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Marion Dickerman (April 11, 1890 – May 16, 1983) was an American suffragette, educator, vice-principal of the Todhunter School and an intimate of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Born in Westfield, New York she studied for two years at Wellesley College before transferring to Syracuse University from which she was graduated with a bachelor of arts in 1911 and a graduate degree in education in 1912.

She taught first at Canisteo, New York, and in 1913 moved to Fulton, New York, where she taught American history at Fulton High School. It was here that she again met Syracuse classmate Nancy Cook, who taught arts and handicrafts at the same School. These two women become lifelong partners, spending almost their entire adult lives together, although Dickerman would also become involved in other lesbian relationships off and on.

Her respect for Woodrow Wilson's vision overcame her strong antiwar sentiments and she and Cook both became active in the Red Cross. As Dickerman later recounted, she "really believed this was a war to end wars and make the world safe for democracy." In 1918, they both traveled to London to assist the women-staffed Endell Street Military Hospital and "scrub floors or perform whatever other chores were required."


Eleanor Roosevelt, Marion Dickerman & Nancy Cook
Nancy Cook was a suffragette, teacher, part owner of the Todhunter School and an intimate of Eleanor Roosevelt. She taught first at Fulton, New York, where she taught art and handicrafts to high school students from 1913 to 1918. It was here that she again met Syracuse classmate Marion Dickerman, who taught arts and handicrafts at the same School. These two women become lifelong partners, spending almost their entire adult lives together. With Eleanor Roosevelt they shared the Val-Kill property.


Marion Dickerman & Nancy Cook are buried together at Westfield Cemetery, Westfield, Chautauqua County, New York.


Stone cottage in the Hyde Park's estate of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (photo by Elisa)


Eleanor Roosevelt, Marion Dickerman & Nancy Cook


Eleanor Roosevelt, Nancy Cook, Caroline O'Day & Marion Dickerman


Eleanor Roosevelt & Marion Dickerman


Eleanor Roosevelt & Marion Dickerman


Eleanor Roosevelt & Nancy Cook


Eleanor, John and Franklin D. Roosevelt & Marion Dickerman


Eleanor Roosevelt, Marion Dickerman, Mrs Al Smith, Caroline O'Day & Anna Roosevelt


Franklin D. Roosevelt, E.J. Flynn, L.M. Howe, G. Forbush & Nancy Cook


Marion Dickerman


Eleanor Roosevelt & Nancy Cook

After their return she briefly entertained political aspirations but accepted the position of dean at the Trenton State College in Trenton, New Jersey in 1921. Unhappy there, she one year later joined the faculty at the Todhunter school. Cook who was now the executive secretary of the Women's Division of the State Democratic Committee would travel together with her in 1922 to Hyde Park where they would meet Eleanor Roosevelt. Their common dedication to politics, education, and progressive reform would lead to a friendship that some speculate to be romantic, and in the purchase of the Todhunter School in 1927 and the three women would share the Val-Kill property.

Lorena Hickok took an active dislike to her and this started to unravel the relationship between the three. By 1936 Val-Kill Industries was disbanded. Dickerman and Cook continued to live in Stone Cottage until after Franklin D. Roosevelt's death in 1945. They sold all interest in the Val-Kill property to Eleanor in 1947 when they moved to New Canaan, Connecticut, where Dickerman became the educational programing director for the Marine Museum.

She died in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Dickerman

Nancy Cook (August 26, 1884 – August 16, 1962) was an American suffragette, teacher, part owner of the Todhunter School and an intimate of Eleanor Roosevelt. She taught first at Fulton, New York, where she taught art and handicrafts to high school students from 1913 to 1918. It was here that she again met Syracuse classmate Marion Dickerman, who taught arts and handicrafts at the same School. These two women become lifelong partners, spending almost their entire adult lives together.

Born in Massena, New York she attended Syracuse University from which she was graduated with a bachelor of arts in 1912.

Her respect for Woodrow Wilson's vision overcame her strong antiwar sentiments and she and Dickerman both became active in the Red Cross. As Dickerman later recounted, they "really believed this was a war to end wars and make the world safe for democracy." In 1918, they both traveled to London to assist the women-staffed Endell Street Military Hospital and "scrub floors or perform whatever other chores were required." Cook would, with less than two weeks training, begin to make artificial limbs for soldiers that had lost an arm or a leg.

Cook, who had never felt teaching to be her element, was delighted when Harriet Hay Mills, asked Cook if she would accept the position as executive secretary of the Women's Division of the State Democratic Committee, a post she would hold for nineteen years. She held key responsibility in Al Smith and Franklin Roosevelt's gubernatorial and presidential campaigns.

Cook and Dickerman became frequent guests of the Roosevelts. The three women, with FDR's encouragement, built Stone Cottage at Val-Kill, on the banks of the FallKill creek. Cook and Dickerman made this their year around home and Eleanor had her own room, although she rarely spent the night. Cook, an expert woodworker, made all furniture. Towels, linens, and various household items were monogrammed "EMN", intertwining the three women's initials. In 1927, Cook helped start Val-Kill Industries, whose daily operations she would manage until the business closed.

Thrilled with FDR's victory, Cook and Dickerman found it difficult to understand Eleanor's anxiety over her role as first lady. By 1936, when Val-Kill Industries dissolved, Eleanor moved out of the Stone Cottage she shared with Cook and Dickerman and had the factory building remodeled.

Lorena Hickok took an active dislike to Dickerman and this started to unravel the relationship between the three. Dickerman and Cook continued to live in Stone Cottage until after Franklin D. Roosevelt's death in 1945. They sold all interest in the Val-Kill property to Eleanor in 1947 when they moved to New Canaan, Connecticut, where Dickerman became the educational programming director for the Marine Museum.

Cook lived there with Dickerman, her life partner, until her death.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Cook

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher

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