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Charlotte Mary Mew was an English poet, whose work spans the cusp between Victorian poetry and Modernism.
Born: November 15, 1869, Bloomsbury, London
Died: March 24, 1928, London, United Kingdom
Buried: Hampstead Cemetery, Hampstead, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England, Plot: northern part of the cemetery, GPS (lat/lon): 51.55082, -0.15848
Find A Grave Memorial# 63323444

House: Hampstead Town Hall (Haverstock Hill, London NW3 4QP) has been listed as a queer venue since the 1970s. However, ever since the London Gay Men's Chorus was founded in 1991, its offices and facilities have been based in Hampstead Town Hall. LGMC was founded when nine friends came together to sing a few Christmas carols at Angel Underground Station hoping to raise a few pounds for the Terrance Higgins Trust. LGMC is now Europe's largest gay men's choir. Hampstead Town Hall was designed by Frederick Mew, father of Charlotte Mew (1869–1928), English poet, whose work spans the cusp between Victorian poetry and Modernism. She was born in Bloomsbury, the daughter of Frederick Mew and Anna Kendall. Her father died in 1898 without making adequate provision for his family; two of her siblings suffered from mental illness, and were committed to institutions, and three others died in early childhood leaving Charlotte, her mother and her sister, Anne. Charlotte and Anne made a pact never to marry for fear of passing on insanity to their children. (One author calls Charlotte "almost certainly chastely lesbian)". Through most of her adult life, Mew wore masculine attire and kept her hair short, adopting the appearance of a dandy. In 1898, Mew fell in love with Ella D'Arcy, a writer and the assistant literary editor of the Yellow Book. D'Arcy, however, did not reciprocate the affection. Nine years later, Mew fell in love with May Sinclair, a well known novelist who was active in the suffrage movement. Sinclair was friendly with Mew and helped with her career. Her presentation of Mew's work to Ezra Pound led to the publication of the poem “The Fête” in the Egoist. Nevertheless, Sinclair did not return Mew's affections, and may have even unsympathetically informed others of the poet's lesbianism. Mew gained the patronage of several literary figures, notably Thomas Hardy, who called her the best woman poet of her day, Virginia Woolf, who said she was "very good and interesting and quite unlike anyone else", and Siegfried Sassoon. She obtained a Civil List pension of seventy-five pounds per year with the aid of Sydney Cockerell, Hardy, John Masefield and Walter de la Mare. This helped ease her financial difficulties. After the death of her sister from cancer in 1927, she descended into a deep depression, and was admitted to a nursing home where she eventually committed suicide by drinking Lysol.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

School: University College London (UCL, Gower St, Kings Cross, London WC1E 6BT) is a public research university in London, England, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It is the largest postgraduate institution in the UK by enrollment and is regarded as one of the world's leading multidisciplinary research universities. Established in 1826 as London University by founders inspired by the radical ideas of Jeremy Bentham, UCL was the first university institution to be established in London, and the first in England to be entirely secular and to admit students regardless of their religion. UCL also makes the contested claims of being the third-oldest university in England and the first to admit women. Notable queer alumni and faculty: Caroline Spurgeon (1869–1942), Charlotte Mew (1869–1928), Derek Jarman (1942–1994), Eileen Gray (1878–1976), Leander Starr Jameson (1853–1917).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

May Sinclair was a popular British writer who wrote about two dozen novels, short stories and poetry. She was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League. From the late 1920s she was suffering from the early signs of Parkinson's disease, and ceased writing. She settled with her companion of 30 years, Florence “Florrie” Bartrop, in Buckinghamshire in 1932.

Addresses:
The Gables, 96 Burcott Lane, Bierton, Aylesbury HP22 5AS, UK (51.83097, -0.78631)
Pembroke Cottage, Little Tingewick, Buckingham MK18 4AG, UK (51.98959, -1.06774)

Place
Bierton is a village in Buckinghamshire, England, about half a mile northeast of the town of Aylesbury. It is a mainly farming parish, The hamlets of Broughton, Broughton Crossing and Burcott lie within Bierton with Broughton civil parish part of Aylesbury Vale district and forms part of the Aylesbury Urban Area. Notable inhabitants of Bierton include architect Deborah Saunt of Channel 4 television's series Grand Designs, playwright Robert Farquhar, BBC fashion commentator Jerry O'Sullivan, and the notable author and poet May Sinclair who lived at The Gables in Burcott Lane for the last ten years of her life. Finmere is a village and civil parish in Oxfordshire, south of the River Great Ouse. It is almost 4 miles (6 km) west of Buckingham in Buckinghamshire and just over 4 miles (6 km) east of Brackley in Northamptonshire. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 466. Finmere's toponym is derived from the Old English for "pool frequented by woodpeckers". The village includes the hamlet of Little Tingewick.

Life
Who: Mary Amelia St. Clair (August 24, 1863 – November 14, 1946), aka May Sinclair
May Sinclair was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League. May Sinclair was also a significant critic in the area of modernist poetry and prose, and she is attributed with first using the term stream of consciousness in a literary context. Sinclair met Ezra Pound in 1908, and would become both his financial patron and advocate for his work. Through him she met H.D. and Richard Aldington in 1911, and she became a champion of these imagist poets, of T.S. Eliot, and of Vorticism. In 1913 May Sinclair met Charlotte Mew, whose long poem The Farmer’s Bride she admired, and the two had a brief but intense friendship. In 1934, Sinclair was living at Pembroke Cottage, Little Tingewick, in Buckinghamshire, with her maid and companion since 1919, Florence Bartrop. She moved to the Gables, 96, Burcott Lane, Bierton in 1936, where she died in 1946. She is buried at St John-at-Hampstead Churchyard, Hampstead, London.

Queer Places, Vol. 2.2: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1544067568 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1544067569
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6980566
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1544067569/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1913 Esther Roper and Eva Gore-Booth moved to London, at 14 Frognal Gardens, London NW3 6UX, for the sake of Eva’s health. The house has a fine mature rear garden. Frognal gardens is a very quiet position, tucked behind Hampstead Village is the most historical location abutting Church Row. Not far from here, at 108 Frognal, London NW3 6XU, lived Tamara Karsavina (1885–1978). She is buried at Hampstead Cemetery (Fortune Green Rd, West Hampstead, London NW6 1DR). 14 Frognal Gardens was listed for rent in 2014 for £5,200. In the same cemetery is buried Charlotte Mew (1869–1928).

Queer Places, Vol. 2.1: Retracing the Steps of LGBTQ people around the World
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1532906315
CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon print: http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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