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William Vincent Astor was a businessman, philanthropist, and member of the prominent Astor family.
Born: November 15, 1891, New York City, New York, United States
Died: February 3, 1959, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Harvard University
Lived: Ferncliff, Astor Courts, Astor Dr, Rhinebeck, NY 12572, USA (41.93635, -73.92604)
130 E 80th St, New York, NY 10075, USA (40.77573, -73.959)
Buried: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, Westchester County, New York, USA, Plot: Section 88, row 2
Spouse: Brooke Astor (m. 1953–1959), Mary Benedict Cushing (m. 1940–1953)
Books: Memphis Movie Theatres
Parents: John Jacob Astor IV, Ava Lowle Willing
Siblings: John Jacob Astor VI

Helen Huntington was a prominent socialite, patron of the arts, heiress and political hostess. Having grown up in Rhinebeck, New York, she played alongside Vincent Astor, who lived at 'Ferncliff' nearby. They married on April 30, 1914. At the ceremony, he was stricken with the mumps, a disease that made him sterile; as for the bride, her friend Glenway Wescott, the novelist, admiringly described her in his unpublished diaries as "a grand, old-fashioned lesbian." "Mrs. (Vincent) Astor said she always had a homosexual to dinner" because they were "the only people who could talk," the architect Philip Johnson remembered. The couple divorced in 1940. A year later, Helen became the second wife of Lytle Hull (1882-1958), a real-estate broker who was a friend and business associate of her former husband. She also considered Leonard Bernstein, Cole Porter, Elsa Maxwell and Cholly Knickerbocker good friends. A supreme lover of animals, she owned three large dogs and three small dogs, as well as five horses, six cows, four sheep, 5 chickens, 2 parrots and numerous other pets. Shortly after his divorce, Astor married Mary Benedict Cushing. They divorced in September, 1953, and the following month, Mary wed James Whitney Fosburgh, a painter who worked as an art lecturer at the Frick Museum, and gay. On 8 October, 1953, several weeks after divorcing his second wife, Astor married the once-divorced, once-widowed Roberta Brooke Russell. Together, Vincent and Brooke developed the Vincent Astor Foundation, designed to give back to New York City. Brooke died in 2007 at the age of 105.
Together from 1914 to 1940: 26 years.
Helen Dinsmore Huntington (April 9, 1893 - December 11, 1976)
William Vincent Astor (November 15, 1891 – February 3, 1959)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Ferncliff, the Astor family estate on the Hudson, had been demolished in the 1940s. Astor Courts, the guest house on the same property, is a wedding place facility, which hosted, among other, Chelsea Clinton’s wedding.
Address: Astor Courts, Astor Dr, Rhinebeck, NY 12572, USA (41.93635, -73.92604)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Place
Built in the XIX century
“Minnie (Mary Benedict Cushing, Vincent Astor’s second wife) made him tear down the old mansion. If I had been married to him I would certainly never have made him do this. Ohhh! I can’t imagine a house, where you came in the front door into a hall that ran straight through and looked out on the river – to tear that down, and live in an old swimming pool house which didn’t have one view. Perhaps she didn’t want to run it. I don’t know because I never discussed it with her. And Vincent when he came up after it was gone, and saw just the steps of the big house still standing almost cried. The tennis court (house) was designed by Stanford White and built by Lady Ribblesdale (Vincent’s mother whose second husband was Lord Ribblesdale) when she was married to Jack Astor.” Brooke Astor. The current 50-ish acre estate, most often referred to as Astor Courts, was once part of the sprawling 2,800 acre spread of John Jacob Astor IV, the great-grandson of John Jacob Astor who made a mountain of money in real estate, opium, and fur trades. Astor Courts–sometimes referred to as Ferncliff Casino and/or Astor Casino–was commissioned by John Jacob “Jack” Astor IV and his first wife Eva in the early XX century as a sporting pavilion and guest quarters to go along with the estate’s main house built in the late 1850s by another of the wildly wealthy of the Astor clan. The long and low Beaux Arts style building, inspired by the Grand Trianon at Versailles and completed 1904, was one of the last buildings finished by architect Stanford White before he was shot and killed in 1906 at Madison Square Garden by Harry K. Thaw, the notoriously volatile heir to a Pittsburgh coal and railroad fortune. Along with vast entertaining spaces and several guest rooms, the Astor Courts housed what some believe was the first indoor swimming pool at a private residence, as well as an indoor clay tennis court with soaring vault and truss ceiling of industrial glass, two indoor squash courts, a bowling alley, and a shooting range. There was a grass tennis court that sat along side the building. The entire estate was inherited by Vincent Astor who in the 1940s razed the monumental main house at Ferncliff and, after an extensive renovation and re-purposing of some rooms, moved into the sporting pavilion. In the spring of 2003 the property was purchased for $3,200,000 by its current owners, real estate developer Arthur Seelbinder and his Democratic fundraiser and former tee-vee producer wife Kathleen Hammer. The couple hired architect Sam White–Stanford White’s great-grandson–to oversee the renovation of the hotel-sized house that stretches out over 40,000 square feet.
Life
Who: William Vincent Astor (November 15, 1891 – February 3, 1959)
In 1953 Vincent Astor married for a third time. His new bride was the once-divorced and once-widowed Brooke Russell Kuser Marshall who became the powerful queen of New York high society Brooke Astor, a formidable woman who once upon a time Your Mama would sometimes see swaddled in fur at big shindigs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Although it has been reported that Brooke Astor didn’t particularly care for the drafty and vast Astor Courts, the couple used the former sporting pavilion as a country retreat until Vincent Astor died in 1959. Subsequent to Vincent Astor’s death, Ferncliff was cut up into bite sized pieces, some of which was sold off and some of which–the part where Astor Courts is situated–was donated by Brooke Astor to The Catholic Archdiocese of New York who used the former Astor family playhouse as a nursing home where the old folks were cared for by nuns. Vincent Astor is buried at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, New York.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The East 80th Street Houses are a group of four attached rowhouses on that street in the New York City borough of Manhattan. They are built of brick with various stone trims in different versions of the Colonial Revival architectural style.
Address: 130 E 80th St, New York, NY 10075, USA (40.77573, -73.959)
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: 80002686, 1980
Place
They were built in the 1920s as homes for wealthy New Yorkers of that era, including Vincent Astor, Clarence Dillon and George Whitney. All were designated city landmarks by 1967, the first group of houses on the Upper East Side so recognized. The last house in the row, the Vincent and Helen Astor House at 130 East 80th, is the only one not of brick. It is a five-story, three-bay Neo-Adamesque building faced in French limestone laid in an ashlar pattern. It shares classical detailing with the two houses to the west. The entrance, two paneled doors surmounted by a fanlight, is sheltered by a small portico supported by Ionic columns. The window above echoes the fanlight with a blind arch, and on either side two-story Ionic pilasters support a full entablature with dentil course and four paterae. Above it a pediment with gently pitched slate roof runs the full width of the house. The first of the houses to be built on East 80th Street was 116. The firm of Cross and Cross, known for other designs in New York of the era such as Tiffany’s and the Links Club, built the neo-Federal home for Lewis Spencer Morris, a descendant of Lewis Morris, signer of the Declaration of Independence. It was joined in 1927 by Mott B. Schmidt’s neo-Adamesque style home for Vincent Astor at 130. Astor also had Schmidt design a matching garage to replace the brownstone at 121 East 79th. The four houses were among the last built in their styles before the Great Depression changed American ideas about luxury housing. The residents kept the block and their vacant rear lots together until 1942, when they began to sell them off. The Junior League of New York moved into the Astor House later in the decade, and found it so well maintained it did not need a sprinkler system in the yard. The last parcel, the Astors’ garage, was sold by Brooke Astor in 1964. Three years later, in 1967, the Morris and Dillon houses were the first houses on the Upper East Side recognized by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The Astor House followed three months later. Late in 1968, the Whitney House completed the set.
Life
Who: William Vincent Astor (November 15, 1891 – February 3, 1959) and Helen Dinsmore Hull Huntington (1893 - 1976)
Vincent Astor was a businessman and philanthropist and a member of the prominent Astor family. He was born in the Fifth Avenue mansion where his paternal grandmother Caroline Webster Schermerhorn reigned over American society. He was the son of John Jacob Astor IV, millionaire and inventor; and his first wife, Ava Lowle Willing, an heiress from Philadelphia. In 1912, Vincent inherited an estimated $69 million when his father went down with the Titanic, while Vincent was a student at Harvard University. After his father’s death, he quit college to manage his family’s vast properties. He also was called "the richest boy in the world." In 1919, his mother Ava married a recently widowed English nobleman, Thomas Lister, Baron Ribblesdale. Astor married Helen Dinsmore Huntington, on April 30, 1914. At the ceremony, he was stricken with the mumps, a disease that made him sterile; as for the bride, her friend Glenway Wescott, the novelist, admiringly described her in his unpublished diaries as "a grand, old-fashioned lesbian." The couple divorced in 1940. A year later, Helen became the second wife of Lytle Hull (1882-1958), a real-estate broker who was a friend and business associate of her former husband.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

120 East End Avenue at 85th Street, designed by Charles A. Platt, overlooking Carl Schurz Park and the East River, was built by Vincent Astor (1891–1959) in 1931 and it was his last residence in New York City. Before marrying Vincent Astor on October, 1953, Brooke Astor briefly worked for Ruby Ross Wood, a prominent New York interior decorator who, with her associate Billy Baldwin, decorated Brooke Astor’s second husband, Charles Henry Marshall's apartment at 1 Gracie Square.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Sleepy Hollow, New York, is the resting place of numerous famous figures, including Washington Irving, whose story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is set in the adjacent Old Dutch Burying Ground. Incorporated in 1849 as Tarrytown Cemetery, it posthumously honored Irving's request that it change its name to Sleepy Hollow Cemetery.
Address: 540 N Broadway, Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591, USA (41.09702, -73.86162)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: 09000380, 2009
Place
The cemetery is a non-profit, non-sectarian burying ground of about 90 acres (360,000 m2). It is contiguous with, but separate from, the church yard of the colonial-era church that was a setting for "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow". The Rockefeller family estate (see Kykuit), whose grounds abut Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, contains the private Rockefeller cemetery. Several outdoor scenes from the 1970 feature film “House of Dark Shadows” were filmed at the cemetery's receiving vault.
Notable queer burials at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery:
• Elizabeth Arden (1878–1966), businesswoman who built a cosmetics empire.
• Brooke Astor (1902–2007), philanthropist and socialite.
• Vincent Astor (1891–1959), philanthropist; member of the Astor family.
• Paul Leicester Ford (1865–1902), editor, bibliographer, novelist, and biographer; brother of Malcolm Webster Ford by whose hand he died.
• Leila Howard Griswold Webb Codman (1856-1910), widow of railroad magnate H. Walter Webb, in 1904 married Ogden Codman, Jr. but died unexpectedly in 1910.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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