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David Leavitt (born June 23, 1961) is an American novelist. Leavitt's partner since the late '70 was Gary Glickman, the author of Years From Now (dubbed as "A debut novel with a gay theme from a new American writer. It explores middle class Jewish family life and the conflict between selfhood and family bond in relationships.") and Aura.

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Leavitt is a graduate of Yale University. After graduation he moved to New York where he lived at first with some fellow students and later with writer Gary Glickman. From New York he later moved with his partner in East Hampton, a favorite place of many famous writers, and he went in New York a few times on business travel, maintaining the Glickman's small apartment.

He is now professor at the University of Florida. He has also taught at Princeton.

He is the author of Family Dancing, Equal Affections, The Page Turner, Martin Bauman, or A Sure Thing, The Lost Language of Cranes, While England Sleeps (for the publication of which he was sued by the poet Stephen Spender), The Body of Jonah Boyd, and numerous short stories. His most recent novel is The Indian Clerk. Leavitt, who is openly gay, has frequently explored gay issues in his work.

At the University of Florida, he is a member of the Creative Writing faculty and is also the editor of Subtropics magazine, the University of Florida's literary review.

He and his partner Mark Mitchell co-edit the excellent literary journal Subtropics whose fiction is regularly gay and often selected among the year's best. Leavitt and Mitchell also co-edited an anthology of gay fiction from 1748 to 1914, Pages Passed From Hand to Hand. They divide their time between Florida and Tuscany and in their spare time have co-written two other books about Italy. "I met Mark Mitchell, my partner, in 1992. In 1993 we traveled to Italy, intending to stay a year. We ended up staying until 2000, when I took a position teaching in the MFA program in Creative Writing at the University of Florida and we settled in Gainesville, where we have lived primarily ever since."


David Leavitt and Gary Glickman, 1987, by Robert Giard
David Leavitt is an American novelist. Leavitt's partner since the late '70 (and until before 1992) was Gary Glickman, the author of Years From Now and Aura. After graduation Leavitt moved to NY where he lived at first with fellow students and later with Glickman. From NY he later moved with his partner in East Hampton, a favorite place of many writers, and he went in New York a few times on business travel, maintaining the Glickman's small apartment. Around 2000, Glickman moved to Santa Monica.


David Leavitt & Mark Mitchell

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Leavitt
Leavitt is a writer whose skill is scary, and The Lost Language of Cranes is the best of his novels (though I should have put his Family Dancing short-story collection on this list, too), a work that for me is built entirely around the impact of the story from which it gets its name. It also manages to provide a touching and thoroughly believable account of how one man learns, literally, to successfully be gay. --Matthew Rettenmund
The Lost Language of Cranes was Leavitt´s first novel and, while I wouldn´t say it´s his best, I would say it´s his sweetest and most satisfying. So much of the story resonates with me personally (the closeted father with a gay son) that it simply touches my heart more than his other work. --Rick R. Reed
In The Lost Language of Cranes there is the turmoil and drama of coming out times two—a father and a son . . . the complex family dynamics . . . the bitter disappointments of love in pretty much every context . . . and emerging from it all, a sense of hope and a sweetly promising romance. Leavitt’s writing is quiet and understated which makes the turbulence beneath the still waters of his prose that much more compelling. It doesn’t get too much better than this. --Dan Stone
Arkansas by David Leavitt is probably not the most obvious choice for this author—most readers would probably pick The Lost Language of Cranes or The Indian Clerk—but I love this collection of three short novels, especially the last one in the volume, Saturn Street. It’s the story of a young man who delivers meals to homebound AIDS patients, only to fall in love with one of them. The offhand, semi-humorous tone of the narration allows breathtaking glimpses of heartbreak. Leavitt artfully uses an outmoded Los Angeles neighborhood as a symbol of lost possibilities in a time of plague. Still recovering from his embroilment in a publishing scandal, Leavitt chose the title of this book from a remark attributed to Oscar Wilde during the last years of his life: “I would like to flee like a wounded hart into Arkansas.” --Wayne Courtois
Because there are only educated guesses about the number of gay people in America, no one will ever know precisely what proportion of the gay population has been afflicted by this disease. However, anecdotal evidence from doctors with gay practices suggests that at least half of the gay men in New York and San Francisco born between 1945 and 1960 were probably infected by the AIDS virus between the end of the seventies and the end of the eighties. In the earliest stages of the epidemic, some died within a month after their diagnosis; most were dead less than three years later. Gay men in Manhattan from the generation born after World War II would suffer at least a fifty percent casualty rate from this scourge. (By comparison, less than three percent of the American soldiers who served in World War II died in or after battle.) Virtually every gay man in every large American city would experience the death of at least ten friends during the epidemic; for some, the number of deceased friends and acquaintances has surpassed three hundred. At the beginning, in Manhattan, it was known as "Saint's Disease," in honor of the downtown discotheque favored by the most beautiful and sought-after men of all-because so many of the best-looking were among the first to die. The novelist David Leavitt recalled the mid-198os as "a time when the streets were filled with an almost palpable sense of mourning and panic."
[...]
ACT UP'S charter described it as a coalition of "diverse individuals united in anger and committed to direct action"; one of its chants identified it as "loud and rude and strong and queer." As the novelist David Leavitt put it, its members were determined to disprove the idea that a community in the grip of AIDS was "weak, ravaged [and] deserving only of charity." Instead, "they presented an image of a community powered by anger and willing to go to almost any length in order to defend itself."
[...]
"This is about constantly sticking it in the face of every single person you can stick it in," Vincent Gagliostro explained to the Journal. Less than three years after ACT UP's founding, Burroughs Wellcome had reduced the cost of AZT, and the organization's members had been invited to sit on many of the government panels they had attacked. "ACT UP has been my way of taking control of my life away from the AIDS virus," explained Peter Staley, an ex-bond trader turned activist. "The issues couldn't be more exciting-sexism, racism, needle exchange, homophobia, homelessness. These are the issues of our day." "The tribe"' has given way to a "`queer nation' which is assertively coed, multi-racial and anti-consumerist," David Leavitt wrote. "The closed club has become an open meeting. What I liked best about ACT UP was its joyousness. Here was a roomful of people who were refusing to accept the common wisdom that ... they were necessarily doomed and hopeless, their lives defined by death. From the shellshocked landscape of the mid-Iy8os, they had stood up, dusted themselves off and gone to work rebuilding." --Charles Kaiser. The Gay Metropolis: The Landmark History of Gay Life in America. Kindle Edition.

David Leavitt, 1987, by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)


Gary Glickman (born March 20, 1959) is a psychotherapist—a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) in Santa Monica, on Ocean Park Boulevard. He was for many years David Leavitt's life-partner. After graduation Leavitt moved to New York where he lived at first with some fellow students and later with Gary Glickman. From New York Gary Glickman later moved with his partner in East Hampton, a favorite place of many famous writers, and he went in New York a few times on business travel, maintaining his small apartment.

Gary Glickman grew up in a once-small town in New Jersey (Morristown), and studied Music and Literature at Brown University. He earned an MFA in Writing from the Writers Workshop at the University of Iowa, published a novel, taught writing, and lived many places—Boston, Provincetown, New York, Rome—before making his home in California, and earning his second masters degree, this time in Counseling and Depth Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute, a program grounded in Jungian, Imaginal, and Archetypal Psychology. His doctorate, from The Chicago School of Psychology, is in Somatic Psychology. His dissertation is a study of how somatic psychotherapists understand gender, and work with it in clinical practice.

He trained in Somatic Experiencing with Peter Levine’s Foundation for Human Enrichment. He has been an adjunct faculty member in the UCLA Extension Writers Program since 1996. In 2000 he was honored with the School of the Arts Outstanding Instructor Award. 

He has worked in several mental health clinics in Los Angeles, including Jewish Family Services of Santa Monica, and for four years was the resident therapist at the Kruks Tilsner Transitional Living Program for young adults, part of the Youth Services department at the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center, in Hollywood. He has been in private practice in Santa Monica since 2002.

Source: www.garyglickman.com/10.html


Gary Glickman, 1987, by Robert Giard
American photographer Robert Giard is renowned for his portraits of American poets and writers; his particular focus was on gay and lesbian writers. Some of his photographs of the American gay and lesbian literary community appear in his groundbreaking book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers, published by MIT Press in 1997. Giard’s stated mission was to define the literary history and cultural identity of gays and lesbians for the mainstream of American society, which perceived them as disparate, marginal individuals possessing neither. In all, he photographed more than 600 writers. (http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/digitallibrary/giard.html)


Further Readings:

The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer (Great Discoveries) by David Leavitt
Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (November 17, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0739471953
ISBN-13: 978-0393329094
Amazon: The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer

A "skillful and literate" (New York Times Book Review) biography of the persecuted genius who helped create the modern computer.

To solve one of the great mathematical problems of his day, Alan Turing proposed an imaginary computer. Then, attempting to break a Nazi code during World War II, he successfully designed and built one, thus ensuring the Allied victory. Turing became a champion of artificial intelligence, but his work was cut short. As an openly gay man at a time when homosexuality was illegal in England, he was convicted and forced to undergo a humiliating "treatment" that may have led to his suicide.

With a novelist's sensitivity, David Leavitt portrays Turing in all his humanity—his eccentricities, his brilliance, his fatal candor—and elegantly explains his work and its implications.

The Lost Language of Cranes by David Leavitt
Paperback: 353 pages
Publisher: Mariner Books (November 14, 1997)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0395877334
ISBN-13: 978-0395877333
Amazon: The Lost Language of Cranes

When Philip falls in love with Eliot, he realizes it's time to come out of the closet to his parents, Owen and Rose. But they are experiencing life changes of their own. Owen spends Sunday afternoons in gay porn theaters, and when he and Rose are forced out of their long-time apartment, they must confront his latent homosexuality and their son's stunning admission.

Family Dancing by David Leavitt
Paperback: 224 pages
Publisher: Warner Books Inc (Mm) (December 1991)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0446328456
ISBN-13: 978-0446328456
Amazon: Family Dancing

Tender, unsettling, and amusing, these stories present families all unhappy in their own different ways. A mother who presides over her local Parents of Lesbians and Gays chapter has trouble accepting her son's lover. A recently separated couple's compulsion to maintain a twenty-six-year tradition seems to magnify futility. The New York Times called this collection "astonishing - funny, eloquent, and wise."

The Indian Clerk: A Novel by David Leavitt
Paperback: 496 pages
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; Reprint edition (September 16, 2008)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1596910410
ISBN-13: 978-1596910416
Amazon: The Indian Clerk: A Novel

“Richly imagined [and] impressive” (New York Times Book Review), this critically acclaimed and emotionally charged novel about the strange and ultimately tragic relationship between an esteemed British mathematician and an unknown—and unschooled—mathematical genius is historical fiction at its best: ambitious, profound, and absorbing.

Based on the remarkable true story of G. H. Hardy and Srinivasa Ramanujan, and populated with such luminaries such as D. H. Lawrence, Bertrand Russell, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, The Indian Clerk takes this extraordinary slice of history and transforms it into an emotional and spellbinding story about the fragility of human connection and our need to find order in the world. A literary masterpiece, it appeared on four bestseller lists, including the Los Angeles Times, and received dazzling reviews from every major publication in the country.

 
Aura (Southern Tier Editions) by Gary Glickman
Paperback: 345 pages
Publisher: Harrington Park Pr; 1 edition (April 2004)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1560235047
ISBN-13: 978-1560235040
Amazon: Aura

A tale of 5 friends, ambitious artists all, who live and play together in New York in the mid-seventies. As the years pass some find their success, while others remain in obscurity, and their relationships are tumultuous. Two decades later, will each be able to look back and see the real accomplishments?.

More Particular Voices at my website: http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Particular Voices

More Real Life Romances at my website:
http://www.elisarolle.com/, My Ramblings/Real Life Romance

Date: 2012-06-23 01:23 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] reginaclarejane.livejournal.com
i loved arkansas myself... :)

Date: 2012-06-23 01:52 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] elisa-rolle.livejournal.com
in Italy he is very famous, probably due to his permanence in Italy.

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