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Boris Evgenievich Kochno or Kokhno was a Russian poet, dancer and librettist. Kochno was born in Moscow, Russia, on 3 January 1904. His father served as a colonel in the hussars.
Born: January 3, 1904, Moscow, Russia
Died: December 8, 1990, Paris, France
Books: Christian Bʹerard, Diaghilev, and the Ballets Russes
Libretti: Mavra
Buried: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France, Plot: Division 16
Buried alongside: Wladimir Augenblick

After Nijinsky, Diaghilev's next discovery was an unknown young actor, Léonide Massine, whom he developed into a great dancer and one of the seminal choreographers of the 20th century. They were together until 1920, when Massine married. Diaghilev successively fell in love with: Boris Kochno, a precocious young poet who eventually became associate director of Ballets Russes; Anton Dolin, a vivacious British dancer; Serge Lifar, a young Russian who traveled to Paris in 1924 determined to seduce Diaghilev and who became the premier danseur of Ballets Russes and, later, the director of the Paris Opera Ballet; and Igor Markevitch, a musical prodigy. Markevitch's first wife was Kyra Nijinska (1913/1914-1998), daughter of Vaslav Nijinsky. She bore him a son, Vaslav (b. 1936), before they divorced.
Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (March 31, 1872 – August 19, 1929)
Leonid Fyodorovich Myasin aka Léonide Massine (August 9, 1896 –March 15, 1979)
Boris Evgenievich Kochno (January 3, 1904 – December 8, 1990)
Sir Anton Dolin (July 27, 1904 –November 25, 1983)
Serge Lifar (April 15, 1905 –December 15, 1986)
Igor Markevitch (July 27, 1912 – March 7, 1983)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Vast tree-lined burial site with famous names including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison & Maria Callas.
Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, France (48.86139, 2.39332)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 8.00-18.00, Saturday 8.30-18.00, Sunday 9.00-18.00
Phone: +33 1 55 25 82 10
Place
Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres), though there are larger cemeteries in the city’s suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery. It is also the site of three WWI memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. Père Lachaise Cemetery was opened on May 21, 1804. The first person buried there was a five-year-old girl named Adélaïde Paillard de Villeneuve, the daughter of a door bell-boy of the Faubourg St. Antoine. Her grave no longer exists as the plot was a temporary concession. Napoleon, who had been proclaimed Emperor by the Senate three days earlier, had declared during the Consulate that "Every citizen has the right to be buried regardless of race or religion.”
Notable queer burials at Père Lachaise:
• Louise Abbéma (1853-1927) was a French painter, sculptor, and designer of the Belle Époque. She first received recognition for her work at age 23 when she painted a portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, her lifelong friend and possibly her lover.
• Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) was a French stage and early film actress.
• Rosa Bonheur (1822-1899), Nathalie Micas (1824-1889) and Anna Elizabeth Klumpke (1856-1942), buried together.
• Colette (Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, 1873-1954) was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. She embarked on a relationship with Mathilde de Morny, Marquise de Belbeuf ("Missy"), with whom she sometimes shared the stage.
• Alphonse Daudet (1840–1897) was a French novelist. He was the husband of Julia Daudet and father of Edmée Daudet, and writers Léon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. Cultivated, “very beautiful, very elegant, a thin and frail young man, with a tender and a somewhat effeminate face”, according to Jean-Yves Tadié, Lucien Daudet lived a fashionable life which made him meet Marcel Proust. They shared at least a friendship (if not a sexual relationship), which was revealed by Jean Lorrain in his chronicle in the Journal. It is for this indiscretion that Proust and Lorrain fought a duel in 1897. Daudet was also friends with Jean Cocteau.
• Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) was an American dancer. Bisexual she had a daughter by theatre designer Gordon Craig, and a son by Paris Singer, one of the many sons of sewing machine magnate Isaac Singer. She had relationships with Eleonara Duse and Mercedes de Acosta. She married the Russian bisexual poet Sergei Yesenin, who was 18 years her junior.
• Joseph Fiévée (1767-1839) was a French journalist, novelist, essayist, playwright, civil servant (haut fonctionnaire) and secret agent. Joseph Fiévée married in 1790 (his brother-in-law was Charles Frédéric Perlet), but his wife died giving birth, leaving him one child. At the end of the 1790s, he met the writer Théodore Leclercq who became his life companion, and the two would live and raise Fiévée’s son together. When becoming Préfet, Fiévée and Leclercq moved to the Nièvre department, and their open relationship greatly shocked some locals. The two men were received together in the salons of the Restoration. Both men are buried in the same tomb at Père Lachaise Cemetery.
• Anne-Louis Girodet (1767-1824) was a French painter and pupil of Jacques-Louis David, who was part of the beginning of the Romantic movement by adding elements of eroticism through his paintings. According to the scholar Diana Knight, over the years Girodet’s homosexuality became widely known.
• Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947) was a Venezuelan, naturalised French, composer, conductor, music critic, diarist, theatre director, and salon singer.
• Harry Graf Kessler (1868-1937) was an Anglo-German count, diplomat, writer, and patron of modern art. In his introduction to “Berlin Lights” (2000) Ian Buruma asserted Kessler was homosexual and struggled his whole life to conceal it.
• Boris Yevgen'yevich Kochno (1904-1990), was hired as the personal secretary to Serge Diaghilev, the impresario of the famed Ballets Russes. He served in this capacity until Diaghilev's death in 1929. In addition to his other duties, he also wrote several ballet libretti for the troupe. He died in 1990 in Paris following a fall. He was buried next to Wladimir Augenblick who died in 2001.
• Mathilde (Missy) de Morny (1863-1944), a French noblewoman, artist and transgender figure, she became a lover of several women in Paris, including Liane de Pougy and Colette.
• Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel “À la recherche du temps perdu” (In Search of Lost Time), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. Also his friend and sometime lover, Reynaldo Hahn is buried here.
• Mlle Raucourt (1756-1815) was a French actress.
• Oscar Wilde’s tomb in Père Lachaise was designed by sculptor Sir Jacob Epstein, at the request of Robert Ross (1869-1918), who also asked for a small compartment to be made for his own ashes. Ross's ashes were transferred to the tomb in 1950.
• Salomon James de Rothschild (1835–1864) was a French banker and socialite. He was the father of Baroness Hélène van Zuylen.
• Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) wrote and published some of his most important work between 1900 and 1914, and then from 1920 to 1921 traveled around the world. He continued to write for the next decade, but when his fortune finally gave out, he made his way to a hotel in Palermo, Grand Hotel Et Des Palmes (Via Roma, 398, 90139 Palermo), where he died of a barbiturate overdose in 1933, aged 56.
• Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas,” written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas (1877-1967) was an American-born member of the Parisian avant-garde of the early XX century. They are buried together.
• Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Russian-born surrealist painter. Loved by Edith Sitwell, he then in turn fell in love with Charles Henry Ford and moved with him in New York City.
• Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. The modernist angel depicted as a relief on the tomb was originally complete with male genitals. They were broken off as obscene and kept as a paperweight by a succession of Père Lachaise Cemetery keepers. Their current whereabouts are unknown. In the summer of 2000, intermedia artist Leon Johnson performed a 40 minute ceremony entitled Re-membering Wilde in which a commissioned silver prosthesis was installed to replace the vandalised genitals.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Henry Symes "Harry" Lehr was an American socialite during the Gilded Age.
Born: March 28, 1869, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Died: January 3, 1929, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Spouse: Elizabeth Wharton Drexel (m. 1901)
Parents: Robert Oliver Lehr
Lived: Hôtel de Canvoie, 52 Rue des Saints-Pères, 75007 Paris, France (48.85411, 2.3297)
Buried: Green Mount Cemetery

Henry “Harry” Symes Lehr was a socialite and the husband of Elizabeth Wharton Drexel. He was the son of Robert Oliver Lehr, a tobacco and snuff importer who became the German consul in Baltimore. Harry was a social climber who duped his wife into a lavender marriage and refused to sleep with her on their wedding night. She stayed in a loveless, unconsummated marriage for 28 years, not wishing to upset her conservative, staunchly Catholic mother, née Lucy Wharton. Her father was Joseph William Drexel, the son of Francis Martin Drexel, the immigrant ancestor of the Drexel banking family in the United States. She married John Vinton Dahlgren I; Dahlgren died on August 11, 1899, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where he had gone in hopes of recovering from an illness. She married Henry Symes Lehr in June 1901. In 1915, the Lehrs were in Paris, and Elizabeth worked for the Red Cross. They remained in Paris after World War I, where they bought in 1923 the Hôtel de Canvoie at 52, rue des Saints-Pères in the VIIe arrondissement. Harry Lehr died on January 3, 1929, of a brain tumor in Baltimore. On May 25, 1936, she married John Beresford, 5th Baron Decies. His first wife had been Helen Vivien Gould. He died on January 31, 1944. She died in June 13, 1944, at the Hotel Shelton.
Together from 1901 to 1929: 28 years.
Elizabeth Wharton Drexel (April 22, 1868 – June 13, 1944)
Henry Symes Lehr (March 28, 1869 – January 3, 1929)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The full-length portrait of Mrs. Harry (Elizabeth Drexel) Lehr was executed in Paris in 1905 by the artist Giovanni Boldini. It now hangs inside The Elms (367 Bellevue Ave, Newport, RI 02840). Born Elizabeth Wharton Drexel, she was the daughter of Joseph William Drexel, partner of J. Pierpont Morgan, and Lucy Smith Wharton. She married Joseph Vinton Dahlgren in 1889 and following his death, married Harry Symes Lehr in 1901. In her autobiography “King Lehr and the Gilded Age” (1935), Mrs. Lehr describes how her new husband revealed on their wedding night that theirs was to be a marriage in name only, and that he was only interested in her money. Harry Lehr was said to have had a long intimate relationship with Charles Greenough, unknown to Elizabeth, and later to the woman Greenough married. After Lehr’s death, Elizabeth married John Beresford, 5th Baron Decies in 1936. Her sister Lucy married Elizabeth's first husband's brother and after her divorce was known as Mrs. Drexel Dahlgren, builder of Champs Soleil (601 Bellevue Ave, Newport, RI 02840).



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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52, rue des Saints-Peres, before Bernard Tapie, had illustrious tenants.
Address: 52 Rue des Saints-Pères, 75007 Paris, France (48.85411, 2.3297)
Type: Private Property
Place
The hotel had several owners, all noble, earls or marquises, until 1923, when the earl of Beaufort sold it to Lady Lehr (two interlaced L on the porch testify it), wealthy American who began to restore it. Currently private home of Bernard Tapie, also known as Hôtel de Canvoie, was auctioned in Dec. 15, 1994, with a starting price of 70 million francs. The general distribution of the plan shows what could be the design of a wealthy Parisian home in the middle of the XVII century. This element was rarely preserved, in most cases changed over the centuries. Purchased for more than 100 million in 1986, facades, roofs, gates, staircase and some parts are classified in Inventory of Historic Monuments since 1949. Acquired in 1981 by Hubert de Givenchy for 26.5 million francs, the hotel was bought by the company Financière et Immobilière Bernard Tapie for over 100 million in 1986. The hotel had since 1640, date of its construction, many residents; the first was Jean-Hugo de Groot, also known as "Grotius,” Dutch diplomat expelled from his country for his liberal views and refugee in France. In 1661, Marie-Sidonia Lénoncourt, wife of the Marquis de Courcelles, inherited it. The woman is known to have been the mistress of Louvois de Cavoye and many others. Convicted of adultery in 1669, she was free again in 1680, after eleven years of trial. On 18 July, 1679, Marie-Sidonia sold the hotel to Louis d’Oger, Marquis of Cavoye, grand maréchal des logis. Louis d’Oger was raised with Louis XIV. Very nice man, his success with women earned him a duel with the husband of Marie-Sidonia and two years’ imprisonment at the Conciergerie. The hotel was the center of a selected company, including Racine and Boileau. D’Oger engaged Mansart et Lepautre, the architect of the Duke of Orleans, to embellish it and died there in 1716. A commission for historical preservation in Paris, in 1927, described it: "The facades were cleaned and consolidated, reconstituted western pediment, the old Louis XIV staircase repaired, the French garden retraced (...) Magnificent Louis XV woodwork decorates the great hall on the ground floor. Charming, Louis XVI wood paneling and a precious pink marble fireplace restored (...) a boudoir of the former hotel Crillon (...) If spirits of the Marquis de Cavoye and Marquise de Courcelles could return, they would find it much more beautiful than they have ever known." The hotel de Cavoye remains remarkable today for its sobriety and its distribution. On the ground floor, the small and large lounges; in the vestibule, the staircase that leads to the state apartments. The workroom has retained its Regency woodwork. The rooms on the garden, are decorated in style Louis XV and Louis XVI. To the left of the stairs opens a library with gallery and, after it, a small Restoration boudoir.
Life
Who: Elizabeth Wharton "Bessie" Drexel (April 22, 1868 – June 13, 1944)
Elizabeth Wharton Drexel was an American author and Manhattan socialite. She is the lady with the orange dress in a famous 1905 portrait by Giovanni Boldini. On June 29, 1889, Elizabeth married John Vinton Dahlgren I (1869–1899), the son of Admiral John Adolph Dahlgren (1809–1870.) Dahlgren died Aug. 11, 1899, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where he had gone in hopes of recovering from an illness. Elizabeth married Henry Symes Lehr (1869–1929), aka Harry Lehr in June 1901. Symes Lehr was homosexual and the marriage was never consummated. In 1915 the Lehrs were in Paris, and Elizabeth worked for the Red Cross. They remained in Paris after WWI, where they bought in 1923 the Hôtel de Canvoie at 52, rue des Saints-Pères in the 7th arrondissement. Harry Lehr died on January 3, 1929 of a brain malady in Baltimore. On May 25, 1936 she married John Beresford, 5th Baron Decies. His first wife had been Helen Vivien Gould. He died on January 31, 1944. She died in 1944 at the Hotel Shelton. She was buried in the Dahlgren Chapel at Georgetown University, which she and her first husband had built as a memorial to their son, Joseph Drexel Dahlgren, who died in infancy. As with her prior book “King Lehr and the Gilded Age” (1935), Lady Decies’ “Turn of the World” (1937) is a fascinating semi-autobiographical history of American high society during the Gay Nineties through WWI. Upon the book’s publication, The Pittsburgh Press wrote, "The magnificent spectacle that went on behind the scenes in pre-war days of society’s Gilded Age at Saratoga, Newport, New York and Paris is detailed by an insider, Elizabeth, Lady Decies, who was Miss Elizabeth Wharton Drexel interesting, amusing and sometimes revolting, as with evident nostalgia she tells of extravagant parties and fortunes spent for clothes and jewels."



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Green Mount Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland. Established on March 15, 1838, and dedicated on July 13, 1839, it is noted for the large number of historical figures interred in its grounds as well as a large number of prominent Baltimore-area families. It retained the name Green Mount when the land was purchased from the heirs of Baltimore merchant Robert Oliver.
Address: 1501 Greenmount Ave, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA (39.30922, -76.60588)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 410-539-0641
National Register of Historic Places: 80001786, 1980
Place
Green Mount is a treasury of precious works of art, including striking works by major sculptors including William H. Rinehart and Hans Schuler. Nearly 65,000 people are buried here, including the poet Sydney Lanier, philanthropists Johns Hopkins and Enoch Pratt, Napoleon Bonaparte's sister-in-law Betsy Patterson, John Wilkes Booth, and numerous military, political and business leaders. In addition to John Wilkes Booth, two other conspirators in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln are buried here, Samuel Arnold and Michael O'Laughlen. It is common for visitors to the cemetery to leave pennies on the graves of the three men; the one-cent coin features the likeness of the president they successfully sought to murder. Until a 1965 agreement with Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor had planned for a burial in a purchased plot in Rose Circle at Green Mount Cemetery, near where the father of the Duchess was interred. The 1965 agreement allowed for the former King Edward VIII and wife, the Duchess of Windsor, to be buried near other members of the royal family in the Royal Burial Ground near Windsor Castle.
Notable queer burials at Green Mount Cemetery:
• Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), American suffragist and philanthropist. At her death, she gave $15,000,000 to M. Carey Thomas, the president of Bryn Mawr College, with whom she was romantically involved and had lived with at Bryn Mawr in the Deanery.
• Mamie Gwinn (1860-1940). In 1885 M. Carey Thomas, together with Mary Garrett, Mamie Gwinn, Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. For many years Thomas maintained an intimate relationship with long-time friend, Mamie Gwinn. Thomas and Gwinn lived together at Bryn Mawr College in a small cottage that came to be known as "the Deanery". When Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein's “Fernhurst”) Alfred Hodder, a fellow Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, Thomas pursued a relationship with Mary Elizabeth Garrett.
• Harry Lehr (1869-1929), American socialite during the Gilded Age. He was known for staging elaborate parties alongside Marion "Mamie" Fish, such as the so-called "dog's dinner", in which 100 pets of wealthy friends dined at foot-high tables while dressed in formal attire At a later party, he impersonated the Czar of Russia, and was henceforth dubbed "King Lehr". He was married to heiress Elizabeth "Bessie" Wharton Drexel. He refused to sleep with her on their wedding night.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Born: September 11, 1916, Rochester, New York, United States
Died: January 3, 2000, Victoria, Canada
People also search for: Jane Rule, Arthur Richards Rule, Carlotta Jane
Buried: Galiano Island Cemetery, Galiano Island, BC V0N 1P0, Canada (48.92364, -123.44147)
Buried alongside: Jane Rule

Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction. Rule studied at Mills College in California. She graduated in 1952, moved to England for a short while and entered in a relationship with critic John Hulcoop. She taught at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she met Helen Sonthoff and fell in love with her. Rule moved with Hulcoop to work at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver in 1956, but Sonthoff visited her and they began to live together until Sonthoff's death in 2000. Rule died in 2007 at her home on Galiano Island due to complications from liver cancer, refusing any treatment that would take her from the island, opting instead for the care and support that could be provided by her niece, her partner, her many Galiano friends and neighbors. The ashes of Jane Vance Rule were interred in the Galiano Island Cemetery next to those of her beloved Helen. In 1964, Rule published Desert of the Heart: the novel featured two women who fall in love with each other; Donna Deitch (1985) later made it into a movie, which quickly became a lesbian classic.
Together from 1954 to 2000: 46 years.
Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff (September 11, 1916 - January 3, 2000)
Jane Vance Rule (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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Jane Rule died at the age of 76 on November 27, 2007 at her home on Galiano Island due to complications from liver cancer, refusing any treatment that would take her from the island, opting instead for the care and support that could be provided by her niece, her partner, her many Galiano friends and neighbours. The ashes of Jane Vance Rule were interred in the Galiano Island Cemetery next to those of her beloved Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff.
Address: Galiano Island, BC V0N 1P0, Canada (48.92364, -123.44147)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Place
Unobviously located near the Mt. Galiano trailhead at the island’s south end, the atmospheric graveyard is set in a pretty waterfront wood overlooking Georgeson Bay, where seals lollop about in the shallows of Collinson Reef. It’s a serene location, where the silence is broken only by unobtrusive wind chimes, rustling branches or the occasional seal bark. The graves here differ greatly, from simple burial mounds marked by humble homemade tributes to the more traditional and decorative, many bearing personal effects laid down by family and friends. Like any cemetery it offers an intimate, moving and fascinating look into the past of the community it serves, so should be considered a must-see.
Life
Who: Jane Vance Rule, CM, OBC (March 28, 1931 – November 27, 2007) and Helen Hubbard Wolfe Sonthoff (September 11, 1916 – January 3, 2000)
Jane Rule was a Canadian writer of lesbian-themed novels and non-fiction. Rule studied at Mills College in California. She graduated in 1952, moved to England for a short while and entered in a relationship with critic John Hulcoop. She taught at Concord Academy in Massachusetts where she met Helen Sonthoff and fell in love with her. Rule moved with Hulcoop to work at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1956, but Sonthoff visited her and they began to live together. Rule and Sonthoff lived together until Sonthoff’s death in 2000. Rule surprised some in the gay community by declaring herself against gay marriage, writing, "To be forced back into the heterosexual cage of coupledom is not a step forward but a step back into state-imposed definitions of relationship. With all that we have learned, we should be helping our heterosexual brothers and sisters out of their state-defined prisons, not volunteering to join them there."



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Elizabeth Palmer Peabody was an American educator who opened the first English-language kindergarten in the United States.
Born: May 16, 1804, Billerica, Massachusetts, United States
Died: January 3, 1894, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Parents: Nathaniel Peabody
Siblings: Sophia Hawthorne, Mary Tyler Peabody Mann
Nephew: Julian Hawthorne
Lived: 15 West St, Boston, MA 02111
Buried: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA

Elizabeth Peabody (1804-1894) was known for starting the first English language kindergarten and was an early advocate for play-based education. What many don’t realize is that she helped stoke the fire of women’s and LGBT rights, simply by opening up her parlor (15 West St, Boston, MA 02111). At a time when people shunned alternative political views, Peabody allowed people who were then social radicals to meet in her home—including Margaret Fuller, author of “Women of the Nineteenth Century,” a book that supported same-sex relationships.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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At Sleepy Hollow Cemetery (34 Bedford St, Concord, MA 0174) is buried Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of the “Vanity Fair”, who is rumoured to have been the unrequited love of Herman Melville. Also his sister-in-law, Elizabeth Peabody (1804-1894), education reformer, is buried here.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Dorothy Arzner, born Dorothy Emma Arzner, was an American film director whose career in feature films spanned from the silent era of the late 1920s into the early 1940s.
Born: January 3, 1897, San Francisco, California, United States
Died: October 1, 1979, La Quinta, California, United States
Education: University of Southern California
Lived: 2249 Mountain Oak Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.11136, -118.30977)

Dorothy Arzner was an American film director. Her directorial career in feature films spanned from the late 1920s into the early 1940s. Throughout that time, she was the only woman working in the field. She lived much of her life with her companion, choreographer Marion Morgan. They met in 1927 on the set of Fashions for Women, Azner the director, Morgan hired to choreograph the film tableaus. The Arzner-Morgan House was built in 1930 by architect W.C. Tanner for Arzner and Morgan. The home is about 3600 square feet and features three bedrooms and three bathrooms and beautifully terraced gardens designed by famed landscape duo Florence Yoch and Lucile Council (partners as well). Arzner and Morgan lived there together for more than 40 years, until Miss Morgan died in 1971. Arzner died aged 82, in La Quinta, California. R.M. Vaughan's 2000 play, Camera, Woman depicts the last days of Arzner's career. According to the play, Harry Cohn fired her over a kiss scene between Merle Oberon and fictitious actress Rose Lindstrom.
Together from 1927 to 1971: 44 years.
Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979)
Marion Morgan (January 4, 1881 – November 10, 1971)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Ona Munson was an American actress perhaps best known for her portrayal of prostitute Belle Watling in Gone with the Wind (1939). When David O. Selznick was casting his production Gone with the Wind, he first announced that Mae West was to play Belle, but this was a publicity stunt. Tallulah Bankhead refused the role as too small. Munson herself was the antithesis of the voluptuous Belle: freckled and of slight build. Munson’s career was stalemated by the acclaim of Gone with the Wind; for the remainder of her career, she was typecast in similar roles. Two years later, she played a huge role as another madam, albeit a Chinese one, in Josef von Sternberg's film noir The Shanghai Gesture. Her last film was The Red House, released in 1947. She was married three times, to actor and director Edward Buzzell in 1926, to Stewart McDonald in 1941, and designer Eugene Berman in 1949. These have been termed "lavender" marriages, in that they were intended to conceal her bisexuality and her affairs with women, including filmmaker Dorothy Arzner and playwright Mercedes de Acosta. Munson has been listed as a member of a group called the "Sewing circle", a clique of lesbians organized by actress Alla Nazimova. In 1955, plagued by ill health, she committed suicide at the age of 51 with an overdose of barbiturates in her apartment in New York. A note found next to her deathbed read, "This is the only way I know to be free again...Please don't follow me.“
Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979)
Ona Munson (June 16, 1903 – February 11, 1955)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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A Greek temple villa designed for film director Dorothy Arzner and her lifelong companion, dancer-choreographer Marion Morgan. The original gardens were designed by the distinguished Southern Californa lanscape architect Florence Yoch, with "elaborate horticultural layouts" i.e. hanging gardens. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, the residence was last on the market in 2012 for $3,495,000.
Address: 2249 Mountain Oak Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90068, USA (34.11136, -118.30977)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1930, Design by W. C. Tanner
For over twenty years, this Greek Revival-style residence in Los Feliz was home to Dorothy Arzner, a pioneering film director and one of the most prominent lesbians working in Hollywood before WWII. Arzner was very open about her sexuality and was infamous for pursuing and having affairs with the actresses in her films. She was one of the most successful and well-known openly queer women in Hollywood of her time. For the last forty years of her life, Arzner lived with her partner, modern dance choreographer Marion Morgan. The couple resided in the Los Feliz home from 1930 to 1951. Arzner passed away in 1979. The building was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) in 1986.
Life
Who: Dorothy Arzner (January 3, 1897 – October 1, 1979) and Marion Morgan (1881–1971)
In 1919, Dorothy Arzner enrolled at the University of Southern California as a medical student. She served as an ambulance driver during WWI. Her career path changed when she was hired by William de Mille as a typist in the Paramount Pictures script department. Arzner eventually rose through the ranks to become a highly regarded editor, yet her career stalled in the late 1920s. In 1927, she leveraged an employment offer from Harry Cohn at Columbia Pictures, threatening B. P. Shulberg (then head of Paramount) to leave the studio if he didn’t let her direct. She remained with Paramount until 1932. In 1936, Arzner became the first woman to join the Directors Guild of America. Over the course of her career, she directed popular films such as “First Comes Courage”; “Dance, Girl, Dance”; “The Bride Wore Red”; and “Honor Among Lovers.” Her films often featured strong feminist and lesbian undertones and themes. She is credited for launching the careers of actresses including Lucille Ball, Katharine Hepburn, and Rosalind Russell. In 1943, she stopped working on feature-length films and began directing television and military training films. She also became a professor at UCLA’s film school, where her graduate students included well-known directors such as Francis Ford Coppola.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Constance Spry was a famous British educator, florist and author in the mid-20th century.
Born: December 5, 1886, Derby, United Kingdom
Died: January 3, 1960, Cranbourne, Berkshire, United Kingdom
Books: The Constance Spry Cookery Book, Flower Decoration, more
People also search for: Rosemary Hume, Harold Piercy, Anthony Marr, Edward V of England
Lived: 64 South Audley Street, Mayfair, W1K
Winkfield Ln, Winkfield, Windsor SL4, UK (51.45266, -0.69276)

English painter Peter Gluck, portrayed by Romaine Brooks in Peter, A Young English Girl, in 1923 or 24, was born as Hannah Gluckstein to a wealthy and close-knit Jewish family. In 1944, Gluck moved to Chantry House in Steyning, Sussex, living with lover Edith Shackleton Heald until her death. Edith, dramatic critic and leader writer on the Evening Standard and book reviewer, had been W.B. Yeats’s close friend and possible lover. Gluck was the child of Joseph Gluckstein, whose brothers Isidore and Montague had founded J. Lyons and Co., a British coffee house and catering empire. Gluck's American-born mother, Francesca Halle, was an opera singer. One of Gluck's best-known paintings, Medallion, is a dual portrait of Gluck and Gluck's lover Nesta Obermer, inspired by a night in 1936 when they attended a Fritz Busch production of Mozart's Don Giovanni. According to Gluck's biographer Diana Souhami, "They sat in the third row and she felt the intensity of the music fused them into one person and matched their love." Gluck referred to it as the "YouWe" picture. Gluck also had a romantic relationship with the British floral designer Constance Spry (December 5, 1886 – January 3, 1960), whose work informed the artist's paintings.
Together from 1944 to 1976: 32 years.
Constance Spry (December 5, 1886 – January 3, 1960)
Hannah Glukstein aka Peter Gluck (August 13, 1895 – January 10, 1978)
Edith Shackleton Heald (died November 5, 1976)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 64 South Audley Street, Mayfair, W1K Constance Spry (1886-1960), “Designer in Flowers worked here 1934-1960.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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In 1946, Constance Spry opened a domestic science school with her friend, the accomplished cook Rosemary Hume, at Winkfield Place, at Cranbourne in Winkfield, Berkshire. Constance lived at Orchard Lea, across the road, and then over the stable block at the Place.
Address: Winkfield Ln, Winkfield, Windsor SL4, UK (51.45266, -0.69276)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 489489 (Grade II, 1972)
Place
The basis of Winkfield Place, at Winkfield Street, is probably late XVII century. In the first half of the following century, it was the home of the Edwards family who where closely involved with the running of the Ranelagh School. In 1751, however, the building was almost entirely rebuilt by the then owner, Richard Buckley. There were various gentlemanly owners throughout the Victorian era. During the WWII, the house was used by the Canadian Red Cross and then became the college of Constance Spry of “Cordon Bleu'” cookery and flower-arranging fame. The flowers for Queen Elizabeth II's wedding were arranged by Winkfield Place staff; but the establishment moved out to Farnham (Surrey) in 1989. Winkfield Place has been divided into Private Apartments. It can however, be easily seen from the entrance. Large country house. Late XVIII century, altered and extended mid and late XIX century, altered XX century. Painted render, hipped and gabled slate roofs. Rectangular plan with extensions and service wing on north-west. Part 3 storeys, part 2 storeys with attics. Entrance front, south-east, symmetrical. First build on left of 5-bays. 3 storeys with plinth, moulded string at first and second floor sills, moulded cornice and plain parapet. Centre ridge chimney with corniced head and clay pots. Sash windows with glazing bars and moulded architraves. 6-panel entrance door under prostyle Tuscan porch with plain frieze and pediment. To right of this and set back, 2 later builds. First of 2 storeys and attics, with plain parapet and 4-bays of sash windows with glazing bars. Second build, slightly set back from first of 2 storeys and 4-bays of sash windows without glazing bars. 2 large ridge chimneys with corniced heads and clay pots on first section, and rectangular chimney with similar heads and pots, projecting from front wall, at right hand end.
Note: Lovel Dene (Woodside Rd, Winkfield, Windsor SL4 2DP, UK) is the weekend retreat of Norman Hartnell (1901–1979), the leading British fashion designer, best known for his work for the ladies of the Royal Family. Lovel Dene, a Queen Anne cottage in Windsor Forest, Berkshire, was extensively re-modelled for him by architect Gerald Lacoste (1909–1983).
Life
Who: Constance Spry (December 5, 1886 –January 3, 1960)
Constance Spry was a famous British educator, florist and author in the mid-XX century. According to the biographer Diana Souhami, the lesbian painter Gluck had a romantic relationship with Spry, whose work informed the artist's admired floral paintings. At Winkfield Place, Spry devoted years to the cultivation of particular varieties of antique roses, which she was instrumental in bringing back into fashion; David Austin's first rose introduction, in 1961, was named after her and is considered to be foundation of his "English rose" series. In 1956, she and Hume published the best-selling “Constance Spry Cookery Book,” thereby extending the Spry style from flowers to food. On January 3, 1960, she slipped on the stairs at Winkfield Place and died an hour later. Her last words were supposedly, "Someone else can arrange this". Spry's books remained in print for many years after her death and her floristry business thrived. An exhibition entitled “Constance Spry: A millionaire for a few pence” at the Design Museum, London, in 2004, was controversial in many quarters and resulted in the resignation of the museum's chairman, inventor James Dyson, who considered the show unworthy.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Lived: Germaine Tailleferre’s Villa, 06130 Grasse, France (43.66015, 6.92649)
Buried: Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Buried alongside: Robert Fizdale

Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale were an American two-piano ensemble. Gold and Fizdale met during their student years at the Juilliard School. In 1944, the pianists formed a duo that survived until their retirement in 1982, based around their common interests of music, travel and cooking. It has often been said that Gold and Fizdale revolutionized the art of performing as a two-piano duo. They did commission and première many of the most important works for two-piano ensemble in the second half of the 20th century, including works by John Cage (A Book of Music (1944) which is one of Cage's earliest experiments in using the prepared Piano), Paul Bowles, Virgil Thomson, Ned Rorem and many other important American Composers. They were fixtures in New York's artistic community, being friends with literary and cultural figures such as Truman Capote, James Schuyler, George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, among others. In 1984 they published The Gold and Fizdale Cookbook, which is dedicated to their friend George Balanchine, "In whose kitchen we spent many happy hours...“ They are buried together at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor, New York.
Together from (before) 1944 to 1990: 46 years.
Arthur Gold (February 6, 1917 – January 3, 1990)
Robert Fizdale (April 12, 1920 – December 6, 1995)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Historic Villa with sea views in Grasse, French Riviera, France, for sale for €2,490,000
Address: 06130 Grasse, France (43.66015, 6.92649)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in the late XIX century
A beautiful property set in the hills of the French Riviera overlooking the Mediterranean coastline with views over the entire bay of Cannes and eastwards over the countryside. The villa was home to one of America's most famous painters, the impressionist Mary Cassat, from Pennsylvania. She called this historic Belle Epoque villa home in the early part of the 1900's and hosted some of the world's most renowned artists of the time including Edgar Degas and Pierre-Auguste Renoir. After Cassat's tenure as owner, the villa was purchased by the famous composer and harpist Germaine Tailleferre and the property was known to be frequented and also used as a performing venue by her group "Les Six" of which she was the only female member. Prior to these two famous artists ownership, the villa was home to one of Grasse's perfume producers. Today the villa stands in all of its former and present glory having been renovated and continuously lived in throughout the years. The grounds around the home total 3,000 m2 and the homes interior of 320 m2 includes 5 bedrooms on the upper floors with a main living floor including, grand entrance hall, living room, lounge, dining room, kitchen, morning room, office, gym, "morrocan style" courtyard and below a full basement. Outdoors there is a sizeable swimming pool compete with fully equipped pool house inclusive of covered lounge/dining, summer kitchen and bathroom. The garden itself is lush and mature with local flower and fauna and provides various points for outdoor leisure. In the north eastern corner of the garden is a studio style open space cottage ready to be kitted out and connected to electrics and plumbing.
Life
Who: Arthur Gold (February 6, 1917 – January 3, 1990) and Robert Fizdale (April 12, 1920 – December 6, 1995.)
Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale were an American two-piano ensemble; they were also authors and television cooking show hosts. Gold and Fizdale met during their student years at the Juilliard School. In 1944, they formed a lifelong gay partnership based around their common interests of music (forming one of the most important piano duos of the XX century), travel and cooking. They were fixtures in New York's artistic community, being friends with literary and cultural figures such as Truman Capote, James Schuyler, George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, among others. In 1948, they were one of the wave of American artists, musicians and writers who took advantage of the first possibility since the end of WWII to freely travel in Europe. "The Boys,” as they were called by their friends, arrived in Paris with a letter of introduction from Marcelle de Manziarly to Germaine Tailleferre of “Les six” who invited them to a lunch with Francis Poulenc and Georges Auric. This lunch ended with Auric and Tailleferre taking the score of Thomson's "The Mother of Us All,” which Thomson had given as a gift, turning it upside down on the piano and having Poulenc singing all of the roles (including Susan B. Anthony) in nonsense English syllables which were supposedly an imitation of Gertrude Stein's Libretto while Tailleferre and Auric improvised a four-hands version of Thomson's score. After this memorable day, Tailleferre invited the couple to her home in Grasse to spend two months while she was writing her ballet Paris-Magie and her opera “Il était Un Petit Navire.” She wrote two-piano versions of both works and gave them to the duo as a gift. These manuscripts were later donated to the Library of Congress after the death of Robert Fizdale. Tailleferre later dedicated two other works to Gold and Fizdale: her “Toccata for Two Pianos” and her “Sonata for Two Pianos.” Francis Poulenc also wrote his own “Sonata for Two Pianos” for "the Boyz" (as he called them), a commission which was paid by their mutual friend the American Soprano and arts patron Alice Swanson Esty, according to Poulenc's correspondence. The duo also recorded a number of recordings featuring works by “Les six,” Vittorio Rieti, and other composers, as well as a series of Concerto recordings with Leonard Bernstein and The New York Philharmonic, including the Poulenc Concerto for Two Pianos, The Mozart Two Piano Concerto and Saint-Saëns's "Carnival of the Animals.”Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale are buried together at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor, New York.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale are buried together at Oakland Cemetery, Sag Harbor.
Address: 62-298 Suffolk St, Sag Harbor, NY 11963, USA (40.99239, -72.29374)
Type: Cemetery (open to publich)
National Register of Historic Places: Sag Harbor Village District (Roughly bounded by Sag Harbor, Rysam, Hamilton, Marsden, Main and Long Island Ave.), 73001274, 1973 & (Roughly bounded by Sag Harbor, Bay, Eastville, Grand, Joel'sLn., Middle Line Hwy., Main, Glover and Long Island), 94000400, 1994
Place
Oakland Cemetery is a public, not-for-profit cemetery located in the village Sag Harbor, New York. It was founded in 1840 and currently sits on 26 acres bounded by Jermain Ave to the north, Suffolk St to the east, and Joels Ln to the west. It is the permanent resting place of over 4,000 people, including more XVIII and XIX century sea captains than in any other Long Island cemetery. It was incorporated in 1884. Prior to the opening of Oakland Cemetery in 1840, Sag Harbor’s most notable cemetery was the Old Burial Ground, opened in 1767 on the corner of Union and Madison Streets next to the First Presbyterian Church. At total of 17 veterans of the American Revolution and one representative to the New York Provincial Congress of 1775 are buried there. Unfortunately, years of neglect left the Old Burial Ground in a state of disrepair. In 1840 Oakland Cemetery was founded, covering just 4 acres, enclosed with stone posts and chestnut pickets. One hundred thirty nine graves from the Old Burial Ground were moved to Oakland Cemetery, including Ebenezer Sage and Captain David Hand and his five wives. During the mid-1800’s, in the center of the property which is now Oakland Cemetery, sat of a group of buildings known as Oakland Works. John Sherry had them built in 1850 to house his brass foundry. He soon took on a partner, Ephraim N. Byram, a clock maker and astronomer who was later buried in the cemetery. They enlarged the building to make room for Byram’s clock manufactory and named the place the Oakland Brass Foundry and Clock Works. The business was in operation for 12 years. In 1863 the building was leased to Abraham DeBevoise and B. & F. Lyon for use as a stocking factory. In 1865 a second building and another bleach house were added to the property. This business closed after three years. Over the next ten years two other industries occupied the Oakland Works. First, a barrel-head and stave factory owned by George Bush; then, a Morrocco leather business owned by Morgan Topping. Both proved unsuccessful. A final attempt to operate a business on the site was made in 1880 when Edward Chapman Rogers opened the Oakland Hat Manufactory. This venture also failed. In 1882, unoccupied for almost two years, the old wooden structures caught fire and burned to the ground. The site was purchased by Joseph Fahys and Stephen French and donated to the cemetery. In September, 1884 the Oakland Cemetery Association purchased the remaining Oakland Works property for $400, adding a third section and extending the cemetery east to its present boundary at Suffolk St for a total of ten acres. In October, 1903 the Ladies Village Improvement Society unveiled a new memorial gate. The Broken Mast Monument in Oakland Cemetery, sculpted by Robert Eberhard Launitz, commemorates those "Who periled their lives in a daring profession and perished in actual encounter with the monsters of the deep."
Notable queer burials at Oakland Cemetery:
• George Balanchine (1904-1983), ballet choreographer and co-founder of the New York City Ballet.
• Arthur Gold (February 6, 1917 – January 3, 1990) and Robert Fizdale (April 12, 1920 –December 6, 1995) were a two-piano ensemble; they were also authors and television cooking show hosts. Gold and Fizdale met during their student years at the Juilliard School. They formed a lifelong gay partnership and shared interests in music (forming one of the most important piano duos of the XX century), travel, and cooking. Works written for Gold and Fizdale: Paul Bowles, "Concerto for Two Pianos” (1946–47), "Sonata for Two Pianos” (1947), "Night Waltz for Two Pianos” (1949), "A Picnic Cantata for Two Pianos” (1953); John Cage, "A Book of Music for Two Pianos”; Francis Poulenc, “L’embarquement pour Cythère” (1951), “Sonate for Two Pianos” (1952-53), “Elegy for Two Pianos” (1959); Germaine Tailleferre, “Il était un Petit Navire Suite for Two Pianos,” “Paris-Magie version for Two Pianos,” “Toccata for Two Pianos,” “Sonata for Two Pianos”; Samuel Barber, “Souvenirs,” Op. 28.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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