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Anne Tracy Morgan was an American philanthropist who provided relief efforts in aid to France during and after World War I and World War II. Morgan was educated privately, traveled frequently and grew up amongst the wealth her father had amassed.
Born: July 25, 1873, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Died: January 29, 1952, Mount Kisco, New York, United States
Lived: 3 Sutton Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75738, -73.96029)
Château de Blérancourt, 33 Place du Général Leclerc, 02300 Blérancourt, France (49.51772, 3.15378)
The Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Avenue at East 36th Street
Buried: Cedar Hill Cemetery, Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA
Parents: J. P. Morgan
Siblings: J. P. Morgan Jr.
Grandparents: Junius Spencer Morgan, Juliet Pierpont
Nephews: Henry Sturgis Morgan, Junius Spencer Morgan III

Anne Morgan was an American philanthropist, daughter of John Pierpont Morgan. In 1903, she became part owner of the Villa Trianon near Versailles, France, along with decorator and socialite Elsie de Wolfe and theatrical/literary agent Bessie Marbury. Morgan was instrumental in assisting De Wolfe, her close friend, in pioneering a career in interior decoration. The three women, affectionately known as "The Versailles Triumvirate," hosted a famous salon in France and, in 1903, along with Anne Harriman, helped organize the Colony Club, the first women's social club in New York City and, later, helped found the exclusive neighborhood of Sutton Place along Manhattan's East River. In 1915, she established the American Fund for French Wounded (AFFW) to provide medical supplies to French hospitals and send parcels to wounded soldiers. Anne Murray Dike, a doctor, joined her. In 1916, Morgan and De Wolfe largely funded Cole Porter’s first Broadway musical, See America First, produced by Marbury. In 1919, Anne Morgan bought the estate of Blérancourt. It was transformed into a museum and inaugurated in 1930, one year after the death of Anne Murray Dike.
Together from 1915 to 1929: 14 years.
Anne Tracy Morgan (July 25, 1873 - January 29, 1952)
Anne Murray Dike (1879-1929)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Morgan Library & Museum – formerly the Pierpont Morgan Library – is a museum and research library (225 Madison Avenue at East 36th Street). It was founded to house the private library of J. P. Morgan (Anne Morgan’s father) in 1906, which included manuscripts and printed books, some of them in rare bindings, as well as his collection of prints and drawings. The library was designed by Charles McKim of the firm of McKim, Mead and White and cost $1.2 million. It was made a public institution in 1924 by J. P. Morgan's son John Pierpont Morgan, Jr., in accordance with his father's will. The building was designated a New York City landmark in 1966 and was declared a National Historic Landmark later that same year.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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The Château de Blérancourt houses the National Museum of French-American Friendship and Cooperation (Musée franco-américain), founded by Anne Morgan, daughter of the financier J. Pierpont Morgan.
Address: 33 Place du Général Leclerc, 02300 Blérancourt, France (49.51772, 3.15378)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Sunday 8.00-19.00
Phone: +33 3 23 39 60 16
Place
Built XVII century, Design by Salomon de Brosse (1571-1626)
The collections of the Museum include many works on the theme of WW1, among them several painting of Joseph-Félix Bouchor. The corps de logis of the château no longer exists, but de Brosse’s twin cubical stone pavilions and a grand entrance gateway approached by a stone bridge across a moat (now dry) survive. The pavilions have identical façades on all sides, framed in rusticated quoins at the corners: each consists of a pair of pedimented windows that make a composition with a central œil de bœuf window under a hemicyclical arch that carries the dentilled cornice across and breaks into the roof balustrading above. Slate roofs with cyma curves converge to a central four-sided cap. The central gateway takes the form of a triumphal arch with a prominent keystone. The Jardins du Nouveau Monde, on its grounds, contain an arboretum and garden plants from the New World.
Life
Who: Anne Tracy Morgan (July 25, 1873 – January 29, 1952)
Anne Morgan was the youngest of the four children of Pierpont Morgan and his second wife, Fanny. Anne and her brother, Jack, would both play key roles during WWI. While Anne founded a major civilian relief organization, Jack led the firm J. P. Morgan & Co., which heavily financed the Western Allies even as the United States remained officially neutral. Morgan created the American Committee for Devastated France with her friend Anne Murray Dike (1879–1929). Morgan, with her commanding presence and social prominence, took the lead in fund-raising efforts, while Dike, trained as a physician, organized activities in the field. When the first American volunteers arrived in northeastern France in 1917, they witnessed destruction on an astonishing scale. Several years of war had decimated the French countryside. "You can travel in a motor going forward in a straight line for fifteen hours and see nothing but ruins," Anne Murray Dike explained in 1919. People had lost nearly everything—not only their homes and livelihoods but a whole generation of young men. In 1924 Marshal Pétain honored the two Annes, who had done so much to revitalize devastated France, by making them officers of the French Legion of Honor in a ceremony at Blérancourt. In 1932 (after Dike’s death), Morgan was elevated to the rank of commander, which was held at the time by only one other woman, the Countess de Noailles. Morgan was the first American woman to receive the French honor. When WWII again brought devastation to northeastern France—including Anne Morgan’s beloved Blérancourt—she took action a second time. Joining with veterans of her WWI committee and their sons and daughters, she formed the American Friends of France and the Comité Americain de Secours Civil, its French counterpart. After her death at the age of seventy-eight in 1952, she became the first American—and the first woman—to be honored with a marble plaque in the Court of Honor at the Hôtel des Invalides, near Napoleon’s tomb in Paris.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Sutton Place first became fashionable around 1920, when several wealthy socialites, including Anne Harriman Vanderbilt and Anne Morgan, built townhouses on the eastern side of the street, overlooking the East River. Both townhouses were designed by Mott B. Schmidt, launching a career that included many houses for the wealthy.
Address: Sutton Pl, New York, NY 10022, USA (40.75738, -73.96029)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: Sutton Place Historic District (1--21 Sutton Pl. & 4--16 Sutton Sq.), 85002294, 1985
Place
Elisabeth Marbury, the wealthy literary agent and producer who had been born into an aristocratic family, commissioned society architect Mott Schmidt to transform a Victorian rowhouse at No. 13 Sutton Place into a Georgian residence. She moved in with her long-time companion, decorator Elsie de Wolfe, and began a campaign of convincing her other female friends to follow suit. One of those friends was Anne Vanderbilt whose husband, William K. Vanderbilt died on July 22, 1920, making Anne a widow for the third time. New York society was shocked when, on January 9, 1921, a New York Times headline reported that “Mrs. W.K. Vanderbilt to Live In Avenue A.” She had sold her gargantuan Fifth Avenue mansion for $3 million to move to what the newspaper called “a little-known two-block thoroughfare.” She used $50,000 of the $3 million to purchase Effingham Sutton’s house, No. 1, and, like Elisabeth Marbury, who was already living there, hired Mott B. Schmidt to renovate it into a 13-room Georgian mansion. Anne Vanderbilt’s close friend, 38-year old Anne Tracy Morgan, daughter of J. Pierpont Morgan, announced her plans to have Mott Schmidt create a house abutting the new Vanderbilt house. “Miss Morgan’s new home is being altered, to conform somewhat to the Colonial style of Mrs. Vanderbilt’s house, after which type most of the houses in the exclusive-little nook have been patterned,” said The Times. “Many of the rooms will contain rare old paneling and furniture. Some of these furnishings will be brought from abroad, but much of it will be Colonial. It is expected that the cost of the site and the remodeling will be about $125,000.” By now the neighborhood was filling with single and very wealthy women who were keeping Mott and Elsie de Wolfe busy changing XIX century middle class homes into fashionable neo-Georgian residences. Anne Vanderbilt’s sister, Mrs. Stephen Olin, was already here as were Mrs. Lorillard Cammann and Francis B. Griswold. Sutton Place was dubbed “The Amazon Enclave.” Two months later Mott Schmidt filed revised plans for Anne Morgan’s house at No. 3 Sutton Place. She had purchased the house next door, No. 5, and the original plans were scrapped so that the two houses could be merged. “The new plans call for the rebuilding of the two structures into a four-story dwelling in American Colonial style with a roof garden,” reported The Times. Reflecting their close relationship, Morgan and Vanderbilt would share a common garden to the rear. To create the illusion of a vintage home, Mott reused the bricks from the old buildings on the site. An elevator, in-house incinerator, gas furnace and refrigerators brought the home squarely into the modern age. Mott based the design on two Philadelphia houses; the 1765 Samuel Powel House and its neighbor, the Benjamin Wister Morris House. He treated the Morgan house and the Vanderbilt house as two independent but critically-related designs. A critic assessed them saying “No more valuable or successful examples of the consistent and intelligent use of English architectural precedent in the designing of American houses are to be found than these two houses on Sutton Place.” The house was completed in 1922 and House & Garden praised Morgan for her choice of XVIII Century interiors. “There are hundreds of beautiful drawing rooms in New York, but I know of no one but Miss Morgan who has determined to make the largest and most important room in her house an early American one. She is using an old pine paneled room, such as were often seen in old Southern houses. The New England pine rooms were usually much smaller and the paneling was generally more severe.” The house of Anne Morgan on Sutton Place was purchased after her death by Arthur Amory Houghton, Jr., the great-grandson of the founder of Corning Glass. Twenty years later, Houghton donated the house to the United Nations Association of the United States. The association leased it to the United Nations for a year as the home of the Secretary General, then sold it to the organization in 1973. Today the stately home of Anne Morgan remains the home of the U.N.’s Secretary General. Its colonial façade, along with those of its neighbors built by independent-thinking women who broke free of tradition, looks as though it has stood there for centuries. 360 E. 55th Street, 404 E. 55th Street and 405 E. 54th Street are known as The Sutton Collection. Located in the heart of Sutton Place, the Sutton Collection is made up of three unique buildings, each building is filled with exceptional architectural details and true New York style that can only be found in the rarest of pre-war properties. At 404 E 55th St resided Noel Coward, this was the playwright’s last Manhattan residence.
Life
Who: Anne Tracy Morgan (July 25, 1873 – January 29, 1952)
Anne Morgan was a philanthropist who provided relief efforts in aid to France during and after WWI and WWII. Morgan was educated privately, traveled frequently and grew up amongst the wealth her father had amassed. She was awarded a medal from the National Institute of Social Science in 1915, the same year she published the story “The American Girl.” In 1932 she became the first American woman appointed a commander of the French Legion of Honor. In 1903 she became part owner of the Villa Trianon near Versailles, France, along with decorator and socialite Elsie De Wolfe (1859-1950) and theatrical/literary agent Elisabeth “Bessie” Marbury (1856-1933.) Morgan was instrumental in assisting De Wolfe, her close friend, in pioneering a career in interior decoration. The three women, known as "The Versailles Triumvirate," hosted a salon in France and, in 1903, along with Anne Vanderbilt (1861-1940), helped organize the Colony Club, the first women’s social club in New York City and, later, helped found the exclusive neighborhood of Sutton Place along Manhattan’s East River.


by Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford, Connecticut is located at 453 Fairfield Avenue. It was designed by landscape architect Jacob Weidenmann (1829–1893) who also designed Hartford's Bushnell Park. Its first sections were completed in 1866 and the first burial took place on July 17, 1866. Cedar Hill was designed as an American rural cemetery in the tradition of Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Address: 453 Fairfield Ave, Hartford, CT 06114, USA (41.72684, -72.6916)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Phone: +1 860-956-3311
National Register of Historic Places: 97000333, 1997
Place
The cemetery straddles three towns. It includes the Cedar Hill Cemetery Gateway and Chapel, also known as Northam Memorial Chapel and Gallup Memorial Gateway, which is separately listed on the NRHP. Cedar Hill Cemetery encompasses 270 acres (1.1 km2) and includes several historic buildings, including the Northam Memorial Chapel (built 1882), which was designed by Hartford architect George Keller, and the Superintendent's Cottage (built 1875), which continues to be occupied by Cedar Hill's Superintendent to this day. Open from dawn til dusk 365 days a year, Cedar Hill Cemetery welcomes visitors to walk the grounds and partake in the expansive art, history and natural resources this park-like space has to offer. Cedar Hill has many unique monuments. One of the most recognizable is the 18-foot (5.5 m) tall pink-granite pyramid, and life-sized angel statue, erected in memory of Mark Howard and his wife, Angelina Lee Howard. Mark Howard was president of the National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford and Connecticut's first internal revenue collector. Another example of an unusual grave is that of Cynthia Talcott, age two, which features her likeness in stone. John Pierpont Morgan's family monument was designed by architect George W. Keller. Made of red Scottish granite, the monument was designed to portray Morgan's vision of the Ark of the Covenant. The Porter-Valentine mausoleum features a stained-glass window created by Louis Comfort Tiffany.
Notable queer burials at Cedar Hill Cemetery:
• Ethel Collins Dunham (1883-1969) and her life-partner, Martha May Eliot (1891-1978), devoted their lives to the care of children. Dunham focused on premature babies and newborns, becoming chief of child development at the Children's Bureau in 1935. She established national standards for the hospital care of newborn children, and expanded the scope of health care for growing youngsters by monitoring their progress in regular home visits by Children's Bureau staff. Martha invented the cure for Rickets. She tried to go to Harvard, but because women were not admitted to the medical school, went to Johns Hopkins. Eliot went on to become chief of the Division of Child and Maternal Health. She was the only woman to sign the founding document of the World Health Organization, and an influential force in children's health programs worldwide. We do not know where Martha is buried, probably with her family in Massachusetts.
• Katharine Hepburn (1907–2003). Hepburn requested that there be no memorial service.
• Isabella Beecher Hooker (1822-1907), suffragist. Daughter of Lyman Beecher, and half-sister of Henry Ward Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), she organized the New England Woman's Suffrage Association in 1868 and the Connecticut Woman's Suffrage Association in 1869. She authored the work "Mother's Letters to a Daughter on Woman's Suffrage." Her sister Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) is buried in the historic cemetery at Phillips Academy (180 Main St, Andover, MA 01810).
• Anne Tracy Morgan (1873-1952), daughter of J. P Morgan. Known for her generosity during WWI and WWII. She lived most of her life in France and was awarded many honors.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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