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Fred Sadoff (October 21, 1926 — May 6, 1994) was an American film, stage and television actor. (Picture: Fred Sadoff, Billy Rose Theatre Collection photograph file, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts)

Frederick Edward Sadoff was born in Brooklyn, New York to Henry and Bertha Sadoff; his only brother was born five years earlier. He got his start as an actor on Broadway in the late 1940s, appearing in South Pacific in the role of 'Professor'. A life member of The Actors Studio, Salmi also appeared in Camino Real and Wish You Were Here. In 1956, he became personal assistant to Michael Redgrave who starred in and directed a production of The Sleeping Prince.

Lynn Redgrave said years later in a filmed documentary: "Bob Mitchell and Fred Sadoff were brought in as part of the family, but we didn't know just how much family they really were." In Lynn's published memoir, Fred is not mentioned; in Vanessa's autobiography he is described in passing as "a close friend of Dad's"; in Rachel's book he is mentioned once as Michael's producing partner; and Fred's name is nowhere to be found in Michael's autobiography. Otherwise, there seems to be only one extant written reference to Fred by a Redgrave - when Rachel, writing to Michael, described Fred "tout court" as "your lover." (
Picture: Michael Redgrave)

This collective silence about Sadoff after the passage of so many years and after his death can be explained only by the fact that generally the Redgraves did not warm to him. "Some people thought he used my father," Corin said, "and in a way he did. But I think he got no more from their relationship than he gave. Though he could never replace Bob in my father's life, he gave a great deal, [and he was] indomitably cheerful, funny and loyal after a fashion."


THE QUIET AMERICAN: Fred's Second Movie Debut, This is a scene of Fred with Audie Murphy and Michael Redgrave. Fred is in the middle. This is from The Quiet American website, in this scene Fred plays Dominquez, a small role.
Fred Sadoff was an American film, stage and television actor. In 1956, he became personal assistant to Michael Redgrave who starred in and directed a production of The Sleeping Prince. Lynn Redgrave said: "Bob Mitchell and Fred Sadoff were brought in as part of the family, but we didn't know just how much family they really were." There seems to be only one extant written reference to Fred by a Redgrave - when Rachel, writing to Michael, described Fred "tout court" as "your lover."

Sadoff moved to London to form a production company with Redgrave under the name F.E.S. Plays, Ltd. which presented works including The Importance of Being Oscar which had a short run on Broadway in 1961. While in England, he also worked as a director for the BBC and Rediffusion.

After Fred Sadoff's departure from London, there was no contact with Michael.

Eventually returning to the United States, he found success as an actor in The Poseidon Adventure in 1972 when he was cast as Linarcos, the company representative who ordered Captain Harrison (Leslie Nielsen) full ahead. He also acted in other films, including Papillon and The Terminal Man in 1974. He also acted in several soap operas, including Ryan's Hope, All My Children and Days of our Lives. On television, he appeared in guess roles on such series as Quincy, M.E., The Streets of San Francisco, The Rockford Files, Barney Miller and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century.

Fred Sadoff died of AIDS on May 6, 1994 in his home in Los Angeles, California at age 67.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Sadoff

Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave, CBE (20 March 1908 – 21 March 1985) was an English stage and film actor, director, manager and author. Lynn Redgrave said in a filmed documentary: "Bob Mitchell and Fred Sadoff were brought in as part of the family, but we didn't know just how much family they really were." There seems to be only one extant written reference to Fred by a Redgrave - when Rachel, writing to Michael, described Fred "tout court" as "your lover." "Some people thought he used my father," Corin said, "and in a way he did. But I think he got no more from their relationship than he gave. Though he could never replace Bob in my father's life, he gave a great deal, [and he was] indomitably cheerful, funny and loyal after a fashion." (P: ©Allan Warren. Sir Michael Redgrave taken in photographer's home London, 1973 (©17))

Redgrave was born in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England, the son of the silent film actor Roy Redgrave and actress Margaret Scudamore. He never knew his father, who left when he was only six months old to pursue a career in Australia. His mother subsequently married Captain James Anderson, a tea planter, but Redgrave greatly disliked his stepfather.

He studied at Clifton College and Magdalene College, Cambridge. Clifton College's theatre, The Redgrave Theatre, is named after him. He was a schoolmaster at Cranleigh School in Surrey before becoming an actor in 1934. There he directed the boys in Hamlet, King Lear and The Tempest, but managed to play all the leading roles himself. The "Redgrave Room" at the school was later named after him. In the new Guildford School of Acting building which opened in January 2010, there is the "Sir Michael Redgrave Studio".


Sir Michael Redgrave was an English stage and film actor, director, manager and author. During the filming of Fritz Lang's Secret Beyond the Door (1948), Redgrave met Bob Mitchell. They became lovers, Mitchell set up house close to the Redgraves, and he became a surrogate "uncle" to Redgrave's children (then aged 11, 9 and 5), who adored him. Mitchell later had children of his own, including a son he named Michael. Fred Sadoff, an actor/director who became Redgrave’s assistant and shared his lodgings in New York and London, followed Mitchell.


Redgrave made his first professional appearance at the Playhouse in Liverpool on 30 August 1934 as Roy Darwin in Counsellor-at-Law (by Elmer Rice), then spent two years with its Liverpool Repertory Company where he met his future wife Rachel Kempson. They married on 18 July 1935.

Redgrave was married to the actress Rachel Kempson for 50 years from 1935 until his death. Their children Vanessa (b. 1937), Corin (1939–2010) and Lynn Redgrave (1943–2010) and their grandchildren – Natasha (1963–2009), Joely Richardson (b. 1965) and Jemma are also involved in theatre or film as actors. His grandson Carlo Gabriel Nero is a screenwriter and film director whilst Luke Redgrave is not connected to acting.

His daughter Lynn created a one-woman play for herself called Shakespeare for My Father, in which she was nominated for Broadway's Tony Award, in which she traced her love for Shakespeare as a way of following and finding her often absent father.

Redgrave owned White Roding Windmill from 1937 to 1946. He and his family lived in "Bedford House" on Chiswick Mall from 1945 to 1954. His entry for Who's Who in the Theatre (1981) gives his address as Wilks Water, Odiham, Hampshire.

Corin helped his father in the writing of his last autobiography. During one of Corin's visits to his father, the latter said, "There is something I ought to tell you". Then, after a very long pause, "I am, to say the least of it, bisexual". Corin encouraged him to acknowledge his bisexuality in the book. Michael agreed to do so, but in the end he chose to remain silent about it. Alan Strachan's 2004 biography of Redgrave discusses his affairs with both men and women. Although Redgrave had some long-term relationships with men, he also was prone to cruising Victoria or Knightsbridge for what he called "a necessary degradation", a habit that gave him a lasting sense of self-disgust.

The 1996 BBC documentary film Michael Redgrave: My Father, narrated by Corin Redgrave, and based on his book of the same name, discusses Michael's bisexuality in some depth. Rachel Kempson recounted that, when she proposed to him, Redgrave said that there were "difficulties to do with his nature, and that he felt he ought not to marry". She said that she understood, it didn't matter and that she loved him. To this, Redgrave replied, "Very well. If you're sure, we will".

During the filming of Fritz Lang's Secret Beyond the Door (1948), Redgrave met Bob Mitchell. They became lovers, Mitchell set up house close to the Redgraves, and he became a surrogate "uncle" to Redgrave's children (then aged 11, 9 and 5), who adored him. Mitchell later had children of his own, including a son he named Michael. Mitchell was followed by Fred Sadoff, an actor/director who became Redgrave's assistant and shared his lodgings in New York and London.

A card was found among Redgrave's effects after his death. The card was signed "Tommy, Liverpool, January 1940", and on it were the words (quoted from W.H. Auden): "The world is love. Surely one fearless kiss would cure the million fevers".

In 1976, after suffering symptoms for many years, Redgrave was diagnosed with rapidly advancing Parkinson's disease and he began a regimen of therapies and medications that caused disorientation and other side effects. Costs for his healthcare expenses and his diminished earning power caused the family to apply for public assistance from the King George's Pension Fund. In an interview on his seventieth birthday, he said: "For a long time, nobody understood the Parkinson's condition, and directors thought I was just forgetful or drunk--and even now the work isn't easy. The difficulty is not just remembering lines but getting from place to place."

Redgrave died in a nursing home in Denham, Buckinghamshire, in 1985, from Parkinson's disease, one day after his 77th birthday.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Redgrave

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
Amazon: Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher

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