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Sir Harold Mario Mitchell Acton CBE was a British writer, scholar, and aesthete. He was born near Florence, Italy, of a prominent Anglo-Italian family.
Born: July 5, 1904, Galluzzo, Florence
Died: February 27, 1994, Villa La Pietra, Florence
Education: Eton College
University of Oxford
Wixenford Preparatory School
Lived: Villa La Pietra, Via Bolognese, 120, 50139 Firenze (43.79788, 11.26224)
Buried: Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori
Find A Grave Memorial# 12692590

Villa La Pietra is a renaissance villa in the hills outside Florence, in Tuscany in central Italy. It was formerly the home of Arthur Acton and later of his son Harold Acton, on whose death in 1994 it was bequeathed to New York University.
Address: Via Bolognese, 120, 50139 Firenze (43.79788, 11.26224)
Type: Student Facility (open to public)
Phone: +39 055 50071
Place
Villa La Pietra was bought and somewhat modified in the 1460s by the Florentine banker Francesco Sassetti. In ca. 1545 it was sold to the Capponi family. The villa was given its present form in the XVII century by the cardinal Luigi Capponi, possibly with the assistance of Carlo Fontana. During the brief period when Florence was capital of the Kingdom of Italy, the villa was used as the embassy of Prussia. In 1903 Arthur Acton, an Anglo-Neapolitan art dealer, rented it after his marriage to Hortense Mitchell, the daughter of a banker from Chicago, Illinois, William Mitchell. With money from her family, the couple bought the villa in 1907. The villa contains the art collection assembled by the Actons, which reflects XX century Anglo-American taste. It is used for didactic purposes by New York University. The collection includes works from the circle of Giotto, Romanesque sculptures, a relief of the Virgin and Child by Donatello, and XV century tapestries made for the de’ Medici family. Between 1905 and 1930 the gardens of the villa were substantially altered by the Actons, only the walled lemon garden to the north-west of the villa remaining mostly unchanged since the time of Luigi Capponi. The Actons laid out a formal Baroque Italian garden with extensive stonework, including almost two hundred statues, many of them by the Venetian sculptors Orazio Marinali and Antonio Bonazza, brought to Florence from the villas of the Brenta. The gardens were restored in the early years of the XXI first century.
Life
Who: Sir Harold Mario Mitchell Acton CBE (July 5, 1904 – February 27, 1994)
Sir Harold Acton was a British writer, scholar, and dilettante. Born at Villa La Pietra, near Florence, Italy, Acton’s father was a successful art collector and dealer, and his prominent Anglo-Italian family included the historian Lord Acton, and, more distantly, Sir John Acton, Commodore and prime minister of Naples under Ferdinand IV. The young Acton attended a private school in Florence until 1913, followed, among others, by Wixenford School near Reading in southern England (alongside Kenneth Clark), and Chateau de Lancy, in Geneva, Switzerland, and ultimately Eton, which he entered in May 1918. Among his contemporaries at Eton were Eric Blair (the writer George Orwell), Cyril Connolly, Robert Byron, Alec Douglas-Home, Ian Fleming, Brian Howard, Oliver Messel, Anthony Powell, and Henry Yorke (the novelist Henry Green.) In his final years at school, Harold became a founding member of the Eton Arts Society, and eleven of his poems appeared in “The Eton Candle,” edited by his friend Brian Howard. Acton is noted by Evelyn Waugh for having inspired, in part, the character of Anthony Blanche in “Brideshead Revisited” (1945.) Acton never married, maintained a cultural and historical commitment to the Catholic Church, and was referred by his contemporaries, with regard to his personal life, as being withdrawn. He died at the age of 89, in Florence, leaving Villa La Pietra to New York University, to be used as a centre for international programmes and a meeting place for students, faculty, and guests to study, teach, and write. Acton is buried beside his parents and brother in the Roman Catholic section of the Cimitero Evangelico degli Allori in the southern suburb of Florence, Galluzzo.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori ("The Evangelical Cemetery of Laurels") is located in Florence, Italy, between 'Due Strade' and Galluzzo. The small cemetery was opened on February 26, 1860 when the non-Catholic communities of Florence could no longer bury their dead in the English Cemetery in Piazzale Donatello.
Address: Via Senese, 184, 50124 Firenze, Italy (43.74775, 11.22999)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Place
The Cemetery is named after the Allori farm where it was located. Initially a Protestant cemetery, the site is now private. Since 1970 it has accepted the dead of other denominations, including Muslims. The cemetery became newsworthy in 2006 when the writer and journalist Oriana Fallaci was buried there alongside her family and a stone memorial to Alexandros Panagoulis, her companion.
Notable queer burials at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori:
• Harold Acton (1904-1994), British writer. Harold Acton’s younger brother, William, a gay artist of modest achievement, died an apparent suicide in 1945. William Acton was a British visual artist who was born in 1906. Several works by the artist have been sold at auction, including 'Armiola' sold at Christie's New York 'Victorian, Pre-Raphaelite & British Impressionist Art' in 2016 for $23,080.
• Robert Wiedeman Barrett Browning, known as Pen Browning, (1849–1912), English painter. His career was moderately successful, but he is better known as the son and heir of the celebrated English poets, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.
• Leo Ditrichstein (1865-1928), American actor and playwriter. Educated in Austria, Ditrichstein was the author of a number of plays, five of which were made into motion pictures. Worked with Gareth Hughes, Welsh actor in theater and film who worked primarily in the United States, and who, according to historian William J. Mann, was a "flaming little queen".
• Alice Keppel (1868-1947), British mistress of Edward VII and mother of Violet Trefusis.
• John Pope-Hennessy (1913-1994), British art historian.
• Violet Page, aka Vernon Lee (1856-1935), British writer.
• Charles Alexander Loeser (1864–1928), American art historian and art collector.
• Osbert Sitwell (1892-1969), British writer.
• Frederick Stibbert (1838-1906), British art collector.
• Violet Trefusis (1894-1972), English and French writer.
• Reginald Turner (1869-1938), British writer. Turner numbered among his friends Max Beerbohm, Lord Alfred Douglas, H. G. Wells, Arnold Bennett, Somerset Maugham, D. H. Lawrence, Oscar Wilde, Osbert Sitwell and others of the London literary scene during the late XIX and early XX century. S. N. Behrman said of him, "He was one of those men who talk like angels and write like pedestrians". Harold Acton agreed, writing of Turner's conversation, "One forgot to eat while he spun his fantasies." Beerbohm said, "He would be eloquent even were he dumb," and Maugham wrote, "Reggie Turner was, on the whole, the most amusing man I have known." After Wilde's death, Turner, who was homosexual, felt few ties to England.
Burial tombstone by Adolf von Hildebrand at Cimitero Evangelico agli Allori:
• RUDOLF BENNERT, Place of birth: FRANKFURT, Mother: FUSSLI M, Died: 08/09/1882, Age: 23, Plot: 2PPsSG VII 16s
• ERMINIA BUMILLER, Father: HERMAN, Mother: DANIELIS FEDERICA, Age: 82, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28r
• HERMAN BUMILLER, Died: 24/07/1898, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28s
• FEDERICA DANIELIS, Father: GIOVAN BATTISTA, Died: 13/03/1903, Age: 78, Plot: 2PPsSG V 28s
• KARL ARNOLD HILLEBRAND, Place of birth: GIESSEN, Died: 18/10/1884, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 78s
• HEINRICH EMIL HOMBERGER, Place of birth: MAINZ, Died: 01/08/1890, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 81s
• JESSY TAYLOR, Place of birth: LONDRA, Father: EDGARD, Died: 08/05/1905, Age: 78, Plot: 2PPsSB VII 79u
Life
Adolf von Hildebrand (October 6, 1847 – January 18, 1921)
Adolf von Hildebrand was a German sculptor. Hildebrand was born at Marburg, the son of Marburg economics professor Bruno Hildebrand. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Nuremberg, with Kaspar von Zumbusch at the Munich Academy and with Rudolf Siemering in Berlin. From 1873 he lived in Florence in San Francesco, a secularized XVI-century monastery. A particular friend of Hans von Marées, he designed the architectural setting for the painter's murals in the library of the German Marine Zoological Institute at Naples (1873). In 1877 he married Irene Schäuffelen, a separation from von Marées that was decipted by the painter in one of his works. Von Hildebrand spent a significant amount of time in Munich after 1889, executing a monumental fountain there, the Wittelsbacher Brunnen. He is known for five monumental urban fountains. Hildebrand worked in a Neo-classical tradition, and set out his artistic theories in his book “Das Problem der Form in der Bildenden Kunst” (The Problem of Form in Painting and Sculpture), published in 1893. He was ennobled by the King of Bavaria in 1904. He was the father of the painter Eva, Elizabeth, sculptor Irene Georgii-Hildebrand, Sylvie, Bertele, and Catholic theologian Dietrich von Hildebrand. He died in Munich in 1921.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Dame Alice Ellen Terry, GBE, known professionally as Ellen Terry, was an English stage actress who became the leading Shakespearean actress in Britain.
Born: February 27, 1847, Coventry, United Kingdom
Died: July 21, 1928, Small Hythe, United Kingdom
Buried: St Paul Churchyard, Covent Garden, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England, Plot: South wall in silver funeral casket
Find A Grave Memorial# 6162
Spouse: James Carew (m. 1907–1928), more
Movies: Victory and Peace, Her Greatest Performance, Potter's Clay
Children: Edward Gordon Craig, Edith Craig

The home of Victorian actress Ellen Terry, where you can explore the house, cottage garden and even attend a show at the XVII century thatched Barn Theatre.
Address: Small Hythe Rd, Tenterden, Kent TN30 7NG, UK (51.0653, 0.68183)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 11.00-17.00 (managed by the National Trust)
Phone:+44 1580 762334
English Heritage Building ID: 179818 (Grade II, 1950)
Place
Built in the late XV or early XVI century
Smallhythe Place in Small Hythe, near Tenterden in Kent, is a half-timbered house and since 1947 is cared for by the National Trust. The house was originally called “Port House” and before the River Rother and the sea receded it served a thriving shipyard: in Old English hythe means "landing place.” It was the home of the Victorian actress Ellen Terry from 1899 to her death in the house in 1928. The house contains Ellen Terry’s theatre collection, while the cottage grounds include her rose garden, orchard, nuttery and the working Barn Theatre. Terry first saw the house in the company of Henry Irving, the manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London’s Covent Garden, with whom she shared a famous theatrical partnership for nearly 24 years. The house was opened to the public by Terry’s daughter Edith Craig in 1929, as a memorial to her mother. The National Trust supported Craig in her running of the museum from 1939, and took over the property when she died in 1947. There are several paintings by the artist Clare Atwood, one of the romantic companions of Edith Craig. In an adjoining room is a letter from Oscar Wilde begging Terry to accept a copy of his first play. There is also a selection of sumptuous costumes dating from Terry’s time at the Lyceum Theatre. In 1929, Craig set up the Barn Theatre in the house’s grounds, where the plays of William Shakespeare were performed every year on the anniversary of her mother’s death. This tradition continues to this day.
Life
Who: Edith Ailsa Geraldine Craig (December 9, 1869 – March 27, 1947)
Edith Craig was a prolific theatre director, producer, costume designer and early pioneer of the women’s suffrage movement in England. She was the daughter of Victorian era actress Ellen Terry and the progressive architect-designer Edward William Godwin, and the sister of theatre practitioner Edward Gordon Craig. As a lesbian, an active campaigner for women’s suffrage, and a woman working as a theatre director and producer, Edith Craig has been recovered by feminist scholars as well as theatre historians. Craig lived in a ménage à trois with the dramatist Christabel Marshall (Christopher Marie St John, 1871-1960) and the artist Clare “Tony” Atwood (1866-1962) from 1916 until her death. Virginia Woolf is said to have used Edith Craig as a model for the character of Miss LaTrobe in her novel “Between the Acts” (1941.) After Edith Craig’s death in 1947, St John and Atwood helped to keep the Ellen Terry Memorial Museum in operation. Marshall died from pneumonia connected with heart disease at Tenterden in 1960. Atwood suffered a fractured femur, senile myocarditis and heart failure, and died at Kench Hill Nursing Home, Tenterden, Kent, on August 2, 1962. When Edith Craig died she left a request that her ashes be buried with her two lesbian partners. By the time they passed away in the 1960s, Edy’s ashes were mislaid. Dismayed at the loss of her ashes, her two friend opted for burial and they lie side by side next to the gate of the tiny churchyard at St John the Baptist (Smallhythe Road, Smallhythe, Kent, TN307NG), leading to the Priest’s House where they had lived with Edy. A memorial stone to Edith Craig is in the same cemetery.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Angelina Weld Grimké was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/'Mulatta' women to have a play publicly performed.
Born: February 27, 1880, Boston, MA
Died: June 10, 1958, New York City, NY
Education: Harvard University,
Wellesley College
Lived: 208 West 151st Street in HARLEM
Find A Grave Memorial# 176208233
Parents: Archibald Grimké
Grandparent: Henry W. Grimké

Around 1913, Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was involved in a train crash which left her health in a precarious state. After her father took ill in 1928, she tended to him until his death in 1930. Afterward, she left Washington, DC, for New York City, where she settled at 208 W 151st St, New York, NY 10039. She lived a quiet retirement as a semi-recluse. She died in 1958.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Alice Hamilton was a leading expert in the field of occupational health and the first woman appointed to the faculty of Harvard University.
Born: February 27, 1869, Fort Wayne, Indiana, United States
Died: September 22, 1970, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Education: Miss Porter's School
Johns Hopkins University
University of Michigan
Leipzig University
European University Viadrina
Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
Harvard University
Buried: Cove Cemetery, Hadlyme, New London County, Connecticut, USA
Buried alongside: Clara Landsberg
Find A Grave Memorial# 135749152
Awards: Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award

Notable queer alumni and faculty at Harvard University:
• Henry Adams (1838-1918), after his graduation from Harvard University in 1858, embarked on a grand tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. He was initiated into the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity as honorary member at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Harris J. Ryan, a judge for the exhibit on electrical engineering. Through that organization, he was a member of the Irving Literary Society. In 1870, Adams was appointed professor of medieval history at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877 at 39. As an academic historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874–1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. Among his students was Henry Cabot Lodge, who worked closely with Adams as a graduate student. On June 27, 1872, Clover Hooper and he were married in Beverly, Massachusetts, and spent their honeymoon in Europe, much of it with Charles Milnes Gaskell at Wenlock Abbey in Shropshire, England. Upon their return, he went back to his position at Harvard, and their home at 91 Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, became a gathering place for a lively circle of intellectuals. Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1875.
• Horatio Alger (1832-1899) passed the Harvard entrance examinations in July, 1848, and was admitted to the class of 1852. Alger's classmate Joseph Hodges Choate described Harvard at this time as "provincial and local because its scope and outlook hardly extended beyond the boundaries of New England; besides which it was very denominational, being held exclusively in the hands of Unitarians". Alger flowered in the highly disciplined and regimented Harvard environment, winning scholastic prizes and prestigious awards. His genteel poverty and less-than-aristocratic heritage, however, barred him from membership in the Hasty Pudding Club and the Porcellian Club. He was chosen Class Odist and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa Society honors in 1852, eighth in a class of 88. He is buried in the family plot at Glenwood Cemetery, Natick, MA 01760.
• Josep Alsop (1910-1989) graduated from the Groton School, a private boarding school in Groton, Massachusetts, in 1928, and from Harvard University in 1932. He is buried in the family mausoleum at Indian Hill Cemetery (383 Washington St, Middletown, CT 06457).
• A. Piatt Andrew (1873-1936) studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, graduating with a master's degree in 1895 and a doctorate in 1900. He was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909.
• Newton Arvin (1900-1963) studied English Literature at Harvard, graduating summa cum laude in 1921. His writing career began when Van Wyck Brooks, the Harvard teacher he most admired, invited him to write for The Freeman while he was still an undergraduate. After a short period teaching at the high school level, Arvin joined the English faculty at Smith College and, though he never earned a doctorate, won a tenured position. One of his students was Sylvia Plath, the poet and novelist.
• John Ashbery (born 1927) graduated in 1949 with an A.B., cum laude, was a member of the Harvard Advocate, the university's literary magazine, and the Signet Society.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959) attended from 1911 to 1912, leaving school without graduating.
• Arthur Everett Austin, Jr (1900-1957) entered Harvard College in the Class of 1922. He interrupted his undergraduate career to work in Egypt and the Sudan (1922-1923) with the Harvard University/Boston Museum of Fine Arts archaeological expedition under George A. Reisner, then the leading American Egyptologist. After taking his degree in 1924, he became a graduate student in Harvard's fine arts department, where he served for three years as chief graduate assistant to Edward W. Forbes, Director of the Fogg Art Museum.
• Maud Babcock (1867-1954) was studying and teaching at Harvard University when she met noted Utahn and daughter of Brigham Young, Susa Young Gates, who, impressed by Babcock's work as a summer course instructor in physical culture, convinced her to move to Salt Lake City. She established UU's first physical training curriculum, of which speech and dramatics were part for several years.
• Lucius Beebe (1902-1966) attended both Harvard University and Yale University. During his tenure at boarding school and university, Beebe was known for his numerous pranks. One of his more outrageous stunts included an attempt at festooning J. P. Morgan's yacht Corsair III with toilet paper from a chartered airplane. His pranks were not without consequence and he proudly noted that he had the sole distinction of having been expelled from both Harvard and Yale, at the insistence, respectively, of the president and dean of each. Beebe earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard in 1926, only to be expelled during graduate school. During and immediately after obtaining his degree from Harvard, Beebe published several books of poetry, but eventually found his true calling in journalism.
• Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990) completed his studies in 1939, graduating with a B.A. cum laude
• Lem Billings (1916-1981) attended Harvard Business School from 1946 to 1948 and earned an MBA.
• John Boswell (1947-1994) received his doctorate in 1975.
• Roger Brown (1925-1997) started his career in 1952 as an instructor and then assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. In 1957 he left Harvard for an associate professorship at MIT, and became a full professor of psychology there in 1960. In 1962, he returned to Harvard as a full professor, and served as chair of the Department of Social Relations from 1967 to 1970. From 1974 until his retirement in 1994, he held the title of John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James.
• John Horne Burns (1916–1953) was the author of three novels. The first, “The Gallery” (1947), is his best known work, which was very well received when published and has been reissued several times. Burns was educated by the Sisters of Notre Dame at St. Augustine's School and then Phillips Academy, where he pursued music. He attended Harvard, where he became fluent in French, German, and Italian and wrote the book for a student musical comedy in 1936. In 1937 he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in English magna cum laude and became a teacher at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. Burns wrote several novels while at Harvard and at Loomis, none of which he published. Gore Vidal reported a conversation he had with Burns following “The Gallery”'s success: “Burns was a difficult man who drank too much, loved music, detested all other writers, wanted to be great.... He was also certain that to be a great writer it was necessary to be homosexual. When I disagreed, he named a half dozen celebrated contemporaries. "A Pleiad," he roared delightedly, "of pederasts!" But what about Faulkner?, I asked, and Hemingway? He was disdainful. Who said they were any good?” He died in Florence from a cerebral hemorrhage on August 11, 1953. He was buried in the family plot in Holyhood Cemetery (Chestnut Hill, MA 02467). Ernest Hemingway later sketched Burns' brief life as a writer: "There was a fellow who wrote a fine book and then a stinking book about a prep school and then just blew himself up."
• William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) graduated in 1936.
• Witter Bynner (1881–1968) was the first member of his class invited to join the student literary magazine, The Advocate. He was also published in another of Harvard's literary journals, The Harvard Monthly. He graduated with honors in 1902. His first book of poems, “An Ode to Harvard” (later changed to “Young Harvard”), came out in 1907. In 1911 he was the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Poet.
• Paul Chalfin (1874-1959) began studying at Harvard University in 1894 and left after two years to become an artist.
• Countee Cullen (1903-1946) entered in 1925, to pursue a masters in English.
• Cora Du Bois (1903-1991) accepted an appointment at Harvard University in 1954 as the second person to hold the Zimurray Chair at Radcliffe College. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1955. She was the first woman tenured in Harvard's Anthropology Department and the second woman tenured in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard.
• Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), educated at Radcliffe College, became department chairman of child and maternal health at Harvard School of Public Health in 1956.
• Kenward Elmslie (born 1929) earned a BA at Harvard University before moving back to New York City, where he became a central figure in the New York School.
• William Morton Fullerton (1865–1952) received his Bachelor of Arts in 1886. While studying at Harvard, he and classmates began The Harvard Monthly. After his graduation and first trip to Europe in 1888, he spent several years working as a journalist in the Boston Area. In 1890, four years after his graduation from Harvard, Fullerton moved to France to begin work for The Times office in Paris.
• Henry Geldzahler (1935–1994) left graduate school in 1960 to join the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
• Julian Wood Glass, Jr, (1910-1992) attended Oklahoma schools and was graduated from Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
• Angelina Weld Grimké (1880–1958) was an American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who came to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance. She was one of the first Woman of Colour/Interracial women to have a play publicly performed. In 1902, Grimké began teaching English at the Armstrong Manual Training School, a black school in the segregated system of the capitol. In 1916 she moved to a teaching position at the Dunbar High School for black students, renowned for its academic excellence, where one of her pupils was the future poet and playwright May Miller. During the summers, Grimké frequently took classes at Harvard University, where her father had attended law school. He was the second African American to have graduated from Harvard Law School.
• Alice Hamilton (1869–1970) was hired in 1919 as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there in any field. Her appointment was hailed by the New York Tribune with the headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own". Her own comment was "Yes, I am the first woman on the Harvard faculty—but not the first one who should have been appointed!" Hamilton still faced discrimination as a woman, and was excluded from social activities and ceremonies.
• Andrew Holleran (born 1944), pseudonym of Eric Garber, novelist, essayist, and short story writer, graduated from Harvard College in 1965.
• Henry James (1843–1916) attended Harvard Law School in 1862, but realized that he was not interested in studying law. He pursued his interest in literature and associated with authors and critics William Dean Howells and Charles Eliot Norton in Boston and Cambridge, formed lifelong friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., the future Supreme Court Justice, and with James and Annie Fields, his first professional mentors.
• Philip Johnson (1906–2005), student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
• Frank Kameny (1925-2011) graduated with both a master's degree (1949) and doctorate (1956) in astronomy.
• Helen Keller (1880–1968) entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College, where she lived in Briggs Hall, South House.
• John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) graduated from Harvard University in June 1940.
• Alfred Kinsey (1804-1956) continued his graduate studies at Harvard University's Bussey Institute, which had one of the most highly regarded biology programs in the United States. It was there that Kinsey studied applied biology under William Morton Wheeler, a scientist who made outstanding contributions to entomology. Under Wheeler, Kinsey worked almost completely autonomously, which suited both men quite well. Kinsey chose to do his doctoral thesis on gall wasps, and began zealously collecting samples of the species. Kinsey was granted a Sc.D. degree in 1919 by Harvard University, and published several papers in 1920 under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, introducing the gall wasp to the scientific community and describing its phylogeny. Of the more than 18 million insects in the museum's collection, some 5 million are gall wasps collected by Kinsey.
• Marshall Kirk (1957-2005) was valedictorian of his high school class and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1980, majoring in psychology, and writing his honors thesis on the testing of gifted children. In 1987 Kirk partnered with Hunter Madsen (writing under the pen-name "Erastes Pill") to write an essay, "The Overhauling of Straight America." The pair developed their argument in the 1989 book "After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the ’90s." The book outlined a public relations strategy for the LGBT movement.
• Lincoln Kirstein (1907-1996) attended Harvard, where his father, the vice-president of Filene's Department Store, had also attended, graduating in 1930. In 1927, while still an undergraduate at Harvard, Kirstein was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who met his wife Eileen through Lincoln's sister Mina, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn.
• Alain LeRoy Locke (1885-1954) graduated from Harvard University in 1907 with degrees in English and philosophy, and was honored as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society and recipient of the prestigious Bowdoin Prize. After graduation, he was the first African-American selected as a Rhodes Scholar (and the last to be selected until 1960). At that time, Rhodes selectors did not meet candidates in person, but there is evidence that at least some selectors knew he was African-American.
• Todd Longstaffe-Gowan (born 1960) read Environmental Studies at the University of Manitoba, Landscape Architecture at Harvard University and completed his PhD in Historical Geography at University College, London. He lectures widely on landscape history and design both in Britain and abroad, is a lecturer on the MA course in Historical and Sustainable Architecture at New York University, and contributes regularly to a range of publications.
• F. O. Matthiessen (1902-1950) completed his M.A. in 1926 and Ph.D. degree in 1927. He returned to Harvard to begin a distinguished teaching career.
• Michael McDowell (1950-1999) received a B.A. and an M.A. from Harvard College and a Ph.D in English from Brandeis University in 1978 based on a dissertation entitled "American Attitudes Toward Death, 1825-1865".
• Henry Plumer McIlhenny (1910–1986) he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933. During his years at Harvard, Paul J. Sachs influenced his future collecting.
• Henry Chapman Mercer (1856-1930), American archeologist, artifact collector, tile-maker, and designer, attended Harvard University between 1875 and 1879, obtaining a liberal arts degree.
• Francis Davis Millet (1848–1912) graduated with a Master of Arts degree. A bronze bust in Harvard University's Widener Library also memorializes Millet.
• Stewart Mitchell (1892–1957) graduated from Harvard University in 1916. He taught English literature at the University of Wisconsin. He resigned his position for political reasons, frustrated that he was forced to give a “politician’s son who should have been flunked” passing grades. Mitchell enlisted in the army, serving in France until he was discharged as a private two years later. In 1922, following two years’ study at the University of Montpellier and Jesus College, Cambridge, he returned to the States and lived with his elderly aunt in New York. Mitchell privately studied foreign language and literature, focusing on French and Greek, before returning to Harvard and graduating with a Ph.D. in Literature in 1933.
• Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) attended with the funding made available to veterans. Published poems in the Harvard Advocate. He graduated in 1950 with a degree in English.
• Daniel Pinkham (1923-2006) studied with Walter Piston; Aaron Copland, Archibald T. Davison, and A. Tillman Merritt were also among his teachers. He completed a bachelor's degree in 1943 and a master's in 1944. He taught at various times at Simmons College (1953–1954), Boston University (1953–1954), and Harvard University (1957–1958). Among Pinkham's notable students were the jazz musician and composer Gigi Gryce (1925–1983) and the composer Mark DeVoto.
• Cole Porter (1891–1964) enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1913. At the suggestion of the dean of the law school, switched to Harvard's music faculty, where he studied harmony and counterpoint with Pietro Yon.
• Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), after graduating from high school, gained her college diploma at Radcliffe College, where she focused primarily on poetry and learning writing craft, encountering no women teachers at all. In 1951, her last year at college, Rich's first collection of poetry, “A Change of World,2 was selected by the senior poet W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. In 1953, Rich married Alfred Haskell Conrad, an economics professor at Harvard University she met as an undergraduate. She said of the match: "I married in part because I knew no better way to disconnect from my first family. I wanted what I saw as a full woman's life, whatever was possible." They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts and had three sons.
• Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) earned his bachelor's degree in architecture at Auburn University (then known as Alabama Polytechnic Institute) in 1940 and then moved on to the Harvard Graduate School of Design to study with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius. After three years, he left to serve in the Navy for another three years, returning to Harvard to receive his master's in 1947
• Leverett Saltonstall (1825-1895) graduated at Harvard College in 1844; overseer of Harvard University for 18 years.
• George Santayana (1863–1952) lived in Hollis Hall as a student. He was founder and president of the Philosophical Club, a member of the literary society known as the O.K., an editor and cartoonist for The Harvard Lampoon, and co-founder of the literary journal The Harvard Monthly. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1886, Santayana studied for two years in Berlin. He then returned to Harvard to write his dissertation on Hermann Lotze and teach philosophy, becoming part of the Golden Age of the Harvard philosophy department.
• Laurence Senelick (born 1942) holds a Ph.D. from Harvard. He is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University.
• Susan Sontag (1933-2004) attended Harvard University for graduate school, initially studying literature with Perry Miller and Harry Levin before moving into philosophy and theology under Paul Tillich, Jacob Taubes, Raphael Demos and Morton White. After completing her Master of Arts in philosophy, she began doctoral research into metaphysics, ethics, Greek philosophy and Continental philosophy and theology at Harvard. The philosopher Herbert Marcuse lived with Sontag and her husband Philip Rieff for a year while working on his 1955 book “Eros and Civilization.”
• Lucy Ward Stebbins (1880-1955) was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and later transferred to Radcliffe College to receive her A.B. degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1902.
• Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) attended Radcliffe College, then an annex of Harvard University, from 1893 to 1897.
• Virgil Thomson (1896-1989) entered thanks to a loan from Dr. Fred M. Smith, the president of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and father of Alice Smith.
• George Tooker (1920-2011) graduated from Harvard University with an English degree in 1942 and enlisted in the Officer Candidates School (United States Marine Corps), but was discharged for medical reasons.
• Prescott Townsend (1894–1973) graduated in 1918 from Harvard University, and attended Harvard Law School for one year.
• Christopher Tunnard (1910-1979), Canadian-born landscape architect, garden designer, city-planner, and author of Gardens in the Modern Landscape (1938), emigrated to America, at the invitation of Walter Gropius, to teach at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 1938 to 1943 Tunnard taught at Harvard.
• Walter Van Rensselaer Berry (1859–1927) graduated from Harvard in 1881; he began studying law in 1883, and opened a law office specializing in international law in Washington, D.C. in 1885.
• Ned Warren (1860–1928) received his B.A. in 1883.
• Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), M.A. from Radcliffe College.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

“Shortly after we reached Washington we bought a small house at 2448 Massachusetts Avenue, the back of which faced Rock Creek Park. Looking out of our windows one would not suppose there was a house within miles. We had a small garden we filled with azaleas, and in the front, on Massachusetts Avenue, was a particularly lovely cherry tree. Edith of course had her dog and her cat.” “Edith Hamilton an Intimate Portrait,” Doris Fielding Reid, 1967
Address: 2448 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC 20008, USA (38.91435, -77.05439)
Type: Private property
National Register of Historic Places: Massachusetts Avenue Historic District (Both sides of Massachusetts Ave. between 17th St. and Observatory Circle, NW), 74002166, 1974
Place
For the last 20 years of her life, classical scholar Edith Hamilton lived at 2448 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., which is near Rock Creek Park.
Note: at Washington National Cathedral (3101 Wisconsin Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016), are buried Helen Keller (1880-1968) and her long-time companion, Anne Sullivan (1866-1936) who preceded her in death.
Life
Who: Edith Hamilton (August 12, 1867 – May 31, 1963) and Dorothy "Doris" Fielding Reid (September 4, 1895 – January 16, 1973)
Edith Hamilton was a German-American educator and author who was "recognized as the greatest woman Classicist.” She was sixty-two years old when “The Greek Way,” her first book, was published in 1930. It was instantly successful, and is the earliest expression of her belief in "the calm lucidity of the Greek mind" and "that the great thinkers of Athens were unsurpassed in their mastery of truth and enlightenment.” Hamilton’s companion for over 40 years was Dorothy "Doris" Fielding Reid, vice president of the investment firm Loomis Sayles & Company. Hamilton dedicated her first book, “The Greek Way,” to Reid. Doris Fielding Reid was a stockbroker and former student of Hamilton’s, who eventually became her biographer. The two women cohabited in Maine, on Park Avenue in New York City, and finally in Washington, D.C. Together, they raised Reid’s nephew, Dorian. After her death, in 1963, Doris published the book "Edith Hamilton: An Intimate Portrait.” Doris died ten years later in Lenox Hill, New York. They are buried together in twin tombstones at Cove Cemetery (Lyme, CT 06371). With them, in the Hamilton family plot, there is also Margaret and Alice, Edith’s sisters, and Alice’s lifelong friend Clara. Edith’s sister Alice went on to become an integral part of Hull House in Chicago, which offered food, shelter, and education, as a charity on the part of wealthy donors and scholars who volunteered their time. She later became a noted pioneer in industrial medicine and a professor at Northwestern University and Harvard Medical School, where in 1919 she became Harvard's first woman professor. Her younger sister Margaret also studied in Munich for one summer in 1899 with a close colleague and family friend Clara Landsberg. Landsberg was from Rochester, New York, where her father was a Reform rabbi. After graduating from Bryn Mawr, Landsberg also became a part of Hull House and shared a room with Alice. She eventually left Hull House to teach Latin at Bryn Mawr while Edith was headmistress. Alice considered Landsberg part of the Hamilton family: "I could not think of a life in which Clara did not have a great part, she has become part of my life almost as if she were one of us." Margaret later taught English at Bryn Mawr and took over as head of the school when Edith retired.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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