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Henry Gauthier-Villars or Willy, his nom-de-plume, was a French fin-de-siecle writer and music critic who is today mostly known as the mentor and first husband of Colette.
Born: August 8, 1859, Villiers-sur-Orge, France
Died: January 12, 1931, Paris, France
Spouse: Colette (m. 1893–1910)
Parents: Jean-Albert Gauthier-Villars
Buried: Montparnasse

Henry Gauthier-Villars or Willy was a French fin-de-siecle writer and music critic who is today mostly known as the mentor and first husband of Colette. In 1889, he met Colette, 14 years younger than he was; they married on May 15, 1893. Colette soon learned that Willy had other affairs, and she met his mistress Charlotte Kinceler, who later became her friend. Willy and Colette had an affair unbeknownst to each other with the same woman, the American socialite Georgie Raoul-Duval, née Urquhart. Upon discovery, they made it a threesome and attended the Bayreuth festival together. In 1906, Colette left the unfaithful Gauthier-Villars, living for a time at the home of the American writer and salonist Natalie Clifford Barney. The two had a short affair, and remained friends until Colette's death. The marriage of Willy and Colette lasted until 1910, although in the years prior they were already separated. Colette went to work in the music halls of Paris, under the wing of Missy de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf, with whom she became romantically involved. She also was involved in a heterosexual relationship during this time, with the Italian writer Gabriele D’Annunzio. According to one writer, Colette "never gave Missy as much love" and took "advantage of her and more or less appropriating Rozven, a Brittany villa, from her after they split up." Another affair during this period was with the automobile-empire scion Auguste Heriot.
Together from 1893 to 1906: 13 years.
Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954)
Henry Gauthier-Villars aka Willy (August 8, 1859 - January 12, 1931)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Tree-lined graveyard with the resting places of writers & artists including Sartre & Beckett.
Address: 3 Boulevard Edgar Quinet, 75014 Paris, France (48.83791, 2.32762)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 44 10 86 50
Place
Montparnasse Cemetery is a cemetery in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, part of the city’s 14th arrondissement. Created from three farms in 1824, the cemetery at Montparnasse was originally known as Le Cimetière du Sud (Southern Cemetery.)
Notable queer burials at Montparnasse:
• Jules-Amédée Barbey d’Aurevilly (1808-1889) was a French novelist and short story writer. He had a decisive influence on writers such as Auguste Villiers de l’Isle-Adam, Henry James and Marcel Proust. When accused of sodomitical practices, D’Aurevilly reply was: “My tastes incline me to it, my principles permit it, but the ugliness of my contemporaries repels me.” He was transferred in 1926 to St Sauveur, le vicomte's cemetery, in Normandy.
• Marie Dorval (1798–1849), actress. In January 1833, female writer George Sand met Marie Dorval after the former wrote the actress a letter of appreciation following one of her performances. The two women became involved in an intimate friendship, and were rumored to have become lesbian lovers.
• Henry “Willy” Gauthier-Villars (1859–1931), writer and first husband of Colette. Willy and Colette had an affair unbeknownst to each other with the same woman, the American socialite Georgie Raoul-Duval, née Urquhart. Upon discovery, they made it a threesome and attended the Bayreuth festival together.
• Joris-Karl Huysmans (1848–1907), author. Huysmans’ novel “À rebours” (Against the Grain or Against Nature or Wrong Way) (1884) became his most famous, or notorious. It featured the character of an aesthete, des Esseintes, and decisively broke from Naturalism. It was seen as an example of "decadent" literature. The description of des Esseintes’ "alluring liaison" with a "cherry-lipped youth" was believed to have influenced other writers of the decadent movement, including Oscar Wilde. It is now considered an important step in the formation of "gay literature.” “À rebours” gained notoriety as an exhibit in the trials of Oscar Wilde in 1895. The prosecutor referred to it as a "sodomitical" book.
• Josie Mansfield (1847-1931), an American woman who became famous when one of her two wealthy lovers murdered the other. In 1873, Mansfield left New York for Paris with Ella Wesner, a male impersonator in Vaudeville. Mansfield and Wesner went to Paris and presided over a salon at the Café Américan. Wesner returned to the United States alone in the spring of 1873.
• Charles, Vicomte de Noailles (1891-1981) and his wife Marie-Laure (1902-1970), heiress of the Bischoffsheim banking fortune, are buried in the Bischoffsheim vault.
• Man Ray (1890–1976), American-born Dada & Surrealist artist and photographer
• Susan Sontag (January 16, 1933– December 28, 2004), American author & philosopher. Sontag lived with “H,” the writer and model Harriet Sohmers Zwerling whom she first met at U. C. Berkeley from 1958 to 1959. Afterwards, Sontag was the partner of María Irene Fornés, a Cuban-American avant garde playwright and director. Upon splitting with Fornes, she was involved with an Italian aristocrat, Carlotta Del Pezzo, and the German academic Eva Kollisch. Sontag was romantically involved with the American artists Jasper Johns and Paul Thek. During the early 1970s, Sontag lived with Nicole Stéphane, a Rothschild banking heiress turned movie actress, and, later, the choreographer Lucinda Childs. She also had a relationship with the writer Joseph Brodsky. With Annie Leibovitz, Sontag maintained a relationship stretching from the later 1980s until her final years.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Died: 1979
People also search for: Marguerite Yourcenar, more
Lived: 549 Prospect Ave, Hartford, CT 06105, USA (41.76378, -72.71623)
Petite Plaisance, 35 S Shore Rd, Northeast Harbor, ME 04662, USA (44.28888, -68.28585)
Studied: Wellesley College
Buried: Brookside Cemetery, Mount Desert, Hancock County, Maine, USA
Buried alongside: Marguerite Yourcenar

Marguerite Yourcenar (born Marguerite Antoinette Jeanne Marie Ghislaine Cleenewerck de Crayencour to Michel Cleenewerck de Crayencour, of French bourgeois descent, and a Belgian mother, Fernande de Cartier de Marchienne, of Belgian nobility) was a Belgian-born French novelist and essayist. In 1939 literary scholar and Kansas City native Grace Frick, invited the writer to the United States to escape the outbreak of World War II in Europe. Frick was a graduate of Wellesley College and did her postgraduate work at Yale. She taught at Stephens College, Columbus, at Barnard College. Yourcenar lectured in comparative literature in New York City and Sarah Lawrence College. Yourcenar was bisexual and she and Frick became lovers in 1937, and would remain so until Frick's death in 1979. After ten years spent in Hartford, they bought a house together in Northeast Harbor on Mount Desert Island, Maine and lived there for decades. They are both buried at Brookside Cemetery, Mount Desert, Maine.
Together from 1937 to 1979: 42 years.
Grace Frick (1903-1979)
Marguerite Yourcenar (June 8, 1903 – December 17, 1987)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Marguerite Yourcenar arrived in Hartford in 1939. WWII was breaking out in Europe, but Yourcenar had chosen life in America with Grace Frick, a Wellesley graduate she had met in Paris in 1934 and fallen in love with “head over heels.” Shortly after Yourcenar arrived in the United States, Frick got a job as academic dean of Hartford Junior College, now Hartford College for Women. They rented a house at 549 Prospect Ave.
Address: 549 Prospect Ave, Hartford, CT 06105, USA (41.76378, -72.71623)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: West End South Historic District (Roughly bounded by Farmington Ave., Whitney and S. Whitney Sts., West Blvd. and Prospect Ave.), 85000763, 1985
Place
Marguerite Yourcenar’s French biographer, Josyane Savigneau, calls Hartford “a rather uninteresting city about a hundred miles from New York.” Yourcenar herself called it “reactionary, chauvinist and Protestant, with a hint of worldliness.” In Savigneau’s book, there are photos of Frick and Yourcenar leaning out of a window of the Prospect Avenue house, “photographs of love, the sort of childish demonstrations of happiness one can’t resist when in the thrall of a passion.” During her decade in Hartford, Yourcenar fell in with one major representative of the avant-garde in town: A. Everett “Chick” Austin Jr., who had turned the Wadsworth Atheneum from a stodgy small-city museum into a cultural movement. Austin was commissioning a theatrical-dance work based on the four elements -- earth, air, fire, water -- and for “Water,” Yourcenar wrote a piece based on Hans Christian Andersen’s story “The Little Mermaid.” “Chick danced in every one,” says Eugene R. Gaddis, the Atheneum’s archivist and Austin’s biographer. Yourcenar blamed herself for suggesting in 1945 that Austin stage the Elizabethan play “Tis Pity She’s a Whore,” “a story of an incestuous young couple, a brother and sister, who brave all sorts of slander to their love.” Reactionary Hartford was not amused, and gave Austin the boot. She wrote the work for which she is best known in America, “Memoirs of Hadrian,” while she lived in Hartford in the 1940s. The novel is in the form of a series of letters from the Roman emperor, on the eve of his death, to his successor. She wrote numerous other novels and short stories, plays and essays, and translated Virginia Woolf, Henry James and African American spirituals into French. Gaddis interviewed Yourcenar at her book-filled home in Maine in 1982, three years after Frick’s death and two years after Yourcenar had become the first woman elected to the French Academy. “Chick Austin was air and fire,” she recalled. She made Gaddis an omelet with vegetables from her kitchen garden and then asked him, in a thick French accent, “Eugene, will you go to the refrigerator and get us a couple of Budweisers?” She died in 1989.
Life
Who: Marguerite Yourcenar (June 8, 1903 – December 17, 1987) and Grace Frick (1903-1979)
Marguerite Yourcenar and Grace Frick lived in Hartford, to be near Grace’s work, first at Hartford Junior College, then at Connecticut College. Soon Yourcenar, too, began teaching, commuting to Sarah Lawrence, just outside New York City, where she gave courses in French and Italian.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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After ten years spent in Hartford, Grace Frick and Marguerite Yourcenar bought a house together in Northeast Harbor on Mount Desert Island, Maine and lived there for decades.
Address: 35 S Shore Rd, Northeast Harbor, ME 04662, USA (44.28888, -68.28585)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone:+1 207-276-3940
Place
You can wander behind the modest house of the late novelist Marguerite Yourcenar, Petite Plaisance, and through the Japanese garden to the little headstone of her dog, inscribed, "A gentle heart in a small body." At the turn of the XX century, Bar Harbor, the onetime fishing village on the eastern coast of Mount Desert Island, was Maine’s premier resort—a glamorous enclave of regal cottages and lavish entertainments for the few and the wealthy. They ran it like a country club until the great fire of 1947 destroyed everything. As the upper crust migrated 10 miles south, to Northeast Harbor and Seal Harbor, what rose from the rubble was a noisy, lively resort on the move. Northeast Harbor is a village on Mount Desert Island, located in the town of Mount Desert in Hancock County, Maine. The village has a significant summer population, and has long been a quiet enclave of the rich and famous. Summer residents include the Rockefeller family, as well as the late Brooke Astor and Barbara Bel Geddes. The village was at a time so popular as a summer resort among Philadelphians that it was sometimes known as "Philadelphia on the rocks.” Northeast Harbor is the home of Morris Yacht Brokerage. The village is home to the Asticou Azalea Garden.
Life
Who: Marguerite Yourcenar (June 8, 1903 – December 17, 1987) and Grace Frick (1903-1979)
Marguerite Yourcenar was a Belgian-born French novelist and essayist. Winner of the Prix Femina and the Erasmus Prize, she was the first woman elected to the Académie française, in 1980, and the seventeenth person to occupy Seat 3. In 1939 Yourcenar’s intimate companion at the time, the literary scholar and Kansas City native Grace Frick, invited the writer to the United States to escape the outbreak of WWII in Europe. Yourcenar lectured in comparative literature in New York City and Sarah Lawrence College. Yourcenar was bisexual; she and Frick became lovers in 1937 and remained together until Frick’s death in 1979. They are buried side by side across the sound in Somesville at Brookside Cemetery (Mt Desert, ME 04660). Yourcenar’s house on Mount Desert Island, Petite Plaisance, is now a museum dedicated to her memory.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lived: 61-63 Petersham Rd, Richmond, Greater London TW10 6UT, UK (51.45518, -0.30333)
Buried: St Mary the Virgin, Mortlake High Street, Across the road from the river, Mortlake, London, SW14 8JA

Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katherine Harris Bradley and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper. As Field, they wrote around 40 works together and a long journal Works and Days. Their intention was to keep the pen name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning. Bradley published first under the pseudonym Arran Leigh, a nod to Elizabeth Barrett. Edith adopted the name Isla Leigh. From the late 1870s, when Edith was at University College, Bristol, they agreed to live together and were, over the next 40 years, lovers and co-authors. They had financial independence: Bradley's father, Charles Bradley, had been in the tobacco industry in Birmingham. They developed a large circle of literary friends; in particular, painters and life partners Charles de Sousy Ricketts and Charles Hazelwood Shannon, near whom they settled in Richmond, London. They also were passionately devoted to their pets, in particular a dog named Whym Chow, for whom they wrote a book of poems named after him. This continued a tradition of lesbian couples forming families that included beloved animals. They wrote each other: “My love and I took hands and swore / against the world to be / Poets and lovers evermore.” –Michael Field, Underneath the Bow (1893)
Together from 1878 to 1913: 35 years.
Edith Emma Cooper (January 12, 1862 - December 13, 1913)
Katherine Harris Bradley (October 27, 1846 - September 26, 1914)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Contemporary dining with carefully crafted dishes in chic riverside spot with alfresco balcony.
Address: 61-63 Petersham Rd, Richmond, Greater London TW10 6UT, UK (51.45518, -0.30333)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 20 8940 0902
Place
In 1899 the death of Edith Emma Cooper’s father enabled her and her aunt, Katherine Harris Bradley, to buy their own house as evidence of their "close marriage,” although Edith saw her father’s death as retribution for their lifestyle. The property, originally built as two Georgian houses in 1740, was described in a rental survey for George III, carried out in 1773 as a “messeuge (a dwelling), court and garden” and a “messuage with stables and coach house.” Lady Ann Bingham, whose sister Lady Lavinia married the first Earl of Spencer, rented the property in 1821, added the room which is currently the Bingham Bar, which links the properties. Katherine Bradley and Edith Cooper, who wrote under the pseudonym Michael Field, lived in the property from 1899-1914. They entertained many literary visitors including W.B. Yeats. The Bingham’s 15 bedrooms are named after their poetry and works. During the XX Century the property fell into disrepair and was bought by the current owners in 1984 undergoing extensive refurbishment from 2006-8. 53 Petersham Road, along with neighbouring associated buildings 55-61 are collectively known as The Paragon, and are all Grade II Listed Georgian-era buildings. No. 55 was at once home of Occultist Aleister Crowley. In 1898, while appearing at the Cambridge Footlights club, Herbert Pollitt (1871-1942), female impersonator under the name of Diane De Rougy, and art collector, met and had an affair with the then unknown Aleister Crowley. Crowley describes his lover: “Pollitt was rather plain than otherwise. His face was made tragic by the terrible hunger of the eyes and the bitter sadness of the mouth. He possessed one physical beauty - his hair. This was very plentiful and he wore it rather long. It was what is called a shock. But its colour was pale gold, like spring sunshine, and its texture was of the finest gossamer.” Crowley would later write that “I lived with Pollitt as his wife for some six months and he made a poet out of me.”
Life
Who: Katharine Harris Bradley (October 27, 1846 –September 26, 1914) and Edith Emma Cooper (January 12, 1862 –December 13, 1913)
Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katharine Harris Bradley and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper. As Field they wrote around 40 works together, and a long journal “Works and Days.” Their intention was to keep the pen-name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning. Bradley’s elder sister, Emma, married James Robert Cooper in 1860, and went to live in Kenilworth, where their daughter, Edith Emma Cooper was born on January 12, 1862. Emma Cooper became an invalid for life after the birth of her second daughter, Amy, and Katharine Bradley, being her sister, stepped in to become the legal guardian of her niece Edith Cooper. From the late 1870s, when Edith was at University College, Bristol, they agreed to live together and were, over the next 40 years, lovers and co-authors. They had financial independence: Bradley’s father Charles Bradley had been in the tobacco industry in Birmingham. They developed a large circle of literary friends and contacts; in particular painters and life partners Charles Ricketts (1866-1931) and Charles Shannon (1863-1937), near whom they settled in Richmond, London. Robert Browning was also a close friend of Edith and Katherine, and they knew and admired Oscar Wilde, whose death they bitterly mourned. They knew many of the aesthetic movement of the 1890s, including Walter Pater, Vernon Lee, J. A. Symonds and also Bernard Berenson. William Rothenstein was a friend. They wrote a number of passionate love poems to each other, and their name Michael Field was their way of declaring their inseparable oneness. Friends referred to them as the Fields, the Michaels or the Michael Fields. They had a range of pet names for each other. They also were passionately devoted to their pets, in particular a dog named Whym Chow, for whom they wrote a book of poems named after him. Edith died of cancer in 1913, as did Katherine less than a year later. They were buried together at St Mary the Virgin (Mortlake High Street, Across the road from the river, Mortlake, London, SW14 8JA). A now-lost marble tomb was erected in 1926. St Mary is a Roman Catholic church in North Worple Way, Mortlake, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. The church building, in Gothic Revival style, was designed by Gilbert Blount, architect to the first Archbishop of Westminster, Nicholas Wiseman, and dates from 1852. In the same cemetery is buried Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), a British explorer, geographer, translator, writer, soldier, orientalist, cartographer, ethnologist, spy, linguist, poet, fencer, and diplomat. He was known for his travels and explorations in Asia, Africa and the Americas, as well as his extensive knowledge of languages and cultures. He wrote numerous books and scholarly articles on a wide range of subjects, including homosexuality. After his death in 1890, his wife Isabel destroyed much of his material, including Burton’s study on homosexuality that was planned to be published with the new translation of Sheikh Nefzawi’s “The Perfumed Garden.” Burton had a lifelong interest in the study of sexual practices. While working in the army of the East India Company, he participated in an undercover investigation of a brothel in Karachi, said to be frequented by British soldiers where the prostitutes were young boys. His report was so detailed that subsequent readers believed Burton had participated in some of the practices described in his writing. Burton lies buried with his wife in a tent-shaped mausoleum. The mausoleum is Grade II* listed.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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