedral (New Change, London, London, EC4M 9AD)
• Norman O'Neill (1875-1934), British composer and conductor. His studies were facilitated by Eric Stenbock, with whom it is said he had a relationship. He married Adine Berthe Maria Ruckert (1875-1947) on 2 July 1899 in Paris, France. Adine was a celebrated pianist and music teacher in her own right. When he died in 1934 he was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, London, as was Adine on her death in 1947. There is a plaque there in memory to both of them.
• Joe Orton (1933-1967), playwright. Orton and his lover, Kenneth Halliwell, moved at 25 Noël Road, Islington, in 1959, at a time when the area was far from fashionable. Eight years later, Halliwell killed himself after murdering Orton.

Cremated here but ashes taken elsewhere:
• Sir Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947), 1st Earl of Bewdley, K.G., P.C. was the leading Conservative politician between the two world wars and was Prime Minister for three terms (1923-4, 1924-29 and 1935-37). Ashes removed to Worcester Cathedral.
• Roger Fry (1866-1934), English artist and critic, a member of the Bloomsbury group. He had an affair with Vanessa Bell, and when she left him, he was heartbroken. Only in 1924 he found happiness with Helen Anrep, a former wife of the Russian-born mosaicist, Boris Anrep. His ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel, Cambridge, in a casket decorated by Vanessa Bell.
• In his later years Lord Ronald Gower had been a crusader for cremation, and after his death on March 9, 1916 his body was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were interred at Rusthall, Kent, on 14 March 1916.
• John Inman (1935-2007), actor, star of “Are You Being Served?,” location of ashes unknown.
• Joan Werner Laurie (1920–1964) was an English book and magazine editor. She met journalist and broadcaster Nancy Spain (1917-1964) in 1950 and they became life partners. Joan and Nancy lived openly together with their sons, and later the couple provided a home to Windmill Theatre owner and rally driver Sheila van Damm. She was learning to fly when she died, with Nancy Spain and four others, when the Piper Apache aeroplane crashed near Aintree racecourse on the way to the 1964 Grand National. She was cremated with Spain at Golders Green Crematorium, London. Nancy Spain is buried with her father at Holy Trinity (A68 four miles north of Otterburn, Horsley, Northumberland, NE19 1RU). The relationship between Werner Laurie and Spain is described in Rose Collis' biography of Nancy Spain, published in 1997.
• Charles Ricketts (1866-1931) was cremated at Golders Green, and his ashes were to be scattered to the four winds in Richmond Park.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period.
Born: March 21, 1839, Toropets, Russia
Died: March 28, 1881, Saint Petersburg, Russia
Buried: Alexander Nevsky Monastery, Saint Petersburg, Saint Petersburg Federal City, Russia
Find A Grave Memorial# 1513
Nationality: Russian
Movies: Boris Godunov
Libretti: Boris Godunov, Khovanshchina, The Fair at Sorochyntsi, Salammbô, Zhenitba

Modest Mussorgsky was a Russian composer, one of the group known as "The Five". He was an innovator of Russian music in the romantic period. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music. Mussorgsky is best known today for his popular piano composition Pictures at an Exhibition: the Russian composer drew inspiration for the piece from an exhibit of watercolors by his friend, artist Victor Hartmann. When Hartmann died in 1874, the grief-stricken Mussorgsky exclaimed, "What a terrible blow! Why should a dog, a horse, a rat live on - and creatures like Hartmann die!" The composition is best known through an orchestral arrangement by Maurice Ravel. Viktor Hartmann was a Russian architect and painter. He was associated with the Abramtsevo Colony, purchased and preserved beginning of 1870 by Savva Mamontov, and the Russian Revival. Vladimir Stasov had introduced him to the circle of Mily Balakirev in 1870 and he had been a close friend of the composer Modest Mussorgsky.

They met in 1870 and remained friends until Hartmann’s death in 1873: 3 years.
Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (March 21, 1839 – March 28, 1881)
Viktor Alexandrovich Hartmann (May 5, 1834 - August 4, 1873)

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Church: Saint Alexander Nevsky Monastery (1-y pr-d, Sankt-Peterburg, Russia, 196642) was founded by Peter I of Russia in 1710 at the eastern end of the Nevsky Prospekt in Saint Petersburg supposing that that was the site of the Neva Battle in 1240 when Alexander Nevsky, a prince, defeated the Swedes; however, the battle actually took place about 12 miles (19 km) away from that site. The monastery grounds contain two baroque churches, designed by father and son Trezzini and built from 1717–1722 and 1742–1750, respectively; a majestic Neoclassical cathedral, built in 1778–1790 to a design by Ivan Starov and consecrated to the Holy Trinity; and numerous structures of lesser importance. It also contains the Lazarev and Tikhvin Cemeteries. Notable queer burials: Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881) and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893).

Queer Places, Vol. 3.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave CBE was an British stage and film actor, director, manager and author.
Born: March 20, 1908, Bristol, United Kingdom
Died: March 21, 1985, Denham, United Kingdom
Education: University of Cambridge
Clifton College
Lived: Bedford House, Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London W4 2PJ, UK
3 Hans Crescent, SW1X
Buried: St Paul Churchyard, Covent Garden, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England
Find A Grave Memorial# 6942760
Height: 1.9 m
Spouse: Rachel Kempson (m. 1935–1985)
Grandchildren: Natasha Richardson, Joely Richardson, more

Sir Michael Redgrave was an English stage and film actor, director, manager and author. During the filming of Fritz Lang's Secret Beyond the Door (1948), Redgrave met Bob Mitchell. They became lovers, Mitchell set up house close to the Redgraves, and he became a surrogate "uncle" to Redgrave's children (then aged 11, 9 and 5), who adored him. Mitchell later had children of his own, including a son he named Michael. Fred Sadoff, an actor/director who became Redgrave’s assistant and shared his lodgings in New York and London, followed Mitchell. A card was found among Redgrave's effects after his death. The card was signed "Tommy, Liverpool, January 1940", and on it were the words (quoted from W.H. Auden): "The world is love. Surely one fearless kiss would cure the million fevers". Rachel Kempson recounted that, when she proposed to him, Redgrave said that there were "difficulties to do with his nature, and that he felt he ought not to marry". She said that she understood, it did not matter and that she loved him. To this, Redgrave replied, "Very well. If you're sure, we will".

Together from 1948 to 1956: 8 years.
Bob Mitchell
Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave, CBE (March 20, 1908 – March 21, 1985)

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Fred Sadoff was an American film, stage and television actor. In 1956, he became personal assistant to Michael Redgrave who starred in and directed a production of The Sleeping Prince. Lynn Redgrave said years later in a filmed documentary: "Bob Mitchell and Fred Sadoff were brought in as part of the family, but we didn't know just how much family they really were." There seems to be only one extant written reference to Fred by a Redgrave - when Rachel, writing to Michael, described Fred "tout court" as "your lover." "Some people thought he used my father," Corin said, "and in a way he did. But I think he got no more from their relationship than he gave. Though he could never replace Bob in my father's life, he gave a great deal, [and he was] indomitably cheerful, funny and loyal after a fashion.” Eventually returning to the United States, Sadoff found success as an actor in The Poseidon Adventure in 1972 when he was cast as Linarcos, the company representative who ordered Captain Harrison (Leslie Nielsen) full ahead. He also acted in other films, including Papillon and The Terminal Man in 1974. Fred Sadoff died of AIDS on May 6, 1994 in his home in Los Angeles, California at age 67.

Together from 1956 to (before) 1972: 16 years.
Fred Sadoff (October 21, 1926 — May 6, 1994)
Sir Michael Redgrave (March 20, 1908 - March 21, 1985)

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School: Clifton College (32 College Rd, Bristol, City of Bristol BS8 3JH) is a co-educational independent school in the suburb of Clifton in the port city of Bristol in South West England, founded in 1862. In its early years it was notable (compared with most Public Schools of the time) for emphasising science rather than classics in the curriculum, and for being less concerned with social elitism, e.g. by admitting day-boys on equal terms and providing a dedicated boarding house for Jewish boys. Having linked its General Studies classes with Badminton School since 1972, it admitted girls to the Sixth Form in 1987 and is now fully coeducational. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Horatio Brown (1854-1926), Robert Smythe Hichens (1864-1950), Roger Fry (1866-1934), L. P. Hartley (1895-1972), Michael Redgrave (1908-1985).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
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School: The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University or simply Cambridge, 4 Mill Ln, Cambridge CB2 1RZ) is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and given royal charter status by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university. The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford after a dispute with the townspeople. The two ancient universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge".

Notable queer alumni and faculty at University of Cambridge:
• Charles Robert Ashbee (1863–1942) was born in 1863 in Isleworth, the son of businessman and erotic bibliophile Henry Spencer Ashbee. His Jewish mother developed suffragette views, and his well-educated sisters were progressive as well. Ashbee went to Wellington College and read history at King's College, from 1883 to 1886, and studied under the architect George Frederick Bodley. His papers and journals are at King's College.
• Anthony Bacon (1558–1601) and Francis Bacon (1561-1626) enrolled in Trinity College in April 1573, where they lived in the household of the Master of Trinity College, John Whitgift.
• Philip Bainbridge (1891-1918), a graduate of Eton and Trinity College, was killed in action at the Battle of Épehy on September 18, 1918, six weeks before his friend Wilfred Owen.
• Thomas Baines (1622–1680) studied at Christ's College, under the tuition of Henry More, and took the degree of B.A. in 1642, and M.A. in 1649. An accident brought him under the notice of John Finch, then at the same college, and from this time they became inseparable friends.
• William John Bankes (1786–1855) was educated at Westminster School and continued his studies at Trinity College, where he received his BA in 1808 and his MA in 1811. Lord Byron, a fellow student at Trinity College, became Bankes' lifelong friend.
• Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) attended Harrow School, and then, despite having little or no interest in academia, moved on to St John's College, and studied history, art and architecture. Beaton continued his photography, and through his university contacts managed to get a portrait depicting the Duchess of Malfi published in Vogue. It was actually George "Dadie" Rylands – "a slightly out-of-focus snapshot of him as Webster's Duchess of Malfi standing in the sub-aqueous light outside the men's lavatory of the ADC Theatre at Cambridge." Beaton left Cambridge without a degree in 1925.
• A.C. Benson (1862-1925) was educated at Temple Grove School, Eton, and King's College. From 1885 to 1903 he taught at Eton, returning to Cambridge to lecture in English literature for Magdalene College. From 1915 to 1925, he was the 28th Master of Magdalene. From 1906, he was a governor of Gresham's School. He is buried at the Ascension Burial Ground (Cambridge CB3 0EA). His cousin James Bethune-Baker is also buried there.
• Anthony Blunt (1907-1983) won a scholarship in mathematics to Trinity College. At that time, scholars in Cambridge University could not earn a degree in less than three years, and hence Blunt spent four years at Trinity and switched to Modern Languages, eventually graduating in 1930 with a first class degree. He taught French at Cambridge and became a Fellow of Trinity College in 1932. Like Guy Burgess, Blunt was known to be homosexual, which was a criminal activity at that time in Britain. Both were members of the Cambridge Apostles (also known as the Conversazione Society), a clandestine Cambridge discussion group of 12 undergraduates, mostly from Trinity and King's Colleges who considered themselves to be the brightest minds in the university. Many were homosexual and Marxist at that time. Amongst other members, also later accused of being part of the Cambridge spy ring, were the American Michael Whitney Straight and Victor Rothschild who later worked for MI5. Rothschild gave Blunt £100 to purchase “Eliezar and Rebecca” by Nicolas Poussin. The painting was sold by Blunt's executors in 1985 for £100,000 and is now in the Fitzwilliam Museum.
• Philip Brett (1937-2002) received his academic degrees from King's College. He was a distinguished professor of musicology, accomplished keyboard player, author and authority on music of the Elizabethan period. He spent his entire teaching career in the University of California system: at Berkeley from 1966 to 1991, at Riverside from 1991 to 2001, and at UCLA for one year. From 1976 onward, Philip produced a steady series of influential articles and books exploring the implications of gay and lesbian sexuality in music. Some of these works included, “Queering the Pitch: The New Gay and Lesbian Musicology” (1994), “Cruising the Performative: Interventions into the Representation of Ethnicity, Nationality, and Sexuality” (1995), and “Decomposition: Post-Disciplinary Performance” (2000). In appreciation of his extraordinary achievement as scholar, teacher and organizer, the Gay and Lesbian Study Group of the American Musicology Society, created the Philip Brett Award in 1996. They give the award each year to honor exceptional musicological work in the field of GLBT studies. For his specialization of early music he received the Noah Greenberg Award in 1980 and a Grammy nomination in 1991. He died of cancer just one day shy of his 65th birthday. He is survived by his registered domestic/life partner of 28 years, Professor George Haggerty, Chair of the Department of English at University of California, Riverside. Professor Brett is buried at St Faith’s Crematorium (75 Manor Rd, Horsham St Faith, Norwich NR10 3LF), Plot: Memorial Garden at Horsham.
• Reginald Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher (1852-1930), known as Regy, was the son of William Baliol Brett, 1st Viscount Esher and Eugénie Mayer. Born in London, Esher remembered sitting on the lap of an old man who had played violin for Marie Antoinette, and was educated at Eton and Trinity College. At Cambridge, Brett was profoundly influenced by William Harcourt the radical lawyer, politician and Professor of International Law. Harcourt controlled Brett's rooms, and lifestyle at Cambridge. Brett was admitted to the Society of Apostles, dedicated to emergent philosophies of European atheism; their number included the aristocratic literati of liberalism Frank, Gerald and Eustace Balfour, Frederick and Arthur Myers, Hallam and Lionel Tennyson, Edmund Gurney, S H and J G Butcher.
• Rupert Brooke (1887-1915), while travelling in Europe, prepared a thesis, entitled "John Webster and the Elizabethan Drama", which won him a scholarship to King's College, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles, was elected as President of the Cambridge University Fabian Society, helped found the Marlowe Society drama club and acted in plays including the Cambridge Greek Play. Brooke made friends among the Bloomsbury group of writers, some of whom admired his talent while others were more impressed by his good looks. Virginia Woolf boasted to Vita Sackville-West of once going skinny-dipping with Brooke in a moonlit pool when they were in Cambridge together.
• Oscar Browning (1837-1923) was educated at King's College, where he became fellow and tutor, graduating fourth in the classical tripos of 1860, and where he was inducted into the exclusive Cambridge Apostles, a debating society for the Cambridge elite. After being a master at Eton College for 15 years until he was dismissed in 1857, Browning returned to King's College, where he took up a life fellowship and achieved a reputation as a wit, becoming universally known as "O.B.". He travelled to India at George Curzon's invitation after the latter had become Viceroy. In 1876 he resumed residence at Cambridge, where he became university lecturer in history. He soon became a prominent figure in college and university life, encouraging especially the study of political science and modern political history, the extension of university teaching and the movement for the training of teachers. Browning served as principal of the Cambridge University Day Training College (1891–1909), treasurer of the Cambridge Union Society (1881–1902), founding treasurer of the Cambridge University Liberal Club (1885–1908), and president of the Cambridge Footlights (1890–1895).
• Guy Burgess (1911-1963) attended Trinity College. He joined the conservative Pitt Club but was also recruited into the Cambridge Apostles, a secret, elite debating society at the University, whose members at the time were largely Marxist and included Anthony Blunt. Burgess, together with Blunt, Maclean and Philby, was recruited by the Comintern.
• Samuel Butler (1835-1902) went up to St John's College in 1854, where he obtained a first in Classics in 1858. Tthe graduate society of St John's is named the Samuel Butler Room (SBR) in his honour.
• George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron (1788–1824) went up to Trinity College, where he met and formed a close friendship with the younger John Edleston. About his "protégé" he wrote, "He has been my almost constant associate since October, 1805, when I entered Trinity College. His voice first attracted my attention, his countenance fixed it, and his manners attached me to him for ever." In his memory Byron composed “Thyrza,” a series of elegies. Edleston gave Byron a ring which Byron was wearing when he died. In later years he described the affair as "a violent, though pure love and passion". Also while at Cambridge he formed lifelong friendships with men such as John Cam Hobhouse and Francis Hodgson, a Fellow at King's College, with whom he corresponded on literary and other matters until the end of his life.
• Edward Carpenter (1844-1929)’s academic ability appeared relatively late in his youth, but was sufficient enough to earn him a place at Trinity Hall. Whilst there he began to explore his feelings for men. One of the most notable examples of this is his close friendship with Edward Anthony Beck (later Master of Trinity Hall), which, according to Carpenter, had "a touch of romance". Beck eventually ended their friendship, causing Carpenter great emotional heartache. Carpenter graduated as 10th Wrangler in 1868.
• Graham Chapman (1941-1989) began to study medicine at Emmanuel College in 1959. He joined the Cambridge Footlights, where he first began writing with John Cleese. Following graduation, Chapman joined the Footlights show "Cambridge Circus" and toured New Zealand, deferring his medical studies for a year. After the tour, he continued his studies at St Bartholomew's Medical College, but became torn between whether to pursue a career in medicine or acting. His brother John later said, "He wasn't ever driven to go into medicine ... it wasn't his life's ambition."
• Ralph Chubb (1892-1960) was born in Harpenden, Hertfordshire. His family moved to the historic town of St Albans before his first birthday. Chubb attended St Albans School and Selwyn College before becoming an officer in the WWI. He served with distinction but developed neurasthenia, and he was invalided out in 1918.
• William Johnson Cory (1823-1892) studied at King's College, where he gained the chancellor's medal for an English poem on Plato in 1843, and the Craven Scholarship in 1844.
• Aleister Crowley (1875-1947) began a three-year course at Trinity College, in October, 1895 where he was entered for the Moral Science Tripos studying philosophy. With approval from his personal tutor, he changed to English literature, which was not then part of the curriculum offered. Crowley spent much of his time at university engaged in his pastimes, becoming president of the chess club and practising the game for two hours a day; he briefly considered a professional career as a chess player. Crowley also embraced his love of literature and poetry, particularly the works of Richard Francis Burton and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Many of his own poems appeared in student publications such as The Granta, Cambridge Magazine, and Cantab. At Cambridge, Crowley maintained a vigorous sex life, largely with female prostitutes, from one of whom he caught syphilis, but eventually he took part in same-sex activities, despite their illegality. In October, 1897, Crowley met Herbert Charles Pollitt, president of the Cambridge University Footlights Dramatic Club, and the two entered into a relationship. They broke apart because Pollitt did not share Crowley's increasing interest in Western esotericism, a breakup that Crowley would regret for many years. In Julym 1898, he left Cambridge, not having taken any degree at all despite a "first class" showing in his 1897 exams and consistent "second class honours" results before that.
• Edward Joseph Dent (1876–1957) was educated at Eton and King's College, where he sat the Classical Tripos in 1898. He was elected a Fellow of the college in March 1902 having distinguished himself in music both as researcher and a composer. Dent was Professor of Music at Cambridge University from 1926 to 1941.
• A.E. “Tony” Dyson (1928–2002) was a British literary critic, university lecturer, educational activist and gay rights campaigner. Educated at Pembroke College, his academic career began in 1955 when he was appointed Assistant Lecturer in English Literature at the University of North Wales, Bangor. From there, he went to the University of East Anglia where he was later appointed Reader. He took early retirement in the 1980s. Dyson single-handedly took the initiative in forming the Homosexual Law Reform Society (HLRS) in May 1958.
• John Finch (1626–1682) studied with Henry More at Christ's College, and there met his lifelong companion Sir Thomas Baines. Sir John Finch died of pleurisy in Florence, Italy in 1682, is buried in Christ's College and commemorated with Baines, who had died in Constantinople, with an elaborate monument. Their portraits by Florentine artist Carlo Dolci hang in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.
• Ronald Firbank (1886-1926) was an innovative British novelist. His eight short novels, partly inspired by the London aesthetes of the 1890s, especially Oscar Wilde, consist largely of dialogue, with references to religion, social-climbing, and sexuality. At the age of ten Firbank went briefly to Uppingham School (September, 1900 to April, 1901) and then on to Trinity Hall. His rooms were the most aesthetic and elegant in the college. In 1909 he left Cambridge without taking a degree.
• John Fletcher (1579–1625) appeared to have entered Corpus Christi College, in 1591, at the age of eleven. It is not certain that he took a degree, but evidence suggests that he was preparing for a career in the church. Little is known about his time at college, but he evidently followed the same path previously trodden by the University wits before him, from Cambridge to the burgeoning commercial theatre of London.
• Dr Charles Edward Foister FRSE (1903-1989) was a British botanist and plant pathologist. He was Director of Scottish Agricultural Scientific Services in Edinburgh from 1957. He was born in Cambridge, the son of Frederick W Foister and his wife Esther Elizabeth Smith. He was educated locally and won a place at Cambridge University graduating BA in 1925. He continued as a postgraduate taking a Diploma in Agricultural Science (1927). He later received a doctorate (PhD) from Edinburgh University. He never married and was presumed homosexual.
• E.M. Forster (1879–1970)
• Roger Fry (1866-1934) was educated at Clifton College and King's College, where he was a member of the Cambridge Apostles. In 1933, he was appointed the Slade Professor at Cambridge, a position that Fry had much desired. Fry died very unexpectedly after a fall at his home in London. His death caused great sorrow among the members of the Bloomsbury Group, who loved him for his generosity and warmth. Vanessa Bell decorated his casket before his ashes were placed in the vault of Kings College Chapel in Cambridge.
• Stephen Fry (born 1957) secured a place at Queens' College. At Cambridge, Fry joined the Cambridge Footlights, appeared on University Challenge, and read for a degree in English literature, graduating with upper second-class honours. Fry also met his future comedy collaborator Hugh Laurie at Cambridge and starred alongside him in the Footlights Club.
• Geoffrey Gorer (1905–1985) was educated at Charterhouse and at Jesus College.
• John Gostlin (c. 1566–1626)
• Ronald Gower (1845-1916) was educated at Eton and at Trinity College.
• Thomas Gray (1716-1771) went up to Peterhouse in 1734. Gray began seriously writing poems in 1742, mainly after his close friend Richard West died. He moved to Cambridge and began a self-imposed programme of literary study, becoming one of the most learned men of his time, though he claimed to be lazy by inclination. Gray was a brilliant bookworm, a quiet, abstracted, dreaming scholar, often afraid of the shadows of his own fame. He became a Fellow first of Peterhouse, and later of Pembroke College. Gray moved to Pembroke after the students at Peterhouse played a prank on him. Gray spent most of his life as a scholar in Cambridge, and only later in his life did he begin traveling again.
• Fulke Greville (1554-1628) enrolled at Jesus College, in 1568.
• Antony Grey (1927-2010), after attending Norwood College in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, and Millfield School in Somerset, read history at Magdalene College.
• Thom Gunn (1929-2004) attended University College School in Hampstead, London, then spent two years in the British national service and six months in Paris. Later, he studied English literature at Trinity College, graduated in 1953, and published his first collection of verse, “Fighting Terms,” the following year. Among several critics who praised the work, John Press wrote, "This is one of the few volumes of postwar verse that all serious readers of poetry need to possess and to study." He met his future lifelong live-in American lover Mike Kitay in Cambridge in 1952, and followed him to America in 1954 and to San Francisco a few years later. The domestic arrangements were hardly disturbed when Bill Schuessler, a friend of Thom’s, fell in love with Mike, moved in with them, and stayed 35 years. In 2004, he died of acute polysubstance abuse, including methamphetamine, at his home in the Haight Ashbury neighbourhood in San Francisco, where he had lived since 1960.
• G.H. Hardy (1877–1947) was awarded a scholarship to Winchester College for his mathematical work. In 1896 he entered Trinity College. After only two years of preparation under his coach, Robert Alfred Herman, Hardy was fourth in the Mathematics Tripos examination. Years later, he sought to abolish the Tripos system, as he felt that it was becoming more an end in itself than a means to an end. While at university, Hardy joined the Cambridge Apostles, an elite, intellectual secret society. In 1919 he left Cambridge to take the Savilian Chair of Geometry (and thus become a Fellow of New College) at Oxford in the aftermath of the Bertrand Russell affair during WWI. Hardy spent the academic year 1928–1929 at Princeton in an academic exchange with Oswald Veblen, who spent the year at Oxford. Hardy gave the Josiah Willards Gibbs lecture for 1928. Hardy left Oxford and returned to Cambridge in 1931, where he was Sadleirian Professor until 1942. Hardy is a major character in David Leavitt's fictive biography, “The Indian Clerk” (2007), which depicts his Cambridge years and his relationship with John Edensor Littlewood and Ramanujan.
• Walter Burton Harris (1866-1933) was educated at Harrow School and (briefly) at Cambridge University and had already managed to travel around the world by the age of 18.
• Gerald Heard (1889-1971) found respite from bullying he endured at Sherborne School when he matriculated at Gonville and Caius College, in 1908, where he graduated with a Second-Class B.A. in History in 1911. Heard entered university expecting to become a clergyman like his grandfather, father, and eldest brother Alexander, but changed his mind along the way. He studied history under the Caius medievalist Z.N. Brooke (1883–1946), who used a “scientific” or critical approach to sources, and he later described himself as having a “German-Cambridge mind,” though he also regarded himself as an academic failure. Heard acquired an Idealist outlook, and sought to integrate history, religion, and the social, physical, and biological sciences. This Idealism came at least in part from Heard’s politics tutor, the Platonist Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (1862–1932), who viewed the scientific spirit as threatening. Dickinson’s Platonism embodied the intellectual and social atmosphere of Edwardian Cambridge with its mysticism and its high esteem for “passionate friendship between men.”
• Norman Hartnell (1901-1979), educated at Mill Hill School, became an undergraduate of Magdalene College and read Modern Languages.
• Arthur Hobhouse (1886-1965) was educated at Eton College, St Andrews University and Trinity College, where he graduated in Natural Sciences. At Cambridge, he was a Cambridge Apostle and a member of the Cambridge University Liberal Club, becoming Secretary in 1906 and was also the lover of John Maynard Keynes and Duncan Grant.
• A.E. Housman (1859-1936) took the Kennedy Professorship of Latin at Trinity College in 1911, and remained for the rest of his life.
• Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986) deliberately failed his tripos and left Corpus Christi College without a degree in 1925.
• George Cecil Ives (1867-1950) was educated at home and at Magdalene College, where he started to amass 45 volumes of scrapbooks (between 1892 and 1949). These scrapbooks consist of clippings on topics such as murders, punishments, freaks, theories of crime and punishment, transvestism, psychology of gender, homosexuality, cricket scores, and letters he wrote to newspapers. His interest in cricket led him to play a single first-class cricket match for the Marylebone Cricket Club in 1902.
• Henry Festing Jones (1851-1928), English lawyer, author and composer. After graduating from Cambridge with a B.A. in 1873, he was articled to a solicitor, and qualified fully in 1876. On January 10, 1876, he made the acquaintance of Samuel Butler through another Cambridge man, and thereafter their friendship became close.
• John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) left Eton for King's College in 1902, after receiving a scholarship to read mathematics. Alfred Marshall begged Keynes to become an economist, although Keynes's own inclinations drew him towards philosophy – especially the ethical system of G. E. Moore. Keynes joined the Pitt Club and was an active member of the semi-secretive Cambridge Apostles society, a debating club largely reserved for the brightest students. Like many members, Keynes retained a bond to the club after graduating and continued to attend occasional meetings throughout his life. Before leaving Cambridge, Keynes became the President of the Cambridge Union Society and Cambridge University Liberal Club.
• Thomas Legge (1535–1607)
• John Lehmann (1907-1987) studied history and modern languages at Trinity College. There his close friendship with Julian Bell, nephew of Virginia Woolf, plunged him into the Bloomsbury circle. By 1931 he was working at the Hogarth Press, owned by Woolf and her husband, Leonard. Hogarth Press published his first volume of poems, “A Garden Revisited” (1931).
• Amy Levy (1861-1889) was sent to Brighton and Hove High School in 1876 and later studied at Newnham College. Levy was the first Jewish student at Newnham when she arrived in 1879 but left before her final year without taking her exams. She was a British essayist, poet, and novelist best remembered for her literary gifts; her experience as the first Jewish woman at Cambridge University and as a pioneering woman student at Newnham College; her feminist positions; her friendships with others living what came later to be called a "new woman" life, some of whom were lesbians; and her relationships with both women and men in literary and politically activist circles in London during the 1880s.
• Christopher Lloyd (1921–2006) attended King's College, where he read modern languages before entering the Army during WWII.
• Donald Maclean (1913-1983) won a place at Trinity Hall, arriving in 1931 to read modern languages. Even before the end of his first year he began to throw off parental restraints and engage openly in communist agitprop. He also played rugby for his college through the winter of 1932-33. Eventually his ambitions would lead to him joining the Communist Party. In his final years Maclean had become a campus figure with most knowing he was a communist. In the winter of 1933-34 he wrote a book review for Cambridge Left, to which other leading communists contributed, such as John Cornford, Charles Madge and the Irish scientist, J.D. Bernal. In 1934 he became the editor of the Silver Crescent, the Trinity Hall students' magazine. In his last year, 1934, he became an agent of the NKVD, being recruited by Theodore "Teddy" Maly. He graduated with a First in Modern Languages and slowly abandoned his earlier ideas of teaching English in the Soviet Union. After spending a year preparing for the Civil Service Examinations, Maclean passed with first class honors.
• George Mallory (1886-1924) entered Magdalene College in October 1905, to study history. There he became good friends with members of the future Bloomsbury Group including James Strachey, Lytton Strachey, Rupert Brooke, John Maynard Keynes, and Duncan Grant, who took several portraits of Mallory. Mallory was a keen oarsman, rowing for his college while at Cambridge. In 1923, he took a job as lecturer with the Cambridge University Extramural Studies Department. He was given temporary leave so that he could join the 1924 Everest attempt.
• Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) attended The King's School in Canterbury and Corpus Christi College, where he studied on a scholarship and received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1584. Marlowe is often alleged to have been a government spy (Park Honan's 2005 biography even had "Spy" in its title). The author Charles Nicholl speculates this was the case and suggests that Marlowe's recruitment took place when he was at Cambridge.
• Edward Marsh (1872-1953) was educated at Westminster School, London, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied classics under Arthur Woollgar Verrall. He was a Cambridge Apostle.
• Ian McKellen (born 1939) won a scholarship to St Catharine's College when he was 18 years old, where he read English literature. While at Cambridge McKellen was a member of the Marlowe Society, appearing in “Henry IV” (as Shallow) alongside Trevor Nunn and Derek Jacobi (March 1959), “Cymbeline” (as Posthumus, opposite Margaret Drabble as Imogen) and “Doctor Faustus.” McKellen was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Letters by Cambridge University on June 18, 2014.
• Louis Mountbatten (1900-1979) attended Christ's College for two terms, starting in October 1919, where he studied engineering in a programme that was specially designed for ex-servicemen. He was elected for a term to the Standing Committee of the Cambridge Union Society, and was suspected of sympathy for the Labour Party, then emerging as a potential party of government for the first time.
• Isaac Newton (1642–1727) was a fellow of Trinity College and the second Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He was a devout but unorthodox Christian, and, unusually for a member of the Cambridge faculty of the day, he refused to take holy orders in the Church of England, perhaps because he privately rejected the doctrine of the Trinity.
• Brian Paddick, Baron Paddick (born 1958) went on to take a Master of Business Administration (MBA) at Warwick Business School, University of Warwick (1989–1990) on police scholarships and a postgraduate Diploma in Policing and Applied Criminology at Fitzwilliam College.
• Frances Partridge (1900–2004) was educated at Bedales School and Newnham College.
• Kim Philby (1912-1988) won a scholarship to Trinity College, where he read History and Economics. He graduated in 1933 with a 2:1 degree in Economics. Upon Philby's graduation, Maurice Dobb, a fellow of King's College, and tutor in Economics, introduced him to the World Federation for the Relief of the Victims of German Fascism in Paris. The organization was one of several fronts operated by German Communist Willi Münzenberg, a member of the Reichstag who had fled to France in 1933.
• Herbert Pollitt (1871-1942) studied at Trinity College, from 1889, graduating with a BA in 1892 and a MA in 1896. He failed to qualify as a doctor.
• Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887–1920) departed from Madras aboard the S.S. Nevasa on 17 March 1914.[82] When he disembarked in London on 14 April, E.H. Neville was waiting for him with a car. Four days later, Neville took him to his house on Chesterton Road in Cambridge. Ramanujan immediately began his work with Littlewood and Hardy. After six weeks, Ramanujan moved out of Neville's house and took up residence on Whewell's Court, a five-minute walk from G.H. Hardy's room.
• Michael Redgrave (1908-1985) studied at Clifton College and Magdalene College.
• Robbie Ross (1869–1918) was accepted at King's College in 1888, where he became a victim of bullying, probably because of his sexuality, which he made no secret of, and perhaps also his outspoken journalism in the university paper. Ross caught pneumonia after a dunking in a fountain by a number of students who had, according to Ross, the full support of a professor, Arthur Augustus Tilley. After recovering, he fought for an apology from his fellow students, which he received, but he also sought the dismissal of Tilley. The college refused to punish Tilley and Ross dropped out. Soon after that, he chose to "come out" to his family. Ross found work as a journalist and critic, but he did not escape scandal. He is believed to have become Oscar Wilde's first male lover in 1886, even before he went to Cambridge.
• Victor Rothschild, 3rd Baron Rothschild (1910-1990) read Physiology, French and English at Trinity College. While at Cambridge Rothschild was said to have a playboy lifestyle, enjoying waterskiing in Monaco, driving fast cars, collecting art and rare books and playing first-class cricket for the University and Northamptonshire. Rothschild joined the Cambridge Apostles, a secret intellectual society at the University. The society was essentially a discussion group. Meetings were held once a week, traditionally on Saturday evenings, during which one member gave a prepared talk on a topic, which was later thrown open for discussion. The society was at that time predominantly Marxist, though Rothschild stated that he "was mildly left-wing but never a Marxist". He became friends with Guy Burgess, Anthony Blunt and Kim Philby; later exposed as members of the Cambridge Spy Ring.
• George “Dadie” Rylands (1902–1999) was a British literary scholar and theatre director. Educated at Eton College and King's College, he was a Fellow of King's from 1927 until his death. As well as being one of the world's leading Shakespeare scholars, he was actively involved in the theatre. He directed and acted in many productions for the Marlowe Society, and was Chairman of the Cambridge Arts Theatre from 1946 to 1982. Rylands' 1939 Shakespeare anthology “Ages of Man” was the basis of John Gielgud's one-man show of the same title. Though Rylands specialised in directing university productions at Cambridge, he also directed Gielgud in professional productions of “The Duchess of Malfi” and “Hamlet” in London in 1945. Parodying a popular song, Maurice Bowra described the situation of many King’s men as being that of “Yes, sir, that’s my Dadie. I’m your Dadie now.” Rylands became a friend for life. Two years before his death, Bowra received a letter from Rylands “This is really a farewell in case I am stabbed during the Rio carnival, and to say I love you very much, and shall be for ever and ever grateful for all you have done to educate me."
• George Santayana (1863-1952) studied at King's College from 1896 to 1897.
• Siegfried Sassoon (1886–1967) was educated at the New Beacon School, Sevenoaks, Kent; at Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wiltshire (where he was a member of Cotton House), and at Clare College, where from 1905 to 1907 he read history. He went down from Cambridge without a degree and spent the next few years hunting, playing cricket and writing verse: some he published privately.
• Michael Schofield (1919-2014) obtained a degree in Psychology at Cambridge University, spent the war years as a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force, and then studied at Harvard Business School. During this time, he identified as homosexual and decided to make an original study of the social aspects of homosexuality.
• Sir John Tresidder Sheppard, MBE (1881–1968) was an eminent classicist and the first non-Etonian to become the Provost of King's College. John Sheppard was educated at Dulwich College. He went up to King's College, where he studied Classics and won the Porson Prize. He was a lecturer in classics at King's College from 1908–1933 and was provost from 1933–1954. During WWII he performed intelligence work, for which he was appointed MBE; he was knighted in 1950 for his services to Greek. During his long career he translated many famous Greek classics, and published several books on the subject. He was openly homosexual.
• Francis Skinner (1912–1941) was a friend, collaborator, and lover of the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. While studying mathematics at Cambridge in 1930, Skinner fell under Wittgenstein's influence and "became utterly, uncritically, and almost obsessively devoted to Wittgenstein.". Their relationship was characterized by Skinner's eagerness to please Wittgenstein and conform to his opinions. In 1934, the two made plans to emigrate to the Soviet Union and become manual labourers, but Wittgenstein visited the country briefly and realised the plan was not feasible - the Soviet Union might have allowed Wittgenstein to immigrate as a teacher, but not as a manual labourer. Skinner graduated with a degree in Mathematics from Cambridge in 1933 and was awarded a postgraduate fellowship. For three years he used his fellowship assisting Wittgenstein in preparing a book on philosophy and mathematics (never published). During the academic year 1934-5 Wittgenstein dictated to Skinner and Alice Ambrose the text of the Brown Book. However, Wittgenstein's hostility towards academia resulted in Skinner's withdrawal from university, first to become a gardener, and later a mechanic (much to the dismay of Skinner's family). In the late 1930s though, Wittgenstein grew increasingly distant, until Skinner's death from polio in 1941.
• Walter John Herbert Sprott, known to friends as ‘Sebastian’ Sprott, and also known as Jack Sprott (1897–1971), was a British psychologist and writer. He was educated at Felsted School and Clare College, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles. He was romantically involved with the economist John Maynard Keynes, who was at the time also seeing the ballerina Lydia Lopokova. Sprott's affair with Keynes ended after Keynes married Lopokova. After a job as a demonstrator at the Psychological Laboratory in Cambridge, he moved to the University of Nottingham, where he eventually became professor of philosophy.
• Norman St John-Stevas (1929-2012) was educated at St Joseph's Salesian School, Burwash, East Sussex, and then at the Catholic school, Ratcliffe College, Leicester. Afterwards he was for six months enrolled at the English College, Rome, a seminary for the Roman Catholic priesthood but found he had no vocation. He remained a lifelong Catholic, however. He then read law at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. As an undergraduate, he lived at St Edmund's House (now St Edmund's College) and served as President of the Cambridge Union in 1950. He graduated with first class honours and won the Whitlock Prize. He was Master of Emmanuel College from 1991 to 1996.
• Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh (1769-1822) attended St. John's College (1786–87), where he applied himself with greater diligence than expected from an aristocrat and obtained first class in his last examinations. He left Cambridge due to an extended illness, and after returning to Ireland did not pursue further formal education.
• Victor Stiebel (1907-1976) arrived in Britain in 1924 to study architecture at Jesus College.
• Mervyn Stockwood (1913-1995) was the Anglican Bishop of Southwark from 1959 to 1980. He was educated at The Downs School and Kelly College; in 1931 he entered Christ's College, and graduated in 1934. Having studied for the Anglican ministry at Westcott House theological college in Cambridge, he was ordained deacon in 1936, priest in 1937. In 1955 he was appointed Vicar of Great St Mary's, Cambridge where his preaching drew large congregations of undergraduates, gaining him a national reputation. In 1959, at the suggestion of Geoffrey Fisher, Harold Macmillan appointed Stockwood to the diocese of Southwark. He was liberal in his view of the morality of homosexual relationships, favoured homosexual law reform, and included homosexual couples among the guests at his dinner parties. On at least one occasion he blessed a homosexual relationship, but Stockwood himself was celibate.
• Alix Strachey (1892–1973) was educated in England at Bedales School, the Slade School of Fine Art, and Newnham College, where she read modern languages. In 1915 she moved in with her brother in his flat in Bloomsbury and became a member of the Bloomsbury Group, where she met James Strachey, then the assistant editor of The Spectator. They moved in together in 1919 and married in 1920. Soon afterwards they moved to Vienna, where James, an admirer of Freud, began a psychoanalysis with him.
• James Strachey (1887–1967) was educated at Hillbrow preparatory school in Rugby and at Trinity College, where he took over the rooms used by his older brother Lytton Strachey, and was known as "the Little Strachey"; Lytton was now "the Great Strachey". At Cambridge, Strachey fell deeply in love with the poet Rupert Brooke, who did not return his affections. He was himself pursued by mountaineer George Mallory—conceding to his sexual advances—by Harry Norton, and by economist John Maynard Keynes, with whom he also had an affair. His love of Brooke was a constant, however, until the latter's death in 1915, which left Strachey "shattered".
• Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) was admitted as a Pensioner at Trinity College, on September 30, 1899. He became an Exhibitioner in 1900 and a Scholar in 1902. He won the Chancellor's Medal for English Verse in 1902 and was given a B.A. degree after he had won a second class in the History Tripos in June 1903. He did not, however, take leave of Trinity, but remained until October 1905, to work on a thesis that he hoped would gain him a Fellowship. Strachey's years at Cambridge were happy and productive. Among the freshmen at Trinity there were three with whom Strachey soon became closely associated: Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf and Saxon Sydney-Turner. With another undergraduate, A. J. Robertson, these students formed a group called the Midnight Society, which, in the opinion of Clive Bell, was the source of the Bloomsbury Group. Other close friends at Cambridge were Thoby Stephen and his sisters Vanessa and Virginia Stephen. Strachey also belonged to the Conversazione Society, the Cambridge Apostles to which Tennyson, Hallam, Maurice, and Sterling had once belonged. Strachey also became acquainted with other men who greatly influenced him, including G. Lowes Dickinson, John Maynard Keynes, Walter Lamb (brother of the painter Henry Lamb), George Mallory, Bertrand Russell and G. E. Moore.
• Michael Whitney Straight (1916–2004) became a Communist Party member while a student at the University of Cambridge in the mid-1930s, and a part of an intellectual secret society known as the Cambridge Apostles. Straight worked for the Soviet Union as part of a spy ring whose members included Donald Maclean, Guy Burgess, Kim Philby and KGB recruiter Anthony Blunt, who had briefly been Straight's lover. A document from Soviet archives of a report that Blunt made in 1943 to the KGB states, "As you already know the actual recruits whom I took were Michael Straight".
• Howard Sturgis (1855-1920) was born in London to a rich and well-connected New England merchant family. Russell Sturgis, Howard’s father, was a partner at Barings Bank in London, where he and his wife, Julia, were noted figures in society, entertaining such guests as Henry Adams, William Makepeace Thackeray, and Henry James, who became an intimate friend and mentor to Howard. Sturgis was a delicate child, closely attached to his mother, and fond of such girlish hobbies as needlepoint and knitting, which he continued to practice throughout his life. He attended Eton and Cambridge, and, after the death of his parents, purchased a house in the country, Queen’s Acre, called Qu’acre, where Howdie (as Sturgis was known to his intimates) and his presumed lover William Haynes-Smith (called “the Babe”) frequently and happily entertained a wide circle of friends, among them James and Edith Wharton.
• Alan Turing (1912-1954) studied as an undergraduate from 1931 to 1934 at King's College, whence he gained first-class honours in mathematics. In 1935, at the age of 22, he was elected a fellow of King's. The computer room at King's College, Alan Turing's alma mater, is called the Turing Room.
• George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592–1628). During his short tenure as Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, he had initiated the purchase of Thomas van Erpe's collection of oriental books and manuscripts on its behalf, although his widow only transferred it to Cambridge University Library after his death. With it came the first book in Chinese to be added to the Library's collections.
• Horace Walpole (1717-1797) received early education in Bexley. He was also educated at Eton College and King's College. At Cambridge Walpole came under the influence of Conyers Middleton, an unorthodox theologian. Walpole came to accept the sceptical nature of Middleton's attitude to some essential Christian doctrines for the rest of his life, including a hatred of superstition and bigotry. Walpole ceased to reside at Cambridge at the end of 1738 and left without taking a degree.
• Hugh Walpole (1884–1941) studied history at Emmanuel College from 1903 to 1906. While there he had his first work published, the critical essay "Two Meredithian Heroes", which was printed in the college magazine in autumn 1905. As an undergraduate he met and fell under the spell of A.C. Benson, formerly a greatly loved master at Eton, and by this time a don at Magdalene College. On graduation from Cambridge in 1906 he took a post as a lay missioner at the Mersey Mission to Seamen in Liverpool.
• Anthony Watson-Gandy (1919-1952) was the son of Major William Donald Paul Watson-Gandy and Annis Vere Gandy. He died at age 32, unmarried. He was educated at Westminster School, King's College and Sorbonne University. He fought in the WWII and gained the rank of Flying Officer in the service of the Royal Air Force.
• Patrick White (1912-1990) lived in England from 1932 to 1935, studying French and German literature at King's College. His homosexuality took a toll on his first term academic performance, in part because he developed a romantic attraction to a young man who had come to King's College to become an Anglican priest. White dared not speak of his feelings for fear of losing the friendship and, like many other gay men of that period, he feared that his sexuality would doom him to a lonely life. Then, one night, the student priest, after an awkward liaison with two women, admitted to White that women meant nothing to him sexually. That became White's first love affair. During White's time at Cambridge he published a collection of poetry entitled “The Ploughman and Other Poems,” and wrote a play named “Bread and Butter Women,” which was later performed by an amateur group (which included his sister Suzanne) at the tiny Bryant's Playhouse in Sydney.
• Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) moved to Cambridge in 1911, met Bertrand Russell, and became the Master’s most favored student. He was admitted as a member of Trinity College and elected, somewhat reluctantly, an Apostle. It amused Lytton Strachey to call him behind his back “Herr Sinckel-Winckel” and the “Witter-Gitter Man.” He taught at the University of Cambridge from 1929 to 1947. He had romantic relations with both men and women. He is generally believed to have fallen in love with at least three men: David Hume Pinsent in 1912, Francis Skinner in 1930, and Ben Richards in the late 1940s. He later revealed that, as a teenager in Vienna, he had had an affair with a woman. Additionally, in the 1920s Wittgenstein became infatuated with a young Swiss woman, Marguerite Respinger, modelling a sculpture of her and proposing marriage, albeit on condition that they did not have children. Ben Richards was at Wittgenstein’s bedside when he died. He is buried at the Ascension Burial Ground (Cambridge CB3 0EA), formerly the burial ground for the parish of St Giles and St Peter's. It includes the graves and memorials of many University of Cambridge academics and non-conformists of the XIX and early XX century. The cemetery encapsulates a century-and-a-half of the University's modern history, with 83 people with Oxford Dictionary of National Biography biographies.
• Christopher Wood (1900-1976) attended Cambridge but never graduated. He was the loved of Gerald Heard. Heard’s personal interest in psychology received encouragement from W.J.H. “Jack” Sprott, a lecturer in the subject at Nottingham University and a Cambridge friend of Christopher Wood’s. Sprott, also known as “Sebastian,” read and commented on most of his early manuscripts.
• Leonard Woolf (1880-1969) won a classical scholarship to Trinity College in 1899, where he was elected to the Cambridge Apostles. Other members included Lytton Strachey, John Maynard Keynes, GE Moore and EM Forster. Thoby Stephen, Virginia Stephen's brother, was friendly with the Apostles, though not a member himself. Woolf was awarded his BA in 1902, but stayed for another year to study for the Civil Service examinations.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
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House: Bedford House (Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London W4 2PJ) was built together with its neighbour, Eynham House, in the mid-XVII century as a single building by Edward Russell, second son of the 4th Earl of Bedford of Corney House. In 1665, it was bought by Thomas Plukenett, whose daughter, Grace, married her neighbour in Woodroffe House and subsequently inherited the whole group of properties up to Chiswick Lane. The building was given a Georgian style pediment and fenestration in the XVIII century and it may then have been divided into the two dwellings. By 1829, the tenant of Bedford House was the first John Sich, owner of the Lamb brewery. The 1901 the red-brick tower of this now defunct brewery can be seen standing at the top of Church Street. Members of the family lived on here until 1920, and in other houses such as Eynham House and Norfolk House along the Mall. Mabel Sich married Frederick William Tuke, whose family ran the mental asylum and lived in Thames View House. The Sich family were active members of the Chiswick community and benefactors of St Nicholas’ church, assisting with its rebuilding in the XIX century. Warwick Draper (barrister and “William Morris socialist”) lived here in the early 1920s, during which time he wrote his important history of Chiswick. Sadly, in 1926 he fell to his death from a balcony whilst inspecting a chimney fire. In 1928 the house was bought by the Canadian Sir Arthur Ellis, Physician to the London Hospital. He sold it in 1945 to the actor Sir Michael Redgrave (1908-1985), who lived here with his family until 1954, when Sir Arthur Ellis bought it back again.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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House: 3 Hans Crescent, SW1X 0LN, was a handsome brick building in the ornate style called Pont Street Dutch. The actor Michael Redgrave (1908-1985) lived on the third floor with his wife Rachel Kempson and teenage children Vanessa, Lynn, and Corin, from 1956 to 1977. The building faced the back entrance to Harrod’s Department Store.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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Church: St Paul's Church, also commonly known as the Actors' Church, is a church designed by Inigo Jones as part of a commission for the 4th Earl of Bedford in 1631 to create "houses and buildings fitt for the habitacons of Gentlemen and men of ability" in Covent Garden, London. As well as being the parish church of Covent Garden, the church gained its nickname by a long association with the theatre community.

Address: Covent Garden, Westminster, London WC2N 6ET, UK (51.51157, -0.12365)
Phone: +44 20 7836 5221
Website: www.actorschurch.org
English Heritage Building ID: 208625 (Grade I, 1958)

Place
St Paul's connection with the theatre began as early as 1663 with the establishment of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, and was further assured in 1723 with the opening of Covent Garden Theatre, now the Royal Opera House. On 9 May 1662, Samuel Pepys noted in his diary the first "Italian puppet play" under the portico — the first recorded performance of "Punch and Judy", a fact commemorated by the annual MayFayre service in May. The portico of St Paul's was the setting for the first scene of Shaw's “Pygmalion,” the play that was later adapted as “My Fair Lady.” Since 2007 St Paul's has been home to its own in-house professional theatre company, Iris Theatre, originally created to mount a production of T.S. Eliot’s “Murder in the Cathedral.” It gained full charitable status in October 2009.

Notable queer burials at St Paul Churchyard:
• Samuel Butler (1835-1902), iconoclastic Victorian-era English author who published a variety of works. Butler never married, and although he did for years make regular visits to a woman, Lucie Dumas, he also "had a predilection for intense male friendships, which is reflected in several of his works.”
• Robert Carr (1587-1645), 1st Earl of Somerset, Court favourite of James I until he was disgraced by his involvement of the poisoning of Sir Thomas Overbury.
• Noël Coward (1899-1973), memorial.
• Ivor Novello (1893-1951), memorial.
• Terence Rattigan (1911-1977), memorial.
• Sir Michael Redgrave (1908-1985), English stage and film actor, director, manager and author. Corin Redgrave helped his father in the writing of his last autobiography. During one of Corin's visits to his father, the latter said, "There is something I ought to tell you". Then, after a very long pause, "I am, to say the least of it, bisexual". During the filming of Fritz Lang's Secret “Beyond the Door” (1948), Redgrave met Bob Michell. They became lovers, Michell set up house close to the Redgraves, and he became a surrogate "uncle" to Redgrave's children (then aged 11, 9 and 5), who adored him. Michell later had children of his own, including a son he named Michael. Michell was followed by Fred Sadoff, an actor/director who became Redgrave's assistant and shared his lodgings in New York and London. A card was found among Redgrave's effects after his death. The card was signed "Tommy, Liverpool, January 1940", and on it were the words (quoted from W.H. Auden): "The word is love. Surely one fearless kiss would cure the million fevers".
• Dame Ellen Terry, GBE (1847-1928), English stage actress who became the leading Shakespearean actress in Britain. Her daughter, Edith Craig (1869-1947) was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women's suffrage movement in England.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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